Fall 2016

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Please consult ConnectCarolina (connectcarolina.unc.edu) for the most up-to-date information about FYS offerings and availability.

For more information about a specific instructor, please click on the instructor name, if highlighted.

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)
American Studies (AMST)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Art (ARTH/ARTS)
Asian Studies (ASIA)
Biology (BIOL)
Chemistry (CHEM)
City and Regional Planning (PLAN)
Classics (CLAS)
Communication (COMM)
Computer Science (COMP)
Dramatic Art (DRAM)
English (ENGL)
Folklore (FOLK)
Geography (GEOG)
Geological Sciences (GEOL)
German and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GERM/GSLL/SLAV)
History (HIST)
Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST)
Information and Library Science (INLS)
Linguistics (LING)
Marine Sciences (MASC)
Mathematics (MATH)
Media and Journalism (MEJO)
Music (MUSC)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)
Political Science (POLI)
Psychology (PSYC)
Public Policy (PLCY)
Religious Studies (RELI)
Romance Studies (ROML)
Sociology (SOCI)
Statistics and Operations Research (STOR)
Women’s and Gender Studies (WMST)

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies

AAAD 50.001: Defining Blackness
SS, US
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Candis Watts Smith

Professor Candis Watts Smith tends to ask research questions that blur disciplinary lines; many of the questions she poses can only be answered by considering bodies of literature, theoretical frameworks and methodological strategies found in Sociology, Political Science, Psychology and Public Policy. Her research interests focuses on American political behavior and Racial and Ethnic Politics. Here, she focuses on individuals’ and groups’ policy preferences, particularly around social policies that exacerbate or ameliorate disparities and inequality between groups.

Dr. Smith uses both qualitative and quantitative methods to answer research questions. This mixed-method approach is best illustrated in her first book Black Mosaic: The Politics of Black Pan-Ethnic Diversity (NYU Press, 2014). Her work also appears in journals like the Annual Review of Political Science, The Journal of Black Studies and Politics, Groups & Identities as well as in edited book volumes.

The boundaries of Blackness are constantly in flux, and pinning down an accurate definition of Blackness in the U.S., to be specific, is becoming an increasing complicated task due to changing social norms, immigration, emigration, the increasing number of immigrants from Africa and the Caribbean, the growing number of multi-racial persons and even increasing socioeconomic bifurcation among those traditionally categorized as Black. Who is included in the definition of Black is not only a matter of color and history but also of politics, culture and self-identification. Over the course of the semester, we will engage in the debates around Blackness. We will examine scholarly texts and government documents as well as film, novels and memoirs. Our goal is to attempt to define Blackness as well as to understand the mechanisms that influence the boundaries and definition of Blackness.

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American Studies

AMST 60.001: American Indians in History, Law, and Literature
HS, US
MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM
Daniel M. Cobb

Daniel M. Cobb is an award-winning writer and teacher committed to the scholarship of engagement, public outreach and service to the profession. His research and teaching focus on American Indian history since 1887, political activism, ethnohistorical methods, ethnobiography, memory and global indigenous rights. His first book, Native Activism in Cold War America (2008), won the inaugural Labriola Center American Indian National Book Award in 2009. His other publications include the edited works Beyond Red Power (2007) and Memory Matters (2011), a revised and expanded fourth edition of William T. Hagan’s classic work American Indians (2013) and Say We Are Nations (2015), a primary document collection on Native politics and protest from the late nineteenth century to the present. Works in progress include biographies of Ponca activist Clyde Warrior, a central figure in the American Indian youth movement of the 1960s, and (you guessed it) D’Arcy McNickle. Cobb currently serves as the coordinator of the American Indian and Indigenous Studies major concentration and minor and as Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of American Studies.

This research seminar provides a broad grounding in American Indian law, history and literature through an exploration of the remarkable life and times of Flathead author, intellectual and activist D’Arcy McNickle (1904-1977). We will read D’Arcy McNickle’s novels, short stories, histories and essays, as well as secondary works about him. Even better, we will be working with D’Arcy McNickle’s handwritten and heretofore unpublished diary. You will have an opportunity to transcribe and contextualize passages and then share (probably through digital technologies) what you have learned about history, law, literature (and much, much more) through his life story. Rather than just being a passive recipient of information, you will be creator of new knowledge!

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AMST 89.001: American Indian Art in the 20th Century
VP, CI, US
MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM
Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote

Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote is an Assistant Professor in the department of American Studies. She teaches courses on American Indian history, art and material culture. Her research interests include American Indian cultural and political history and expressive culture.

This course examines twentieth century American Indian art though secondary articles, books, a graphic novel and art itself. The class sharpens written and verbal communication though in-class discussion, informal and formal assignments such as a research paper students will write over the course of the semester. Students will hone their visual critical thinking skills as well by examining and analyzing contemporary American Indian art and representations of Native people. This course connects American Indian art to vital conversations in American Indian studies such as colonialism, identity, gender and tribal sovereignty. We will also address the following questions. How and why does “contemporary traditional” and “modern” come to describe and even categorize art created by Native people in the twentieth century? How have Native people and others constructed and contested the idea of American Indian Art? Additionally, we will examine how artists have engaged with, and at times resisted, the markets for their work and their influence on Native art.

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Anthropology

ANTH 53H.037: Darwin’s Dangerous Idea (Honors)
SS
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Paul Leslie

Paul Leslie’s professional interests focus on human ecology, and he has pursued this primarily through research among nomadic peoples in East Africa. His most recent project entails studying (while nursing an aged Land Rover across the African savanna) human-environment interactions in northern Tanzania, especially how the changing land use and livelihood patterns of the Maasai people living there affect and are affected by wildlife and conservation efforts. When not teaching or practicing anthropology, he enjoys bicycling, motorcycling, woodworking and jazz.

Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to one of the most profound revolutions in the history of thought, generating stunning insights but also some misunderstanding and tragic abuse. This seminar aims to provide a clear understanding of how natural selection works and how it doesn’t work. We will examine objections to the theory; how the environmental and health problems we face today reflect processes of natural selection; and recent attempts to understand why we get sick, how we respond to disease, why we get old, why we choose mates the way we do and more. Class sessions will feature a mix of lecture and discussion of concepts and issues. Students will also engage in small group projects—cooperative explorations of problems raised in class or in the readings and/or designing mini-research projects.

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ANTH 64.079: Public Archaeology in Bronzeville, Chicago’s Black Metropolis
HS, NA
MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM
Anna Sophia Agbe-Davies

Anna Sophia Agbe-Davies is an historical archaeologist whose excavations have explored the plantation societies of the colonial southeastern US and Caribbean, as well as towns and cities of the 19th and 20th century Midwest, with an emphasis on sites of the African diaspora. Her projects have included excavation and community collaboration at the sites of New Philadelphia, Illinois and the Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls on the south side of Chicago. Her research and teaching interests are strongly shaped by her own experiences as an undergraduate at the College of William and Mary and the time she spent working in museum settings before becoming a professor. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to that, she was a staff archaeologist for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s Department of Archaeological Research.

The term “African diaspora” usually refers to the consequences of the transatlantic slave trade, but there have been many diasporas of people of African descent. One major movement took place in the U.S. in the early 20th century when millions of people left small southern communities for large industrial northern cities. This seminar examines that phenomenon through the lens of a single site where migrants lived in the city of Chicago. The Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls was run by black women to provide social services for female migrants from 1926 through the 1960s. Research at this site combines elements of archaeology, anthropology and history to study their lives. Students, working in teams, will have the opportunity to contribute to the ongoing research effort via analysis of written records and artifacts. This multidisciplinary project will be of interest to students curious about 20th century history, African-American culture, museums and heritage, women’s and gender studies, migration and labor history.

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ANTH 65.086: Humans and Animals: Anthropological Perspectives
HS
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Ben Arbuckle

Ben Arbuckle is an Anthropologist with a specialty in Middle Eastern Archaeology. He runs the Zooarchaeology Laboratory in the Department of Anthropology and the Research Labs in Archaeology where he studies animal bones from archaeological sites. Professor Arbuckle uses these bones, which represent the trash from ancient meals, parties and sacrifices, in order to understand how our ancestors created a world whose technologies and social and political systems we have inherited. He is currently working on a National Geographic funded project exploring the origins of domestic horses and another trying to understand the origins of wool.

In this seminar we explore the complex relationships between people and animals in our own culture and in other cultures, now and also in the past. We will explore the origins and uses of domesticated animals, the role of dogs and cats in human societies, as companions, pets and food. We will also examine the symbolic uses of animals and talk about current issues including animal rights and the growing popularity of hunting.

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Art

ARTH 52.001: Celts–Druid Culture
WB
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Dorothy Verkerk

Dorothy Verkerk received her M.A. and Ph.D. from Rutgers University. Her area of specialization is early medieval art, and her research interests include the interplay between images and texts in early medieval manuscripts, particularly the ways in which images interpret the meanings of texts through visual references to extra-textual elements such as popular sermons, liturgical rites, political necessities and catechisms. She has been studying Celts (defined as those who speak/spoke a Celtic language) since 1995, when she first began teaching the course Celtic Art and Cultures. She received a small grant from Chancellor Hooker’s CCI funds to create the web site Celtic Art and Cultures, which has become the “most linked to” at the university. As she developed the course, she shifted the interest from the historical Celts to how “Celts” were an 18th-century construct, specifically the Druid class.

The ancient Druids (the intellectual class) have fascinated writers for centuries, though there is little reliable information about them, opening the door for fanciful theories and exposing the foibles of the so-called experts on Druids. This seminar will begin with what is known about Druids from primary textual sources such as Julius Caesar’s De Bello Gallico. The focus will then shift to early modern and modern authors who created a vast array of Druids that provide insights into the development of British national identities and established ‘alternative’ religions, visual culture and protest movements. The Druids are cast in roles as patriotic, wise and environmentally sensitive, and at other times they are cast as demonic and wicked. The seminar will examine how identities are created.

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ARTH 61.001: African American Art of the Carolinas
VP, CI
MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM
John Bowles

John Bowles received his Ph.D. from UCLA in 2002 and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Program. He is an historian of African American art, who works from the assumption that art plays an important role in determining how we see ourselves as morally responsible individuals. In his research and teaching, he attempts to convey the urgency of art by addressing moral and political dilemmas we would often rather ignore. He has published articles and art criticism in various journals and has recently completed a book that examines the work of artist Adrian Piper. He is currently writing a book that explores how African American artists have engaged simultaneously with modernism, globalization and diaspora from the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s until today.

Focusing on the Carolinas, this seminar explores the many ways African Americans have used art to define themselves and their communities. We will ask how art has been used to maintain cultural traditions, shape American culture and build political solidarity from the era of colonialism and slavery to the present. We will study the cultivation of artistic practices from Africa; African American painters, sculptors and craftsmen who earned national reputations for the quality of their work; artists who re-imagined and redefined African American identity through art; and artists throughout the 20th century who represented the daily lives and hardships of rural and working-class blacks. Students will visit campus museums and archives and conduct original research using regional sources. Persistent questions throughout the semester will include, How does the art of African Americans in the Carolinas provoke us to question our own identities and roles within the region, and what is the contemporary role of art in shaping public discourse?

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ARTH 89.001: Art and Technology
HS
MWF, 12:20 PM – 1:10 PM
Maggie Cao, Cary Levine

Maggie Cao is the David G. Frey Assistant Professor of art history. She specializes in the history of eighteenth and nineteenth-century American art. She received her B.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard and held a humanities fellowship of the Society of Fellows at Columbia before joining the faculty at UNC in 2016. Her intellectual interests include intersections of art and economic theory, the visual culture of science and technology, and artifacts of the global mercantile world.

Cary Levine is Associate Professor of Contemporary Art History at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His recent book, Pay for Your Pleasures: Mike Kelley, Paul McCarthy, Raymond Pettibon (University of Chicago Press, 2013), examines the work of three important Southern California artists. He has also written criticism for several magazines and has published numerous essays for exhibition catalogues. His current scholarship focuses on the intersections of art, politics and digital technologies.

We are immersed in technology. Virtually every facet of public and private life has been transformed by our devices, our screens and machines. Perpetually focused on the next new thing, we rarely look back to consider the long and multifaceted histories of our technologies and how those histories relate to our lives—to our understandings of each other and our interactions with the world around us. This course examines the relationships between the history of technology and artistic practice. Our conception of “technology” is broad, extending beyond gadgets and machines to include a host of apparatuses that have effected perception, representation and communication. Art and visual culture provide a unique lens through which we can apprehend those effects. This course will explore the impacts of technological innovation on society and culture, and vice versa, along with the ways in which artists have addressed, responded to and critiqued technological progress and invention.

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ARTS 59.001: Time, A Doorway to Visual Expression
VP
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Jim Hirschfield

Jim Hirschfield has been teaching art at UNC since 1988. He began thinking about the experience of time when he traveled through the deserts of the southwest in his VW Microbus. He still enjoys traveling, only now he often travels as a part of his art projects. Jim has received a number of art commissions from cities across the country: From Anchorage, Alaska to Fort Lauderdale, Florida and from San Diego, California to Orono, Maine. He has also received numerous awards for his artwork, which he describes as the exploration of meditative and ethereal environments that expand our perceptions of time.

Visual artists, not unlike writers, communicate through complex structures of elements and principles (e.g., form, space, line, color, rhythm, balance, etc.). Analyzing any one of these components will help illustrate the nuances of visual language. This seminar will study and explore one of the lesser considered, but more intriguing, visual components: the element of Time. From subtle illusionary movement to clearly defined sequences of change, artists have manipulated the element of time to strengthen their work. This First Year Seminar will examine this enigmatic element of time through readings and class discussions of Alan Lightman’s Einstein’s Dreams and Leonard Shlain’s Art and Physics, as well as other selected essays. We will also look at films, listen to music and most importantly express our personal view through the art making process. As a first-year seminar, the course presumes no previous art experience and students may carry out their projects through a variety of mediums (e.g., drawing, photography, painting, video and/or sculpture). The projects will be evaluated through class critiques and discussions about the work. Ultimately, our intention will be to immerse ourselves in the subject and to create personal works of art motivated and inspired by our now enhanced understanding of time.

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Asian Studies

ASIA 65.001: Philosophy on Bamboo: Rethinking Early Chinese Thought
PH, WB
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Uffe Bergeton

Uffe Bergeton is a historian of early China with a focus on pre-Qin (i.e. pre-221 BCE) culture, history and thought. Originally from Denmark, he has lived and studied in France, Taiwan and China. His research projects include early Chinese theories of epistemology and the politics of reclusion, as well as comparisons between pre-Qin China and ancient Greece.

Over the last few decades a large number of bamboo manuscripts of hitherto unknown texts dating to the 4th to the 1st centuries BCE have been excavated from various sites in China. This wealth of new material has led many scholars to rethink longstanding assumptions about early Chinese thought. In order to enable students to engage directly with the recently discovered texts and cutting-edge research on them, this course will briefly introduce students to the received classics of the pre-Qin period, such as the Analects, the Mozi, the Mencius, the Xunzi, the Daodejing, the Zhuangzi and the Hanfeizi. Rather than merely providing an introduction to these traditional texts, we will study how recently discovered texts challenge traditional readings of pre-Qin works and lead us to question traditional classifications of pre-Qin works into “schools of thought” or isms such as Confucianism, Legalism, Daoism, etc.

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Biology

BIOL 62.001: Mountains Beyond Mountains: Infectious Disease in the Developing World
PL, GL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Mark Peifer

Mark Peifer is the Hooker Distinguished Professor of Biology and has been at Carolina since 1992. He is a cell and developmental biologist, and his lab explores how cells communicate and assemble into tissues and organs during embryonic development. He also has an active interest in international development and believes Americans can and should help our neighbors in the developing world, acting in partnership to solve problems and meet challenges.

Billions of people in the developing world live without the benefit of the most basic health care services, and they often die of diseases that are easily treated in the developed world. The scale of the problem is immense, and this fact often leads clinicians and public health officials to despair of ever having any impact on the problem. Dr. Paul Farmer belies this impression. Beginning as a medical student at Harvard, he created what is now a multinational health care network, Partners in Health. His entrepreneurial effort provides a revolutionary example of how one can successfully address infectious disease and its root causes in some of the poorest areas of the world. This seminar will explore the inequities in health care between the developed and developing worlds and the root causes of these inequities. We will examine the biology of infectious disease and the challenges of treating them in the developing world, and explore how Partners in Health and other entrepreneurial non-profit groups provide a model for how the developed world can partner with the poor to meet this challenge.

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Chemistry

CHEM 73.001: From Atomic Bombs to Cancer Treatments: The Broad Scope of Nuclear Chemistry
PL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Todd Austell

Todd Austell received his BS in Chemistry in 1987 and his PhD in Chemistry in 1996, both at UNC. He spent one year working in the pharmaceutical industry prior to graduate school and another year as an Assistant Professor at the United States Air Force Academy prior to returning to his current position. As an undergraduate, he participated in the Department of Energy and American Chemistry Society’s Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry. Topical studies in nuclear chemistry have been a hobby of his since that time. His graduate research involved separation science, and he is currently involved in both curriculum development within the chemistry department and in a long-term study of how middle school and secondary math education/preparation affects student performances in college general chemistry. His hobbies include hiking, camping, disc golf and gardening as well as following all UNC athletics.

Nuclear chemistry is a field that touches the lives of everyone perhaps every day of their lives. This seminar will approach the topic of nuclear chemistry on the level of an introductory chemistry class with no prerequisite. Atomic structure, nuclear fission and nuclear fusion processes will be studied to provide the background necessary to understand their applications. Nuclear weapons and nuclear power will be covered in detail with discussion of topics relevant both for today’s society and for the future. Other topics including household applications, nuclear medicine, radiation safety and the problematic issue of radioactive waste storage will be discussed. The seminar will include guest lecturers from the various fields of nuclear chemistry, selected reading assignments, topical student-led discussions, possible facility trips/tours and a final project presentation on a relevant topic.

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CHEM 89.001: Chemistry of Biomedical Implants – ADDED 6/10/2016
PL
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Mark Schoenfisch

Mark Schoenfisch is a Professor of Chemistry and Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering. He is an analytical chemist, and his lab explores the design and fabrication of chemical sensors for probing physiological analytes including glucose and nitric oxide. Outside of chemistry he enjoys coffee, travel, and photography.

Recent scientific advances have led to major innovations in medicine and patient care. While biomedical implants improve the quality of life of many individuals, the true utility of most devices remains rather limited due to insufficient biocompatibility. This first-year seminar will focus on the underlying chemical composition and physical properties of materials used to fabricate medical implants. We will focus on how such properties impact cost, physiological response, and intended utility. Readings and discussions will form the basis for developing a questioning mind and an objective attitude toward chemistry. Ethical issues and legal aspects related to the development of new biomaterials will also be discussed.

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City and Regional Planning

PLAN 52.001: Race, Sex, and Place in America
SS
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Mai Nguyen

Dr. Mai Nguyen is an associate professor in the City and Regional Planning Department and focuses her teaching and research on housing and community development. She applies both her Sociology and Urban Planning degrees to address vexing urban and regional dilemmas. She employs both quantitative and qualitative methods to examine problems related to social and spatial inequality, urban growth phenomena, the relationship between the built and social environments, and socially vulnerable populations. She is an expert in housing policy, community development, economic development, immigration, disasters and urban growth phenomena (e.g. demographic change, sprawl and urbanization). Dr. Nguyen is also an award winning teacher. She was awarded the J. Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award in January 2013 for excellence in undergraduate teaching.

This seminar will expose students to the complex dynamics of race, ethnicity and gender and how these have shaped the American city since 1945. It will examine both the historical record as well as contemporary works of literature and film to probe the ways race and ethnicity have contributed to the culture of urban life in the United States. It will also explore the different ways women and men perceive, understand, occupy and use urban space and the built environment. Drawing upon the scholarship of several disciplines (urban planning, ethnic studies, sociology and American history), the seminar will examine a broad spectrum of topics, including the social construction of race, the creation of the underclass label, residential segregation, the significance of Hurricane Katrina, sexual identity and space, and immigration. The last portion of the course will focus on planning and policy tools that have the potential to alleviate racial/ethnic and gender inequality in space.

Students may also register for this course under WMST 51.001.

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Classics

CLAS 55H.001: Three Greek and Roman Epics (Honors)
LA, NA, WB
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
James O'Hara

Professor James O’Hara received his A.B. in Classics from the College of the Holy Cross in 1981 and his Ph.D. in Classical Studies from the University of Michigan in 1986. From 1986 to 2001, he taught at Wesleyan University; since 2001 he has been the George. L. Paddison Professor of Latin at UNC, where he has also been department chair. His research and teaching interests are in Greek and Latin poetry, with special interests in Homer, Vergil and the literature written during the reign of Rome’s first emperor, Augustus; other interests include Roman Civilization, Hellenistic poetry, didactic poetry and satire.

The course will involve a close reading in English of Homer’s ILIAD and ODYSSEY and Vergil’s AENEID, and as a transition from Homer to Vergil, we will also read the tragedies of Sophocles from fifth-century Athens. It was epic and tragedy that formulated the bases of Graeco-Roman civilization and provided the models of heroism and human values for the Western Tradition—along with raising fundamental questions about the individual’s relationship to society. We will analyze, discuss and write about these works both as individual pieces of literature in a historical context and in terms of how they position themselves in the poetic tradition; after reading the ILIAD and ODYSSEY, we’ll see how heroic myth gets reworked by tragedy for democratic Athens and then how Vergil combines Homer, tragedy and other traditions to make a new poem for his time. We will look at aspects of structure and technique, questions of overall interpretation and values, and the interplay of genre and historical setting. Requirements: discussion, short online readings in addition to the primary texts, several short papers during the term and a 6-10-page term paper.

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CLAS 63.001: The Politics of Persuasion in the Ancient and Modern Worlds
LA, WB
MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM
Luca Grillo

Luca Grillo earned his BA in Literature and Philosophy in Milan Italy, where he was born, and continued to study the Classics and classical rhetoric at the University of Minnesota and at Princeton. He has published on Caesar, Vergil and Cicero, and he is currently working on a project on irony in Latin Literature. Luca loves jogging, biking and hiking, he is the faculty advisor to the swim club team, is very excited to join all of you at UNC and feels already hooked on the Tar Heels.

This seminar explores the theory and practice of Greek and Roman oratory in comparison with contemporary speeches. Are there rules for crafting a successful speech? How do emotions affect the way we respond to rhetoric? How much do Greek and Roman oratory affect the way we construct and evaluate a speech today? Oratory will be considered both as a discipline with its own laws and practices and as a window into the values and debates that animate the public life of a people. We will do close readings of key passages and orations and analyze their rhetorical structure and argument; then, having mastered the basics of the Greco-Roman “politics of persuasion,” we will compare speeches from other civilizations, including the ancient Near East, the Bible, ancient China and India. Assignments will include not only essays on major themes in classical rhetoric and on their reception in modern discourse, but also close readings of key passages and orations, and analysis of their rhetorical structure and argument. Discussion-based classes will focus on readings taken not only from Homer, Plato, Aristotle, Demosthenes and Cicero but also from past history and from the modern era (e.g. George Washington, Dr. King, Hitler, Churchill and the 2016 presidential candidates). Students will work closely with the instructor to craft a speech, which they will deliver to the rest of the class at the end of the course.

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CLAS 73H.001: Life in Ancient Pompeii (Honors)
HS, BN, WB
MWF, 3:35 PM – 4:25 PM
Hérica Valladares

Hérica Valladares is an art historian who specializes in the study of imperial Rome and ancient Campania. She has traveled extensively and conducted research in Italy, Turkey and North Africa. Professor Valladares is the author of numerous articles on Roman wall painting. She is currently working on a book on the representation of love scenes in Roman art and literature.

Ancient Pompeii, the city whose life was snuffed out by a volcanic eruption almost 2000 years ago, has captured the imagination of multitudes since its rediscovery in the late 18th century. In this seminar we will explore the history and archaeology of this ancient city with the goal of better understanding daily life in the early Roman empire. How did ancient Pompeians spend their days? What were their houses like? Who ran the city and how were they elected? How did Pompeians cope with the various challenges of city life, such as sanitation and traffic jams? The course proceeds topically, moving from an exploration of the city’s public spaces to an analysis of more private domains—Pompeian houses, gardens and tombs. Although the city’s material remains will be the primary focus of our study, we will also consider evidence from literature, epigraphy and 18th and 19th-century publications. The impact of the rediscovery of Pompeii in the 18th century on the development of archaeology as a discipline will be one of our final topics of discussion. We will also consider the reception of Pompeii in contemporary popular culture.

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Communication

COMM 53.001: Collective Leadership Models for Community Change
SS, EE
MW, 5:45 PM – 7:00 PM
Patricia Parker

Patricia Parker (Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin) is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Communication Studies. She is the 2013 recipient of the Office of the Provost Engaged Scholarship Award for teaching and the founder and executive director of The Ella Baker Women’s Center for Leadership and Community Activism, a venture supported by a Kauffman Faculty Fellowship for social entrepreneurship. Her teaching, research and engaged scholarship explore questions at the intersections of race, gender, class and power in organization processes, with a primary focus on youth civic activism and girls’ and women’s transformational leadership. Her publications include a book on African American women’s executive leadership (Erlbaum, 2005) and several articles and book chapters on leadership and social change appearing in edited volumes and journals published internationally. She is currently working on a book project exploring youth civic activism and collective leadership within university-community partnerships.

In this seminar we explore the possibilities for collective leadership involving youth and adults in vulnerable communities. Course readings, guest speakers and class field trips will provide exemplars of collaborative leadership models that engage people across traditional divides of culture, race, economics and age. Students will work in teams to research, design and present a sustainable community-based change project focusing on three key strategies that engage youth as leaders and stakeholders in communities: youth media arts, youth organizing and youth participatory action research. Students will present their projects (orally and through multi-media documentation) in class and may be selected to present their work at the biennial leadership conference first convened in 2009 and organized by participants in the inaugural class of this seminar. Throughout the semester, each seminar participant will write a series of short essays reflecting on the collective leadership models and their own community engagement.

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COMM 89.001 Introduction to Networked Societies
SS
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Neal Thomas

Dr. Neal Thomas’ academic work draws out connections between digital media technologies, knowledge, power and everyday social life. From a critical humanities perspective, his current research looks at some core computer programming techniques at work in social media to see how the technology encodes philosophical ideas about what it means to be social and even what it means to /mean/ in the first place. If you’ve been noticing the rising effects of algorithms and network gadgets in contemporary culture, then this seminar might just be for YOU.

This seminar is designed to introduce early-career students to the role that networks play in contemporary global societies. Over the course of the semester, we will examine key ways to think about network societies by taking up the idea of the network in social, political, economic, cultural and technological terms. With help from popular and academic writing, we will ask: What does it mean to organize the world through networks? How do identity, commerce, science and political life function according to network thinking? In formulating responses to such questions, the seminar will center on in-class discussion, taking theories about networks and applying them to everyday life both within and outside a North American context.

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COMM 89.002: Romance and Popular Culture
LA, GL
MW, 1:25 PM – 2:40 PM
Kumarini Silva

Dr. Kumarini Silva’s research is at the intersections of feminism, identity and Identification, post-colonial studies and popular culture. Her work has appeared in Social Identities, South Asian Popular Culture and Cultural Studies. She is the author of Brown Threat: Identification in the Security State (Fall 2016, University of Minnesota Press) and co-editor of Feminist Erasures: Challenging Backlash Culture (2015, Palgrave UK). Her current book project focuses on the political and social relationships that are produced through romance culture and its global circulation. Silva has also published book chapters on race, global media and film.

This course approaches romance as a genre that allows us to think through and articulate social, political and economic conditions in our society. Framed by cultural theory, philosophy, feminist theory and media studies, this course focuses on understanding how the most disavowed genre of publishing and popular culture continues to generate large numbers of consumers and is one of the highest grossing genres of the publishing industry. Focusing on five specific themes—that take into account global issues like colonialism, post-colonialism and globalization and their relationship to the circulation of romance culture—the course attempts to map the ways in which romance intersects our cultural and political landscape in implicit and explicit ways, defining who we are and our social, economic and political expectations.

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Computer Science

COMP 89.135: “Big Data” Ethics
PH, CI, QI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Michael J. Fern

Michael J. Fern is the Associate Chair for Business Affairs and Professor of the Practice of Entrepreneurship in the Department of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His teaching and research interests focus on ethics and entrepreneurship and their intersection with data science, computing and software. Before joining UNC-CH, Fern was a technology entrepreneur and consultant. He also previously served as a faculty member at Korea University, Santa Clara University and the University of Victoria. He is a UNC-CH alumnus, receiving his PhD in strategic management from the Kenan-Flagler Business School.

In 2010, Eric Schmidt, then the CEO of Google, said that every two days we are creating as much information and data as we did up until 2003. Today, we’re generating exponentially more data. While this data explosion presents tremendous opportunity to better understand ourselves and the world around us, from global warming to healthcare, it also poses significant risks and challenges, such as a threat to our personal privacy. Through readings, guest lectures, writing assignments, discussion and debates, and the analysis of real-world data, we will explore and come to better understand the moral and ethical issues and implications surrounding the collection and use of “big data” in the 21st century.

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COMP 89H.052: 3D Computer Animation (Honors)
PL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Anselmo Lastra

Anselmo Lastra is Professor and former Chair of the Department of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received a BS in Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and MS and PhD degrees in Computer Science from Duke University. His research interests are in the areas of computer graphics, image-based modeling and rendering, and graphics hardware architectures.

Computer animation is reaching very realistic levels, but can human characters really look real? In this seminar we’ll learn basic 3D computer modeling and animation, and use these skills to explore the issues inherent in making truly realistic animations. You’ll work with a 3D animation program, such as Blender or Maya. By the end of the semester you will create your own animated short video.

No computer programming required (but you should be comfortable using a PC or Mac).

Topics include
• Mesh (polygonal) modeling
• Modeling with curves and surfaces
• Materials, shading and texturing
• Lighting
• Animation
• Characters and rigging
• Compositing
• The uncanny valley (why humanoid characters can be creepy)
• Automated 3D modeling
• Virtual reality

We’ll cover basic sound and video editing to the level necessary for you to make short videos.

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Dramatic Art

DRAM 79.001: The Heart of the Drama: Fundamentals of Acting, Playwriting, and Collaboration
VP, CI
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Mark Perry

Mark Perry teaches playwriting, play analysis and dramaturgy and serves as a resident dramaturg with PlayMakers Repertory Company. His plays A New Dress for Mona and The Will of Bernard Boynton have been produced by UNC’s Department of Dramatic Art, and both scripts are available from Drama Circle. Mark is a graduate of the University of Iowa’s Playwrights Workshop and a former recipient of the North Carolina Arts Council’s Literature Fellowship for playwriting.

The goal of this seminar is to get you doing theatre, to spark your creativity and to connect you with the deeper lessons of this dynamic art form. You will act. You will write. You will work with others. It will not always be easy, but if you are willing to stretch yourself, you should have a great time. Each lesson is organized around a principle or virtue inherent in the practice of the art. Participants study a quotation or two that relate to that principle and then engage in drama exercises that spring from that principle. By the end of the course, you will have gained skills to make you comfortable to write, stage and perform your own 10 minute plays. Not just for those interested in pursuing theatre, this seminar will give you a more holistic understanding of essential principles in the practice of your life.

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DRAM 80.001: Psychology of Clothes: Motivations for Dressing Up and Dressing Down
VP, CI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Bobbi Owen

Bobbi Owen is the Michael R. McVaugh Distinguished Professor of Dramatic Art. Her courses include costume design and costume history, based in Western and non-Western traditions. She writes about theatrical designers with books including Costume Design on Broadway and Broadway Design Roster, the catalog for the United States entry in the 2007 Prague Quadrennial, Design USA (with Jody Blake) and The Designs of Willa Kim. She is currently writing a book about William Ivey Long, the much honored costume designer of Broadway musicals including Hairspray, Chicago, The Producers and Crazy for You.

Her research interests focus on traditional dress around the world which is rapidly disappearing. NowesArk is an electronic study collection that contains information about traditional garments and accessories in the Department of Dramatic Art. It is a companion website to Costar, an online archive of vintage clothing, mainly from the 19th and 20th century. Both collections, at http://costumes.unc.edu/costar/homes/Cloaks.jsp, are a valuable means to study the materials, construction, provenance and patterns used for historic clothing.

Through traditional and innovative teaching methods, this seminar will help students find ways to articulate their own motivations for dress and then apply the ideas they have discovered to the ways in which individuality as well as group attitudes are expressed through clothing. The semester begins with the familiar – observation and analysis of clothing forms on UNC’s campus. Small groups will present their findings to the class with an emphasis placed on not only what the subjects are wearing, but why. Throughout the semester the class will meet “on location” wherever clothing is worn throughout the community. In the classroom, students will discuss readings from basic texts to create a shared vocabulary. They will also discover common (and occasionally uncommon) motivations for dress, not only in our own culture, but also in others in the world today as well as during selected historical periods.

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DRAM 81H.001: Staging America: The American Drama (Honors)
VP, CI, NA
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Gregory Kable

Gregory Kable is a senior lecturer in the Department of Dramatic Art, where he teaches dramatic literature, theatre history and performance courses and serves as an Associate dramaturg for PlayMakers Repertory Company. He also teaches seminars on American Musicals and Modern British Drama for the Honors program. He has directed dozens of productions at UNC and throughout the local community and is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama.

This seminar examines our national drama from its colonial origins to the present. Students will read plays and criticism, screen videos, engage in critical writing and explore scenes in performance as related means of testing the visions and revisions constituting American dramatic history. We will approach American drama as both a literary and commercial art form and look to its history to provide a context for current American theater practice. Readings are chosen for their intrinsic merit and historical importance but also for their treatment of key issues and events in American life. Our focus throughout will be on the forces that shaped the American drama as well as, in turn, drama’s ability to shed new light on the national experience.

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DRAM 83.001: Spectacle in the Theatre
VP
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
David Navalinsky

David Navalinsky is the Director of Undergraduate Production in the Department of Dramatic Art and has served on the First Year Seminars Steering Committee. David has taught at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Mississippi. David has worked professionally at South Coast Repertory in Orange County California, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, The Illinois Shakespeare Festival and the Karamu Performing Arts Theatre in Cleveland, OH. Some of David’s favorite projects were at the Dallas Children’s Theater where he made a dinosaur collapse and pirates walk the plank.

This seminar will explore how theatrical designers use the playwright’s words to create the world we see on stage. Students will generate designs in the areas of scenery, costumes and lighting for three plays throughout the semester. These plays will be placed outside of their traditional setting while still maintaining the story and themes. Students have placed Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a trailer park and a daycare center for example. Careful historical research, close reading and analysis, text and source material, and collaboration will be the focus of the student projects. No previous theatre or artistic experience necessary.

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DRAM 87H.001: Style: A Mode of Expression (Honors)
VP, CI, NA
TTH, 12:30 PM –1:45 PM
McKay Coble

McKay Coble teaches design, both scenic and costume for the theatre and the history of material culture. She fell in love with the power of choice as far as visuals are concerned early in her career as a Carolina student and has never turned back. Formerly the chair of the Department of Dramatic Art, she is a resident designer for PlayMakers Repertory Company. She uses the many and varied artistic venues on campus as co-instructors and the FYS will be visiting them together. You will likely join her on a design journey as she creates the scenery for a production for PRC and you will have the opportunity to see the process and product.

Consider Oscar Wilde’s statement from The Decay of Living 1889: “Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life. This results not merely from Life’s imitative instincts, but from the fact that the self-conscious aim of Life is to find expression, and that Art offers it certain beautiful forms through which it may realize that energy…” Do you agree or disagree? This seminar studies the elements of design in their pure form, surveys a history of period styles and theatre, and identifies their causes. Art and design have frequently shown the inner life of humankind throughout history better than political, intellectual, or social history. While a period’s style is seldom defined by the everyday choices of everyday people and is most often recorded in the works of artists, writers and intellectuals we must recognize the “times” as a major motivator for all stylistic choices. Even minor arts reflect major events. We will study the elements of design as they exist in their pure form; a “tool box” of elements available to artists and practice the principles to which design is bound. We will survey a history of period styles, period theatre and identify their causes. We will explore one period’s style as a foundation for the next and dispel the Star Trek premise that future styles will only reflect the future. Student progress will be assessed through an in-class presentation on a topic of period style or context and final creative project/paper. The text for the class is A History of the World in 100 Objects by Neil MacGregor which will be a daily discussion.

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DRAM 88.001: Ecology and Performance – CANCELLED 8/10/2016
VP, EE
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Karen O’Brien

Karen O’Brien is David G. Frey Fellow Assistant Professor in UNC’s Department of Dramatic Art. Her research and creative interests include inquiries in artistic, cultural and textual performance, particularly in the environmental arts and in the geo-political context of Irish Studies. She holds a Ph.D. in Drama and Theatre from University of California, Irvine and San Diego. She also received an MFA in Directing and a BFA in Electronic Media from the College-Conservatory of Music at University of Cincinnati.

This seminar will guide students through the process of researching, developing and producing new performance pieces inspired by socio-ecological issues. This task will involve: learning and practicing a range of collaborative performance techniques; gaining knowledge about the environmental arts, theatre for social change and core principles surrounding notions of sustainability; researching and engaging in current ecological debates; and synthesizing critical inquiry and creative endeavor in the form of a new ecologically-driven performance. The seminar will culminate in the presentation of new performance pieces aimed at promoting socio-ecological sustainability. Students will be expected to: closely read assigned texts; keep a journal throughout the semester; conduct and present individual and group research; collaborate with a group to integrate research into performance; and attend one group field outing and one performance event outside of the scheduled course time. No prerequisites are required.

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English

ENGL 53.001: Slavery and Freedom in African American Literature and Film
LA, US
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
William L. Andrews

William L. Andrews teaches courses on African American literature, American autobiography studies and Southern literature. Since the mid-1980s he has done a considerable amount of editing of African American and Southern literature and criticism. Professor Andrews is the series editor of North American Slave Narratives, Beginnings to 1920, a complete digitized library of autobiographies and biographies of North American slaves and ex-slaves.

The purpose of this seminar is to explore the African American slave narrative tradition from its 19th-century origins in autobiography to its present manifestations in prize-winning fiction and film. The most famous 19th-century slave narrative, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845) was an international best seller. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), the amazing but utterly truthful story of Harriet Jacobs’s slave experience in Edenton, North Carolina, is extensively read and taught in college and university classrooms around the world. In the 20th century, many important African American autobiographies and novels—Washington’s Up From Slavery (1901), Wright’s Black Boy (1945), Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952), Haley’s The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1965) and Morrison’s Beloved (1987) —are products, formally and thematically, of the ongoing slave narrative tradition. The slave narrative has also given rise to a number of notable films, from major studio releases like Spielberg’s Amistad (1997) to TV-films like Charles Burnett’s Nightjohn (1996). The 1977 television series based on Haley’s Roots enabled the slave narrative tradition to have a profound impact on late 20th-century American culture. Slave narratives have also had strong influence on popular films such as Blade Runner (1982), The Handmaid’s Tale (1990), Django Unchained (2013) and 12 Years a Slave (2013). Because of the widespread incidence of human trafficking and other forms of involuntary servitude in the world today, slavery remains a major human rights issue.

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ENGL 57.001: Future Perfect: Science Fictions and Social Form
LA
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Tyler Curtain

Tyler Curtain is a theorist with the Department of English and Comparative Literature. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in theory, as well as courses in science fiction and fantasy. Professor Curtain is a member of the executive committee of the Discussion Group on Science Fiction and Utopian and Fantastic Literature of the Modern Language Association. He will be the group’s President in 2016-2017.

Will humans go extinct? If so, how? What are the ethical questions involved in human disappearance? How do humans themselves contribute to the possibilities, and what can be done to postpone the inevitable? This seminar will tackle some sobering (and, quite frankly, exciting and interesting) questions by reading cultural and scientific works that address human disappearance. We will read both science and fiction to think about the core concerns of the class. Our texts will include works ranging from Alien to the classic 1950s tale A Canticle for Leibowitz, from Danny Boyle’s 28 Days Later to Cormac McCarthy’s The Road. We will ask some fundamental questions about what it means to be human, how we imagine our societies and cultures to work (and not work) and what these texts and questions might tell us about how we are to live now. Students will read novels and short stories, watch movies and TV shows, and read scientific and philosophical papers that deal with human extinction. Students will also be required to write a paper and complete an original research project at the end of term that they will share with the rest of the class.

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ENGL 59.001: Black Masculinity and Femininity
John L. Townsend III FYS in English
LA, CI, US
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
GerShun Avilez

GerShun Avilez received his Ph.D. in English from the University of Pennsylvania, where he also earned a Graduate Certificate in Africana Studies. He has taught at Yale University and held the Frederick Douglass Post-doctoral Fellowship at the University of Rochester. He is a cultural studies scholar who specializes in contemporary African American literature and visual culture and 20th century American literature in general. His teaching extends to the literature of the Black Diaspora. Much of his scholarship explores how questions of gender and sexuality inform artistic production. He also works in the fields of political radicalism, spatial theory and legal studies. His book Radical Aesthetics & Modern Black Nationalism is forthcoming from the University of Illinois Press in 2016 as a part of “The New Black Studies” Series. The book investigates how Black Nationalist rhetoric impacted African American artistic experimentation in the late 20th and 21st centuries through an examination of drama, novels, poetry film and visual art. He is at work on a new book-length project on Black sexuality and artistic culture as well as shorter projects on (1) rethinking 20th century African American literary history and (2) temporality in contemporary drama. Throughout his work and teaching, he is committed to studying a wide variety of art forms, including, drama, fiction, non-fiction, film, poetry, visual and performance art, ethnography and comic books.

This first year seminar will use literature, film and popular culture to explore different expressions of masculinity and femininity in the African American and Black diasporic contexts. Students will evaluate how artists use gender and sexuality for social critique and artistic innovation. In addition, students will be given opportunities to enhance their writing and oral communication skills.

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ENGL 72.001: Literature of 9/11– CANCELLED 7/8/2016
LA, CI, GL
MW, 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM
Neel Ahuja

Neel Ahuja grew up in Topeka, Kansas. He studied gender studies at Northwestern University before completing a Ph.D. in transnational cultural studies at the University of California-San Diego. Neel is Associate Professor of postcolonial literature and theory in the English Department at UNC–Chapel Hill, and he teaches courses on security culture, world literatures, medical humanities and environmental studies. Neel is the author of the book Bioinsecurities: Disease Interventions, Empire, and the Government of Species. He has recently written a series of essays concerning the relationships between international politics, animals and the environment.

This seminar will explore representations of the 9/11 attacks and their aftermath in literature and popular culture. Following an introduction to the concept of terrorism and to the production of knowledge about political violence in the fields of law, politics, religious studies and terrorism studies, we will explore a diverse array of themes related to the 9/11 attacks and the “war on terror” as depicted in memoirs, poetry, novels, public art, graphic novels, film and music: explanations of the causes and consequences of political violence; the role of religion in public culture and state institutions; national security discourse; mourning, trauma and public memorials; depictions of the US military in Iraq, Pakistan and Afghanistan; and the perspectives of detainees and minority communities on the attacks and their aftermath. Students will read critical scholarship and literary texts, discuss major controversies in organized debates, compose two papers and complete group presentations on topics of their choice.

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ENGL 85H.001: Economic Saints and Villains
LA, CI, WB
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Ritchie Kendall

Ritchie Kendall is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature who joined the UNC faculty in 1980. He holds a B.A. in English from Yale University (1973) and an M.A. and Ph.D. in English from Harvard University (1980). His specialty is in English Renaissance drama with an emphasis on the socio-economic dimensions of early modern theater. He has taught Honors courses in Shakespeare, Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, comedy and social class, epic and drama, and early modern ideas of entrepreneurship.

The rise of new economic activities—whether the birth of international banking, trading in future commodities, or the marketing of junk bonds—bring with them both excitement and trepidation. Literature about how ordinary and extraordinary people go about the business of getting and spending is one way that a culture comes to terms with emergent and potentially revolutionary economic formations. This seminar will explore how early modern England from the 16th to the 19th centuries imagined new economic orders through plays and novels. We will examine how Renaissance plays by Marlowe, Shakespeare, Dekker and Heywood present economic scoundrels such as Barabas and Shylock as well as heroic entrepreneurs such as Simon Eyre and Thomas Gresham. In the 18th century we will sample the work of Daniel Defoe who crafted a guide for early tradesmen but also produced subversive novels with dubious heroines who use sex and business acumen to acquire and lose great fortunes. From the 19th century, we will read two works, a little known melodrama, The Game of Speculation, as well as the iconic A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Both stories speculate on the compatibility of economic and spiritual success. We will conclude with a modern epilogue: three satiric films from the era of Reagonomics including Oliver Stone’s Wall Street, Mike Nichols’ Working Girl and Jon Landis’ Trading Places. Our objective throughout will be to analyze how literary art, itself a form of economic activity, simultaneously demonizes and celebrates the “miracle of the marketplace” and those financial pioneers that perform its magic.

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ENGL 89.001: The Literature of College Life
LA, CI, NA
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Kimberly J. Stern

Kimberly J. Stern holds a Ph.D in English Literature from Princeton University and is Assistant Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 2015 she published a Broadview edition of Oscar Wilde’s controversial play Salome, and her monograph The Social Life of Criticism: Gender, Critical Writing, and the Politics of Belonging is forthcoming with the University of Michigan Press in 2016. She is now working on a second book, Lessons of the Aesthete: Liberal Education and the Pedagogical Styles of Oscar Wilde and serves as co-editor of Nineteenth Century Studies. Her teaching and research interests include gender studies, aesthetic theory, drama, the British novel and the history of ideas.

In this first-year seminar, students will explore the literature of college life — novels, poetry and nonfiction that attempt to capture the experiences and challenges of higher education. Ranging from formal educational treatises to popular fiction, students will become familiar with the conventions of reading and writing about literature, even as they reflect on questions of both personal and intellectual significance. For instance, what is the function of higher education? How has that function changed over time? What are the untold stories of university life? While the course readings will span several centuries, students will be encouraged to reflect on how this literature reflects on their own experiences at the university, their educational goals and their place within the larger university community. To encourage reflection on these questions, students will articulate their ideas in a range of ways: through online journaling, visual media and formal academic research.

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ENGL 89.002: Blake 2.0: William Blake in Popular Culture
John L. Townsend III FYS in English
LA, NA
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Joseph Viscomi

Joseph Viscomi, the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of English Literature, directs and co-edits the William Blake Archive. His special interests are British Romantic literature, art and printmaking. He has co-edited 9 illuminated works for The William Blake Trust and over 90 electronic editions for the Blake Archive. He is the author of Prints by Blake and his Followers, Blake and the Idea of the Book and numerous essays on Blake’s illuminated printing, color printing and reception. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Rockefeller Foundation, Getty Foundation and National Humanities Center.

William Blake, the visionary poet, artist and printmaker of the British Romantic period, has had enormous influence on modern art and popular culture. His illuminated poetry integrated word and image anticipating graphic novels and influencing many modern musicians, poets, writers (including Pullman, His Dark Materials Trilogy, Bono, Patti Smith and Jim Morrison). Using the Blake Archive, a hypertext of Blake’s poetry and art, we will study key Blake works as well as the digital medium that enables us to study these works in new ways. We will also explore the Web for performances and adaptations of the works we study and for works by musicians, painters, poets, writers, actors, playwrights, performers, dancers and film and video makers who were or are inspired or influenced by Blake. Students will share their discoveries with the class and produce critical or creative responses to a work by Blake or by an influenced artist.

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Folklore

FOLK 77H.001: The Poetic Roots of Hip Hop
VP, US
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Glenn Hinson

Glenn Hinson’s engagement with African American expressive culture emerges from decades of work with artists that range from blues musicians and gospel singers to tap dancers, vaudeville comics and hip-hop emcees. As a folklorist (and associate professor) who teaches in the Departments of American Studies and Anthropology, he studies everyday performances and the ways that they offer insights into the workings of culture. Professor Hinson’s current research focuses on oral poetry, self-taught art and the intersections between faith and creativity.

“There ain’t nothing new about rapping.” That’s what elders from a host of African American communities declared when hip-hop first exploded onto the scene. This “new” form, they claimed, was just a skilled re-working of poetic forms that had been around for generations. Each elder seemed to point to a different form—some to the wordplay of rhyming radio deejays, others to the bawdy flow of street corner poets, still others to the rhymed storytelling of sanctified singers. And each was right; elegant rhyming has indeed marked African American talk for generations. Yet because most such rhyming was spoken, its history remains hidden. In this seminar, we’ll explore this lost history, talking to poets and hip-hop emcees while probing the archives to uncover the hidden heritage of African American eloquence. Our goal is nothing short of writing the prehistory of hip-hop, and in so doing demonstrating rhyme’s longstanding role as a key marker of African American identity.

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Geography

GEOG 50.001: Mountain Environments
PL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Diego Riveros-Iregui

Dr. Diego Riveros-Iregui received a Ph.D. in Ecology and Environmental Sciences from Montana State University (2008), a M.S. in Geology from the University of Minnesota (2004) and a B.S. in Geology from the National University of Colombia in Bogotá (1999). His research interests include watershed science, forest and soil processes, ecosystem ecology and landscape biophysical responses to environmental change. His field studies include subalpine forests of the Rocky Mountains of Montana and Colorado and highly impacted sites of the Andes Mountains of Colombia and the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador. Riveros-Iregui publishes in journals such as Global Change Biology, Water Resources Research and Geophysical Research Letters. He currently serves on the editorial board of The Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences. He teaches courses on hydrology, watershed systems, environmental systems and field methods in tropical hydrology. Riveros-Iregui collaborates with scientists in the U.S. and Latin America. For more information visit http://diegori.web.unc.edu.

This seminar focuses on understanding the physical geography of mountain environments and the processes that have created them, shaped them and sustained them. There are several reasons for studying the environments of mountains: (a) they reveal integrative earth systems processes that can be readily observed and understood; (b) the processes are not oversimplified, but have spatial complexity at scales that can be readily comprehended; and (c) they also reveal human interactions with and impacts on their environment. We will explore mountain environments by concentrating on processes that shape the landscape, patterns that are apparent because of those active processes and how the concept of scale (both through space and time) define the patterns that we see that are shaped by sets of scale-dependent processes. Although we will talk about mountain environments in general, we will draw examples from specific environments, including the Rocky Mountains and the Andes.

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GEOG 63.001: The Problem with Nature and Its Preservation
PH
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Gabriela Valdivia

Gabriela Valdivia is Associate Professor in the Geography Department at UNC-CH. Her research examines the political dimensions of natural resource governance in Latin America: how Latin American states, firms and civil society appropriate and transform resources to meet their interests and how capturing and putting resources to work transforms cultural and ecological communities. Her latest research project, “The Impact of Oil Extraction, Regulatory Policy and Environmental Practice on Native Amazon and Afro-Ecuadorian Communities,” funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), examines how the everyday lives of Afro-descendants and Amazonian peoples are shaped by oil infrastructure in Ecuador. She grew up in Peru and conducted ethnographic research in Ecuador and Bolivia, and brings these experiences into her courses on Latin America and courses on political ecology and nature-society relations.

This seminar will explore conceptualizations of Nature, consider how meanings and practices of nature transformation, conservation and preservation help create the landscapes and societies we inhabit and evaluate the implications of efforts to manage these. The readings and discussion will evaluate Western (especially American) conceptions of Nature and compare with other perspectives, such as indigenous world views, to better understand questions of sovereignty, value and sustainable futures.

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GEOG 67.001: The Politics of Everyday Life
SS, GL
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Sara Smith

Sara Smith is a political geographer with a South Asia focus, specializing in feminist political geography and political geographies of youth and the future. She has been involved in non-profit work and research in India since 1999. Her Ph.D. is in geography, and she has been teaching in UNC’s Department of Geography since 2009. Professor Smith’s current research in the Ladakh region of India’s Jammu and Kashmir State addresses the ways that individuals’ personal lives (especially their decisions about love and babies) are entangled in territorial struggle. Smith is developing a new project about how marginalized young people from India’s remote mountain regions experience university life in major Indian cities and how this shapes their politics. If you are curious, you can find out more about this work on her faculty website: https://sarasmith.web.unc.edu/.

This seminar examines the ways that politics, especially contests over territory, are part of our day-to-day life. We will explore a range of cases, from immigration policy and rhetoric in the US, to popular representations of geopolitics in film, to the politics of family planning in India. How do questions of love, friendship, family and youth identity tie into the international and national political stories that we see on the news? What does national identity have to do with our individual sense of self? We will also explore alternative ways that international politics have been studied, as feminist geopolitics or anti-geopolitics and questions of citizenship. Work for the seminar will involve original research on intersections of international politics and students’ daily life, as well as exploring representations of geopolitical issues in the media, film and fiction.

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Geological Sciences

GEOL 72H.001: Field Geology of Eastern California (Honors)
PL, EE
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Allen Glazner

Allen Glazner’s research focuses on volcanoes, earthquakes and the processes that build the earth’s crust. In a typical year he spends several weeks doing field work with UNC students in the mountains and deserts of California. He was schooled at Pomona College and UCLA, began his teaching career at UNC in 1981 and has won two teaching awards. Geologic field trips have taken him to Argentina, Greece, Mexico, Italy, Switzerland, Alaska, Chile, Iceland, Scotland, France and Hawaii in recent years. He likes mountains, hiking, cycling, jazz and cool science stuff.

Have you ever wanted to stand on a volcano, see a glacier, trace out an earthquake fault or see the Earth’s oldest living things? This seminar is designed around a one-week field trip to eastern California, where students will study geologic features including active volcanoes, earthquake-producing faults and evidence for recent glaciation and extreme climate change. Before the field trip (which will take place the week of Fall Break and be based at a research station near Mammoth Lakes, California), the class will meet twice a week to learn basic geologic principles and to work on developing field research topics. During the field trip students will work on field exercises (e.g. mapping, measuring and describing an active fault; observing and recording glacial features) and collect data for the research projects. After the field trip, students will obtain laboratory data from samples collected during the trip and test research hypotheses using field and laboratory data. Grading will be based on presentation of group research projects and on a variety of small projects during the trip (notebook descriptions, mapping projects, etc.). Students will be required to pay some of the costs of the trip (estimated at about $900.) This course will require missing three days of classes. The course is designed to teach basic geology “on the rocks”, so there are no prerequisites. Link to Yosemite Nature Notes video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5RQp77uVPA

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German and Slavic Languages and Literatures

GERM 51.001: Stalin and Hitler: Historical Issues in Cultural and Other Perspectives
HS, GL
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
David Pike

David Pike received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1978 in German Studies with a minor in Russian and has taught at UNC–CH since 1980. He is the author of three books, The Politics of Culture in Soviet -Occupied Germany, 1945-1949 (1993), Lukács and Brecht (1985) and German Writers in Soviet Exile, 1933-1945 (1982). His research takes him regularly to Berlin and Moscow.

This course deals with critical issues, in the broadest possible context, that dominated the twentieth century: the rise of fascism out of the carnage of World War One and the Bolshevik revolution to which the war and Czarist Russia’s involvement in it helped contribute. As the semester unfolds, drawing on a variety of historical and documentary films, and literature (memoirs, novels), we will take a comparative look at singular personalities like Lenin, Stalin and Hitler and examine the role played by such key figures in historical events of this magnitude. More towards the end of the semester, we glance briefly at the situation created in Western and Eastern Europe by the defeat of fascism and contemplate the origins and evolution of the cold war. We conclude with a consideration of the dissolution and democratization of Eastern European countries, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and, against the tragic background of the past, the recent reemergence of conflict between Russia and the “West.”

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GERM 56.001: Germans, Jews, and the History of Anti-Semitism
HS, CI, NA
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Jonathan M. Hess

Jonathan M. Hess, Moses M. and Hannah L. Distinguished Professor of Jewish History and Culture, received a B.A. from Yale, an M.A. from The Johns Hopkins University and another M.A. and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Currently in his 23rd year of teaching at Carolina, Hess specializes in German and German-Jewish literature, culture and history. In his spare time, he plays the piano, walks his two hound dogs and loves to go hiking in the mountains with his family.

When Hitler came to power in 1933, Jews made up approximately 1% of the population in Germany. How was it possible that this miniscule minority came to occupy such a prominent role in Nazi ideology and the German cultural imagination? What might studying the relationship between Germans and Jews in the centuries before the Holocaust teach us about the persistence of anti-Semitism and racism in our world today? This course seeks to answer these questions by examining a variety of primary sources from the Middle Ages to the Holocaust and beyond, including political treatises, literary texts, theological tracts, film and personal memoirs. No previous familiarity with the subject is required.

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GSLL 70.001: Teenage Kicks: Race, Class, and Gender in Postwar Youth
LA, EE, GL
MW, 1:25 PM – 2:40 PM
Priscilla Layne

Priscilla Layne is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in African, African American and Diaspora Studies. She is a native of Chicago and before moving to North Carolina, she received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2011. Her fields of research and teaching interests are 20th- and 21st-century literature, film, music, (post)subculture studies, multiculturalism, African Diaspora studies and gender studies. She is the author of several essays about German film, Turkish German literature, popular music and counterculture in Germany. In her free time she enjoys live music, traveling with her son and collecting punk records.

This seminar is an investigation of youth cultures from the 1940s to the present in the US and around the world (including the UK, Germany and Japan). It offers students not only a history of how different youth cultures developed over time, but also how the constitution of youth cultures has been influenced by additional factors like race, class and gender. In examining youth cultures across the world, students will not only be introduced to the study of pop music and pop culture, but also subculture and postsubculture theory, intersectionality and media studies. Over the course of the semester, students will gain an understanding of how and why the concept of the “teenager” emerged in the 1940s and why teenagers are attracted to youth cultures. Students will learn how to do close readings of a variety of media, ranging from essays, short stories, songs and poems to films. Students will also get the opportunity to conduct sustained, mentored research and fieldwork on one subculture of their choice.

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SLAV 84.001: Terror for the People: Terrorism in Russian Literature and History
LA, BN, CI
MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM
Stanislav Shvabrin

Stanislav Shvabrin has researched, published and lectured on the history and culture of Russian diasporas, comparative verse theory, poetics and politics of national memory and translation studies. Apart from his scholarly and editorial work on Vladimir Nabokov, he has written on Georgy Ivanov, Andrei Kurbsky, Mikhail Kuzmin and Marina Tsvetaeva.

Before Timothy McVeigh, Taliban, Al-Qaeda and ISIS/ISIL, Russia provided the world with visual imagery and vocabulary to refer to terror perpetrated in the name of ostensibly lofty goals and ideals. This course offers you an opportunity to acquaint yourself with such key concepts as anarchism, nihilism and “Red Terror” as well as the minds responsible for their invention and application. As we delve into the substance of these ideas and attempt to understand the reasons for their enduring relevance, we will examine the different ways in which leading Russian intellectuals, including Ivan Turgenev, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Nikolay Chernyshevsky, Pyotr Kropotkin and others, envisaged their coming to fruition. In addition to a selection of literary texts and political manifestoes composed by visionaries of both conservative and libertarian persuasions, we will examine witness accounts of those at the receiving end of many progressive initiatives.

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SLAV 88H.001: Gender and Fiction in Central and Eastern Europe
LA, BN
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Ewa Wampuszyc

Ewa Wampuszyc has been a Professor in UNC’s Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures since 2010. She received her Ph.D. in 2004 from the University of Michigan. Before coming to UNC, she taught courses in literature, language and European studies at the University of Florida. Professor Wampuszyc’s research interests include: representations of Warsaw in literature and film, cultural capital as it relates to economic capital and post-communist cultural transformation in Central Europe. Teaching First Year Students every fall has become one of the highlights of her academic year. While she has many outside interests, she enjoys her work so much that she also considers it a hobby.

Studying culture through the prism of gender can be a great introduction to a region like Central and Eastern Europe. In this seminar, we will have a chance to explore definitions of “masculine” and “feminine” in fiction, film and essays by and about women from Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Romania. We will discuss how gender concepts shed light on self-identity, nationalism, private property, public spaces, values, ethics, political dissent and oppression, and consumerism. We will consider the connection between the 19th century “Woman Question” and nationalism. We will study how communist ideology promised gender equality, but failed. We will discuss perceptions of gender and consumerism after the fall of communism. Students will learn how political and economic transition affected Central/Eastern Europe; about everyday life under communism; about the geography of Central and Eastern Europe; and how the language and discourses we use shape our world view. Student progress and grades will be assessed through class participation, a group presentation and writing assignments (ranging from short responses to a longer paper).

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History

HIST 53.001: Traveling to European Cities: American Writers/Cultural Identities, 1830-1930
HS, NA
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Lloyd Kramer

Lloyd Kramer’s interests focus on Modern European History with an emphasis on nineteenth-century France and French-American cultural relations. He is particularly interested in historical processes that shape personal and collective identities, including the experiences of cross-cultural exchange and the emergence of modern nationalism. Other research and teaching interests deal with the roles of intellectuals in modern societies and the theoretical foundations of historical knowledge. His teaching stresses the pleasures of reading, discussing and writing about influential books in various eras of European and world history.

This seminar examines two key themes in modern cultural and intellectual history: the importance of travel in the lives and cultural identities of American writers and the important role of European cities in the evolution of modern American cultural identities. We shall focus on a historical era in which American writers were especially drawn to Europe as an alternative to the social and cultural life in the United States; and we’ll discuss how the encounter with Europe influenced these writers as they defined their national identities as well as their views of politics, social relations, gender identities, literature, art and Western cultural traditions. The seminar is based on the assumption that travel has become one of the most influential personal experiences in modern times. In short, we shall explore the connection between travel, writing and personal identities. This is a class for people who like to read about personal experiences and are intrigued by foreign travel. The assigned texts include works by women and men such as Margaret Fuller, Mark Twain, Henry James, Edith Wharton, Gertrude Stein and Ernest Hemingway; and the cities we’ll discuss include Paris, London, Rome, Venice and Athens.

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HIST 70.001: Exploring Cultural Landscapes: Chapel Hill as a Case Study
HS, CI, EE
T, 3:30 PM – 6:00 PM
John Sweet

Within the general field of Early American history, John Sweet’s research focuses on the dynamics of colonialism and on the interplay of religious cultures. His first book explored the encounters of Indians, Africans and Europeans in New England and argued that the racial legacy of colonialism shaped the emergence of the American North as well as the South. He has also worked with other historians and literary scholars on the Jamestown colony and its broader cultural and international contexts. His current project is The Captive’s Tale: Venture Smith and the Roots of the American Republic.

The course explores the concept of cultural landscapes as a way of studying history and its legacies. Through a combination of field work, historical research and analysis, students use maps, photographs, GIS resources and archival documents to understand how–and why–people in the past shaped our surroundings today.

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HIST 72H.001: Women’s Voices: 20th-Century European History in Female Memory
HS, CI, NA
M, 3:35 PM – 6:05 PM
Karen Hagemann

Karen Hagemann is the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of History and Adjunct Professor of the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense. She has published widely on Modern European and German history as well as military and gender history. Currently she has finished a book entitled Revisiting Prussia’s Wars against Napoleon: History, Culture, Memory (Cambridge University Press) and is working as the general editor of the Oxford Handbook Gender, War and the Western World since 1600. (http://history.unc.edu/people/faculty/karenhagemann)

The seminar examines twentieth century European history through the lens of women’s autobiographical writings. It explores women’s voices from different generational and national backgrounds. We will read and discuss autobiographical texts by six women, who grew up in middle class families in Austria, Britain, France and Germany and wrote about their lives in the first half of the twentieth century. They all tried to make a difference in society and politics: Emmeline Pankhurst (1958-1928), a leader of the British suffragette movement; Alice Salomon (1872-1948), a liberal Jewish-German social reformer; Vera Brittain (1893-1970), a British peace activist and writer; Toni Sender (1888-1964), one of the first female parliamentarians in Weimar Germany; Geneviève de Gaulle-Anthonioz (1920-2002), a French resistance fighter and a survivor of the women’s concentration camp Ravensbrück; and Ruth Klüger (1931-), an Austrian-Jewish student who survived Auschwitz and became a professor in the U.S The overarching theme of the seminar is the struggle of women for equal economic, social and political rights. We will explore what effects political changes, revolutions and wars as well as the Holocaust had on this struggle and the lives of women more general. Through intensive discussions of the reading in class, group work and the opportunity to write a research paper on a female autobiography of their own choice, the seminar offers students a unique approach to twentieth century European history and will introduce them to historical research and writing.

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HIST 74.001: Emperors, Courts, and Consumption: The Mughals of India
John L. Townsend III FYS in History
HS, BN
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Emma Flatt

Emma Flatt’s research has focused on mentalities and practices in the courtly societies of medieval South India. She is currently writing a book which examines how skills like perfume-making, astrological divination, gardening, magical spells and letter writing allowed nobles to succeed at court. She is also researching the history of friendship in medieval South Asia. Originally from the UK, she has lived, studied and worked in India, Italy and Singapore.

The Mughal Empire (1526-1858) is not only one of the most well-known of South Asian polities, it was also the grandest and longest lasting empire in Indian history. At its height this empire covered almost the entire subcontinent and its rulers and elites were responsible for much of the iconic architecture and painting associated with India in the popular mind today. Rich in textual, material and visual primary sources, in recent years this period has been the focus of vibrant and exciting scholarly work, which has re-evaluated long-held assumptions about the nature of pre-modern South Asia. Through a study of autobiographical texts, contemporary accounts, objects, architecture and later representations in scholarly works, films, novels and Wikipedia entries, we will analyze the complex ways in which this powerful dynasty portrayed itself and the various ways it is remembered today.

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Interdisciplinary Studies

IDST 89.001: Colonialism, Power, and Resistance
HS, GL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Carlee Forbes, Aubrey Lauersdorf, Meredith McCoy, Marsha S. Collins

This course will be team taught by an interdisciplinary group of PhD students. Carlee Forbes is in Art History, Aubrey Lauersdorf is in History and Meredith McCoy is in American Studies. Their research interests overlap in terms of subject matter—each examines the power relationships between various actors in colonial settings. Carlee focuses on artists and patrons in Central Africa, Meredith on American Indian education policy and Aubrey on gender and colonialism in Spanish Florida. In their rare spare time, these three enjoy varied activities from trying new recipes to outdoor adventures.

Marsha S. Collins is the Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education and a Professor of Comparative Literature. She received her AB from Smith College, MA from the University of Wisconsin at Madison and MA and PhD from Princeton University. She is the author of books on Pío Baroja and Luis de Góngora, and articles on Cervantes, Galdós, Unamuno, Góngora and Lope de Vega, among others. Her teaching and research focus on Early Modern European Literature, romance and pastoral, and the relationship between literature and the visual arts. Her new book, Imagining Arcadia in Renaissance Romance, a comparative study of 16th-century fictional worlds in Renaissance romances, will be published in 2016.

You may have heard that colonialism began in the 1400s and ended in the 1700s. You likely learned about examples of colonialism in high school, like Christopher Columbus “discovering” America or the Pilgrims establishing Plymouth Colony. Colonialism occurs whenever a group of people takes control of territory, exploiting land, resources and people for economic benefit. Colonizers can also introduce settlers to a place that had long been home to indigenous peoples.

Is colonialism still occurring? In this course, we bring together Art History, History and American Studies to better understand colonial processes from multiple perspectives across Africa, Europe, South America and North America. We will investigate how colonialism creates, enforces and reinforces power through law, art, language and land. This class is less about how colonialism began (which we hope you know about already—if not, we’ll help fill in the gaps) and more about ongoing responses to it.

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Information and Library Science

INLS 89.001: Social Media & New Movements
SS
MW, 10:10 AM – 11:25 AM
Zeynep Tufekci

Zeynep Tufekci is an assistant professor in the School of Information and Library Science and an adjunct professor in the Department of Sociology. Her research interests are social impacts of technology, privacy and surveillance, inequality, research methods and complex systems. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Science, Washington Post and other media.

Movements ranging from uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt and beyond to “Occupy” protests in the United States have been using new media technologies to coordinate, organize and intervene in the public sphere as well as to document, share and shape their own stories. Using a range of tools from Facebook to Twitter, from satellite modems to landlines to ad-hoc mesh networks, these movements have made their mark in history. The objective of this seminar is to enhance our conceptual and empirical understanding of the interaction between the new media ecology and social change. We will explore various approaches to studying social movements and social change and look at specific cases. Governments and powerful institutions are also responding to the challenge posed by the emergence of the Internet as a mundane and global technology. From increased surveillance and filtering capacity, to delivering propaganda over the Internet to their own, governments around the world are broadening their repertoire of social, technical and legal tools for control and suppression of—and through—the Internet. We will explore the integration of new media tools within these movements as well as governmental and institutional responses to these developments. Materials for this class will include readings, videos (not to be viewed in class but as material to be viewed) and a variety of visiting speakers (both in person and via Skype).

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Linguistics

LING 89H.001: Decipherment of Ancient Scripts (Honors)
SS, WB
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
David Mora-Marin

David Mora-Marin is a linguistic anthropologist who specializes in historical linguistics and writing systems. He focuses on the study of the contemporary and ancient indigenous languages of Mexico and Central America. His goal is to utilize linguistic data to better understand the history of their speakers (e.g. migrations, contacts with speakers of other languages, social and political changes, economic development), as well as the nature of language itself (i.e. how languages are structured and why they change). Mora-Marin studies three of the thirteen or so Mesoamerican scripts: Olmec, Epi-Olmec and Mayan. He has also carried out field projects in Oaxaca and Yucatan (Mexico) to document contemporary indigenous languages.

The seminar deals with the origin and evolution of writing systems; the methods for deciphering ancient scripts and studying contemporary scripts; and the socio-cultural and linguistic underpinnings of literacy in the ancient and contemporary worlds. Students will study and analyze, through a series of workshops and group projects, the early Sumerian, Egyptian, Harappan, Chinese and Mesoamerican writing systems—the five writing systems that account for much of the diversity of scripts known today. These are all non-alphabetic scripts, and studying them offers insights into the cognitive processes involved in the origin and evolution of writing, the relationship between script and image, and between script and language, and the challenges of learning to read and write in any writing system. Students will use group and individual projects emphasizing linguistic methodologies to study a variety of undeciphered (or partly deciphered) scripts such as Etruscan (Italy), Cretan Hieroglyphic (Crete), Linear A (Crete), Rongorongo (Easter Island), Zapotec (Oaxaca Valley, Mexico), Olmec (Veracruz, Mexico), Harappan (India), Khipu (Peru) and the increasingly visual and pictorial multimedia literacy strategies of the contemporary world.

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Marine Sciences

MASC 55.001: Change in the Coastal Ocean
PL
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Christopher S. Martens

Christopher S. Martens earned his Ph.D. in Chemical Oceanography from Florida State University in 1972, then moved to Yale to complete two years of postdoctoral study before joining the faculty at UNC in 1974. His current research focuses on how biological processes affect the chemistry of seawater, sources of greenhouse gases, changing coral reef ecosystems and the carbon cycle in deep sea environments including the northern Gulf of Mexico area impacted by the Deepwater Horizon disaster. He publishes widely and has twice been co-recipient of the Geochemical Society’s Best Paper award in Organic Geochemistry. He is an experienced SCUBA diver and underwater videographer. He has received a “Favorite Faculty” award for recognized excellence in undergraduate teaching.

This seminar provides students with opportunities to explore recent changes in marine and terrestrial environments caused by the interactions of fascinating oceanographic processes. Class presentations and discussions focus on the work of active marine scientists who combine their traditional disciplinary research with knowledge and skills from other fields as needed to understand new environmental challenges. This cross-cutting scientific approach prepares class members to recognize important connections between traditional disciplines to discover interdisciplinary research areas that they might wish to further explore during their undergraduate careers at Carolina. In preparation for discussions, laboratory demonstrations and occasional visits to field sites, we read a series of recently published, non-technical research papers. We use information from those papers plus current research at Carolina to investigate how biological, geological, physical and geochemical processes interact to influence coastal, open-ocean and tropical environments. Students will participate in “video- and photo-trips” during classes, laboratory demonstrations using state-of-the art instrumentation in our laboratories and “hands on” mini-experiments designed to emphasize the importance of the scientific question rather than just the technology involved. Please note that this seminar has no prerequisites.

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MASC 57H.001: From “The Sound of Music” to “The Perfect Storm” (Honors)
PL, QI
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Alberto Scotti

Alberto Scotti is a native of Milano, Italy and attended the university there, where he earned a laurea in physics in 1992. He then moved to Baltimore, Maryland, where he completed a PhD degree in Engineering at Johns Hopkins University in 1997. Subsequently, Dr. Scotti completed his postdoctoral study at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where he retooled himself as an oceanographer. In 1999, Dr. Scotti joined the faculty at UNC in the Department of Marine Sciences. His research interests center on problems of applied fluid dynamic that are related to the environment and/or geophysics. When not working on problems of fluid dynamics, he enjoys the outdoors, especially alpine activities like mountaneering and skiing with his wife and children.

We are constantly surrounded by phenomena that are wave-like in nature. We communicate over short distances with sound waves, and we use electromagnetic waves to communicate over long distances. We see waves when we stand at beach, and the weather we experience is controlled very often by wave-like features of the jet stream. In this seminar, we will develop the conceptual framework necessary to understand waves, starting from laboratory observations. The main goal is to explore the common traits of waves and how these traits can be used to enhance our understanding and to predict the outcome of a broad range of important physical phenomena.

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MASC 59.001: Extreme Microorganisms: Pushing the Limits of Life on Earth and Beyond
PL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Andreas Teske

Andreas Teske is a biochemist by training, but became fascinated by the microbial world of the oceans and focused his Ph.D. research on the ecology and diversity of marine bacteria that catalyze the sulfur cycle. After completing his Ph.D. at Bremen University and the Max-Planck-Institute for Marine Microbiology in Germany in 1995, he spent his postdoc years at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and stayed on as Assistant Scientist. Andreas Teske joined the UNC Marine Sciences faculty in 2002. His research interests include the microbiology of the deep marine subsurface and microbial ecosystems of petroleum seeps and hydrothermal vents. In search of novel extreme marine microorganisms, he and his students are participating in a wide range of research cruises.

We will expand our horizons in biology by learning about some of the most extreme microorganisms on the planet—microorganisms that thrive without oxygen in deep marine sediments and in the Earth’s crust, under high temperatures in boiling hot springs or in superheated deep-sea water under high pressure and under chemical stress factors (high sulfide and heavy metal concentrations) that were once thought to be incompatible with life. Numerous extremophilic (extreme-loving) microorganisms of different metabolic types have been isolated in the laboratory as pure cultures; others have been observed in Nature but have so far resisted cultivation. Extremophiles provide opportunities to study the unusual and strange biochemistry that allows them to thrive in their unique habitats; they are also valuable model systems for potential life on other planets. We will get to know the unusual habitats where extremophiles are found, for example hot springs and volcanic areas on land (Yellowstone) and in the ocean (hydrothermal vents), and we will explore the earliest history of extremophiles as some of the most ancient microorganisms on Earth.

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Mathematics

MATH 51.001: Fish Gotta Swim, Birds Gotta Fly’: The Mathematics and the Mechanics of Moving
QI
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
Roberto Camassa

Roberto Camassa is the Kenan Distinguished Professor in the Dept of Mathematics. His Ph.D. is from Cal Tech, and his research interests include nonlinear evolution equations, mathematical modeling, fluid mechanics and optics.

One focus of this seminar is to address the science of motion of vehicles and living organisms, in fluids such as air and water, using simple physical explanations supported with the relevant mathematical descriptions. Experimental demonstrations will be used to illustrate the concepts encountered in class, as well as to provide an insight into the art of fluid flow visualization. There are no prerequisites, and material from physics and mathematics will be introduced as needed. Understanding of the material will be reinforced with biweekly homework assignments and a final animation project. While this course is focused on the physics and mathematics, rather than computer programming, an introduction to elementary concepts of scientific computing will be part of the course.

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MATH 62H.001: Combinatorics (Honors)
QI
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Ivan Cherednik

Ivan Cherednik is Austin H. Carr Distinguished Professor of Mathematics. Trained at the Steklov Mathematics Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences and at Moscow State University, his areas of specialization are Representation Theory, Combinatorics, Number Theory, Harmonic Analysis and Mathematical Physics. Cherednik’s particular affection for Combinatorics is well known: he proved the celebrated Constant term conjecture in Combinatorics.

A leading expert in Modern Combinatorics wants to share his vision of the subject with the students. The seminar is a perfect background for future specialists in mathematics, physics, computer science, biology, economics, for those who are curious what statistical physics is about, what cryptography is and how the stock market works, and for everyone who likes mathematics.
The course will be organized around the following topics:

1) Puzzles: dimer covering, magic squares, 36 officers
2) Combinations: from coin tossing to dice and poker
3) Fibonacci numbers: rabbits, population growth, etc.
4) Arithmetic: designs, cyphers, intro to finite fields
5) Catalan numbers: from playing roulette to the stock market

The students will learn about the history of Combinatorics, its connections with the theory of numbers, its fundamental role in the natural sciences and various applications. It is an advanced research course; all students are expected to participate in projects under the supervision of Ivan Cherednik and the Graduate Research Consultant (the GRC Program). The grades will be based on the exam, bi-weekly homework assignments and participation in the projects. The course requires focus and effort, but, generally, the students are quite satisfied with the progress they make (and their grades too). From the Course Evaluation: “A difficult but wholly worthwhile course: I feel more competent for having taken it”, “I would recommend this FYS to others ONLY if they have a VERY strong affinity for and ability in Algebra (I thought I did, but I was wrong).”

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Media and Journalism

MEJO 89.001: Democracy in Action in 2016 Elections
HS, CI, NA
MW, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Ferrel Guillory

Ferrel Guillory is a Professor of the practice in the UNC School of Media and Journalism. He founded the UNC Program on Public Life in 1997 and is a senior fellow at MDC, Inc., a non-profit research firm, through which he has co-authored seven State of the South reports. In addition, Guillory is a co-founder of EducationNC, a non-profit organization that reports and analyzes PreK-12 education in North Carolina online at www.ednc.org.
B.A. – Loyola University New Orleans
M.S. – Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

“Nowhere in the world are more people more fully engaged in active, responsible participation in the choice of national leadership than in the United States during the fall season of any American Presidential campaign,” Theodore H. White wrote in The Making of the President 1960. Through this seminar, which coincides with the fall 2016 presidential campaign, students will discuss and write about the dramatic story of democracy in action as it unfolds in their communities, in their state and across the nation. Campaigns being enterprises of multiple dimensions, the seminar will give students an exploration of politics through many lens: candidates and personality, political parties and partisanship, money and media, issues and interest groups, voters and polling. This seminar also seeks to give students experience in interpretative journalism, with monthly writing assignments. At the conclusion of the seminar, students will have a deeper appreciation for the complexities of people wielding power through their votes, through their participation in campaigns and through a free press in a free, democratic society.

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Music

MUSC 57.001: Music and Drama: Verdi’s Operas and Italian Romanticism
LA, CI, WB
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
John Nádas

John Nádas (Gerhard L. Weinberg Distinguished Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences) was born in Caracas, Venezuela. He received a B.F.A. in music from Tulane University, an M.A. from Villa Schifanoia (Florence, Italy), and a Ph.D. in musicology from New York University. He taught at the University of California at Santa Barbara before joining the faculty of Carolina. Professor Nádas served as Editor-in-Chief of The Journal of Musicology. His interests include the music of 14th- and 15th-century France and Italy, Monteverdi and 19th-century Italian opera.

Why does opera continue to attract growing audiences? Because opera entertains them in a special way. Of course, there are skeptics who may sneer about fat sopranos, preening tenors and silly plots. The truth is greater than that, however, for when the audience is receptive to its magic, opera can touch the soul as few arts can. Most important, unlike musical concerts and spoken plays, opera combines the arts in a unique way. First and foremost, language and music can work together to do what neither could do alone. No better examples of this art form can be found than the stunning operas created during the nineteenth century in Italy, especially those of Giuseppe Verdi. A distinctive Italian brand of Romanticism was formulated, which formed Verdi’s artistic tastes and nourished his imagination. Schiller, Hugo and especially Shakespeare were the touchstones of Verdi’s sensibilities and encouraged his boldness and originality of operatic subjects. We will trace Verdi’s artistry from early works such as Nabucco, Ernani and Macbeth, through the brilliance of Traviata, Rigoletto and Trovatore, and finally to one of the sublime masterpieces from the end of the century, Otello. The seminar will include weekly reading and listening assignments, class participation in discussions, two brief papers as follow-ups to class viewings of operas, mid-term and final exams, and a final project.

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MUSC 89.001: Hip-Hop Diplomacy: Opportunities and Challenges – CANCELLED 6/9/2016
VP, GL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Mark Katz

Mark Katz is the Ruel W. Tyson Jr. Distinguished Professor of the Humanities and the Director of the Institute for the Arts and Humanities at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the author of Capturing Sound: How Technology has Changed Music and Groove Music: The Art and Culture of the Hip-Hop DJ. He is co-editor of Music, Sound, and Technology in America: A Documentary History and former editor of The Journal of the Society for American Music. In 2013 he created, and continues to direct, the U.S. State Department-funded musical diplomacy program Next Level, which connects American hip-hop artists to underserved communities around the world to promote cultural exchange, conflict reduction and entrepreneurship.

For 75 years the U.S. Department of State has been sending American musicians abroad as cultural diplomats. In 2001 it sent its first hip-hop musician on an official tour, and 2013 it established Next Level, a program that sends American hip-hop artists abroad to teach and perform with youth in underserved communities. Hundreds of hip-hop diplomats have now toured and taught in scores of countries around the world. Katz created the Next Level program and, as its director, havs overseen residencies in twelve countries on five continents. This class draws both on the history of American musical diplomacy and Katz’s own experiences to explore hip-hop diplomacy in the context of American foreign policy and consider its goals, potential and challenges. Next Level artists will serve as special guests throughout the semester.

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Philosophy

PHIL 51.001: Who Was Socrates?
PH, NA, WB
MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM
C. D. C. Reeve

C. D. C. Reeve works primarily in ancient Greek philosophy, especially Plato and Aristotle. He is interested in philosophy generally and has published work in the philosophy of sex and love and on film. His books include: Philosopher-Kings (Princeton 1988; reissued 2006); Socrates in the Apology (Hackett 1989); Practices of Reason (Oxford, 1992)—named an Outstanding Academic Book for 1992 by Choice; Substantial Knowledge (Hackett 2000); Love’s Confusions (Harvard 2005); Action, Contemplation, and Happiness: An Essay on Aristotle (Harvard 2012)—named an Outstanding Academic Title for 2012 by Choice; Blindness and Re-Orientation: Problems in Plato’s Republic (Oxford, 2012); and Aristotle on Practical Wisdom: Nicomachean Ethics Book VI (Harvard, 2013). He has translated Plato’s Cratylus (1997), Euthyphro, Apology, Crito (2002), Republic (2004) and Meno (2006) as well as Aristotle’s Politics (1998) and Metaphysics (2016) for Hackett. He is currently working on Aristotle’s Physics and De Anima. Recent articles include: “Aristotle’s Philosophical Method,” in the Oxford Handbook of Aristotle (2012); “A Celemín of Shit: Comedy and Deception in Almodóvar’s Talk to Her” in Philosophers on Film: Talk to Her (2009); and “Glaucon’s Challenge and Thrasymacheanism,” in Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy (2008).

Socrates is by far the most famous Greek philosopher and, perhaps, the first real philosopher known in the Western tradition. In this seminar, we explore the intellectual and historical context within which Socrates is thought to have revolutionized philosophy so as to better understand his significance for his contemporaries and for us. Our focus, however, will be on the large and perennial human questions that Socrates made his own: How should we live? What is justice? What is virtue? What sort of society should we strive to provide for our families and for ourselves? Each week we will read a part of one of the primary texts and discuss it carefully in the class. These discussions will serve both as a testing-ground for ideas and as preparation for the writing assignments. By learning to talk and write in an engaging but disciplined way about books and ideas that are both exciting and significant, we will not only be finding out about Socrates but also be taking up the Socratic challenge to live the examined life.

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PHIL 66.001: Ethics: Theoretical and Practical
PH
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Thomas Hill

Thomas Hill is a Kenan Professor in the Department of Philosophy. Professor Hill has written extensively in ethics, the history of ethics and political philosophy.

This seminar aims to encourage students to think seriously and clearly about ethical problems by means of class discussion, group research projects and examination of philosophical and literary works. Theoretical issues to be considered include relativism, utilitarianism, deontological ethics and virtue ethics. Practical issues may include abortion, substance abuse, treatment of animals and the environment, and sex, love and marriage.

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PHIL 78.001: Death as a Problem for Philosophy: Metaphysical and Ethical
PH
MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM
Russ Shafer-Landau

Russ Shafer-Landau is Director of the Parr Center for Ethics and Professor of Philosophy. He has written widely in ethical theory; his research focuses on issues about the objectivity of ethics.

In this seminar we will be discussing a variety of important questions about death, including:

1. What is Death?
2. What is the Value of Life?
3. Why is Death Bad (if it is)?
4. Are We Immortal–and if so, is that a good thing?
5. What is the Moral Status of Suicide and Euthanasia?
6. What is The Meaning of Life and How Does it Relate to Death?
7. How Should One Face One’s Own Death?

Students will be expected to be active participants in discussion and there will be several short writing assignments.

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Physics and Astronomy

PHYS 52.052: Making the Right Connections
MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM
Lab: M, 1:25 PM – 3:25 PM or M, 3:35 PM – 5:35 PM
Hugon J.Karwowski

Hugon J.Karwowski, who is a native of Poland, is a physicist and a teacher. His research is in applied nuclear physics, neutrino physics and astrophysics. Most of his experimental work is performed using accelerators at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. His other interests are politics, world history and grade inflation. He is a winner of numerous teaching awards and has served as a mentor of students on all levels.

This seminar will investigate the multiple roles that computers perform in scientific investigations. We will discuss and test in practice how the connections are made between measuring devices and computers. We will investigate how the collected data are evaluated and how the decisions based on the experimental results are made. We will also discuss the role of the computer simulations in scientific research and the societal consequences of recent technological advances. In the lab students will learn digital electronics, programming and gain working knowledge of data acquisition techniques with primary focus on flow of data from and to scientific instruments. We will visit a number of research labs on and off campus and talk to young researchers about their work. This seminar will be of particular interest for prospective science majors, but there are no prerequisites.

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Political Science

POLI 50.001: Movies and Politics
SS, CI
MW, 9:05 AM – 11:25 AM
Pamela Conover

Pamela Conover, Burton Craige Professor of Political Science, was educated at Emory University and received her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota. Professor Conover teaches courses dealing with political psychology, and social movements and political protest. In the past, Professor Conover’s research has concerned the nature of political thinking and the politics of identity and citizenship. She also coauthored the book Feminism and the New Right. Her current research is focused on partisan polarization and rivalry, and the role of values and integrity in shaping the behavior of politicians. In her spare time, she enjoys cycling and being walked by her two golden retrievers, Izzy and Gracie.

In this seminar, we will consider the interplay between films and politics—filmmakers and citizens. We will discuss what movies “mean,” and the intent of filmmakers, but our major focus will be on the contribution of films to political life and what we can learn from films about our political system as well as ourselves as citizens. Towards this end, we will watch both fictitious and documentary films. One theme will be to evaluate whether political films provide accurate understandings of reality. Another theme will be to explore the changing influence of documentary filmmakers in shaping the political role of films in our society. A third theme will be to consider how political life is shaped by diversity—race, class, gender, sexuality and religion—and the extent to which that diversity is represented in films. A final theme will be to examine how our self-understandings as citizens are shaped by the experience of watching films. Among the topics covered will be propaganda, industry and governmental censorship, campaigning, political ambition, interest groups and corruption, congress and the presidency, the judicial system, foreign affairs and contemporary wars. In addition to watching films and reading about them, students will engage in seminar discussions, wiki writing and online discussions. Grades will be based on several writing projects, class and forum discussions, and a final exam.

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POLI 62.001: How Leaders Lead Others – CANCELLED 6/7/2016
SS, CI
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Terry Sullivan

Terry Sullivan (Ph.D., University of Texas) focuses on political leadership, the tradecraft of politicians, bargaining and persuasion, and White House operations. Since 1997, Professor Sullivan has directed the White House Transition Project, which provides help to all the presidential campaigns, the past two president elects as they prepared to assume the presidency and the last outgoing president. Professor Sullivan served on President Bush’s Presidential Transition Coordinating Council where he helped coordinate the Bush to Obama transition and now serves on the National Commission on Reform of the Federal Appointments Process.

The use of political leadership stands at the center of an organized society; yet we know little about how leaders exercise their influence with other decision-makers. In this seminar, students will examine theories of leadership ranging from ancient models of good character through the medieval theories of the religious tutors (Machiavelli and Erasmus) to modern business leadership and then compare those theories with what real leaders do. To obtain this perspective, students will listen to secret recordings of bargaining between the president and other national leaders. This seminar teaches students about the differences between real leadership and theories of leadership. It also exposes them to the rigors of research projects conducted on the basis of real data they develop. In addition, this class will help students learn how to write more effectively to sound smart.

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POLI 65: Organized Interest in American Politics – ADDED 5/18/2016
SS
TuTh, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Virginia Gray

Virginia Gray joined the UNC faculty in 2001 as Winston Distinguished Professor of Political Science, after spending many years at the University of Minnesota. She received her Ph.D. from Washington University where she studied with the eminent scholar of interest groups, Robert Salisbury. Her specialties are state politics and public policy. Since 1988, her major research focus has been collaborative work with Professor David Lowery on interest groups. They have published a book and fifty journal articles on interest groups, and their work has been supported by two grants from the National Science Foundation and one from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Gray also brings practical credentials: she was a registered lobbyist in the state of Minnesota and the head of a PAC, for the U of M Faculty Association. In her spare time she can be found cheering on the Tar Heels at the Dean Dome.

Bank of America, the Sierra Club, the National Rifle Association, UNC, and the Allied Underwear Association–what do they have in common? They are all interest organizations that employ lobbyists in Washington, D.C. As social scientists, we can use a common framework to analyze these and other organized interests: Why are there so many of them? Where do they come from? Are they ruining democracy? Can there be democracy without groups? What can we do about groups? Each student will select an interest group to track throughout the semester, and a series of web-based assignments will culminate in an analysis paper. Other assignments will involve participating in debates and group generation of reform proposals.

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POLI 66.001: The United States and the European Union: Partners or Rivals?
SS
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Liesbet Hooghe

Liesbet Hooghe received her Ph.D. from the University of Leuven in Belgium in 1989. Before joining UNC in 2000, she taught at the University of Toronto (1994-2000) and held research fellowships at Cornell University, Oxford University (Nuffield), the European University Institute (Florence, Italy) and the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin ( Germany). Between 2004 and 2016, she was affiliated with the VU Amsterdam. Her principal areas of interest are comparative politics (Europe), identity, political parties, political elites, decentralization and international organization. She has written several books, including Cohesion Policy and European Integration (OUP, 1996); Multi-Level Governance in the European Union (Rowman & Littlefield, 2001—with Gary Marks); The European Commission and the Integration of Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2002), The Rise of Regional Authority (Routledge, 2010 – with Gary Marks and Arjan Schakel); the European Commission of the 21st Century (Oxford University Press, 2013; co-authored); Measuring Regional Authority (OUP, 2016; co-authored); and Community, Scale and Regional Governance: A Postfunctionalist Theory (OUP, 2016 – with Gary Marks).

This seminar introduces students to the European Union and its relations with the United States. In the first part, we become familiar with the European Union. Why is there a European Union? How does it operate, and how has it developed? What kind of polity is emerging at the European level, and how does it differ from federalism in the United States? Finally, how does Europe deal with its multiple crises? The second section compares American and European politics. How are elections and the practice of government different? How does welfare in the United States and the role of the state in the economy differ from that in Western Europe? Are Europeans from Venus and Americans from Mars, as a famous American scholar once argued, or is the reality more fine-grained? Students will participate in structured discussion, debate and role play. Each student will make at least one class presentation, and each will participate in an extensive role play on a current event relevant to transatlantic relations. There will also be plenty of opportunity for class discussion.

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POLI 67.001: Designing Democracy
SS
MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM
Andrew Reynolds

Andrew Reynolds received his B.A.(Hons) from the University of East Anglia, a M.A. from the University of Cape Town and his Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego. His research and teaching focus on democratization, constitutional design and electoral politics. He is particularly interested in the presence and impact of minorities and marginalized communities. He has worked for the United Nations, the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (IDEA), the UK Department for International Development, the US State Department, the National Democratic Institute, the International Republican Institute, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and the International Foundation for Election Systems. He has also served as a consultant on issues of electoral and constitutional design for Afghanistan, Angola, Burma, Egypt, Fiji, Guyana, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles, Northern Ireland, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Yemen and Zimbabwe. He has received research awards from the U.S. Institute of Peace, the National Science Foundation, the US Agency for International Development and the Ford Foundation.

Among his books are: The Arab Spring: Pathways of Repression and Reform (Oxford, 2015) with Jason Brownlee and Tarek Masoud, Designing Democracy in a Dangerous World (Oxford, 2011), The Architecture of Democracy: Constitutional Design, Conflict Management, and Democracy (Oxford, 2002), Electoral Systems and Democratization in Southern Africa (Oxford, 1999), Election 99 South Africa: From Mandela to Mbeki (St. Martin’s, 1999) and Elections and Conflict Management in Africa (USIP, 1998), co-edited with T. Sisk. In 2012 he embarked on a multi-year research project to study the impact of LGBT national parliamentarians on public policy around the world. His forthcoming book is The Children of Harvey Milk (2016).

His articles have appeared in journals including American Political Science Review, World Politics, Democratization, Politics and Society, Middle East Law and Governance, Electoral Studies, Journal of Democracy, The Journal of Commonwealth and Comparative Politics and Political Science Quarterly. He has published opinion pieces in the New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Christian Science Monitor and San Diego Union Tribune. His work has been translated into French, Spanish, Arabic, Serbo-Croat, Albanian, Burmese and Portuguese.

This course will present political institutions as levers of conflict management in ethnically plural, post-conflict national states. To highlight the issues that lie behind constitutional design attention will be focused on a province that was in turmoil within an established democracy (Northern Ireland), a democratizing state (South Africa), a North African state in tumult (Egypt) and post war institutional design (Afghanistan). These states will be analyzed in terms of their paths toward democracy, the nature of their internal conflict and the types of political institutions they have (or are) adopting. Key to the class will be the student’s focus on their own case study of a democratizing state. The class will be briefed on the core ‘building block’ choices that go into a new constitution and the importance of rooting institutions in the distinct historical and socio-political characteristics of a nation. Through lectures, videos and discussions we shall investigate how nations can seek to transform violent conflict into democratic debate.

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POLI 71H.001: Politics of Race, Ethnicity, Language, Religion, and Gender (Honors)
SS, US
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Andrea Benjamin

Andrea Benjamin’s research interests include race and politics, elections and voting behavior, identity, urban politics and public opinion. She is currently working on a book that explores the potential for Black-Latino coalitions in local elections. Professor Benjamin is originally from Northern California. She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of California at Davis and earned her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

In many parts of the world, race, ethnicity, language, religion and gender are explicitly linked to politics. In the United States, we tend to link these identities to politics through political parties. In this seminar, we will explore the concepts of race, ethnicity, language, religion and gender in a comparative context in order to gain a better understanding of their application in the United States. From there we will consider the relationship between race, ethnicity, language, religion, gender and politics, from the perspective of citizens, candidates, policies and institutions. We will use scholarly texts as the foundation for the seminar, but we will couple those with newspaper articles and narratives to gain a first-hand perspective as needed. This seminar will not have a final exam, but students will work on a group project and make a presentation to the class.

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POLI 75.001: Thinking about Law
PH
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Charles Szypszak

Charles Szypszak has been with the School of Government since 2005. Prior to that, he was an attorney and director of a general practice firm in New Hampshire. He provides legal counsel to state, national and international institutions, organizations and public officials and teaches Law for Public Administration in the graduate program in public administration. He has taught and worked on law reforms in Poland and Russia. He is the recipient of the University’s J. Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award and the School of Government’s Coates Distinguished Professorship for Teaching Excellence.

Are you interested in being a lawyer or public official? Do you know what it means to “think like a lawyer?” Have you considered why people mostly honor the law? Where do you find “the law?” How do judges decide difficult cases? This seminar will explore the notion of a rule of law, formal and customary law, legal analysis, judicial interpretation and the realities of the adversarial system and law practice. We will consider what makes law seem legitimate and how to assess whether it promotes liberty and justice. This seminar will challenge students to be reflective and critical about their own perspectives and to explore personal responsibility for promoting a rule of law. Students will be engaged in analytical thinking and expression through readings, classroom discussions and research and writing assignments. Reading materials will include selections from court cases and other sources that provide an introduction to the notion of a rule of law, the sources of law that govern us and protect our individual rights, the nature of legal analysis, the different methods of judicial interpretation and the realities of law practice and the adversarial system.

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Psychology

PSYC 55.001: Children’s Eyewitness Testimony
SS
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Peter A. Ornstein

Peter A. Ornstein received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1968 and joined the faculty of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1973, where he is now the F. Stuart Chapin Professor of Psychology. A former chair of the Department of Psychology, Dr. Ornstein is a developmental psychologist who has long been interested in cognitive development and its implications for understanding children’s abilities to provide testimony in legal settings. His research focuses on age-related changes in long-term memory for the details of salient personal experiences and the “socialization” of children’s memory skills. Outside of the world of research and teaching, he and his wife enjoy traveling, hiking and wilderness canoeing.

With increasing frequency, young children are being called upon to provide evidence in legal proceedings, and often it is the testimony of children that is central to the outcome of a case being tried. Children’s testimony is sought regularly in cases that range from divorce and custody disputes in family courts to allegations of sexual abuse in criminal cases. But what is known about the abilities of children to provide accurate information in these types of legal situations? To a great extent, children’s testimony depends upon their abilities to remember previous experiences and to be able to resist the suggestions of others. In this seminar, we will discuss the relevant literature on children’s memory and cognition in the context of a treatment of specific cases – most of which involve allegations of child sexual abuse – that have come to trial. Particular emphasis will be placed on two cases, the relatively recent Little Rascals Day Care case in North Carolina and the 300-year old Salem Witch Trials.

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PSYC 67.001: The Senses of Animals
PL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Mark Hollins

Mark Hollins is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and Director of the Somatosensory Research Lab. Graduate and undergraduate students in the Lab work with Dr. Hollins to examine the ways in which both sensory and cognitive factors influence perception. Their current work focuses on pain perception, since chronic pain is a major public health problem affecting one in three people and yet is not fully understood.

This seminar deals with the senses of animals. Many animal senses are related to our own, but are either more or less highly developed than ours. For example, falcons have sharper vision than we do, whereas moles are nearly blind. However, some animals possess sensory abilities that we lack entirely, such as the ability to perceive magnetic fields or the polarization of light. Taking the human senses as a point of reference, we will examine both categories of animal senses, talking about how they work and how they help animals survive. The seminar is also intended to increase students’ understanding of the scientific method and to help them develop their ability to communicate scientific ideas effectively in speech and writing. Grades will be based primarily on two exams (but no final), a report on a scientific article, a team project, a research proposal and a poster presentation.

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PSYC 68.001: Psychology of Emotion
SS
MWF, 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Kristen Lindquist

Dr. Kristen Lindquist is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and the director of the Carolina Affective Science Lab. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Boston College and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Harvard University Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative and the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging. Dr. Lindquist’s research uses social cognitive, psychophysiological and neuroscience methods to understand the nature of human emotion.

This seminar is designed especially for students interested in exploring the psychological and neuroscientific study of emotion. The seminar assumes students will have diverse backgrounds and there are no pre-requisites. Topics will include theoretical models of emotion process and structure, as well as discussions of psychological research bearing on questions such as “Can you read emotions in the faces of other people?” (emotional expressions), “How is emotion expressed in the body?” (autonomic physiology), “Where do emotions live in the brain?” (affective neuroscience), “Is emotion a source of wisdom or the enemy of rationality?” (emotion and reasoning), “Does emotion help or hurt your relationships with other people?” (emotion and social behavior), “Can you control your emotions or do they control you?” (emotion regulation), “Do emotions drive you crazy?” (emotion and psychopathology) and “Are women really the more emotional sex?” (gender and emotion). A range of perspectives in psychology will be explored, spanning social, cultural, developmental, clinical, cognitive and comparative psychology disciplines. Each week, a portion of the classes will be dedicated to discussions of research studies led by Dr. Lindquist. The rest of the classes will be less formal group-based discussions and demonstrations. Discussions will be used to explain or demonstrate especially important ideas, to discuss concepts covered in the assigned readings and to discuss the “real world” implications of class topics. Several discussion sessions will be dedicated to visits to Dr. Lindquist’s lab and the Biomedical Research Imaging Center, where students can experience research techniques and methods in a hands-on setting. Students will be evaluated based on exam performance, on a written research proposal, on an oral presentation of the research proposal and on participation in discussions.

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PSYC 89.001: Plasticity and the Brain
PL
TTH, 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM
Joe Hopfinger

Dr. Joe Hopfinger is a cognitive neuroscientist with over 15 years of experience teaching and running his lab at UNC. His lab utilizes a variety of methods to investigate the neural mechanisms of attention, using “brainwave” recordings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to peer into the living human brain as it performs its amazing cognitive functions. Dr. Hopfinger has recently expanded his research into the domain of “neural plasticity,” and he is studying the neural effects of online-cognitive training, as well as transcranial neural stimulation. He is excited to offer this new course on this cutting-edge, and somewhat controversial, topic.

This course will introduce you to the recent research and debate regarding neural plasticity and the ability of the healthy adult brain to change. Exciting new research suggests that the ability of the adult brain to change goes well beyond simply acquiring new knowledge and memories. Incredible accounts of brain damaged patients recovering cognitive, perceptual and motor functions has opened new areas of research into the ability of the adult brain to change, and a host of new businesses have arisen purporting to be able to trigger, and maintain, desired changes in the brain. Goals of this course include gaining knowledge of a new area of research in the psychological and neural sciences, developing skills in going beyond general-audience books and media coverage to critically evaluate research sources (scientific journal articles) and presenting your own well-researched ideas in written and oral formats.

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Public Policy

PLCY 51.001: The Global Environment in the 21st Century
GL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Elizabeth Sasser

Elizabeth Sasser is a public policy practitioner with extensive experience in federal and state government. Prior to joining UNC Public Policy as a Lecturer, Elizabeth served as policy advisor at the U.S. Department of Energy during the first term of the Obama Administration. She worked with Administration leadership on strategies to advance the nation’s interests on environmental and energy issues, focusing primarily on bilateral relations with China. Prior to her time in the Administration, she was a policy advisor to two North Carolina governors on energy and education issues. She has a B.A. and an M.P.P. from Duke University and studied at Peking University in Beijing, China, where she developed a fluency in Mandarin.

Many serious environmental threats are global in scope. Just think of the way we produce and consume energy; how waste produced in one corner of the world travels by air, sea and land to pollute another corner; and how ecosystems that transcend national boundaries are impacted by human behavior. Who is responsible for governing these global environmental challenges? This seminar explores linkages among nations, global environmental institutions and the environmental problems they cause and seek to rectify. We will examine how global environmental policy is made, with specific attention to the roles of institutions, nations, commercial and non-profit entities. Topics include the evolution of environmental policy in the United States; China, India and other developing countries’ impact on the global environment; global environmental institutions such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change; the role of environmental non-profit organizations; risks to the environment through pollution of land and sea by waste; global energy and environmental implications of shale gas and fracking; and the Fukushima-Dai-ichi nuclear disaster and its global repercussions.

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PLCY 55.001: Higher Education, the College Experience, and Public Policy
SS
MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM
Anna Krome-Lukens

Anna Krome-Lukens completed her PhD in U.S. History at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her historical research focuses on the history of social welfare and public health policies. She developed her interest in pressing issues in higher education while in graduate school, through involvement in UNC’s graduate branch of student government, work in Undergraduate Retention, an appointment as the graduate representative to Faculty Council and service on several university-wide committees, including the University Copyright Committee and the Administrative Board of the Library.

Higher education is undergoing rapid transformations that may dramatically change the undergraduate college experience. In this course, students will examine urgent questions facing American colleges and universities. For example, why is the cost of college rising and what implications does this shift have for who attends and graduates from college? How well is higher education preparing students for jobs of the future? How has new technology reshaped the college experience, both academically and socially? How should universities respond to student needs and desires? What role should athletics play in higher education? Students will explore these and other topics through class discussion, position papers, oral presentations and interactions with UNC faculty and staff.

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PLCY 70.001: National Policy: Who Sets the Agenda?
SS, CI, NA
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Larry Stein

Larry Stein was Senior Vice President for Policy Affairs at Capital One Financial Corporation. Stein has been with the Fortune 200 financial services company since 2003 and is responsible for Federal, State and local government relations, regulatory relations and the public policy dimension of corporate reputation management. During the second term of the Clinton Administration, Stein served as Assistant to the President and Director of Legislative Affairs. Stein was President Clinton’s chief lobbyist and sat on the Clinton Economic team and was a lead participant in the budget negotiations with the Congressional majority in both 1998 and 1999. Through a 33-year career in government and business, Stein has worked on a wide range of financial, tax and budgetary issues including Dodd-Frank, the Andrews Air Force Base Budget Summit, multiple budget, tax and trade bills, the repeal of Glass-Steagel, the Sarbanes-Oxley corporate accountability act and the impeachment of the President in 1998 and 99. Stein graduated Phi Beta Kappa, Magna Cum Laude from Allegheny College and was awarded a University Scholarship to Vanderbilt University where he received his Masters.

The class will concentrate on the contrast between the sometimes euphoric process of campaigning for high office as set against the painstaking and often torturous process of legislating. Taking the Obama 2008 campaign as a case study, (and using Game Change by John Heileman and Mark Halperin as a central text), we will explore President Obama’s historic victory and subsequent collision with legislative reality in his struggle to get the Affordable Care Act into law (using portions of America’s Bitter Pill by Steven Brill as a documentary record). The class will, in the process of the inquiry, bore deeply into the changing mechanics of “campaigning in America,” taking a look back at the Presidential campaigns of 1960 (The Making of a President 1960 by Theodore White) and the first real Presidential campaign of 1800 (The Deadlocked Election of 1800—Jefferson, Burr and The Union in the Balance by James Roger Sharp). Overall the class will attempt to explore the mismatch between the qualities necessary to win elections and those necessary for governing a diverse, contentious polity.

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PLCY 71.001: Justice and Inequality
PH
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Douglas MacKay

Douglas MacKay holds a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Toronto. Prior to joining the Department of Public Policy on July 1, 2013, he completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. MacKay’s research and teaching interests concern questions at the intersection of justice and public policy. He is currently working on projects concerning the justice of economic inequality – both domestic and global; the ethics of immigration policy; priority setting in health care; the ethics of international clinical research; and justice in the division of responsibilities within federal systems of government.

The value of equality is a foundational principle of the United States of America. The Declaration of Independence proclaims that “all men are created equal” and possess unalienable rights to “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” The Constitution of the United States requires that no State “deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” Additionally, equality has been the goal of a number of influential political movements, including the Civil Rights movement, the Feminist movement, Occupy Wall Street and the LGBT movement. Yet despite this prominence of the value of equality, the U.S. is becoming a more unequal society in a number of domains, particularly, with respect to the distribution of income, political influence and social mobility. This course investigates the value of equality and asks which forms of inequality are unjust and ought to be remedied. We will focus on a variety of different spheres of U.S. social, political and economic life, including the distribution of income and opportunities, marriage, health outcomes, education, voting and political influence, and employment. We will also ask whether equality is a value that applies beyond U.S. borders, particularly with respect to global disparities in income and wealth, and climate change. The course will feature a combination of lectures and class discussion. Significant instructional time will also be dedicated to developing students’ critical thinking, reading and writing skills.

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PLCY 85.001: Reforming America’s Schools
SS, NA
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
JB Buxton

JB Buxton has worked in a variety of roles in government and the nonprofit sector focused on public education, including North Carolina’s deputy state superintendent, senior education advisor to N.C. Gov. Mike Easley; a White House Fellow working with the Domestic Policy Council under President Clinton; director of policy and research for the Public School Forum of N.C. and coordinator of special programs for the NC Teaching Fellows Program. He began his career as a high school English teacher and coach in Massachusetts. Buxton currently runs the Education Innovations Group, a consulting practice focused on PreK-12 and postsecondary public education. Buxton works with state departments of education, national foundations and state, regional and national organizations focused on dramatic improvements in public education. Buxton received his bachelor’s degree in English from UNC-Chapel Hill and his master’s in public affairs from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University.

This course focuses on the policy and politics of education reform in America. Who are the major institutional and political actors engaged in education reform? Who are the major influencers? How do they interact to make and implement public policy? What are the major issues and debates in contemporary American public education? Participants in the seminar will develop an understanding of who is involved and how policy is developed at the local, state and federal levels, and delve into current issues and debates on subjects like standards, testing and accountability, school choice, teacher preparation and compensation, and innovative school models. The seminar will include interactions with current policy and political actors from North Carolina and around the nation.

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PLCY 89.001: Ending Poverty – CANCELLED 5/10/2016
SS, BN
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Sudhanshu Handa

Professor Sudhanshu Handa is a development economist specializing in human capital, poverty and social protection. He is one of the lead researchers on the Transfer Project (https://transfer.cpc.unc.edu/), a multi-country research initiative led by UNICEF to understand the impact of social protection programs in Africa on households and children. Prof. Handa has lived and worked in Jamaica, Mozambique, Kenya and Mexico. He is returning to UNC this fall after three years serving as the Head of Economic and Social Policy at UNICEF’s Office of Research. Dr. Handa received his PhD from University of Toronto and his BA from Johns Hopkins University.

Ending poverty is the underlying goal of almost all social policy initiatives, yet poverty remains a serious problem world-wide. In the United States alone about one-fifth of all children live in poverty, and in poorer developing nations over half the population typically live in poverty. Why is ending poverty such a seemingly elusive goal for social policy? Using Poor Economics as one of the core texts, we will address common debates and conceptions about poverty ranging from ’the poor are lazy and wasteful’ to ‘poor but efficient’. The seminar will review typical poverty alleviation initiatives, focusing primarily on low-income countries while also referring to the U.S. and European approaches to social protection. The seminar will compare a rights-based approach to poverty policy with an economic approach and use both approaches to discuss the appropriateness of specific programs. There is no pre requisite for this seminar.

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Religious Studies

RELI 65.001: Myth, Philosophy, and Science in the Ancient World
PH, WB
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Zlatko Pleše

Zlatko Pleše received his PhD in Classics at Yale University, where he specialized in ancient philosophy and medicine, early Christianity, Hellenistic rhetoric and Coptic language. He taught at various universities in Europe and the US, including Yale and Wesleyan University, and is currently associate professor of Ancient Mediterranean religions (Greco-Roman world, early Christianity and late antiquity) at Carolina. He has published monographs and articles on Platonist philosophers of the Roman imperial period, ancient Gnostic and Hermetic writings, apocryphal gospels and early modern theories of nationhood in South-Eastern Europe.

This interdisciplinary course explores various, often conflicting ways of shaping reality in the ancient world–religious, scientific and philosophical. The course is organized around a series of case studies: 1) the formation and makeup of the cosmos; 2) the origin of mankind and its sexual differentiation; 3) the invention of the ‘self;’ 4) the origin and nature of dreams; 5) foundations of law, justice and culture. Short papers, in-class discussions and oral presentations will be used to reconstruct the complex intellectual world of natural scientists, philosophers, oral story-tellers, ethnographers and cultural historians throughout the ancient Mediterranean world. Readings include Near Eastern mythical narratives and Homeric poems and hymns; selections from the earliest Greek philosophers and from Plato’s dialogues; works from the famous Hippocratic corpus and Galen’s medical treatises; and a number of religious texts from ancient Greece and Rome, early Christianity and late antiquity.

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RELI 70.001: Jesus in Scholarship and Film
SS
T, 12:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Bart Ehrman

Bart Ehrman is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies. He has taught at Carolina since 1988. He is author or editor of thirty books and is widely regarded as a leading expert on the New Testament and the history of the early Christian church. He is also a well-known teacher on campus, having won the Undergraduate Students Teaching Award, the Bowman and Gordon Gray Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and the John William Pope Center Spirit of Inquiry Teaching Award.

This seminar will examine how historians have reconstructed the life, teachings and death of the historical Jesus. We will look at the Gospels of the New Testament, as well as references to Jesus in other writings (Roman and Jewish sources, as well as Gospels that did not make it into the New Testament). In addition, we will explore how Jesus has been portrayed in modern film, including such Biblical “epics” as The Greatest Story Ever Told, such “period pieces” as Jesus Christ Superstar, such brilliant retellings as Jesus of Montreal and such controversial films as The Last Temptation of Christ and The Passion of the Christ. The ultimate goals of the seminar are to see what we can say about the historical man Jesus himself and how Jesus came to be portrayed in both ancient sources and modern imagination.

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Romance Studies

ROML 56.001 Italians in Search of Harmony
LA
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Ennio Rao

Ennio Rao is Professor of Italian and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Romance Languages. He earned his Ph.D. at Columbia University, concentrating in the Classics and Italian Renaissance literature. In his years at Carolina he has received a Tanner Award for excellence in undergraduate teaching and taught a wide range of courses, spanning such areas as the humanist invective, Italian chivalric literature, renaissance theater, the history of the Italian language and Italian dialectology. He is currently studying the revival of Epicureanism in 15th-century Italy.

This seminar explores the concept of harmony in selected Italian writers, from Dante to contemporary writers. In the 14th century, Dante dreamed of a universal empire that would assure peace on earth, thus allowing mankind to pursue knowledge and wisdom and to achieve the ultimate harmony in the next world: the natural reunion of creature and creator. Dante himself directs his readers to interpret the journey of the pilgrim in the Divine Comedy as Everyman’s quest for transcendental harmony with God. This quest for harmony is characteristic of many Italian writers, from Petrarch to Leopardi, to many contemporary poets, novelists and film directors. Students will be reading and discussing works by Dante, Petrarch, Leopardi, Pirandello, Vittorini and Moravia and will view films by Antonioni and Bertolucci. They will also be divided into groups and invited to produce an original work (theatrical, cinematic, literary, artistic, etc.) that illustrates the concept of harmony.

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ROML 89.001: Courts, Courtiers, and Court Culture in Early Modern Spain
LA, WB
MW, 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM
Carmen Hsu

Professor Carmen Hsu teaches 16th- and 17th-century Spanish literature and culture. She is devoted to research on well-known authors, especially Miguel de Cervantes and Lope de Vega among others. She is also drawn to subjects and texts that reflect Spain’s encounters with cultures and peoples beyond Western Europe. One overarching concern that unites her work on these diverse subjects is her interest in situating Spanish literature within a global, comparative and interdisciplinary context.

What was an early modern Spanish court like? Who and what were the key components that contributed to the making of the court society in 16th- and 17th-century Spain? How did literature, the visual arts, clothing, food, gifts, buildings, entertainments and social etiquette make up the court culture of that time in Spain? This course aims to engage students in discussions about the making of the fascinating Habsburg court world in early modern Spain. We will embark on a shared intellectual adventure exploring how and where monarchs and courtiers lived, their education, what cultural milieu they contributed in fomenting, how they used literature and other cultural forms for self-promotion and the politics and reasoning behind.

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ROML 89H.001: Sex, Sexuality, and the Body in Early Modern European Literature (Honors)
LA, NA
MW, 1:25 PM – 2:40 PM
Lucia Binotti

Professor Lucia Binotti is a Philologist turned into Digital Humanist. She works on material and cultural history and in the mechanisms that construct linguistic and cultural identity. Binotti has always been fascinated with the cultural and social parallels that the printing revolution of the sixteenth century shares with the information technology revolution of today. Her latest projects take her reflection on the place of the humanities in 21st century education outside of the walls of academia, in an endeavor to produce artifacts that will enhance the dissemination and fruition of social and cultural knowledge among a broader public.

The aim of this course is to explore the cultural constructions of gender and sexuality in the literature of Medieval and Renaissance Southern Europe. We will approach questions such as the status of women and the context of misogyny, the societal role of same-sex relations, the presentation and visualization of sexuality, desire and the body. We will observe the period through the lens of five overarching themes that recur at different moments and in different texts throughout the course: “Sex, beauty and artistic creation,” “Sex, marriage and family,” “Sex and religion”, “Sex and science” and “Sex, deviancy and crime.” Using such themes as the framework for our interpretations we will read, analyze and discuss in loose chronological order an array of literary works mostly of the Iberian and Italian tradition, from which we will tease out an interdisciplinary understanding of the cultural and aesthetic forces that shaped the representation of sex and sexual love before the advent of the scientific theories that in turn define modern gender and sexuality for us today. This historical approach will offer insights into the shaping of our own cultural and personal attitudes. By focusing our attention on the challenged and changing meanings of sexuality, this course aims to strengthen your skills of critical analysis.

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Sociology

SOCI 58.001: Globalization, Work, and Inequality
SS, GL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Ted Mouw

Ted Mouw is a sociologist who studies social demography, labor markets and inequality. He received his Ph.D. (in sociology) and M.A. (in economics) in 1999 from Michigan. He is currently working on a project on globalization and low-wage labor markets. There are three components to this project: 1) Longitudinal evidence on “dead end jobs” and working poverty in the U.S., 2) immigration and the labor market for Mexican migrants and 3) industrialization and labor conditions in Mexico and Indonesia. He has also researched the use of job contacts to find work and racial friendship segregation in schools. After college he lived in Indonesia for two years, where he taught English, studied Indonesian and Javanese, and climbed volcanoes.

This seminar, which presents a comparative and multidisciplinary perspective on how globalization affects labor markets and inequality, will consist of two parts. First, we will discuss basic sociological and economic models of work and globalization and then students will apply these models to three case studies: 1) “sweatshops” and the question of international labor standards, 2) industrialization and development in China and Indonesia and 3) immigration and economic integration between the U.S. and Mexico. Students will prepare research papers on one of the three case studies. Course readings will be supplemented by the teacher’s current research on two questions: 1) What are conditions actually like for workers in Nike plants in Indonesia? (Interviews and a photo-narrative) and 2) How does the labor market work for undocumented Mexican workers? (Interviews from Carrboro, NC, part of Mouw’s personal research project.)

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SOCI 64.001: Equality of Educational Opportunity Then and Now
SS
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Karolyn Tyson

Karolyn Tyson is Professor in the Department of Sociology. She earned her doctorate in sociology in 1999 from the University of California at Berkeley. Her main fields of interest are sociology of education, social psychology and social inequality. Dr. Tyson’s publications have examined the processes by which schools reproduce social inequality and how the schooling experience affects students’ attitudes toward school. Her overall program of research centers on understanding how cultural, structural and individual-level factors affect school achievement and contribute to unequal educational outcomes.

The 1954 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka case centered on one of the most significant and controversial issues in American public education: equality of educational opportunity. Now more than 60 years after this historic Supreme Court decision, this seminar will use a sociological lens to examine in depth the social conditions that precipitated the case, other relevant court decisions, the changing definitions of race and the educational landscape over the past 6 decades. Topics include de jure and de facto segregation, busing, between-school segregation, tracking and ability grouping, the black-white achievement gap and residential segregation. Students will read historical and contemporary accounts and research reports on the move and progress toward equality of educational opportunity, view films related to the topic, conduct original research exploring the schooling experiences of contemporary American youth and prepare an oral presentation and a research paper.

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SOCI 72.001: Race and Ethnicity in the United States
SS, US
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Anthony Perez

Anthony Perez studies the measurement, meaning and implications of race/ethnicity in the United States and abroad. His research focuses on the interplay between formal and informal conceptualizations of race and ethnicity and de facto measures of race/ethnic populations used in the Census, social surveys and demographic data; causes of uncertainty in the reporting of race across generations and throughout the life course; and the consequences of racial uncertainty for research on inequality, race-attentive social policy and demographic projections of past and future diversity.

It is impossible to understand the structure of American society, or the lived experiences of its people, without understanding both the meaning and consequences of race and ethnicity. Yet, while examples of what race does are well known to students interested in questions of social justice and inequality, the question of what race is receives considerably less attention. Any student familiar with U.S. society can identify myriad, often striking examples of racial inequality—from highly disproportionate rates of poverty, unemployment and disease to racially disparate treatment at the hands of police, teachers and neighbors. But what, exactly, is “race?” The geographic origins of our ancestors? The social categories that others perceive from our appearance? The identities we claim based on a sense of belonging or attachment to a particular culture or community? Or can race be any and all of these things, depending on the context in which individuals perceive and react to one another? These are just some of pressing questions with which students will grapple in this seminar, as we delve into the meaning and measurement of race in society, how it changes over time and space and what it signals for the future of race/ethnic relations in the United States. In pursuit of these aims, we will incorporate a variety of instructional strategies and active learning techniques, including primary data collection and analysis, critical examination of race/ethnicity in popular culture (including music, literature, and film) and in-class group activities.

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SOCI 89H.001: Rationalization and the Changing Nature of Social Life in 21st Century America
SS
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Howard E. Aldrich

Howard E. Aldrich is Kenan Professor of Sociology. He has won numerous awards for his teaching and mentoring: Favorite Professor Award from the senior class at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; graduate students’ Award for Best Teaching, Department of Sociology, several times; and the J Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award from the University of Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 2000, he won the Global Entrepreneurship Researcher of the Year Award from the Swedish Foundation of Small Business Research. His main research interests are entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial team formation, gender and entrepreneurship, and evolutionary theory. He writes a regular column, “Speaking from Experience,” for The National Teaching and Learning Forum. He fly fishes year-round in the mountains of Western North Carolina and Eastern Tennessee and wherever else his travels may take him. Photos of his catches may be seen on his homepage.

In the 21st century, fast food restaurants have become a model for everyday life. Some scholars have even talked about the “McDonaldization” of the nation and the world. By that, they mean a drive toward greater efficiency, predictability, calculability and control by non-human technologies in modern organizations. This drive has shaped many features of American life, including consumption behavior, health care, law and education. Such forces have even affected personal relationships. Sociologists have a term for this process: “rationalization.” In this course, we will explore that social process through a process called “active learning:” field trips, participation in a makerspace, presentations by visitors, videos, role-playing, classroom simulations and other activities. You will be assessed based on your contributions to blog posts, five short (two pages) papers, a term project and a group presentation.

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Statistic and Operations Research

STOR 54.001: Adventures in Statistics
QI
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Jan Hannig

Jan Hannig is a Professor in the Department of Statistics and Operations Research. His current research interests are in foundations of statistics. He and his co-authors can be partially credited with resurrection of fiducial statistics. Fiducial statistics was created in the 1930s and since inception was wrought with controversy. By the mid-1960s the topic was largely dormant and stayed ignored until the mid-2000s. Since then it has experienced a renaissance with several groups contributing publications in leading statistical journals. Jan is married to Dr. Shevaun Neupert, a professor of Psychology at NCSU, with a keen interest in applied statistics. This makes for some wonderfully nerdy Saturday morning chats. They have a daughter Klára and a son Declan.

The aim of this seminar is to show that contrary to the common belief, statistics can be exciting and fun. We will focus on the big picture ideas. Instead of memorizing confusing formulas, many of the technical ideas will be demonstrated by computer experiments. We will view some recent movies and discuss the role statistics plays in sports, gambling, medicine, politics, finance, etc. Then we will study randomness and discover why the casino always wins. Finally we will discuss the basic principle of statistical reasoning “if it is unlikely do not believe it,” get to understand why a relatively small sample can carry a big punch and learn how to lift ourselves by our bootstraps. This seminar is not a replacement for an introductory statistics course.

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STOR 55.001: Risk and Uncertainty in the Real World
QI
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Shankar Bhamidi

After spending most of his childhood in India, Shankar Bhamidi came to the US to pursue a PhD in Statistics at the University of California at Berkeley. After five fantastic years pursing his passion in probabilistic modeling of real world networks and eating wonderful food (!), he completed his PhD in 2008 and moved to Vancouver for a year to further advance his training both in probability and in being a foodie, before finally moving to UNC in 2009. His research entails probabilistic and mathematical modeling of real world networks, including social networks such as Twitter, Facebook and peer interaction networks, data transmission networks such as the Internet and vascular networks in the brain. When he is not obsessively thinking about a math problem then he is neck deep in a Sci-Fi book or an Anime.

In the early 1900′s the great writer H.G.Wells said “Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write.” We see this every day as society becomes more and more complex and we are faced with a barrage of data and the pressure of making “optimal” decisions about our life and our future in the light of this uncertainty. Yet we are ill-equipped from an evolutionary perspective to make such decisions. The aim of this class is to study the role of uncertainty in our daily lives, to explore the cognitive biases that impair us and to understand how one uses quantitative models to make decision under uncertainty in a variety of fields. We will study the connections of such questions to an array of scientific disciplines ranging from psychology, financial modeling, evolution, sociology, law and criminal justice, economics, medicine and health, and rare events and coincidences.

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Women’s and Gender Studies

WMST 51.001: Race, Sex, and Place in America
SS
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Mai Nguyen

Dr. Mai Nguyen is an associate professor in the City and Regional Planning Department and focuses her teaching and research on housing and community development. She applies both her Sociology and Urban Planning degrees to address vexing urban and regional dilemmas. She employs both quantitative and qualitative methods to examine problems related to social and spatial inequality, urban growth phenomena, the relationship between the built and social environments, and socially vulnerable populations. She is an expert in housing policy, community development, economic development, immigration, disasters and urban growth phenomena (e.g. demographic change, sprawl and urbanization). Dr. Nguyen is also an award winning teacher. She was awarded the J. Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award in January 2013 for excellence in undergraduate teaching.

This seminar will expose students to the complex dynamics of race, ethnicity and gender and how these have shaped the American city since 1945. It will examine both the historical record as well as contemporary works of literature and film to probe the ways race and ethnicity have contributed to the culture of urban life in the United States. It will also explore the different ways women and men perceive, understand, occupy and use urban space and the built environment. Drawing upon the scholarship of several disciplines (urban planning, ethnic studies, sociology and American history), the seminar will examine a broad spectrum of topics, including the social construction of race, the creation of the underclass label, residential segregation, the significance of Hurricane Katrina, sexual identity and space, and immigration. The last portion of the course will focus on planning and policy tools that have the potential to alleviate racial/ethnic and gender inequality in space.

Students may also register for this course under PLAN 52.001.

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