Fall 2015

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Please consult ConnectCarolina (through MyUNC) for the most up-to-date information about FYS offerings and availability.

For more information about a specific instructor, please click on the instructor name, if highlighted.

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)
American Studies (AMST)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Art History (ARTH)
Studio Art (ARTS)
Asian Studies (ASIA)
City and Regional Planning (PLAN)
Chemistry (CHEM)
Classics (CLAS)
Communication Studies (COMM)
Computer Science (COMP)
Dramatic Art (DRAM)
English (ENGL)
Folklore (FOLK)
Geography (GEOG)
Geology (GEOL)
German Languages and Literatures (GERM)
History (HIST)
Marine Sciences (MASC)
Mathematics (MATH)
Media and Journalism (JOMC)
Music (MUSC)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)
Political Science (POLI)
Psychology (PSYC)
Public Policy (PLCY)
Religious Studies (RELI)
Romance Languages and Literatures (ROML)
Social Work (SOWO)
Sociology (SOCI)
Statistics and Operations Research (STOR)

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies

AAAD 51: Masquerades of Blackness
VP, US
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Charlene Regester

Charlene Regester is an Associate Professor in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies and Affiliate Faculty for the Global Cinema Minor. She received her BA, MA, Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is the author of African American Actresses: The Struggle for Visibility, 1900-1960 (which was nominated by the press to the NAACP Image Awards). She is the 2011 recipient of the Trailblazer Award Hayti Heritage Film Festival and 2007 Oscar Micheaux Book and Film Award from the Oscar Micheaux Film Festival, South Dakota. She has appeared on North Carolina Bookwatch with UNC-TV 2011; WUNC-FM Radio “The State of Things;” and Turner Movie Classics. Documentaries in which she has appeared include: Movies of Color: Black Southern Cinema, (2003 directed by Tom Thurman), Beyond Tara: The Extraordinary Life of Hattie McDaniel (2001 directed by Madison Davis Lacy), and I’ll Make Me a World (1999 directed by Denise Greene and Samuel Pollard).
This seminar is designed to investigate how the concept of race has been represented in cinema historically, with a particular focus on representations of race when blackness is masqueraded. Its intent is to launch an investigative inquiry into how African Americans are represented on screen in various time periods, how we as spectators are manipulated by these cinematic constructions of race, and how race is marked or coded other than through visual representation. Students will view films that deal with “passing” from the various historical periods and will utilize theoretical concepts introduced in class to read these visual representations. Films selected for viewing include the pre-World War II Era, the Civil Rights Era, and the “Post-Racial” era. Students will be required to write three papers that reflect their ability to apply theoretical concepts to reading racialized representations on screen in these three historical periods to demonstrate their understanding of how racial masquerades have evolved over time and continue to persist in contemporary culture.

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AAAD 89: Afrofuturist Literature, Music, and Art – ADDED 6/26/15
LA, US
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
David Pier

Dr. Pier’s research focus is on music and cultural politics in contemporary Africa. His forthcoming book, “Ugandan Music in the Marketing Era: The Branded Arena,” is an ethnographic study of a beer-branding event that enlisted thousands of Ugandan traditional music-and-dance performers as amateur advertisers. He has also written articles about modern dance and neo-traditional guitar music in Africa and hip hop in the U.S. His interest in African music grew out of his experience as a jazz pianist and composer, having performed and recorded with Clark Terry, Jane Monheit, Roswell Rudd, and others.

This first-year seminar explores how Black fiction writers, musicians, and artists from Africa, the U.S., and the broader African diaspora have projected forward from present-day Black experiences to imagine alternative futures, utopian and dystopian. We will consider genres such as science fiction, jazz, and electronic music, in terms of the resources they have offered for Black-perspective speculations about the future. For their class projects, students can either write a traditional research-based essay, or produce a creative work tied to the course’s themes, such as a short story, musical piece, or artwork.

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American Studies

AMST 51: Navigating America
SS, CI, EE
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Rachel A. Willis

Rachel A. Willis is a Senior Fellow at the Global Research Institute and Associate Professor of American Studies and Economics at UNC. She has won numerous awards including the UNC Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, the Student Undergraduate Teaching Award, and the Robert Sigmon Award for Service Learning. Her teaching methods incorporate innovative field study, collaborative assignments and experiential learning through events and programs outside of the classroom. Her research focuses broadly on access to work and in recent years have focused on the impact of climate change on transportation infrastructure in port cities.
This seminar is designed to teach students how to navigate new intellectual terrain and process unfamiliar information from a variety of disciplinary perspectives with an emphasis on discussion, field study, and documentation. Each student will plan, implement, and document an individual short journey. This voyage of discovery on the campus or in the surrounding community will be chronicled with a documentary journal and presented to the class in a multi-media format that conveys the individual’s perspective, journey, and discoveries. Additionally, the class will collaboratively plan, implement, and document a common full day journey. This required field study will be a core aspect of the experiential education connection for the course.

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AMST 55: Birth and Death in the United States
PH, CI, US
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Timothy Marr

Timothy Marr is the Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Associate Professor in the Department of American Studies, where since 2000 he has taught courses on mating and marriage, cultural memory, and tobacco. His research interests include the life and works of Herman Melville and American approaches to Islam and Muslims.
This course explores birth and death as common human rites of passage impacted by changing American historical and cultural contexts. Since both are defining life events that remain beyond experiential recall, studying them in interdisciplinary ways opens powerful insights into how culture mediates the construction of bodies, social identities, and philosophical meanings. Readings and assignments are designed to examine changing anthropological rituals, medical procedures, scientific technologies, and ethical quandaries. We will also explore a variety of representations of birth and death in literary expression, film, and material culture as well as in hospitals, funeral homes, and cemeteries.

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AMST 60: American Indians in History, Law, and Literature – CANCELLED 7/31/15
HS, US
MWF, 11:15am – 12:05pm
Daniel M. Cobb

Daniel M. Cobb is an award-winning writer and teacher committed to the scholarship of engagement, public outreach, and service to the profession. His research and teaching focus on American Indian history since 1887, political activism, ethnohistorical methods, ethnobiography, memory, and global indigenous rights. His first book, Native Activism in Cold War America (2008), won the inaugural Labriola Center American Indian National Book Award in 2009. His other publications include the edited works Beyond Red Power (2007) and Memory Matters (2011), a revised and expanded fourth edition of William T. Hagan’s classic work American Indians (2013), and Say We Are Nations (2015), a primary document collection on Native politics and protest from the late nineteenth century to the present. Works in progress include biographies of Ponca activist Clyde Warrior, a central figure in the American Indian youth movement of the 1960s, and (you guessed it) D’Arcy McNickle. Cobb currently serves as the coordinator of the American Indian and Indigenous Studies major concentration and minor and as Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of American Studies.
This research seminar provides a broad grounding in American Indian law, history, and literature through an exploration of the remarkable life and times of Flathead author, intellectual, and activist D’Arcy McNickle (1904-1977). We will read D’Arcy McNickle’s novels, short stories, histories, and essays, as well as secondary works about him. Even better, we will be working with D’Arcy McNickle’s handwritten and heretofore unpublished diary. You will have an opportunity to transcribe and contextualize passages and then share (probably through digital technologies) what you have learned about history, law, literature (and much, much more) through his life story. Rather than just being a passive recipient of information, you will be creator of new knowledge!

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AMST 89:001: American Indian Art in the 20th Century
VP, CI, US
MWF, 11:15am – 12:05pm
Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote

Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote is an Assistant Professor in the department of American Studies. She teaches courses on American Indian history, art, and material culture. Her research interests include American Indian cultural and political history and expressive culture.
This course examines twentieth century American Indian art though secondary articles, books, a graphic novel, and art itself. The class sharpens written and verbal communication though in-class discussion, informal, and formal assignments such as a research paper those students will write over the course of the semester. Students will hone their visual critical thinking skills as well by examining and analyzing contemporary American Indian art and representations of Native people. This course connects American Indian art to vital conversations in American Indian studies such as colonialism, identity, gender, and tribal sovereignty. We will also address the following questions. How and why does “contemporary traditional” and “modern” come to describe and even categorize art created by Native people in the twentieth century? How have Native people and others constructed and contested the idea of the American Indian Art? Additionally, we will examine how artists have engaged with and at times resisted the markets for their work and their influence on Native art.

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AMST 89:002: Mobility, Cars, NASCAR, and the South
HS, US
MWF, 1:25 – 2:15pm
Elizabeth Engelhardt

Elizabeth Engelhardt is the John Shelton Reed Distinguished Professor of Southern Studies. She teaches on southern cultures; food studies; gender, class, race, and region; environmentalism; Appalachia; and American studies. She’s written or co-edited six books and numerous articles, including ones on barbecue, moonshining, seed saving, and mountains. She’s on the board of the Southern Foodways Alliance, which documents and celebrates complicated stories of food in diverse southern communities. Dr. Engelhardt’s teaching has received a Silver Spurs and a President’s Associates Teaching Award from the University of Texas at Austin, where she was Professor and department chair before coming to UNC.
On July 10, 1949, three female drivers competed at the Daytona Beach Road Course, the second ever NASCAR event. That same year Victor Green published another volume of his Negro Motorist Green Book, which had helped African American travelers find friendly places to stay while on the road in the Jim Crow era since 1936. The Good Roads Movement, begun by enthusiastic bicyclists in the late nineteenth century, made grand plans for a Dixie Highway taking tourists from Maine to Florida and transforming automobile highways across the US South. This class looks at the culture, history, memories, and meanings of mobility for a diverse range of people in southern cultures. In particular, we read and discuss books and articles by scholars on roads, cars, access, and diverse southern cultures. Then we apply those ideas to documents such as maps, motor guides, advertisements, photographs, oral histories, and novels held in UNC’s Wilson Library to see what works and what we need to research to tell a more complicated story. Finally, individual research projects allow each course member to lead the way in this emerging field of southern studies through writing and digital image creation.

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ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 50: Skeleton’s in the Closet
SS
MWF, 1:25 – 2:15pm
Dale Hutchinson

Dale Hutchinson is a professor in the Department of Anthropology. His research interests include the prehistory of the eastern United States and Andean South America, the origins and health consequences of social and economic transitions (agriculture, state, European contact) and forensic anthropology. When not teaching, he enjoys gardening, playing music, and outdoor activities.
If the world operated as portrayed on CSI or Bones, most forensic specialists could do surgery, excavate skeletal remains, tell the age and occupation of someone from a fragment of bone, and be a gourmet chef. This seminar aims to provide just exactly how biological anthropologists contribute their efforts to the study of the human skeleton to two main areas of study: forensic anthropology and bioarchaeology. We will discuss shared knowledge of the two areas, such as skeletal anatomy, age and sex estimation, and field recovery techniques. Then we will explore how those basic skills are used in scientific investigations of crime on the one hand, and of the lifeways of past populations on the other. Classes will be a mix of lab exercises, lecture, discussion, group exercises and research projects. This course assumes no prior knowledge of biology or anthropology.

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ANTH 53H: Darwin’s Dangerous Idea (HONORS)
SS
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Paul Leslie

Paul Leslie’s professional interests focus on human ecology, and he has pursued this primarily through research among nomadic peoples in East Africa. His most recent project entails studying (while nursing an aged Land Rover across the African savanna) human-environment interactions in northern Tanzania, especially how the changing land use and livelihood patterns of the Maasai people living there affect and are affected by wildlife and conservation efforts. When not teaching or practicing anthropology, he enjoys bicycling, motorcycling, woodworking, and jazz.
Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to one of the most profound revolutions in the history of thought, generating stunning insights but also some misunderstanding and tragic abuse. This seminar aims to provide a clear understanding of how natural selection works, and how it doesn’t work. We will examine objections to the theory; how the environmental and health problems we face today reflect processes of natural selection; and recent attempts to understand why we get sick, how we respond to disease, why we get old, why we choose mates the way we do, and more. Class sessions will feature a mix of lecture and discussion of concepts and issues. Students will also engage in small group projects—cooperative explorations of problems raised in class or in the readings, and/or designing mini-research projects.

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ANTH 64: Public Archaeology in Bronzeville, Chicago’s Black Metropolis
HS, NA
MWF, 9:05 – 9:55am
Anna Sophia Agbe-Davies

Anna Sophia Agbe-Davies is an historical archaeologist whose excavations have explored the plantation societies of the colonial southeastern US and Caribbean, as well as towns and cities of the 19th and 20th century Midwest, with an emphasis on sites of the African diaspora. Her current projects include excavation and community collaboration at the sites of New Philadelphia, Illinois, and the Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls on the south side of Chicago. Her research and teaching interests are strongly shaped by her own experiences as an undergraduate at the College of William and Mary, and the time she spent working in museum settings before becoming a Professor. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to that, she was a staff archaeologist for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s Department of Archaeological Research.
The term “African diaspora” usually refers to the consequences of the transatlantic slave trade, but there have been many diasporas of people of African descent. One major movement took place in the U.S. in the early 20th century when millions of people left small southern communities for large industrial northern cities. This seminar examines that phenomenon through the lens of a single site where migrants lived in the city of Chicago. The Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls was run by black women to provide social services for female migrants from 1926 through the 1960s. Research at this site combines elements of archaeology, anthropology, and history to study their lives. Students, working in teams, will have the opportunity to contribute to the ongoing research effort via analysis of written records and artifacts. This multidisciplinary project will be of interest to students curious about 20th century history, African-American culture, museums and heritage, women’s and gender studies, migration, and labor history.

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ANTH 65: Humans and Animals: Anthropological Perspectives
HS
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Ben Arbuckle

Ben Arbuckle is an Anthropologist with a specialty in Middle Eastern Archaeology. He runs the Zooarchaeology Laboratory in the Department of Anthropology and the Research Labs in Archaeology where he studies animal bones from archaeological sites. Professor Arbuckle uses these bones, which represent the trash from ancient meals, parties and sacrifices, in order to understand how our ancestors created a world whose technologies and social and political systems we have inherited. He is currently working on a National Geographic funded project exploring the origins of domestic horses, and another trying to understand the origins of wool.
In this seminar we explore the complex relationships between people and animals in our own culture and in other cultures, now and also in the past. We will explore the origins and uses of domesticated animals, the role of dogs and cats in human societies, as companions, pets, and food. We will also examine the symbolic uses of animals and talk about current issues including animal rights and the growing popularity of hunting.

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ART HISTORY

ARTH 54H: Art, War, and Revolution (HONORS)
VP, NA
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Daniel Sherman

Daniel Sherman came to UNC in 2008, having taught previously at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he was also director of the Center for 21st Century Studies, and at Rice University. He received his B.A. from Harvard and his Ph.D. from Yale. A specialist in modern art and French cultural history, he has written and edited several books on art museums, the commemoration of World War I in France, and culture and politics after 9/11. As a historian who has taught French studies, art history, and general humanities courses, he is committed to discussion and debate across traditional disciplinary boundaries. He enjoys travel (especially to France), baking, and hanging out with his cats.
Focusing on one or a few related works of art per week, this course will explore the complex relationship between art, war and conflict. At the heart of the course lie the tensions between glorifying war and violence and memorializing their victims, between political justification and moral outrage, between political programs (many of the works being commissioned to legitimate a particular view of war) and the malleability of meaning. The focus on single works in a variety of media – painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, graphic arts, and film – will offer students the opportunity to study the works in depth while also gaining exposure to a range of interpretive methods and the richness of the historical context.

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ARTH 55H: Art Gender and Power in Early Modern Europe (HONORS)
VP, NA
MWF, 1:25 – 2:15pm
Tania String

Dr. Tania String is an art historian specializing in the art of the Tudor period in England, and the Renaissance more broadly. She is the author of numerous books and articles on the portraits of Henry VIII. Before coming to Carolina in 2010 she taught in England at the University of Bristol.
What did it mean to be a man or to be a woman in the Renaissance? This seminar will explore the ways in which constructions of gender are critical to understandings of the visual arts in the early modern period (c. 1400-1650). We will discuss and analyze a focused group of representations of men and women: portraits, mythological and biblical paintings and sculptures, and even turn our attention to the buildings these men and women inhabited. We will study the work of artists such as Michelangelo, Donatello, Titian, Holbein, and Rubens, amongst others, to find ways of understanding how masculinity and femininity were central concerns in early modern society and in the art produced in this period.

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ARTH 61: Introduction to African American Art
VP
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
John Bowles

John Bowles received his Ph.D. from UCLA in 2002 and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Program. He is an historian of African American art, who works from the assumption that art plays an important role in determining how we see ourselves as morally responsible individuals. In his research and teaching, he attempts to convey the urgency of art by addressing moral and political dilemmas we would often rather ignore. He has published articles and art criticism in various journals and has recently completed a book that examines the work of artist Adrian Piper. He is currently writing a book that explores how African American artists have engaged simultaneously with modernism, globalization and diaspora from the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s until today.
Focusing on the Carolinas, this seminar explores the many ways African Americans have used art to define themselves and their communities. We will ask how art has been used to maintain cultural traditions, shape American culture, and build political solidarity from the era of colonialism and slavery to the present. We will study the cultivation of artistic practices from Africa; African American painters, sculptors, and craftsmen who earned national reputations for the quality of their work; artists who re-imagined and redefined African American identity through art; and artists throughout the 20th century who represented the daily lives and hardships of rural and working-class blacks. Students will visit campus museums and archives, and conduct original research using regional sources. Persistent questions throughout the semester will include, How does the art of African Americans in the Carolinas provoke us to question our own identities and roles within the region, and what is the contemporary role of art in shaping public discourse?

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ARTH 89: Islamic Art and Science
HS, BN, CI
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Glaire D. Anderson

Glaire D. Anderson is Associate Professor of Islamic Art History. She received her PhD from MIT and specializes in the age of the caliphs (roughly 650-1250). Aside from her academic interests, Anderson is an avid drummer who enjoys music of all kinds and a fan of Tarheels fencing and baseball.
This course explores the intersection of science and visual arts in Islamic civilization, which has a rich tradition connecting two fields we tend to think of as separate today. No background in art history or Islam is necessary or expected. Assigned readings will provide a common historical background for our class discussions. Together we will learn how to look at visual materials such as buildings, scientific instruments, and manuscripts, and explore how art illuminates the past. A timeline quiz, weekly reading blog, a research scavenger hunt, and a team research project support key skills: research, critical thinking, and writing. Digital projects are welcome and students are encouraged to use resources in the UNC Makerspaces.

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STUDIO ART

ARTS 89: The Walking Seminar
VP, EE
MW, 2:30 – 3:45pm
Mario Marzan

Mario Marzan’s work explores the shifting, changing and constantly evolving negotiation of geographical spaces in relation to individual and cultural identities and histories. From depictions of vast geographic locations to the intimate rooms of a house under construction, his work maps transient spaces as fluid sites of exchange. In his teaching he emphasizes on an interdisciplinary approach that assumes no boundaries between research, theory and practice. He was born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and he is currently an Associate Professor of Studio Art at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
The Walking Seminar engages students in a territorial investigation of the North Carolina landscape, exploring things such as the history of walking, relationships of actual geography to art, performative endurance (pilgrimage) and psychogeography (relationships of place to personal and cultural identity). Through research and art-making, students in the class foster a means for understanding their location and documenting their experience.

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ASIAN STUDIES

ASIA 58H: Chasing Madame Butterfly (HONORS)
VP, BN, CI
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Jan Bardsley

Jan Bardsley is a graduate of UC Davis (Dramatic Art) and UCLA (East Asian Languages and Cultures) and has been a Tar Heel since 1994. Traveling to Nagasaki in 2005 with Carolina students on a study abroad program in Japanese theater piqued her curiosity about the many stories of Madame Butterfly. In 2012, L.A. Opera invited Professor Bardsley to give a lecture on Japanese productions of Madame Butterfly to local educators. This seminar draws on her research on the New Woman of Japan in the 1910s, representations of Japan in American popular culture, and such icons of femininity as the princess, geisha, and beauty queen. Professor Bardsley is also a huge fan of Japanese popular culture, food, and speedy trains.
One of the most famous operas in the world, Puccini’s Madame Butterfly (1904), a tragic tale of love betrayed, has its roots in novels, a play, and the history of relations between Japanese and foreigners in the city of Nagasaki. Why have the stories of Madame Butterfly captured this attention, inspired such diverse interpretations, and incited debate? Students explore these questions by learning the history of Nagasaki and about tourism to the city, by reading the early stories of Madame Butterfly, and by considering the newer stage productions, M. Butterfly and Miss Saigon, that reinterpret the story. We also read essays that offer widely different perspectives on Madame Butterfly, delving into the controversies that have erupted over representations of Japan, interracial romance, and cross-racial casting. Field trips, including one to see N.C. Opera’s performance of Madame Butterfly this fall, guest speakers, a Japanese food-making event, and the chance to do your own original research on Madame Butterfly make this seminar productive and fun. No background knowledge of Japan, Japanese, or literary studies is required.

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ASIA 59: Media Masala: Popular Music, TV, and the Internet in Modern India and Pakistan
VP, BN
TuTh, 5:00 – 6:15pm
Afroz Taj

Afroz Taj has been teaching South Asian literature, culture, and language in the United States since 1983. In 1995 Afroz came to the University of North Carolina to establish a pioneering program of teaching Hindi-Urdu through live, interactive videoconferencing. He is the creator of the popular language learning websites “A Door Into Hindi” and “Darvazah: A Door Into Urdu.” Afroz’s research interests include Urdu poetry and poetics, South Asian theater, cinema and media. Afroz is the author of The Court of Indar and the Rebirth of North Indian Drama, Urdu Through Hindi, and The Tanhaiyan, Ankahi, and Ahsas Companion.
This seminar explores different types of broadcast and digital media, examining various cultural examples (e.g., music videos, television soap operas and reality shows, radio, and the Internet) and covering a variety of topics, including gender, sexuality, globalization, religion (personal and public), and activism. We will also discuss the ways traditional art forms (e.g., qawwali, ghazal, epic, classical dance) are transformed and given relevance in the modern South Asian media. An important theme of this course is how India and Pakistan, despite historical tensions, are linked by a common media culture that interprets and sometimes transcends geopolitical differences. This seminar will be particularly useful and fun for students who like to consider a variety of multimedia and textual sources in thinking about a provocative issue or question. Each student will design a short research project and make a presentation, and with a small group, produce a music video, giving the class an experiential perspective on the media in modern India and Pakistan. There are no prerequisites.

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ASIA 89: Narrating the Self: Exploring Arab Intellectuals’ Autobiographical Writings
LA, BN
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Fadi A. Bardawil

Fadi A. Bardawil is Assistant Professor in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. His research, at the crossroads of political anthropology and intellectual history, focuses on contemporary modernist Arab thinkers and the international circulation of social theory. Currently, he is working on a book manuscript provisionally titled In Marxism’s Wake: Disenchanted Levantine Intellectuals and Metropolitan Traveling Theories. His writings have appeared, and are forthcoming, in the Journal for Palestine Studies (Arabic edition), Boundary 2, Jadaliyya, Kulturaustausch, and al-Akhbar daily (2006-2012).
How did twentieth-century and contemporary intellectuals narrate their own lives? This course explores the memoirs of prominent novelists, sociologists, feminists, literary critics and poets. In reading these memoirs, we will explore how they articulate central themes such as the relations between East and West; Tradition and Modernity; Identity and Difference; Home and Exile; Private and Public; Masculine and Feminine; Sacred and Profane; Youth and Adulthood; and Origins and Becomings. The seminar seeks to introduce students to the lives of prominent Arab intellectuals and their historical and political backdrop and the central questions that preoccupied them. It also aims to nurture close reading skills of primary texts in students and foster the formulation of clear, coherent arguments orally and in writing.

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CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING

PLAN 55: Sustainable Cities – CANCELLED 7/21/15
SS
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Todd BenDor

Todd BenDor is an Associate Professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning. He received his Ph.D. in Regional Planning from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research uses computer modeling to better understand the impacts that human activities and development can have on sensitive environmental systems. His recent work has focused on understanding the social and economic consequences of environmental policies that require environmental restoration during the urban development process. Todd enjoys traveling, nature photography, and skiing, and he laments the loss of his amateur status after winning 40 dollars in a pool tournament years ago.
This seminar examines the sustainability of cities and regions. A sustainable community is one in which new development improves the quality of life of people in the community, while preserving environmental functions into the future. We will look at how cities have evolved and how different approaches to property rights and urban development affect sustainability and quality of life in America. We will critically examine a vision for more sustainable places, and we will look at actions that can be taken by citizens, businesses, and governments to help improve sustainability. In this seminar, students will engage in discussions about the economic, social, and environmental conditions of cities, and make presentations about urban sustainability topics that interest them. Students will also examine several different cities in detail to understand how their actions have transformed their urban environments. By the end of this seminar, students will understand what constitutes a sustainable urban community and be able to articulate the major threats to sustainable development. Students will also have developed a sound base of knowledge about the validity, effectiveness, feasibility, strengths and weaknesses of various strategies and methods for fostering sustainability.

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PLAN 57H: What is a Good City? (HONORS)
SS
MW, 1:45 – 3:00pm
Nikhil Kaza

Nikhil Kaza studies the phenomena of plans and their uses in public and private decision-making. Of particular interest are urban development processes, energy planning and land use impacts.
A city is many things to many people. It is a place where business is conducted; it is a seat of power; it is where people live and make lives. It is also the place that corrupts migrants. It is a pantheon of great buildings as well as vast slums. Social and technological innovations are pioneered in cities due to innumerable and happenstance interactions; at the same time, anonymity and alienation are common themes in a city dweller’s life. To understand a city, much less to fashion a good city, we need a kaleidoscope of view points. After studying the forces that have produced the urban landscapes, we will explore the city from the normative perspectives of urban historians, planners and architects, social scientists, social critics, and futurists, as a way for each student to develop her/his own perspective about what a “good city” might be.
The purpose of the class is to develop critical appreciation for the complexities that underlie cities. To this end, we will examine the city from variety of angles including management of city, the conflicts within a city, the design and use of public spaces and infrastructure, the relationship between public and private. We will use a positive lens on the functioning and shaping of cities to get the normative question(s) of what constitutes a good city and the relationship between good city and good society. At the end of the class, you should have a better understanding of the urban condition. However, it is quite unlikely that you will be able to design a good city and its institutions.

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CHEMISTRY

CHEM 73: From Atomic Bombs to Cancer Treatments: The Broad Scope of Nuclear Chemistry
PL
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Todd Austell

Todd Austell received his BS in Chemistry in 1987 and his PhD in Chemistry in 1996, both at UNC. He spent one year working in the pharmaceutical industry prior to graduate school and another year as an Assistant Professor at the United States Air Force Academy prior to returning to his current position. As an undergraduate, he participated in the Department of Energy and American Chemistry Society’s Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry. Topical studies in nuclear chemistry have been a hobby of his since that time. His graduate research involved separation science, and he is currently involved in both curriculum development within the chemistry department and in a long-term study of how middle school and secondary math education/preparation affects student performances in college general chemistry. His hobbies involve hiking, camping, disc golf, and gardening as well as following all UNC athletics.
Nuclear chemistry is a field that touches the lives of everyone perhaps every day of their lives. This seminar will approach the topic of nuclear chemistry on the level of an introductory chemistry class with no prerequisite. Atomic structure, nuclear fission and nuclear fusion processes will be studied to provide the background necessary to understand their applications. Nuclear weapons and nuclear power will be covered in detail with discussion of topics relevant both for today’s society and for the future. Other topics including household applications, nuclear medicine, radiation safety, and the problematic issue of radioactive waste storage will be discussed. The seminar will include guest lecturers from the various fields of nuclear chemistry, selected reading assignments, topical student-led discussions, possible facility trips/tours, and a final project presentation on a relevant topic.

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CLASSICS

CLAS 55H: Three Greek and Roman Epics (HONORS)
LA, NA, WB
MWF, 12:20 – 1:10pm
William Race

William Race, Paddison Professor of Classics, received his B.A. from Michigan and Ph.D. from Stanford. He has published numerous books and articles on classical Greek poetry, ancient epic, and the influence of the classical tradition on English poetry.
The course will involve a very close reading of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Vergil’s Aeneid, the three epics that formulated the bases of Greco-Roman civilization and provided the models of heroism and human values for the Western Tradition—and also raised fundamental questions about the individual’s relationship to society. In addition, we will read Book 3 of Apollonius Rhodius’ Argonautica, which forms a bridge between Greek and Roman epic. The students will discuss questions that arise in the assigned readings, prepare brief in-class analyses, and write three papers. There will also be a comprehensive final examination.

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CLAS 61: Writing the Past
LA, CI, WB
MWF, 12:20 – 1:10pm
Emily Baragwanath

Emily Baragwanath studied at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, before taking up a Rhodes Scholarship to the University of Oxford, U.K. where she gained her doctorate in Classics. She has since held research fellowships at Christ Church, Oxford, at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington D.C., and in Heidelberg. Her main area of scholarly interest is the literary techniques employed by Greek historians in their construction of historical narratives. Her book, Motivation and Narrative in Herodotus, winner of Oxford’s Conington Prize and the CAMWS Award for Outstanding Publication 2010, explores the representation of human motivation in Herodotus’ Histories.
The intersection of history-writing, cinema and fiction will be our focus as we engage with the greatest Greek historians—Herodotus, Thucydides, Polybius—against the backdrop of modern renditions of the past and of war in cinema (including Peter Weir’s Gallipoli, Wolfgang Petersen’s Troy and Zack Snyder’s 300), documentaries (including Tolga Ornek’s Gallipoli), news footage and short stories. We will examine the strategies of each ancient writer in confronting challenges that remain pressing for directors, journalists, and historians today. These include difficulties of conflicting perspectives, biased evidence, and the limitations of memory, as well as broader questions about the nature of historical representation. The aim is for students to engage in critical and informed analysis of the strategies of our three ancient historians in ‘writing the past’, and to draw appropriate comparisons with the challenges that confront modern counterparts. The course will center on in-class group discussion and debate focused on questions arising from the week’s reading or viewing assignments. Students will write two short essays and a longer paper arising from their course project.

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COMMUNICATION STUDIES

COMM 57: Is There Life After College?: The Meaning of Work in Contemporary Life
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Dennis Mumby

Dennis Mumby is a Professor in the Department of Communication Studies, and a Fellow in the Institute for the Arts and Humanities. He received his B.A from Sheffield Hallam University in the U.K., and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. Before coming to UNC in 2002 he taught at Purdue University in Indiana. His research focuses on the place of work and organizations in everyday life, particularly with regard to issues of gender, power, and identity. He has taught courses on organizational communication, work and gender, and organizational culture, among others. Born and raised in the U.K., Dennis enjoys running, reading novels, hanging out in coffee shops, and supporting Liverpool FC (aka, “the Mighty Reds”).
This course examines the historical emergence of work as a defining feature of contemporary life. As students beginning college and preparing for a professional career, you will be asked to explore the place of work in your lives. As a class we will think about the question posed by philosopher Alain de Botton: What are “the pleasures and sorrows of work?” We will explore this question in the context of economic, political, and social conditions that are often referred to as neoliberalism and post-Fordism. Furthermore, we will explore the relationships between work and other aspects of our lives, including family, leisure activities, personal relationships, consumption, and self-identity. Through various readings, written assignments and field projects that examine the phenomenon of work, the goal of the class is to get you to think critically and self-reflectively about the numerous factors that shape your development of a professional identity.

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COMM 63: The Creative Process in Performance
VP, CI, US
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Joseph Megel

Joseph Megel has spent the last 20 years focusing on the direction and development of new works, for theatre, film and video. Mr. Megel is a member of SSDC (Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers), Co-Artistic Director of StreetSigns Center for Literature and Performance in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and an Associate Artist for The Working Theatre in New York. He holds the M.F.A. degree from the Peter Stark Motion Picture Producing Program at the University of Southern California, a Master of Arts from the University of Cincinnati’s College Conservatory of Music and a B.S. in Speech from Northwestern University. He served for six years as Artistic Director of Playwrights Theatre of New Jersey, a new play development theatre, and continues to serve as Co-Executive Producer of Harland’s Creek Productions, producer of New York premieres of new plays, developmental producer of screenplays, readings and films.
Students in this seminar will attend and study the production process of multimedia, music, dance and theater performances in campus venues: The Memorial Hall Carolina Performing Arts Series, the Process Series of the Performance Studies program in the Department of Communication Studies, Playmakers, and others across campus. We will explore the ways that these performances engage us, communicating powerful ideas and emotions through their various media of expression. Students will research performance pieces, interview the performers, attend rehearsals and performances, and write essays that combine their own experiences of the performances with readings in performance studies. Students will also create their own performance pieces as they observe the relationship of preparation and practice to the spontaneity and surprise of performance.

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COMM 82: Globalizing Organizations
SS, CI, GL
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Sarah Dempsey

Sarah Dempsey is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Studies. She has taught courses on the topics of organizational communication, work, labor and professional life, nonprofit organizations, and communication and social change. Dr. Dempsey’s teaching incorporates experiential and active learning techniques. Her research interests include processes of social change and advocacy, and problems of participation and communication within international contexts.
“Globalization” is both a hotly contested subject and a central part of contemporary life. This course provides an introduction to key debates by focusing on the politics of the global food system. By the end of the semester, you will gain an understanding of the impacts of various “globalized” and “globalizing” organizational actors within the global food system. We will consider the roles of multinational companies, commodity chains and their labor practices, food marketing and consumption, and community-based social movements. The course also includes experiential activities designed to foster critical reflection about the community-building functions of food, including: sharing a dining hall meal, volunteering at the Carolina Campus Community Garden, participating in Hunger Lunch, and visiting the Carrboro Farmer’s Market.

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COMM 86: Surveillance and Society
SS, NA
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Torin Monahan

Torin Monahan is an Associate Professor of Communication Studies. His research focuses on institutional transformations with new technologies, with a particular emphasis on surveillance and security programs. He has published over forty articles or book chapters and five books, including Surveillance in the Time of Insecurity, which won the Surveillance Studies Book Prize of the International Surveillance Studies Network in 2011. Areas of expertise include ethnography, science and technology studies, surveillance studies, critical criminology, urban studies, and contemporary social and cultural theory. Monahan is an Associate Editor of the leading academic journal on surveillance, Surveillance & Society.
How are surveillance technologies altering social life in post-9/11 worlds? This course will explore this question by mapping the complex ways that technologies and societies interact to produce security, fear, control, vulnerability, and/or empowerment. Some of the areas covered include the surveillance capacities of social media, monitoring of individuals at schools and workplaces, video surveillance in public and quasi-public spaces, passenger-screening technologies at airports, and a host of other monitoring technologies throughout everyday life. Readings will be drawn from the social sciences, science fiction, and popular media. Several films will be shown to facilitate critical inquiry into the shaping of popular perceptions about the future and our role in its creation. The class is designed to give students freedom to develop and express their own ideas. The course goal is for you to cultivate a technological literacy that will allow you to analyze and critique surveillance technologies as social entities.

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COMM 89: Stop Motion Animation
VP
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Francesca Talenti

Francesca Talenti is a filmmaker and animator who has exhibited her work from Sundance to PBS National, by way of Mumbai, Göteborg, Casablanca, and many others. She has won a number of audience and “best of” awards, and has received grants from the Independent Television Service, Latino Public Broadcasting, and the Kauffman Foundation. In the past few years Francesca has also created media for live theater and interactive installations.
This seminar is a deep exploration of Stop-Motion Animation, in which you will gain historical, aesthetic, and technical knowledge of this particular form of cinematic expression. The primary focus is on the making of stop-motion films, with a particular emphasis on the analog and the tactile, as bolstered by digital tools. In the process you will learn about broader cinematic principles. You will also be introduced to collaborative and creative practices as you design storyboards, environments, characters, and stories, with the larger goal of exercising, flexing, and strengthening your creative abilities.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

COMP 60H: Robotics with LEGO® (HONORS)
QI
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Henry Fuchs

Henry Fuchs is the Federico Gil Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Fuchs is a co-director, with Nadia Thalmann of NTU Singapore and Markus Gross of ETH Zurich, of the NTU-ETH-UNC “BeingThere” International Research Centre for Tele-Presence and Tele-Collaboration. In 1975 he received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Utah. He has been active in computer graphics since the 1970s, with rendering algorithms (BSP Trees), hardware (Pixel-Planes and PixelFlow), virtual environments, tele-immersion systems and medical applications. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of the ACM, recipient of the 1992 ACM-SIGGRAPH Achievement Award and recipient of the IEEE VGTC 2013 Virtual Reality Career Award.
This seminar explores the process of design and the nature of computers by designing, building, and programming LEGO® robots. Competitions to evaluate various robots are generally held at the middle and/or at the end of the semester. Previous programming experience is not required. Assignments will typically take one to two weeks, each building on previously constructed robot and making one that will perform a more complex task. Early robots will follow black race course routes or run through mazes constructed on the floor of the robotics laboratory. Later “robots” will play simple games with human users. Others robots will play simple soccer games, remotely controlled by human handlers. Most assignments will include a written report, as well as a demonstration of a working robot and a listing of its computer program

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COMP 89H: Everyday Computing (HONORS)
PL
MW, 2:30 – 3:40pm
Ming C. Lin

Ming C. Lin (Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, 1993) is currently John R. & Louise S. Parker Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at UNC. She has received several honors and awards, including 2010 IEEE VGTC Technical Achievement Award in Virtual Reality, and nearly a dozen of best paper awards at international conferences on computer graphics and virtual reality. She is a Fellow of ACM and IEEE. Her research interests include physics-based modeling, 3D graphics, digital audio synthesis, haptics, virtual environments, robotics, and geometric computing. Her research has been adopted by computing industry, computer-aided design and manufacturing, robotics, healthcare, nanotechnology, education, and entertainment.
We will study various examples on how computing technology affects different aspects of our daily life in today’s society, including artistic and creative processes, bioinformatics, computer animation, computer game dynamics, digital music and audio synthesis, medical simulation and training, robotics and automation, special effects generation, and virtual environments. Students will learn about computational thinking for solving many different problems in the physical and virtual world. Building upon the foundation from classroom seminars and invited guest lectures from industry and within the academia, students will engage in an in-depth study of one particular cutting-edge topic (e.g. computational sciences, multimedia for assistive technology, game design, etc.) of interest to them, thereby allowing issue-specific research by individual students while covering a wide range of materials. No prerequisites are required, but basic literacy in using a computer is helpful.

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DRAMATIC ART

DRAM 81H: Staging America: The American Drama (HONORS)
VP, CI, NA
TuTh, 2:00 — 3:15pm
Gregory Kable

Gregory Kable is a senior lecturer in the Department of Dramatic Art, where he teaches dramatic literature, theatre history, and performance courses and serves as an Associate dramaturg for PlayMakers Repertory Company. He also teaches seminars on American Musicals and Modern British Drama for the Honors program. He has directed dozens of productions at UNC and throughout the local community, and is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama.
This seminar examines our national drama from its colonial origins to the present. Students will read plays and criticism, screen videos, engage in critical writing, and explore scenes in performance as related means of testing the visions and revisions constituting American dramatic history. We will approach American drama as both a literary and commercial art form, and look to its history to provide a context for current American theater practice. Readings are chosen for their intrinsic merit and historical importance, but also for their treatment of key issues and events in American life. Our focus throughout will be on the forces that shaped the American drama as well as, in turn, drama’s ability to shed new light on the national experience.

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DRAM 88: Ecology and Performance – CANCELLED 8/4/2015
VP, EE
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Karen O’Brien

Karen O’Brien is David G. Frey Fellow Assistant Professor in UNC’s Department of Dramatic Art. Her research and creative interests include inquiries in artistic, cultural, and textual performance, particularly in the environmental arts and in the geo-political context of Irish Studies. She holds a Ph.D. in Drama and Theatre from University of California, Irvine and San Diego. She also received an MFA in Directing and a BFA in Electronic Media from the College-Conservatory of Music at University of Cincinnati.
This seminar will guide students through the process of researching, developing, and producing new performance pieces inspired by socio-ecological issues. This task will involve: learning and practicing a range of collaborative performance techniques; gaining knowledge about the environmental arts, theatre for social change, and core principles surrounding notions of sustainability; researching and engaging in current ecological debates; and synthesizing critical inquiry and creative endeavor in the form of a new ecologically-driven performance. The seminar will culminate in the presentation of new performance pieces aimed at promoting socio-ecological sustainability. Students will be expected to: closely read assigned texts; keep a journal throughout the semester; conduct and present individual and group research; collaborate with a group to integrate research into performance; and attend one group field outing and one performance event outside of the scheduled course time. No prerequisites are required.

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ENGLISH

ENGL 53: Slavery and Freedom in African American Literature and Film
LA, US
MWF, 1:25 – 2:15pm
William L. Andrews

William L. Andrews teaches courses on African American literature, American autobiography studies, and Southern literature. Since the mid-1980s he has done a considerable amount of editing of African American and Southern literature and criticism. Professor Andrews is the series editor of North American Slave Narratives, Beginnings to 1920, a complete digitized library of autobiographies and biographies of North American slaves and ex-slaves.
The purpose of this seminar is to explore the African American slave narrative tradition from its 19th-century origins in autobiography to its present manifestations in prize-winning fiction and film. The most famous 19th-century slave narrative, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845) was an international best seller. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), the amazing but utterly truthful story of Harriet Jacobs’s slave experience in Edenton, North Carolina, is extensively read and taught in college and university classrooms around the world. In the 20th century, many important African American autobiographies and novels—Washington’s Up From Slavery (1901), Wright’s Black Boy (1945), Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952), Haley’s The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1965), and Morrison’s Beloved (1987) —are products, formally and thematically, of the ongoing slave narrative tradition. The slave narrative has also given rise to a number of notable films, from major studio releases like Spielberg’s Amistad (1997) to TV-films like Charles Burnett’s Nightjohn (1996). The 1977 television series based on Haley’s Roots enabled the slave narrative tradition to have a profound impact on late 20th-century American culture. Slave narratives have also had strong influence on popular films such as Blade Runner (1982), The Handmaid’s Tale (1990), Django Unchained (2013), and 12 Years a Slave (2013). Because of the widespread incidence of human trafficking and other forms of involuntary servitude in the world today, slavery remains a major human rights issue.

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ENGL 72: Literature of 9/11
LA, CI, GL
MWF, 9:05 – 9:55am
Neel Ahuja

Neel Ahuja grew up in Topeka, Kansas. He studied gender studies at Northwestern University before completing a Ph.D. in transnational cultural studies at the University of California-San Diego. Neel is Associate Professor of postcolonial literature and theory in the English Department at UNC–Chapel Hill, and he teaches courses on security culture, world literatures, medical humanities, and environmental studies. Neel is the author of the forthcoming book Bioinsecurities: Disease Interventions, Empire, and the Government of Species. He has recently written a series of essays concerning the relationships between international politics, animals, and the environment.
This seminar will explore representations of the 9/11 attacks and their aftermath in literature and popular culture. Following an introduction to the concept of terrorism and to the production of knowledge about political violence in the fields of law, politics, religious studies, and terrorism studies, we will explore a diverse array of themes related to the 9/11 attacks and the “war on terror” as depicted in memoirs, poetry, novels, public art, graphic novels, film, and music: explanations of the causes and consequences of political violence; the role of religion in public culture and state institutions; national security discourse; mourning, trauma, and public memorials; depictions of the US military in Iraq, Pakistan, and Afghanistan; and the perspectives of detainees and minority communities on the attacks and their aftermath. Students will read critical scholarship and literary texts, discuss major controversies in organized debates, compose two papers, and complete group presentations on topics of their choice.

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ENGL 79: Globalization/Global Asians
CI, GL
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Jennifer Ho

Jennifer Ho is an Associate Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. She teaches classes in contemporary American, multiethnic American, and Asian American literature, which are also the areas of her research. Her latest book, Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture (Rutgers University Press, May 2015) looks at Asian American subjects (both people and areas of study) deemed to be ambiguous—transracial/transnational adoptees, Tiger Woods, multiracial writing. Although originally from California, Professor Ho has adopted hush puppies as her own (though not sweet tea or Carolina BBQ, so maybe the California is still in her).
What is globalization? Is it a product of our modern era or, if we think about the exchange of goods and ideas that have occurred throughout the millennia, is there really anything new about globalization? Our current conception of globalization suggests that due to advances in technology—telephone, television, and the internet—the size and speed of the world has shrunk so that we can register, instantaneously, events that occur in Japan, Pakistan, and Indonesia through various forms of media—our smart phones, our television sets, and our laptop computers. This course will explore the concept of globalization by focusing on the Asian diaspora, particularly the cultural productions that document, represent, and express “Global Asians.” Starting with a theoretical grounding of terms like globalization, transnationalism, and diaspora, we will turn to various units that explore narratives in an Asian diasporic/global context such as Cristina Garcia’s Monkey Hunting, Monique Truong’s The Book of Salt, and Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist.

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ENGL 81: Jane Eyre and Its Afterlives
LA, CI, NA
MWF, 2:30 – 3:20pm
Jeanne Moskal

Jeanne Moskal is an award-winning teacher and mentor. She has authored a study of the poet William Blake and has edited the travel writings of Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein. Moskal’s book-in-progress analyzes twentieth-century adaptations of Jane Eyre.
Class members will reflect upon Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847) in its original contexts and study subsequent novels and films that engage with it. What makes a literary work a “classic”? How do later readers’ concerns affect their responses? Lovers of Jane Eyre are welcome, as are newcomers and skeptics. We will read Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847), ed. Richard J. Dunn; Grace Zaring Stone, The Bitter Tea of General Yen (1930); Daphne Du Maurier, Rebecca (1938); Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea (1966); and two books by Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (1985) and Why Be Happy When You Could be Normal? (2013). Films will be drawn from this list. English-language adaptions of 1934, 1943, 1970, and 2011; film adaptions in Spanish, Hindi, Tamil, and Mandarin; The Bitter Tea of General Yen, dir. Frank Capra (1933); Rebecca, dir. Alfred Hitchcock (1940); Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (BBC-TV, 1990); Wide Sargasso Sea (1993), dir. John Duigan. Your grade will be determined by a Creative Assignment, presented orally and in writing (8 pages; 45%), a Conversational Bibliography, presented orally and in writing (8 pages; 45%), and engaged, thoughtful participation in class discussions(10%).

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ENGL 85H: Economic Saints and Villains (HONORS)
Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative
LA, CI, WB
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Ritchie Kendall

Ritchie Kendall is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature who joined the UNC faculty in 1980. He holds a B.A. in English from Yale University (1973) and an M.A. and Ph.D. in English from Harvard University (1980). His specialty is in English Renaissance drama with an emphasis on the socio-economic dimensions of early modern theater. He has taught Honors courses in Shakespeare, Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, comedy and social class, epic and drama, and early modern ideas of entrepreneurship.
The rise of new economic activities—whether the birth of international banking, trading in future commodities, or the marketing of junk bonds—bring with them both excitement and trepidation. Literature about how ordinary and extraordinary people go about the business of getting and spending is one way that a culture comes to terms with emergent and potentially revolutionary economic formations. This seminar will explore how early modern England from the 16th to the 19th centuries imagined new economic orders through plays and novels. We will examine how Renaissance plays by Marlowe, Shakespeare, Dekker, and Heywood present economic scoundrels such as Barabas and Shylock as well as heroic entrepreneurs such as Simon Eyre and Thomas Gresham. In the 18th century we will sample the work of Daniel Defoe who crafted a guide for early tradesmen but also produced subversive novels with dubious heroines who use sex and business acumen to acquire and lose great fortunes. From the 19th century, we will read two works, a little known melodrama, The Game of Speculation, as well as the iconic A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Both stories speculate on the compatibility of economic and spiritual success. We will conclude with a modern epilogue: three satiric films from the era of Reagonomics including Oliver Stone’s Wall Street, Mike Nichols’ Working Girl, and Jon Landis’ Trading Places. Our objective throughout will be to analyze how literary art, itself a form of economic activity, simultaneously demonizes and celebrates the “miracle of the marketplace” and those financial pioneers that perform its magic.

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ENGL 87H: Jane Austen, Then and Now (HONORS)
VP
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Inger Sigrun Brodey

Inger Sigrun Brodey was born in Kyoto, Japan, and studied at the Albert-Ludwigs Universität in Freiburg, Germany, as well as at Waseda University in Tokyo, before receiving her Ph.D. from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her primary interest is in the history of the novel in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Europe and Meiji Japan. Her books include Ruined by Design: Shaping Novels and Gardens in the Culture of Sensibility (Routledge, 2008), which won the 2009 SAMLA Studies Book Award. Her UNC awards include a Spray-Randleigh Faculty Fellowship, a Brandes Honors Curriculum Development Award, and a Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. She currently serves as the Bank of America Distinguished Term Associate Professor in Honors and is completing a book on Cowboys and Samurai in film.
In this course, we will study all of Jane Austen’s six major novels. In addition, we study one film adaptation of each novel to determine what aspects of Austen’s work translates into the film medium and what aspects are harder to capture in a cinematic format. Students will gain a thorough knowledge of Austen’s innovations in narrative and place in literary history. After receiving in-class instruction on filming, students may create their own adaptation of a scene from one of Austen’s novels as a final research project.

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ENGL 88: The Legacy of the Japanese American Internment: from WWII to 9/11
John L. Townsend III FYS in English
LA, US
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Heidi Kim

Heidi Kim joined the faculty at Carolina in 2010, and not a year has gone by without her teaching a first-year seminar. Her research ranges through nineteenth and 20th-century American literature and Asian American studies, currently focusing on authors such as William Faulkner, John Steinbeck, and Ralph Ellison. She teaches widely in 20th and 21st century American and comparative ethnic literature. She is always looking for ways to bring her students’ work into conversation with the campus and public. You can see an example of a previous class’s work at http://poston.web.unc.edu
The Japanese American incarceration and internment during World War II was a pivotal event in the history of the United States. This course will explore the legacy of the incarceration as a major piece of civil rights history through law and literature. We will study its legal history, from the Supreme Court landmark cases, now known by every lawyer, and the 1980s appeals and movement for redress and reparation, in conversation with other major civil rights issues and debates, such as the current detention in Guantanamo Bay and the infamous Tuskegee medical experiments. At the same time, we will uncover the human side of the story through memoirs, letters, artwork, and fictional retellings. As a special feature, we will have the opportunity to be in conversation with musicians and think about the role that art and music played in the dramatic shifts of Japanese American culture at this time. Students will have the opportunity to conduct independent research on topics of interest; there will also be opportunities for creative writing.

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ENGL 89.001: Literature of War from World War I to the 21st Century
John L. Townsend III FYS in English
LA, CI
MW 3:35 – 4:50pm
Hilary Lithgow

Hilary Lithgow is interested in the value that literature can have for people in their everyday lives, and what literature might be able to show us about our lives that we might not otherwise be able to see. Hilary’s graduate work focused on Victorian and early twentieth century British literature, and on what a writer’s style tells us about his or her values and commitments. In doing that work, she got especially interested in the literature of war and the ways in which war experience shapes the writings of everyday soldiers from World War I to the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan; this semester’s first year seminar grows directly out of that interest. She holds two BA’s in English, one from Haverford College and the other from Oxford University, and a PhD in English from Stanford; her teaching has been recognized by multiple awards, including most recently the Joseph Flora Award here at UNC.
This is a class about literature and war and what each one of these subjects might teach us about the other. We will consider a range of war texts (including novels, poems, movies, scholarly writings and live and videotaped conversations with veterans) and our work will be oriented around one central question: what, if anything, can a work of art help us see or understand about war that cannot be shown by any other means? A large part of our work in this course will involve close attention to the particular choices that those who write about war make in their use of language and literary form. While attending to the crucial historical, political, technological and logistical differences among the wars we consider, we will also engage broader general questions about the nature of human beings, art, language and war. Themes we’ll address will include: the place of reading and writing in the face of death, the limits of language in the representation of combat, violence and human experience, moral concerns about aestheticizing and possibly falsifying experience, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as it shapes (and is potentially reduced by) self-expression and storytelling.

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FOLKLORE

FOLK 77: The Poetic Roots of Hip-Hop: Hidden Histories of African American Rhyme
VP, US
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Glenn Hinson

Glenn Hinson’s engagement with African American expressive culture emerges from decades of work with artists that range from blues musicians and gospel singers to tapdancers, vaudeville comics, and hip-hop emcees. As a folklorist who teaches in the Departments of American Studies and Anthropology, he studies everyday performances and the ways that they offer insights into the workings of culture. Professor Hinson’s current research focuses on oral poetry, self-taught art, and the intersections between faith and creativity.
“There ain’t nothing new about rapping.” That’s what elders from a host of African American communities declared when hip-hop first exploded onto the scene. This “new” form, they claimed, was just a skilled re-working of poetic forms that had been around for generations. Each elder seemed to point to a different form—some to the wordplay of rhyming radio deejays, others to the bawdy flow of street corner poets, still others to the rhymed storytelling of sanctified singers. And each was right; elegant rhyming has indeed marked African American talk for generations. Yet because most such rhyming was spoken, its history remains hidden. In this seminar, we’ll explore this lost history, talking to poets and hip-hop emcees while probing the archives to uncover the hidden heritage of African American eloquence. Our goal is nothing short of writing the prehistory of hip-hop, and in so doing demonstrating rhyme’s longstanding role as a key marker of African American identity.

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GEOGRAPHY

GEOG 56: Local Places in a Globalizing World
SS, GL
M, 3:35 – 6:35pm
Altha Cravey

Altha Cravey became a geographer because she loves to travel and see new things. Her research focuses on globalization, labor, and gender issues in contemporary Mexico. She is beginning to publish on globalization in the US South as well. Cravey was born and raised in Illinois and Indiana and worked as a construction electrician for eleven years before finishing her undergraduate education. Her dissertation at the University of Iowa was supported by a four-year Iowa Fellowship and was published as Women and Work in Mexico’s Maquiladoras (Rowman and Littlefield, 1998). Cravey loves to bicycle around campus and Chapel Hill.
Globalization is a word we hear every day, but what does it mean for us in local places? Specifically, what can an understanding of globalization tell us about Carolina and nearby places? This seminar weaves together perspectives on globalization with hands-on exploration of Carolina and its place in today’s global “knowledge economy,” and the University’s founding in relation to the globalizing forces of that day. Our focus will shift back and forth between the global and the local, even to the microscale of our campus. We will learn through a variety of experiences and approaches, including fieldwork, old documents, and some introductory GIS (geographic information systems) exercises in addition to readings, class discussion, and group work. By the end of the seminar, students will not only have an understanding of globalization and the very real connections between the global and the local, but also a unique perspective on our university.

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GEOG 64: Vietnam
HS, BN
MWF, 1:25 – 2:15pm
Christian C. Lentz

When Christian C. Lentz was growing up in a small Rhode Island town, he wanted to experience places just over the horizon, if not the other side of the earth. So in college he learned Indonesian and studied abroad there before turning towards Vietnamese and Vietnam. He continues to work in Southeast Asia and is interested in how everyday folk—farmers, soldiers, and traders—negotiate a social world enlivened by their thoughts and actions. His research looks at Vietnam during war and revolution, when ordinary people changed their world and, in many ways, turned it upside down. After earning his PhD from Cornell University, he became Assistant Professor of Geography at UNC in 2011.
What do we think of when we think of Vietnam? For many, Vietnam was and remains a war that haunts veterans, families, and politicians. But to think only of the “Vietnam War” overlooks a country and its story. In fact, many Vietnamese wonder why Americans are so preoccupied with the “American War”!
We will explore modern Vietnam in order to situate the American War in a broader spatial and historical context. Landscapes range from forests, over mountains, through fields, and downstream to river deltas. Vietnamese move from village to city, meander through cafes and rice paddies, cross oceans and land again. Our journey begins with royal unification and collapse, winds through colonialism and nationalist struggles, pauses in the Cold War, and ends with ongoing reforms. This seminar aims to introduce a fascinating place rich in history and to animate a geographic imagination students can take anywhere. Through forays to the university library and media center, we learn how to locate and appreciate fact and fiction, primary and secondary sources, text and picture, film and map. Through reading and writing exercises as well as film screenings and class discussions, students encounter new points of view, engage scholarly debates, and develop informed perspectives.

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GEOG 89: The Politics of Everyday Life
SS, GL
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Sara Smith

Sara Smith is a political geographer with a South Asia focus, specializing in feminist political geography and political geographies of youth and the future. She has been involved in non-profit work and research in India since 1999. Her Ph.D. is in geography, and she has been an Assistant Professor in UNC’s Department of Geography since 2009. Professor Smith’s current research in the Ladakh region of India’s Jammu and Kashmir State addresses the ways that individuals’ personal lives (especially their decisions about love and babies) are entangled in territorial struggle. Smith is developing a new project about how marginalized young people from India’s remote mountain regions experience university life in major Indian cities, and how this shapes their politics. If you are curious, you can find out more about this work on her faculty Web site at http://geography.unc.edu/people/faculty-1.
This seminar examines the ways that politics, especially contests over territory, are part of our day-to-day life. We will explore a range of cases, from immigration policy and rhetoric in the US, to popular representations of geopolitics in film, to the politics of family planning in India. How do questions of love, friendship, family, and youth identity tie into the international and national political stories that we see on the news? What does national identity have to do with our individual sense of self? We will also explore alternative ways that international politics have been studied, as feminist geopolitics or anti-geopolitics, and questions of citizenship. Work for the seminar will involve original research on intersections of international politics and students’ daily life, as well as exploring representations of geopolitical issues in the media, film, and fiction.

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GEOLOGY

GEOL 72H: Field Geology of Eastern California (HONORS)
PL, EE
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Drew Coleman

Drew Coleman’s research focuses on understanding how the Earth works by determining the rates of processes (mountain building, biologic extinction, volcanic eruptions, etc.) that occurred in the past. To accomplish this he and his students date rocks. His teaching is inquiry based and he is most happy when he is teaching “hands on” in the field or lab. He is a Professor in the Geological Sciences and also the Assistant Dean for the First Year Seminar program – so he is kinda invested in the success of this class.
This seminar will be designed around a one-week field trip to eastern California, where students will study geologic features including active volcanoes, earthquake-producing faults, evidence for recent glaciations and extreme climate change, and how locals deal with living on active geologic features. Before the field trip (which will take place the week of Fall Break and be based at the Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Lab, Mammoth Lakes, California), the class will meet twice a week to go over basic geologic principles and to work on field topics for which student groups will be responsible. During the trip students will work on specific projects (e.g., making a geologic map of a small area; mapping, measuring, and describing an active fault; observing and recording glacial features on a hike), and collect samples for an original, small group, research project. After the field trip students will complete laboratory analysis of samples and present the results of their research to the Department. Grading will be based on the research, group work presented on the trip, and on a variety of small projects during the trip (notebook descriptions, mapping projects, etc.). Students will be required to pay some of the costs (estimated about $850). This course will require missing three days of classes.

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GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

GERM 56: Germans, Jews, and the History of Anti-Semitism
HS, CI, NA
MWF, 11:15am – 12:05pm
Jonathan M. Hess

Jonathan M. Hess, Moses M. and Hannah L. Distinguished Professor of Jewish History and Culture, received a B.A. from Yale, a M.A. from The Johns Hopkins University, and another M.A. and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Currently in his 22nd year of teaching at Carolina, Hess specializes in German and German-Jewish literature, culture, and history. In his spare time, he plays the piano, walks his two hound dogs, and loves to go hiking in the mountains with his family.
When Hitler came to power in 1933, Jews made up approximately 1% of the population in Germany. How was it possible that this miniscule minority came to occupy such a prominent role in Nazi ideology and the German cultural imagination? What might studying the relationship between Germans and Jews in the centuries before the Holocaust teach us about the persistence of anti-Semitism and racism in our world today? This course seeks to answer these questions by examining a variety of primary sources from the Middle Ages to the Holocaust and beyond, including political treatises, literary texts, theological tracts, film, and personal memoirs. No previous familiarity with the subject is required.

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GERM 59: Moscow 1937: Dictatorships and Their Defenders
HS, GL
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
David Pike

David Pike received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1978 in German Studies with a minor in Russian and has taught at UNC–CH since 1980. He is the author of three books, The Politics of Culture in Soviet -Occupied Germany, 1945-1949 (1993), Lukács and Brecht (1985), and German Writers in Soviet Exile, 1933-1945 (1982). His research takes him regularly to Berlin and Moscow.
This seminar deals in the broadest possible context with two critical issues that dominated the 20th century: the rise of fascism out of the carnage of World War I and the Bolshevik revolution to which the war and Czarist Russia’s involvement in it helped contribute. As the semester unfolds, drawing on a variety of historical and documentary films, and literature (memoirs, novels), we will take a comparative look at singular personalities like Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler and examine the role played by such key figures in historical events of this magnitude. Towards the end of the semester, we will glance briefly at the situation created in Western and Eastern Europe by the defeat of fascism and contemplate the origins and evolution of the cold war. We will conclude the seminar with a consideration of the dissolution and democratization of Eastern European countries, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and, against the tragic background of the past, the general prognosis for democracy in the future.

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SLAV 88H: Gender and Fiction in Central and Eastern Europe (HONORS)
LA, BN
MWF, 9:05 – 9:55am
Ewa Wampuszyc

Ewa Wampuszyc has been a Professor in UNC’s Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures since 2010. She received her Ph.D. in 2004 from the University of Michigan. Before coming to UNC, she taught courses in literature, language, and European studies at the University of Florida. Professor Wampuszyc’s research interests include: representations of Warsaw in literature and film, cultural capital as it relates to economic capital, and post-communist cultural transformation in Central Europe. Teaching First Year Students every fall has become one of the highlights of her academic year. While she has many outside interests, she enjoys her work so much that she also considers it a hobby.
Studying culture through the prism of gender can be a great introduction to a region like Central and Eastern Europe. In this seminar, we will have a chance to explore definitions of “masculine” and “feminine” in fiction, film, and essays by and about women from Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Romania. We will discuss how gender concepts shed light on self-identity, nationalism, private property, public spaces, values, ethics, political dissent and oppression, and consumerism. We will consider the connection between the 19th century “Woman Question” and nationalism. We will study how communist ideology promised gender equality, but failed. We will discuss perceptions of gender and consumerism after the fall of communism. Students will learn how political and economic transition affected Central/Eastern Europe; about everyday life under communism; about the geography of Central and Eastern Europe; and how the language and discourses we use shape our world view. Student progress and grades will be assessed through class participation, a group presentation, and writing assignments (ranging from short responses to a longer paper).

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HISTORY

HIST 60: Oral History in Action – CANCELLED – 7/31/15
HS, NA
W, 3:35 – 6:05pm
Malinda Maynor-Lowery

Professor Lowery is a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina. Her book, Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation (UNC Press, 2010), received the 2011 Labriola American Indian Center National Book Award, presented by Arizona State University, and Best 2010 First Book from the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association. She has produced four documentary films about Native American issues, including the award-winning In the Light of Reverence, which aired on PBS in 2001 to over three million people. Two previous films, Real Indian and Sounds of Faith, examine Lumbee identity and culture, and the most recent is an online video for Native survivors of domestic violence featuring the Lumbee and Eastern Band Cherokee tribes (www.survivortosurvivor.org). Her current book project is a history of the Lumbee tribe for a general audience, forthcoming from the University of North Carolina Press.
Oral history is “history from the ground up,” learning about the past from the people who lived it. In this seminar, students will do original research in oral history and contribute these true-life stories to a trilogy of theatrical plays concerning agriculture, labor, women, race, and political protest. This course addresses timely issues of concern in the South: African American farmers, industrial safety and labor inequality, and urban political protest. These topics require advanced analysis of the relationships between gender, race, and class. Students will receive methodological training in oral history that will help them resolve the contradictions inherent in written and oral sources. By conducting oral history interviews themselves, students will engage take responsibility for the impact of their interpretations.

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HIST 84: Monsters, Murders, and Mayhem in Microhistorical Analysis: French Case Studies
HS, NA
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Jay M. Smith

Jay M. Smith studied at Northern Illinois University and the University of Michigan. He came to UNC–CH straight from Ann Arbor in 1990 and has never looked back. A specialist of early-modern France (1500-1800), he likes thinking about how people accommodate change, how mental transitions get made, and how human beings move forward through time while always keeping one foot in the past. “Events” and their meaning have become a recent obsession. Microhistory, for him, provides a welcome excuse to think hard about events and how they relate to, affect, and are produced by their contexts.
In recent years the field of French history (long a trendsetter within the discipline) has witnessed an extraordinary outpouring of microhistorical works covering a range of phenomena from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century. “Monsters, Murders, and Mayhem” will explore at length the distinctive features of microhistorical approaches to the past. After beginning with a brief overview of the history of microhistory, students will read a range of recent French microhistories that use the particular in an effort to make claims about the general. The instructor’s own experience in writing and publishing Monsters of the Gévaudan will be used to facilitate discussion of microhistory’s strengths and weaknesses—from the point of view of authors, readers, and publishers alike. Students will also try their hand at conceiving and writing microhistory, both in projects that will be presented in class and in a longish paper. Other written work will include book reviews, one write-up for one of the microhistories addressed in class, and a brief response to one classmate’s book review. By the end of the term students will have experimented with all of the activities that make up the professional life of the historian: conceiving and defining a new project, thinking through the methodology that frames one’s research, evaluating the published work of other historians, absorbing outsiders’ critical treatment of one’s work, engaging in purposeful historical research, and writing up one’s results in the clearest style possible. They also will have acquired a certain expertise over the burgeoning sub-field of French microhistory.

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HIST 89: Go Tell it on the Mountain: African American Life in the 1950s
John L. Townsend III FYS in History
HS, US
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
William Sturkey

A native of Erie, Pennsylvania, Dr. William Sturkey is an Assistant Professor of History who studies the history of race in the United States, particularly in the modern American South. His first book, recently published in February of 2015, is an edited collection of the newspapers, essays, and poems produced by young black Freedom School students during the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Summer. His second book, scheduled for publication in the fall of 2016 with Harvard University Press, examines the interplay of Southern modernization and Jim Crow throughout the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Dr. Sturkey’s next project will explore the history of working-class black life in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Through the lens of African American life in the 1950s, this course will explore the integration of large minority groups into mainstream American political, social, and cultural life. It will consciously seek to move beyond classical Civil Rights Movement narratives, such as Brown v. Board of Education and the Montgomery Bus Boycott, to more fully explore the complexities of 1950s black life by incorporating interdisciplinary approaches to studying black integration through the broad themes of consumerism, music, literature, gender, sexuality, politics, celebrity, and sports. From listening to Chuck Berry to reading James Baldwin’s first novel to reading back issues of Ebony Magazine, students will be introduced to readings, music, and new concepts that will help facilitate a profound yet nuanced understanding of black life and racial integration during the 1950s, develop a basic familiarity with humanities-based research methodologies, and explore issues that inform more recent forms of political, social, and cultural integration into American society.

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MARINE SCIENCES

MASC 53: The Ends of the Earth: Polar Oceanography and Exploration
PL
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Carol Arnosti

Carol Arnosti grew up in Wisconsin, where she developed an early appreciation for snow and ice. As an undergraduate at Lawrence University, she majored in chemistry, studied history, and played intercollegiate basketball. After completing a Ph.D. in oceanography at M.I.T. and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, she went to the Max-Planck Institute in Bremen, Germany, where she rapidly became involved in a new project investigating microbial life at low temperatures. Continued involvement in this project since moving to Chapel Hill in 1995 has led to repeated research work in the Arctic as well as a trip to Antarctica, and a permanent case of ‘Polar Fever’.
What explains the ‘pull of the Poles’? What motivated early explorers to undergo great hardships to investigate the Arctic and Antarctic, and what did they discover about these regions? What have we discovered in the intervening decades, and what do we still not understand about polar regions? Why do the Arctic and Antarctic play such a critical role in global climate? This seminar will combine scientific and historical perspectives to investigate the ‘ends of the earth’, the Arctic and Antarctica. We will begin by surveying the geography and oceanography of these regions, and then step back into the past and follow in the footsteps of some of the early polar explorers by reading their own accounts of their explorations. Modern accounts will help us compare and contrast these early explorations. The seminar will also include readings and discussions about current questions and problems of the polar regions, in particular human impacts and potential effects of global warming. Class discussions, short writing assignments, a term paper, and group presentations will be used to hone critical thinking and communication skills, and to help develop both scientific and historical understanding of these unique regions of the earth.

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MASC 55: Change in the Coastal Ocean
PL
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Christopher S. Martens

Christopher S. Martens earned his Ph.D. in Chemical Oceanography from Florida State University in 1972, then moved to Yale to complete two years of postdoctoral study before joining the faculty at UNC in 1974. His current research focuses on how biological processes affect the chemistry of seawater, sources of greenhouse gases, changing coral reef ecosystems, and the carbon cycle in deep sea environments including the northern Gulf of Mexico area impacted by the Deepwater Horizon disaster. He publishes widely and has twice been co-recipient of the Geochemical Society’s Best Paper award in Organic Geochemistry. He is an experienced SCUBA diver and underwater videographer. He has received a “Favorite Faculty” award for recognized excellence in undergraduate teaching.
This seminar provides students with opportunities to explore recent changes in marine and terrestrial environments caused by the interactions of fascinating oceanographic processes. Class presentations and discussions focus on the work of active marine scientists who combine their traditional disciplinary research with knowledge and skills from other fields as needed to understand new environmental challenges. This cross-cutting scientific approach prepares class members to recognize important connections between traditional disciplines to discover interdisciplinary research areas that they might wish to further explore during their undergraduate careers at Carolina. In preparation for discussions, laboratory demonstrations, and occasional visits to field sites, we read a series of recently published, non-technical research papers. We use information from those papers plus current research at Carolina to investigate how biological, geological, physical, and geochemical processes interact to influence coastal, open-ocean, and tropical environments. Students will participate in “video- and photo-trips” during classes, laboratory demonstrations using state-of-the art instrumentation in our laboratories, and “hands on” mini-experiments designed to emphasize the importance of the scientific question rather than just the technology involved. Please note that this seminar has no prerequisites.

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MATHEMATICS

MATH 53: Symmetry and Tilings
QI
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Linda Green

Linda Green grew up in Durham, North Carolina and graduated from the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Chicago and her Ph.D. from Princeton University, specializing in in three-dimensional topology and geometry. Before coming to UNC, she worked in industry, using mathematical models of breast cancer to help guide health care policy. She also directed math enrichment programs for middle and high school students in the San Francisco Bay Area. She joined the UNC faculty as a lecturer in 2013. Her non-mathematical interests include soccer and hiking.
Repeating symmetry patterns and tilings are present all around us, from the brickwork on campus, to designs on tapestries and wallpaper, to paintings like those of M.C. Escher, to crystals including snowflakes and quartz. In this class, students will explore symmetry patterns, learn to identify and classify two-dimensional patterns, and use software to create their own tiling designs. Students will relate tiling patterns to their folded up counterparts, called orbifolds, and use mathematical ideas of curvature and cone points to determine which patterns are possible and which patterns can never be achieved. In addition to analyzing repeating patterns of tiles, students will examine non-periodic patterns, such as Penrose’s kite and dart tilings, and use mathematical ideas of self-similarity and limits to understand why these patterns can never exactly repeat. Course assignments will include mathematical investigations, design projects such as virtual and physical kaleidoscopes, quizzes, homework, and a final project. The final project will allow students to delve more deeply into a theoretical topic (e.g. hyperbolic tilings or crystallographic groups) or an application (e.g. quasicrystals or basket weave patterns). There are no prerequisites.

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MATH 62H: Combinatorics (HONORS)
QI
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Ivan Cherednik

Ivan Cherednik is Austin H. Carr Distinguished Professor of Mathematics. Trained at the Steklov Mathematics Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences and at Moscow State University, his areas of specialization are Representation Theory, Combinatorics, Number Theory, Harmonic Analysis, and Mathematical Physics. Cherednik’s particular affection for Combinatorics is well known: he proved the celebrated Constant term conjecture in Combinatorics.
A leading expert in Modern Combinatorics wants to share his vision of the subject with the students. The seminar is a perfect background for future specialists in mathematics, physics, computer science, biology, economics, for those who are curious what statistical physics is about, what is cryptography, and how stock market works, and for everyone who likes mathematics.
The course will be organized around the following topics:

1) Puzzles: dimer covering, magic squares, 36 officers
2) Combinations: from coin tossing to dice and poker
3) Fibonacci numbers: rabbits, population growth, etc.
4) Arithmetic: designs, cyphers, intro to finite fields
5) Catalan numbers: from playing roulette to stock market

The students will learn about the history of Combinatorics, its connections with the theory of numbers, its fundamental role in the natural sciences and various applications. It is an advanced research course; all students are expected to participate in projects under the supervision of I.Ch. and the Graduate Research Consultant (the GRC Program). The grades will be based on the exam, bi-weekly home assignments and the participation in the projects. The course requires focus and effort, but, generally, the students are quite satisfied with the progress they make (and their grades too). From the Course Evaluation: “A difficult but wholly worthwhile course: I feel more competent for having taken it”, “I would recommend this FYS to others ONLY if they have a VERY strong affinity for and ability in Algebra (I thought I did, but I was wrong)”.

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MEDIA AND JOURNALISM

JOMC 89: Science, Media, and Public Life
SS, CI
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Daniel Kreiss

Daniel Kreiss is Assistant Professor in the School of Media and Journalism at UNC. Kreiss’s research explores the impact of technological change on the public sphere and political practice. In Taking Our Country Back: The Crafting of Networked Politics from Howard Dean to Barack Obama (Oxford University Press, 2012), Kreiss presents the history of new media and Democratic Party political campaigning over the last decade. Kreiss is currently working on a second book project, provisionally titled Networked Ward Politics: Parties, Databases, and Campaigning in the Information Age (under contract with Oxford University Press and due out in 2016). Kreiss is an affiliated fellow of the Information Society Project at Yale Law School and received a Ph.D. in Communication from Stanford University. Kreiss’s work has appeared in New Media and Society, Qualitative Sociology, Critical Studies in Media Communication, Research in Social Movements, Conflict, and Change, The Journal of Information Technology and Politics, and The International Journal of Communication, in addition to other academic journals.
How does the media cover scientific controversies? What role does science play in political controversies? What is the relationship between science, media, and democracy? This seminar explores the interaction of media, politics, and science through a series of case studies about contemporary controversies around issues such as fracking, climate change, stem cells, and Obamacare. We will trace public debate about these controversies through social media, journalism, science blogs, and popular culture such as films and television shows. To help us make sense of these public debates, throughout the semester we will read a number of academic works about scientific and technical controversies. Through class discussions and course assignments we will analyze the stakeholders involved in contemporary controversies and how they communicate and justify their public actions. We will examine how scientists communicate their findings to broader publics and the nature of scientific debate, as well as how journalists cover controversies and understand science. We will analyze when and how elected officials and candidates invoke or critique science, and the role of science in policymaking more broadly. We will also hear from UNC professors, journalists, representatives of social movement and advocacy organizations, Triangle companies, and elected officials and candidates about their roles in public debate.

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MUSIC

MUSC 65: Music and Culture: Understanding the World through Music
VP, NA
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Emil Kang and James Moeser

Emil Kang is Executive Director for the Arts and Professor of the Practice of Music. Kang arrived in 2005 as UNC–Chapel Hill’s first Executive Director for the Arts, a senior administrative post created to help unify and elevate the performing arts at the University. In September 2012, Kang was appointed by President Obama to serve on the National Council on the Arts, an 18-member body charged with advising the Chairman of the National Endowment of the Arts on programs and policies. Prior to coming to Chapel Hill, Kang served as President and Executive Director of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.
James Moeser is Chancellor Emeritus and Professor of Music. He served as UNC’s chancellor for eight years, stepping down from that position in July, 2008. With degrees in music (organ performance) from the Universities of Texas and Michigan and Fulbright study in Berlin and Paris, he had a distinguished career as a concert organist before beginning a new career in academic administration. One of his proudest achievements was the creation of the Carolina Performing Arts series and the position of Executive Director of the Arts. In 2013-14, he served as Interim Chancellor of the UNC School of the Arts.
This seminar will focus on the incredibly wide variety of performances presented by Carolina Performing Arts. Through research on and attendance at performances, including opportunities to meet the artists, students will explore questions such as: How does music reflect culture? What makes great music? What is the role of music in other genres? What are the obligations of the performer to the composer? What goes into the preparation of a performance? What is the impact of the audience on the performer? How much improvisation takes place in a live performance? What makes a particular performance outstanding, or by contrast, unsuccessful? We will also examine the ideas of virtuosity, curiosity, and re-invention. Students will be provided tickets and will be expected to attend all performances listed below. Musical ability and training is not a requirement for this seminar, although students with musical experiences are welcome. Program and dates are subject to change.

Please note that attendance at all 11 performances are mandatory:

1. September 29, Kenny Endo and Kaoru Watanabe
2. October 3, Buddy Guy, Blues Guitar
3. October 20, Gil Shaham, violin
4. October 22, UNC Symphony Orchestra with Gil Shaham
5. October 29, Danay Suarez
6. October 30, Chicago Symphony Orchestra with Ricardo Muti
7. November 6, Umusuna, Memories Before History
8. November 10, Ensemble Intercontemporain
9. November 11, Ensemble Intercontemporain
10. November 17, You Us We All, an Opera by Shara Worden
11. November 19, Youssou N’Dour

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MUSC 89: From Medieval Manuscript to iPod: Music and Material Culture
HS, NA
MWF, 2:30 – 3:20pm
Lauren Jennings

Dr. Lauren Jennings’ teaching and research interests include song, poetry, and manuscript culture in late-medieval Italy and music making in America during the early 19th century. Her research has been supported by grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the US-Italy Fulbright Committee, the American Musicological Society, and the Medieval Academy of America. Before coming to Carolina, Dr. Jennings taught at the University of Southern California where she was a Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholar in the Humanities. Her first book, Senza Vestimenta: The Literary Tradition of Trecento Song, was published by Ashgate in the fall of 2014.
Music is perhaps the most intangible and fleeting of the arts—once a note is played, it disappears from existence, remaining only in our memories. Yet we encounter music daily through physical, tangible objects from printed and handwritten sheet music to LPs, CDs, and iPods. In this seminar, we will explore these objects and more, considering how they shape our experience and interpretation of music as listeners, performers, and music enthusiasts. Working directly with original materials around campus including medieval manuscripts in the Rare Books Collection, vintage LPs in the Music Library, and wax cylinder recordings the Southern Folk Life Collection and with other relevant musical collections in and around Chapel Hill, we will also examine the roles musical objects have played in constructing and preserving cultural and historical memory from the Middle Ages to the present day. No previous musical knowledge or abilities required.

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PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 54: Thinking About Time
PH, WB
MW, 3:35 – 4:50pm
Gillian Russell

Gillian Russell works in the philosophy of language and logic as well as epistemology. She will be joining the Philosophy Department faculty in the summer of 2015. She is the author of Truth in Virtue of Meaning: A Defence of the Analytic/Synthetic Distinction (2008) as well as the co-editor of The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Language (2011) and New Waves in Philosophical Logic (2011). Some of her publications include “One True Logic?” in the Journal of Philosophical Logic (2008), “Knowledge by Indifference” (with John Doris) in the Australasian Journal of Philosophy (2008), “In Defence of Hume’s Law” and “Barriers to Implication” (with Greg Restall) in Hume, `Is’ and `Ought’: New Essays ed. by Charles Pigden (2010), “Indexicals, Context-Sensitivity and the Failure of Implication” in Synthese (2011), “Lessons from the Logic of Demonstratives” in New Waves in Philosophical Logic ed. by Greg Restall and Russell (2011), “Logical Pluralism” in The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2013), “Quine on Analyticity” in A Companion to W. V. O. Quine ed. by G. Harman and E. Lepore (2014) and “Metaphysical Analyticity and the Epistemology of Logic” in Philosophical Studies (2014).”
What is time? Do the past and the future exist, or only the present? Is the “flow of time” an objective feature of reality, or is it just an illusion created by the way we humans experience the world, which is static and changeless in itself? Is it conceptually possible to change the past, and if not, then why not? Is time travel a logical possibility? In this course, we will examine both historical and contemporary attempts to grapple with these problems (and related ones), and will do some grappling on our own. We will consider philosophical literature from 2500 years ago to the present day, and will briefly consider the impact of Einstein’s theories of relativity on these problems (at a very introductory level). Students will analyze historical arguments concerning these problems, produce arguments on their own, and collaborate in writing philosophical dialogues. Individually, each student will write six short papers, each with a different format. Working in pairs, the students also will write dialogues in which an issue discussed in the reading will be debated. They will present these dialogues in class, and each dialogue will be used as the basis of a discussion.

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PHIL 59: Proofs of the Existence of God
PH
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Douglas MacLean

Douglas MacLean’s current research focuses on practical ethics and issues in moral and political theory that are particularly relevant to practical concerns. Most of his recent writing examines how values do and ought to influence decisions, both personal decisions and government policies.
Throughout the history of the Western world, philosophers have been concerned to prove that God exits, that God does to exist, or to explain why God’s existence or non-existence cannot be proven. We will critically examine some of the most important of these arguments. Our aim is to focus on some of the philosophical issues they raise, such as: What are these proofs supposed to accomplish, and who is the intended audience? Is it reasonable to believe in God even if one cannot prove God’s existence, and is there necessarily a conflict between reason or science and faith? Why do some philosophers believe that God’s existence is necessary for morality? This class, conducted as a seminar, is an introduction to philosophy and to philosophical reasoning. There are no prerequisites. Every student will hand in one-page written responses to the readings prior to the class in which they are discussed, and students will lead the discussion of the readings and topics. You will also write four short papers (500-750 words) and one longer paper at the end of the term.

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PHYSICS

PHYS 52: Making the Right Connections
MW, 11:15am – 12:30pm
Lab: M, 1:25 – 3:25pm or M, 3:35 – 5:35pm
Hugon J.Karwowski

Hugon J.Karwowski, who is a native of Poland, is a physicist and a teacher. His research is in applied nuclear physics, neutrino physics and astrophysics. Most of his experimental work is performed using accelerators at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. His other interests are politics, world history and grade inflation. He is a winner of numerous teaching awards and has served as a mentor of students on all levels.
This seminar will investigate the multiple roles that computers perform in scientific investigations. We will discuss and test in practice how the connections are made between measuring devices and computers. We will investigate how the collected data are evaluated, and how the decisions based on the experimental results are made. We will also discuss the role of the computer simulations in scientific research, and the societal consequences of recent technological advances. In the lab students will learn programming and gain working knowledge of data acquisition techniques with primary focus on flow of data from and to scientific instruments. We will visit a number of research labs on and off campus and talk to young researchers about their work. This seminar will be of particular interest for prospective science majors, but there are no prerequisites.

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PUBLIC POLICY

PLCY 51: The Global Environment in the 21st Century
GL
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Elizabeth Sasser

Elizabeth Sasser is a public policy practitioner with extensive experience in federal and state government. Prior to joining UNC Public Policy as a Lecturer, Elizabeth served as policy advisor at the U.S. Department of Energy during the first term of the Obama Administration. She worked with Administration leadership on strategies to advance the nation’s interests on environmental and energy issues, focusing primarily on bilateral relations with China. Prior to her time in the Administration, she was a policy advisor to two North Carolina governors on energy and education issues. Elizabeth worked to develop strategies to improve the environment of the state and the lives of its citizens. She has a B.A. and an M.P.P. from Duke University and studied at Peking University in Beijing, China, where she developed a fluency in Mandarin.
Many serious environmental threats are global in scope. Just think of the way we produce and consume energy; how waste produced in one corner of the world travels by air, sea and land to pollute another corner; and how ecosystems that transcend national boundaries are impacted by human behavior. Who is responsible for governing these global environmental challenges? This seminar explores linkages among nations, global environmental institutions and the environmental problems they cause and seek to rectify. We will examine how global environmental policy is made, with specific attention to the roles of institutions, nations, commercial and non-profit entities. Topics include the evolution of environmental policy in the United States; China, India and other developing countries¿ impact on the global environment; global environmental institutions such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change; the role of environmental non-profit organizations; risks to the environment through pollution of land and sea by waste; global energy and environmental implications of shale gas and fracking; and the Fukushima-Dai-ichi nuclear disaster and its global repercussions.

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PLCY 70: National Policy: Who Sets the Agenda?
HS, CI, NA
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Larry Stein

Larry Stein was Senior Vice President for Policy Affairs at Capital One Financial Corporation. Stein has been with the Fortune 200 financial services company since 2003, and is responsible for Federal, State, and local government relations, regulatory relations, and the public policy dimension of corporate reputation management. During the second term of the Clinton Administration, Stein served as Assistant to the President and Director of Legislative Affairs. Stein was President Clinton’s chief lobbyist and sat on the Clinton Economic team and was a lead participant in the budget negotiations with the Congressional majority in both 1998 and 1999. Through a 33-year career in government and business, Stein has worked on a wide range of financial, tax and budgetary issues including Dodd-Frank, the Andrews Air Force Base Budget Summit, multiple budget, tax and trade bills, the repeal of Glass-Steagel, the Sarbanes-Oxley corporate accountability act and the impeachment of the President in 1998 and 99. Stein graduated Phi Beta Kappa, Magna Cum Laude from Allegheny College and was awarded a University Scholarship to Vanderbilt University where he received his Masters.
The class will concentrate on the contrast between the sometimes euphoric process of campaigning for high office as set against the painstaking and often torturous process of legislating. Taking the Obama 2008 campaign as a case study, (and using Game Change by John Heileman and Mark Halperin as a central text), we will explore President Obama’s historic victory and subsequent collision with legislative reality in his struggle to get the Affordable Care Act into law (using portions of America’s Bitter Pill by Steven Brill as a documentary record). The class will, in the process of the inquiry, bore deeply into the changing mechanics of “campaigning in America,” taking a look back at the Presidential campaigns of 1960 (The Making of a President 1960 by Theodore White) and the first real Presidential campaign of 1800 (The Deadlocked Election of 1800—Jefferson, Burr and the Union in the Balance by James Roger Sharp). Overall the class will attempt to explore the mismatch between the qualities necessary to win elections and those necessary for governing a diverse, contentious polity.

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PLCY 71: Justice and Inequality
PH
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Douglas MacKay

Douglas MacKay holds a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Toronto. Prior to joining the Department of Public Policy on July 1, 2013, he completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. MacKay’s research and teaching interests concern questions at the intersection of justice and public policy. He is currently working on projects concerning the justice of economic inequality – both domestic and global; the ethics of immigration policy; priority setting in health care; the ethics of international clinical research; and justice in the division of responsibilities within federal systems of government.
The value of equality is a foundational principle of the United States of America. The Declaration of Independence proclaims that “all men are created equal” and possess unalienable rights to “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” The Constitution of the United States requires that no State “deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” Additionally, equality has been the goal of a number of influential political movements, including the Civil Rights movement, the Feminist movement, Occupy Wall Street, and the LGBT movement. Yet despite this prominence of the value of equality, the U.S. is becoming a more unequal society in a number of domains, particularly, with respect to the distribution of income, political influence, and social mobility. This course investigates the value of equality, and asks which forms of inequality are unjust and ought to be remedied. We will focus on a variety of different spheres of U.S. social, political, and economic life, including the distribution of income and opportunities, marriage, health outcomes, education, voting and political influence, and employment. We will also ask whether equality is a value that applies beyond U.S. borders, particularly with respect to global disparities in income and wealth, and climate change. The course will feature a combination of lectures and class discussion. Significant instructional time will also be dedicated to developing students’ critical thinking, reading, and writing skills.

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PLCY 80: Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Economic Growth
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Jason Marc Cross

Jason Marc Cross is a lawyer and anthropologist. His teaching, scholarship, and consulting address the role of law and technology in global health, human rights, international development, and science and technology governance. Cross’ research examines how law and technology are used to manage expert knowledge and public participation in decision-making with humanitarian objectives. His writing addresses this use of law and technology concerning access to medicines for developing countries, transparency and accountability reform in economic law, and the promotion of democracy and human rights. Cross is writing a book manuscript entitled Metrics & Democratization: Law, Technology & Democratic Expertise in Postwar El Salvador.
This seminar provides an introduction to entrepreneurship and innovation, and considers their relationship to economic growth. The focus is on historical examples of entrepreneurs who created enduring innovations, emphasizing the context that set the stage, the strategy employed by the entrepreneur, and the public policies that supported the opportunity and the growth of the enterprise. The objective is to recognize the potential of new technologies, changes in consumer taste and shifts in the external environment as economic opportunities. The course emphasizes entrepreneurs as part of a larger societal system that both determines what is possible and also changes in response to entrepreneurial actions. The role of public policy in providing incentives for entrepreneurship and innovation and setting social priorities is discussed.

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI 50: Movies and Politics
SS, CI
MW, 9:05 – 11:25am
Pamela Conover

Pamela Conover, Burton Craige Professor of Political Science, was educated at Emory University, and received her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota. Professor Conover teaches courses dealing with political psychology, and social movements and political protest. In the past, Professor Conover’s research has concerned the nature of political thinking, and the politics of identity and citizenship. She also coauthored the book Feminism and the New Right. Her current research is focused on partisan polarization, and rivalry, and the role of values and integrity in shaping the behavior of politicians. In her spare time, she enjoys cycling and being walked by her two golden retrievers, Izzy and Gracie.
In this seminar, we will consider the interplay between films and politics—filmmakers and citizens. We will discuss what movies “mean,” and the intent of filmmakers, but our major focus will be on the contribution of films to political life and what we can learn from films about our political system as well as ourselves as citizens. Towards this end, we will watch both fictitious and documentary films. One theme will be to evaluate whether political films provide accurate understandings of reality. Another theme will be to explore the changing influence of documentary filmmakers in shaping the political role of films in our society. A third theme will be to consider how political life is shaped by diversity—race, class, gender, sexuality, and religion—and the extent to which that diversity is represented in films. A final theme will be to examine how our self-understandings as citizens are shaped by the experience of watching films. Among the topics covered will be propaganda, industry and governmental censorship, campaigning, political ambition, interest groups and corruption, congress and the presidency, the judicial system, foreign affairs, and contemporary wars. In addition to watching films and reading about them, students will engage in seminar discussions, wiki writing, and online discussions. Grades will be based on several writing projects, class and forum discussions, and a final exam.

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POLI 62: How Leaders Lead Others
SS, CI
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Terry Sullivan

Terry Sullivan (Ph.D., University of Texas) focuses on political leadership, the tradecraft of politicians, bargaining and persuasion, and White House operations. Since 1997, Professor Sullivan has directed the White House Transition Project, which provides help to all the presidential campaigns, the past two president elects as they prepared to assume the presidency, and the last outgoing president. Professor Sullivan served on President Bush’s Presidential Transition Coordinating Council where he helped coordinate the Bush to Obama transition and now serves on the National Commission on Reform of the Federal Appointments Process.
The use of political leadership stands at the center of an organized society; yet we know little about how leaders exercise their influence with other decision-makers. In this seminar, students will examine theories of leadership ranging from ancient models of good character through the medieval theories of the religious tutors (Machiavelli and Erasmus) to modern business leadership, and then compare those theories with what real leaders do. To obtain this perspective, students will listen to secret recordings of bargaining between the president and other national leaders. This seminar teaches students about the differences between real leadership and theories of leadership. It also exposes them to the rigors of research projects conducted on the basis of real data they develop. In addition, this class will help students learn how to write more effectively to sound smart.

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POLI 65: Organized Interest in American Politics
SS
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Virginia Gray

Virginia Gray joined the UNC faculty in 2001 as Winston Distinguished Professor of Political Science, after spending many years at the University of Minnesota. She received her Ph.D. from Washington University where she studied with the eminent scholar of interest groups, Robert Salisbury. Her specialties are state politics and public policy. Since 1988, her major research focus has been collaborative work with Professor David Lowery on interest groups. They have published a book and fifty journal articles on interest groups, and their work has been supported by two grants from the National Science Foundation and one from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Gray also brings practical credentials: she was a registered lobbyist in the state of Minnesota and the head of a PAC, for the U of M Faculty Association. In her spare time she can be found cheering on the Tar Heels at the Dean Dome.
Bank of America, the Sierra Club, the National Rifle Association, UNC, and the Allied Underwear Association–what do they have in common? They are all interest organizations that employ lobbyists in Washington, D.C. As social scientists, we can use a common framework to analyze these and other organized interests: Why are there so many of them? Where do they come from? Are they ruining democracy? Can there be democracy without groups? What can we do about groups? Each student will select an interest group to track throughout the semester, and a series of web-based assignments will culminate in an analysis paper. Other assignments will involve participating in debates and group generation of reform proposals.

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POLI 66: The United States and the European Union: Partners or Rivals?
SS
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Liesbet Hooghe

Liesbet Hooghe received her Ph.D. from the University of Leuven in Belgium in 1989. Before joining UNC in 2000, she taught at the University of Toronto (1994-2000) and held research fellowships at Cornell University, Oxford University (Nuffield), the European University Institute (Florence, Italy ), and the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin ( Germany ). Since 2004, she has also been affiliated with the Free University of Amsterdam. Her principal areas of interest are comparative politics (Europe), identity, political parties, political elites, and federalism. She has written several books, including Cohesion Policy and European Integration (OUP, 1996); Multi-Level Governance in the European Union (Rowman & Littlefield, 2001—with Gary Marks); The European Commission and the Integration of Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2002), and The Rise of Regional Authority (Routledge, 2010 – with Gary Marks and Arjan Schakel).
This seminar introduces students to the European Union and its relations with the United States. In the first part, we become familiar with the European Union. Why is there a European Union? How does it operate, and how has it developed? What kind of polity is emerging at the European level, and how does it differ from federalism in the United States? Finally, what is the effect of the Eurocrisis on the European polity—and on the world economy? The second section compares American and European politics. How are elections and the practice of government different? How does welfare in the United States and the role of the state in the economy differ from that in Western Europe? Are Europeans from Venus and Americans from Mars, as a famous American scholar once argued, or is the reality more fine-grained? Students will participate in structured discussion, debate, and role play. Each week two people present on a news topic selected from the Economist or an important political figure in EU-US relations. These form the basis for class discussion. We also conduct two role plays. In one, we take a typical EU legislative proposal through the EU machinery, in which each student is assigned a role. In the second, we play a transatlantic EU-US Summit around four core themes: trade, security, climate change, banking regulation. And last but not least, you are able to test your writing skills by writing a brief scholarly paper on a seminar topic.

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POLI 71H: Politics of Race, Ethnicity, Language, Religion, and Gender (HONORS)
SS, US
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Andrea Benjamin

Andrea Benjamin’s research interests include race and politics, elections and voting behavior, identity, urban politics, and public opinion. She is currently working on a book that explores the potential for Black-Latino coalitions in local elections. Professor Benjamin is originally from Northern California. She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of California at Davis and earned her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.
In many parts of the world, race, ethnicity, language, religion, and gender are explicitly linked to politics. In the United States, we tend to link these identities to politics through political parties. In this seminar, we will explore the concepts of race, ethnicity, language, religion, and gender in a comparative context in order to gain a better understanding of their application in the United States. From there we will consider the relationship between race, ethnicity, language, religion, gender, and politics, from the perspective of citizens, candidates, policies, and institutions. We will use scholarly texts as the foundation for the seminar, but we will couple those with newspaper articles and narratives to gain a first-hand perspective as needed. This seminar will not have a final exam, but students will work on a group project and make a presentation to the class.

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POLI 75: Thinking About Law
PH
TuTh, 8:00 – 9:15am
Charles Szypszak

Charles Szypszak has been with the School of Government since 2005. Prior to that, he was an attorney and director of a general practice firm in New Hampshire. He provides counsel to state, national, and international institutions, organizations, and public officials on real property registration and conveyance laws, and he teaches Law for Public Administration in the graduate program in public administration. He has worked on law reforms in Russia and Poland. He is the recipient of the School of Government’s Coates Distinguished Professorship for Teaching Excellence.
Are you interested in being a lawyer or public official? Do you know what it means to “think like a lawyer”? Have you considered why people mostly honor the law? Where do you find “the law”? How do judges decide difficult cases? This seminar will explore the notion of a rule of law, formal and customary law, legal analysis, judicial interpretation, and the realities of the adversarial system and law practice. We will consider what makes law seem legitimate and how to assess whether it promotes liberty and justice. This seminar will challenge students to be reflective and critical about their own perspectives and to explore personal responsibility for promoting a rule of law. Students will be engaged in analytical thinking and expression through readings, classroom discussions, and research and writing assignments. Reading materials will include selections from court cases, scholarly articles, and other sources that provide an introduction to the notion of a rule of law, the sources of law that govern us and protect our individual rights, the nature of legal analysis, the different methods of judicial interpretation, and the realities of law practice and the adversarial system.

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PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 58: The Psychology of Mental States and Language Use
SS
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Jennifer Arnold

Jennifer Arnold is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology. She studies the ways that our minds handle the jobs of speaking and understanding. How do speakers choose words and produce them? How do listeners pick out the speaker’s meaning? Her research is guided by questions about how people represent the thoughts, intentions, and mental activities of other people, and how this information influences specific linguistic processes.
Adults constantly make judgments about other people’s beliefs, desires, goals, knowledge, and intentions from evidence like eye gaze and inferences from their words and actions. These judgments together can be called mentalizing, mind-reading, or theory of mind (where “theory” refers to the theory an individual might hold about another’s mental state, not a scientific theory). This information is known to guide some aspects of language use — for example, you wouldn’t ask someone to hand you “that book” if they don’t know it exists. But some of the finer processes of language comprehension or production may proceed independently of these judgments, especially if they are too complex to happen quickly. This seminar examines a set of phenomena known as mentalizing, or theory of mind, and how mentalizing affects the development of language, adult language use, and the language of autistic individuals, who are known to have difficulty reasoning about others minds. This seminar will use a discussion format in which students will read papers, participate in experiment demonstrations, and design a small-scale original research study with their classmates.

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PSYC 67: The Senses of Animals
PL
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Mark Hollins

Mark Hollins is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and Director of the Somatosensory Research Lab. Graduate and undergraduate students in the Lab work with Dr. Hollins to examine the ways in which both sensory and cognitive factors influence perception. Their current work focuses on pain perception, since chronic pain is a major public health problem affecting one in three people, and yet is not fully understood.
This seminar deals with the senses of animals. Many animal senses are related to our own, but are either more or less highly developed than ours. For example, falcons have sharper vision than we do, whereas moles are nearly blind. However, some animals possess sensory abilities that we lack entirely, such as the ability to perceive magnetic fields or the polarization of light. We will examine both categories of animal senses, talking about how they work, and how they help animals survive. The seminar is also intended to increase students’ understanding of the scientific method, and to help them develop their ability to communicate scientific ideas effectively in speech and writing. Grades will be based primarily on a midterm, a report on a scientific article, a team project, a research proposal, and a poster presentation.

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PSYC 68: Psychology of Emotion
SS
MWF, 2:30 – 3:20pm
Kristen Lindquist

Dr. Kristen Lindquist is director of the Carolina Affective Science Lab and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Boston College and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Harvard University Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative and the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Lindquist’s research uses social cognitive, psychophysiological, and neuroscience methods to understand the nature of human emotion.
This seminar is designed especially for students interested in exploring the psychological study of emotion. Topics will include theoretical models of emotion process and structure, as well as discussions of psychological research bearing on questions such as “Can you read emotions in the faces of other people?” (emotional expressions), “How is emotion expressed in the body?” (autonomic physiology), “Where do emotions live in the brain?” (affective neuroscience), “Is emotion a source of wisdom or the enemy of rationality?” (emotion and reasoning), “Does emotion help or hurt your relationships with other people?” (emotion and social behavior), “Can you control your emotions or do they control you?” (emotion regulation), “Do emotions drive you crazy?” (emotion and psychopathology), and “Are women really the more emotional sex?” (gender and emotion). A range of perspectives in psychology will be explored, spanning social, cultural, developmental, clinical, cognitive, and comparative psychology disciplines. Mondays and Wednesdays will be discussions of research studies led by Dr. Lindquist and Fridays will be less formal group-based discussions and demonstrations. Friday discussions will be used to explain or demonstrate especially important ideas, to discuss concepts covered in the assigned readings, and to discuss the “real world” implications of class topics. Several Friday sessions will be dedicated to visits to Dr. Lindquist’s psychology lab, where students can experience research techniques and methods in a hands-on setting. Students will be evaluated based on exam performance, on a written research proposal, on an oral presentation of the research proposal, and on participation in discussions.

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PSYC 89: Racism, Racial Identity, and African American Mental Health
SS, US
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Enrique W. Neblett, Jr.

Enrique W. Neblett, Jr. is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Lab Director of the African American Youth Wellness Laboratory at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Michigan and completed a postdoctoral fellowship funded by the National Science Foundation at Howard University. Inspired by Kenneth and Mamie Clark’s famous “doll study,” Dr. Neblett’s research examines the association between racism-related stress and health in African American and ethnic minority youth, with a focus on racial and ethnic protective factors and mechanisms that promote youth well-being. His work has been published in prominent scholarly outlets, and he has been recognized by the Department of Psychology on numerous occasions for teaching excellence.
This seminar examines the connections among racism experiences, racial identity and African American mental health with a focus on African American children, adolescents, and young adults. We begin the seminar with an overview of foundational themes and theoretical perspectives that inform the study of racism and racial identity as they pertain to African American youth mental health. In the second part of the seminar, we use film, debate and personal reflections to inform an in-depth study of racial identity – the significance and meaning that individuals ascribe to being African American – as a protective factor in the link between racism and poor mental health outcomes for African American youth. Finally, we conclude the seminar with a discussion of current topics, controversies, and recent advances in the field. Throughout the seminar, a primary objective will be to consider diverse perspectives regarding how our knowledge and understanding of racism and racial identity has evolved over time and how the psychological experiences of African Americans can be used to promote African American mental health and wellness.

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELI 63: The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls
HS, WB
MW, 5:00 – 6:15pm
Jodi Magness

Jodi Magness is the Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism. Before coming to UNC–Chapel Hill in 2002, she taught at Tufts University for ten years. Professor Magness received her B.A. in Archaeology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and her Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from the University of Pennsylvania. She has participated on numerous excavations in Israel and Greece, and currently directs excavations at Huqoq in Israel. Professor Magness’ publications include a book entitled The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls (2002).).
The Dead Sea Scrolls have been described as the most important archaeological discovery of the 20th century. The first scrolls were discovered in 1947, in a cave near the site of Qumran by the Dead Sea. Eventually the remains of over 900 scrolls were found in 11 caves around Qumran. The scrolls date to the time of Jesus and include the earliest preserved copies of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). They were deposited in the caves by members of a Jewish sect called the Essenes who lived at Qumran. In this seminar, students explore the meaning and significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls – and learn about broader issues such as how canons of sacred scripture developed among Jews and Christians – through classroom discussions, thought papers, and creative assignments.

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RELI 73H: From Dragons to Pokemon: Animals in Japanese Myth, Folklore, and Religion (HONORS)
LA, BN, CI
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Barbara Ambros

Barbara Ambros is an Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies where she teaches East Asian religions. Her research interests include religion in early modern through contemporary Japan; gender studies; critical animal studies; and place, space, and pilgrimage. She is the author of “Bones of Contention: Animals and Religion in Contemporary Japan” (University of Hawaii Press, 2010). Fun facts: she holds a second-degree black belt in Shotokan Karate and serves as the faculty advisor for the UNC Shotokan Club.
This seminar examines the cultural construction of animals in Japanese myth, folklore, and religion. We will discuss various kinds of animals: those that occur in the natural world (insects, snakes, foxes, badgers, monkeys), those that are found in myths (dragons, tengu [goblins], oni [demons]), and those that have appeared in popular media such as science fiction and animation (Godzilla, Pokemon). We will explore how images of various animals were culturally constructed as tricksters, gods, monsters, or anthropomorphic companions; how animals were ritualized as divine, demonic, or sentient beings in Buddhism, Shinto, and folk religion; and how animals could serve as metaphors that embodied collective ideals or nightmares. Most of our readings will focus on primary and secondary texts from the Japanese tradition (in English), but we will also read theoretical texts on human-animal relationships and historical studies on animals in premodern Europe and China. We will also view and analyze several Japanese animated films that deal with animals and environmental issues, such as The Princess Mononoke and Pompoko.

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ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

ROML 55H: Writing with an Accent: Latino Literature and Culture (HONORS)
LA
MWF, 11:15am – 12:05pm
Rosa Perelmuter

Dr. Rosa Perelmuter is Professor of Spanish and Director of the Moore Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program. She has held several fellowships, including two Pogue Foundation Research Leaves and a National Endowment for the Humanities summer grant. Her first book, Noche intelectual, a study of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz’s Primero sueño, was published by the Universidad Autónoma de México Press in 1982, and her second, Los límites de la femineidad en Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz: Estrategias retóricas y recepción literaria, was published in Madrid/Frankfurt by Iberoamericana/Vervuert in 2004. Since then, she has continued to think and write about Sor Juana and other writers of Colonial Spanish America, and is currently at work on two projects: a book-length study of the description of nature in epic poems written in Spanish America in the 16th and 17th centuries and a personal memoir and history of the Cuban Jewish Community between 1920 and 1960.
In this seminar we will study the literary production of Hispanics living in the U.S. Using a variety of materials (essays, documentaries, films, music) and English-language texts (novels, short stories, plays, poetry) we will examine works by Chicano, Puerto Rican, Nuyorican, Dominican, and Cuban-American writers. Topics to be discussed include: Latino or Hispanic? What’s in a Name?; Negotiating the Barrio; The politics of Bilingualism; The search for Home in Migrant, Rural, and Urban Environments; The Many Faces of Machismo; Religion and Spirituality in Latino Communities; Forms of Prejudice and Discrimination; Music as a Cultural Bridge. All readings will be in English, though knowledge of Spanish is desirable.

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ROML 89: The Spanish Mystics
PH, WB
MWF, 11:15am – 12:05pm
N. Grace Aaron

Dr. N. Grace Aaron is a Senior Lecturer in Spanish, a literary translator and the author of Thought and Poetic Structure in San Juan de la Cruz’s Symbol of Night, a comprehensive study of the philosophical, psychological, literary and theological perspectives on St. John of the Cross’s signature motif. As an undergraduate student at William & Mary, reading the French existentialists and Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha profoundly informed her intellectual and inner life. Middlebury College’s Spanish program introduced her to Borges, Carlos Fuentes and García Márquez who depicted worlds where characters passed seamlessly between objective and alternate realities. Those seminal influences came to fruition at UNC Chapel Hill when she discovered that Medieval poets, Golden Age dramatists and nineteenth-century Naturalist novelists asked the same question in different contexts: do the stars determine one’s destiny? Are human beings prisoners of their heredity, environment and basic instincts? Or is one essentially free?
“The Spanish Mystics” explores Christian spirituality in the sixteenth-century through selected readings, film, music and art. Another goal is to inquire into the nature of the mystical experience itself and to distinguish between types of mysticism, as well as to compare narratives within Islam, Judaism and Eastern traditions. The course format will be discussion-oriented Socratic debate, in keeping with Harvard philosopher Michael J. Sandel’s Ted Talk on that lost art and his MOOC course “Justice” (www.justiceharvard.org). Students will engage with texts (English) and film outside of class, and with each other and expert guest lecturers during class. In our efforts to identify who mystics are and how they experience and express reality, the human quest for freedom, meaning and articulating one’s own worldview will structure and underpin our intellectual endeavor. Studying the Spanish mystics at the pivotal moment of the freshman journey aims to integrate the interior life with academic pursuit.

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SOCIOLOGY

SOCI 58: Globalization, Work, and Inequality
Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative
SS, GL
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Ted Mouw

Ted Mouw is a sociologist who studies social demography, labor markets, and inequality. He received his Ph.D. (in sociology) and M.A. (in economics) in 1999 from Michigan. He is currently working on a project on globalization and low-wage labor markets. There are three components to this project: 1) Longitudinal evidence on “dead end jobs” and working poverty in the U.S., 2) immigration and the labor market for Mexican migrants, and 3) industrialization and labor conditions in Mexico and Indonesia. He has also researched the use of job contacts to find work and racial friendship segregation in schools. After college he lived in Indonesia for two years, where he taught English, studied Indonesian and Javanese, and climbed volcanoes.
This seminar, which presents a comparative and multidisciplinary perspective on how globalization affects labor markets and inequality, will consist of two parts. First, we will discuss basic sociological and economic models of work and globalization, and then students will apply these models to three case studies: 1) “sweatshops” and the question of international labor standards, 2) industrialization and development in China and Indonesia, and 3) immigration and economic integration between the U.S. and Mexico. Students will prepare research papers on one of the three case studies. Course readings will be supplemented by the teacher’s current research on two questions: 1) What are conditions actually like for workers in Nike plants in Indonesia? (Interviews and a photo-narrative). 2) How does the labor market work for undocumented Mexican workers? (Interviews from Carrboro, NC, part of my personal research project.)

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SOCI 69: Human Societies and Genomics
SS
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Guang Guo

Guang Guo is Dr. George and Alice Welsh Distinguished Professor in the Department of Sociology. He earned his doctorate in sociology at Princeton University and his undergraduate economics degree from the Tianjin Institute of Finance and Economics in China. In his work, he uses the tools in human genomics for understanding human societies. He examines how genes and social contexts interact to influence youth’s delinquency, what roles genomics play in human social networks, what roles genomics play in human marriages.
The seminar focuses on how advances in molecular genomics over the past decades benefit sociology and other social sciences. Topics include an introduction to traditional biometrics (inferring genetic influences using genetically related individuals without using molecular information); an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics; joint influences of social contexts and genetic heritage to human behaviors; history of human evolution and contemporary race/ethnicity; evolutionary psychology; sex, gender, and genomics; ethical, legal, and social issues in genetic studies (ELSI); genetic testing; and epigenetics – the potential links between genes and environment. To make the seminar accessible to students in social sciences, it does not have prerequisites, but familiarity with basic genetics or a social science field is helpful. The seminar does not focus on technical details of genomics, but on the main ideas. Students will be reading book chapters and mainly original articles published in contemporary scientific journals before classes, and presenting and discussing these articles in class. Students will write short summaries of the articles they read, present articles and lead discussion on these articles in class, take a midterm exam, and write a review essay.

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SOCI 89: Race and Ethnic Relations in the U.S.
SS, US
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Anthony Perez

Anthony Perez studies the measurement, meaning, and implications of race/ethnicity in the United States and abroad. His research focuses on the interplay between formal and informal conceptualizations of race and ethnicity and de facto measures of race/ethnic populations used in the Census, social surveys, and demographic data; causes of uncertainty in the reporting of race across generations and throughout the life course; and the consequences of racial uncertainty for research on inequality, race-attentive social policy, and demographic projections of past and future diversity.
It is impossible to understand the structure of American society, or the lived experiences of its people, without understanding both the meaning and consequences of race and ethnicity. Yet, while examples of what race does are well known to students interested in questions of social justice and inequality, the question of what race is receives considerably less attention. Any student familiar with U.S. society can identify myriad, often striking examples of racial inequality—from highly disproportionate rates of poverty, unemployment, and disease to racially disparate treatment at the hands of police, teachers, and neighbors. But what, exactly, is “race?” The geographic origins of our ancestors? The social categories that others perceive from our appearance? The identities we claim based on a sense of belonging or attachment to a particular culture or community? Or can race be any and all of these things, depending on the context in which individuals perceive and react to one another? These are just some of pressing questions with which students will grapple in this seminar, as we delve into the meaning and measurement of race in society, how it changes over time and space, and what it signals for the future of race/ethnic relations in the United States. In pursuit of these aims, we will incorporate a variety of instructional strategies and active learning techniques, including primary data collection and analysis, critical examination of race/ethnicity in popular culture (including music, literature, and film), and in-class group activities.

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SOCIAL WORK

SOWO 89: Interpersonal Violence Across the Lifespan: Current Issues and the Role of Media, Film, and Music
SS
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Cynthia Fraga Rizo

Cynthia Fraga Rizo is an Assistant Professor at the UNC-CH of Social Work. Prior to joining the faculty in 2012, she received her doctoral degree in social work from UNC-CH. Dr. Rizo’s research and practice interests focus on issues related to violence against women, such as intimate partner violence and human trafficking. In particular, Dr. Rizo’s research focuses on the well-being and coping experiences of vulnerable partner violence survivors. Specific survivor populations of interest include immigrants, Latinas and South Asians, and older adults. Ultimately, Dr. Rizo’s work will focus on developing and evaluating culturally-specific interventions for vulnerable survivors.
This course provides an overview of interpersonal violence – that is, different forms of violence in which the perpetrator exerts power and control in an attempt to abuse and hurt another individual. Information will be presented on various forms of interpersonal violence that occur throughout the life course, including child abuse, bullying, community violence, dating violence, intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and elder abuse. Different theoretical perspectives will be used to better understand interpersonal violence in general, and the various forms more specifically. Further, this course will use current and ongoing issues, media, film, and music to fully examine the prevalence, form, and function of interpersonal violence in our society today. The class thoughtfully integrates a number of assignments and activities with the intent to foster active learning and self-directed inquiry. For example, students will be asked to participate in debates. Students will also complete a group activity focused on identifying media, music, and/or firm related to one of the forms of interpersonal violence discussed as part of the course. Students will also complete an individual reflection paper (3-4 pages) and a final paper (5-6 pages) related to one of the forms of interpersonal violence discussed during the semester.

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STATISTICS AND OPERATIONS RESEARCH

STOR 89.001: Risk and Uncertainty in the Real World
QI
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Shankar Bhamidi

After spending most of his childhood in India, Shankar Bhamidi came to the US to pursue a PhD in Statistics at the University of California at Berkeley. After 5 fantastic years pursing his passion in probabilistic modeling of real world networks and eating wonderful food (!), he completed his PhD in 2008 and moved to Vancouver for a year to further advance his training both in probability and in being a foodie, before finally moving to UNC in 2009. His research entails probabilistic and mathematical modeling of real world networks, including social networks such as Twitter, Facebook and peer interaction networks, data transmission networks such as the Internet and vascular networks in the brain. When he is not obsessively thinking about a math problem then he is neck deep in a Sci-Fi book or an Anime.
In the early 1900′s the great writer H.G.Wells said “Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write.” We see this every day as society becomes more and more complex and we are faced with a barrage of data and the pressure of making “optimal” decisions about our life and our future in the light of this uncertainty. Yet we are ill-equipped both from an evolutionary perspective to make such decisions. The aim of this class is to study the role of uncertainty in our daily lives, to explore the cognitive biases that impair us and to understand how one uses quantitative models to make decision under uncertainty in a variety of fields. We will study the connections of such questions to an array of scientific disciplines ranging from psychology, financial modeling, evolution, sociology, law and criminal justice, economics, medicine and health and rare events and coincidences.

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STOR 89.002: Data Analysis and Common Sense
QI
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Andrew Nobel

Andrew Nobel is currently a Professor in the Department of Statistics and Operations Research and in the Department of Biostatistics. He came to UNC in 1995, having done undergraduate work in electrical engineering, graduate work in information theory, and post-doctoral work in statistics. Since coming to UNC he has been fortunate enough to collaborate with faculty and students in many different fields, including biomedicine, genomics, and mathematics. He is particularly interested in statistical approaches to the analysis of large data sets, including identifying communities in social networks, and exploring the biological mechanisms underlying disease and tissue differentiation in humans.
The information that individuals, organizations, and societies use to make critical decisions is increasingly in digital form. Much of this information is contained in large, often complex, data sets consisting of thousands or millions of measurements. The collection and analysis of such data sets has become important (and prevalent) in fields as diverse as business analytics, medicine, national security, and public policy. Understanding and analyzing large data sets is an increasingly important skill for many entering the modern workforce. This course introduces and explores some of the fundamental ideas underlying the exploratory analysis and understanding of large data sets. As the title suggests, many of these ideas are rooted in common sense.

Beginning with a discussion of the scientific method and the impact of big data, the course will proceed through a mix of real examples, a variety of scientific and non-scientific readings, and the presentation of some basic ideas from probability and statistics. A central goal of the course is to provide students with the tools needed to critically assess the analysis of complex data sets, and to carry out more elementary analyses themselves.

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