Spring 2011 Course List

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AFAM
AMST
ANTH
ART
ASIA
BUSI
CHEM
CLAS
COMM
COMP
DRAM
ECON
EDUC
ENGL
GEOG
GEOL
GERM
HIST
IDST
INLS
JOMC
MASC
MATH
MUSC
PHIL
PHYS
PLAN
PLCY
POLI
PSYC
PUBH
RELI
ROML
SOCI
STOR
WMST

AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES

AFAM 51: Masquerades of Blackness
VP, US 
TuTh 9:30-10:45AM
Charlene Regester
This seminar is designed to investigate how the concept of race has been represented in cinema historically, with a particular focus on, or interest in, representations of race when blackness is masqueraded. Its intent is to launch an investigative inquiry into how African Americans are represented on screen in various time periods, how we as spectators are manipulated by these cinematic constructions of race, and how race is marked or coded other than through visual representation. Students will view films that deal with “passing” from the various historical periods and will utilize theoretical concepts introduced in the assigned reading material to read racialized representations in these visual representations. Films selected for viewing include those from the pre-World War II Era, the Civil Rights Era, and the “Post-Racial” era. Students will be required to write three papers that reflect their ability to apply theoretical concepts to reading racialized representions on screen in these three historical periods and that demonstrate their understanding of how racial masquerades have evolved over time.

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AMERICAN STUDIES

Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative
AMST 51: Navigating America
SS, CI, EE, NA
MWF 1:00-1:50PM
Rachel Willis
This seminar is designed to teach students how to navigate new intellectual terrain and process unfamiliar information from a variety of disciplinary perspectives with an emphasis on discussion and field study. Each student will plan, implement, and document an individual short journey during the first half of the semester. This voyage of discovery on the campus or in the surrounding community can be either physical or intellectual, but must be chronicled with a documentary journal and presented to the class in a multi-media format that conveys the individual’s perspective, journey, and discoveries. Additionally, the class will collaboratively plan, implement, and document a common journey to the western part of the state from MARCH 25-27, 2011 that will be linked to our readings, guest lectures, and research on the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Appalachian Trail. Author and public historian Anne Whisnant will be our guest faculty expert for this journey. Students MUST be available for these three days for this travel as it will be a core aspect of the experiential education connection for the course.

AMST 53: Family and Social Change
HS, CI, NA
TuTh 9:30-10:45AM
Robert Allen
This seminar uses changes in the American family over the past century as a way of understanding larger processes of social change. Through reading, film viewing, and discussion, we will consider the complex of changes that, taken together, produced “modern” American society over the 19th and 20th centuries: industrialization and the rise of corporate capitalism, urbanization, the rise of consumer culture and mass media, and the civil rights movements that extended full citizenship beyond white males. We will then consider how changes in the family as a social institution reflect and contribute to these social changes. We will examine changing notions of romance, marriage, parenting, fatherhood, motherhood, and childhood. We will examine scholarly histories of the family, along with diaries and memoirs in the Southern Historical Collection, oral history interviews, and court cases. Finally, we will examine the representation of family life in contemporary Hollywood cinema. Participants will research their own family histories and produce a family “album” that documents and reflects upon the ways that links can be made between change at the level of “society” and change at the level of the family.

Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative
AMST 59: Yoga in Modern America: History, Belief, Commerce
HS, CI, NA
TuTh 3:30-4:45PM
Jay Garcia
This seminar offers a chronological and interdisciplinary exploration of yoga in the U.S. from the late-nineteenth century to the present. Following prefatory readings in yoga philosophy, the seminar concentrates on discussions of yoga undertaken by American writers, including Henry David Thoreau, William James, and Christopher Isherwood, among others. The seminar addresses several interrelated subjects, including the cultural networks that helped to bring yoga to the U.S. via lecture circuits for Hindu thinkers; the complex versions of yoga that have arisen within the contours of the U.S.; practical and philosophical tensions created by the divergent meanings attached to yoga (exercise regimen, spiritual practice and advertising concept, among others); and the status of yoga as a growing industry in North America ($18 billion in 2007). The seminar draws upon the expertise of local residents who participate in different ways in the yoga community. Through readings, visitors, and writing assignments, students gain a detailed understanding of the complex processes of transplantation that have made yoga practices an increasingly visible feature of contemporary American life.

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ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 51: Environmentalism and Society
SS
TuTh 2:00-3:15PM
Dorothy Holland
This seminar addresses the social problem of environmental degradation. We examine the environmental movement as a transformative process linked to changing systems of power and privilege, consumer desire, and culturally developed attachments to place and nature. Students conduct original group research projects on the environmental movement in North Carolina.

ANTH 61: Deep Economies
SS, GL
TuTh 2:00-3:15PM
Rudi Colloredo-Mansfeld
In Namibia, an ethnic group named the Ju/hoansi lived for 20,000 years by foraging and hunting—then they nearly gave up their way of life in eighteen months in the late 1970s. In Maine, lobster gangs in coastal towns attack rival lobstermen and defy marine biologists. Yet, in so doing, they have created one of the most productive fisheries in the world. And in Chicago, street level entrepreneurs work as mechanics, chefs, and child-care specialists using back allies, public parks and store fronts. Along the way they build a community economy that spans church ministries, downtown businesses, and the urban drug trade.
This course examines these and other classic studies from anthropology to look at what makes an economy sustainable and what trades keep communities together in the long run. Instead of looking at the economy as a narrow set of market activities, will look at how work and wealth cross boundaries into ritual life, family ties, and personal identity. We also tackle specific moral problems: Does sharing a resource cause people to over use it? Must capitalism result in winner-take-all societies? Do economies centered on gift exchange produce equality and goodwill?

Keeping a field notebook, seminar participants will develop their own ethnography, or cultural inquiry, into community-centered exchange. Students explore how “hustling,” “investing,” “defending,” and “sharing,” work as both individual economic strategies and community building actions.

ANTH 77: Windows of Mystery and Wonder: Exploring Self-Taught Art
VP
TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM
Glenn Hinson
Who has the right to define what counts as “art”?  Both the market and the academy readily claim this prerogative, offering themselves as artistic gatekeepers who hold the rights of definition.  Meanwhile, countless folk artists with neither formal training nor affiliation follow their own visions, creating works grounded more in the everyday aesthetics of their communities—and in the wonders of their imaginations—than in the traditions of mainstream art.  The market is quick to label these artists “outsiders,” crafting biographies that highlight their presumed eccentricity and oddness.  This seminar will turn the tables on this act of imposed definition, exploring the worlds of self-taught artistry by engaging the artists directly, asking questions about meaning, tradition, and the role of creativity in everyday life.  It will also explore the manipulations of the market, investigating how stereotypes of race, class, and region affect the commercial valuing of vernacular art.

Students in this seminar will work in groups to conduct fieldwork with a self-taught (or “folk”) artist, whom they will interview and photograph over the course of the semester.  We will also host artists in class, and visit some in their homes.

ANTH 089: Public Archaeology in Bronzeville: Research and Community Engagement in Chicago’s Black Metropolis
EE, HS
Anna Agbe-Davies
TuTh 2:00-3:15PM
The term “African diaspora” usually refers to the consequences of the transatlantic slave trade, but there have been many diasporas of people of African descent. One major movement took place in the early 20th century U.S. when millions left small southern communities for large industrial northern cities. This class examines that phenomenon through the lens of a single site where migrants lived in the city of Chicago. The Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls was run by black women to provide social services for female migrants from 1926 through the 1960s. Research at this site combines elements of archaeology, anthropology, and history to study their lives. Students, working in teams, will have the opportunity to contribute to the ongoing research effort via analysis of written records and artifacts. This multidisciplinary project will be of interest to students curious about 20th century history, African-American culture, museums and heritage, women’s and gender studies, migration, and labor history.

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ART

Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative
ART 50: The Artistic Temperament
VP
TuTh 9:30-10:45AM
James Hirschfield
This seminar examines the daunting yet important questions of how to advance and sustain one’s artistic production. We focus not only on what it means to be a successful artist, but also examine the importance of creativity and hard work in any successful venture. While looking at the work and lives of musicians (Hector Berlioz to the Beatles), playwrights (Shakespeare to Arthur Miller), film makers (Luis Brunuel to Werner Herzog), visual artists (Michelangelo to Alberto Giacometti), and even a tight-rope walker (Philippe Petit), we will grapple with what it means to be in the business of self-expression. The seminar is meant to help students understand who they are, and how in the words of Joseph Campbell they can “follow their bliss”. As we consider career options, two important questions will emerge: “What does it means to be an artist?” and “What lies before me?” Ultimately, the key to success in the arts is finding the physical and spiritual nourishment to continue, sustain, and move an artistic activity forward. We will focus not on the road to success per say, but also on driving down that road and learning to avoid the pot holes and muddy patches that can throw us off the road.

ART 54: Art, War, and Revolution
VP, NA
TuTh 11AM-12:15PM
Daniel Sherman
Focusing on one or a few related works of art per week, this seminar will explore the complex relationship between war and conflict. At the heart of the seminar lie the tensions between glorifying war and violence, and memorializing their victims; between official justification and moral outrage; and between political programs (many of the works represent a particular view of war) and the malleability of meaning. The focus on single works in a variety of media – painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, graphic arts, and film – will offer students the opportunity to study each work in depth while also gaining exposure to a range of interpretive methods and the richness of the historical context. Although we will begin with a work from classical antiquity (the Arch of Titus in Rome) and consider an influential series of prints from 17th-century Europe (Jacques Callot’s Disasters of War), our primary focus will be on the 19th and 20th centuries, examining works related to the French Revolution, the U.S. and Spanish Civil Wars, the Russian Revolution, and the two World Wars. The seminar will meet occasionally at the Ackland Art Museum and Wilson Library to examine original prints and poster art.

ART 61: Introduction to African American Art
VP
W 2:00-4:50PM
John Bowles
Focusing on the Carolinas, this course explores the many ways African Americans have used art to define themselves and their communities. We will ask how art has been used to maintain cultural traditions, shape American culture, and build political solidarity from the era of colonialism and slavery to the present. We will study the cultivation of artistic practices from Africa as the foundation for community solidarity and local resistance to slavery and racism; African American painters, sculptors, and craftsmen who earned national reputations for the quality of their work; artists who re-imagined and redefined African American identity through art; and artists throughout the 20th century who represented the daily lives and hardships of rural and working-class blacks. Students will visit campus museums and archives, and conduct original research using regional sources. Persistent questions throughout the semester will include, How does the art of African Americans in the Carolinas provoke us to question our own identities and roles within the region, and what is the contemporary role of art in shaping public discourse?

ART 89 Section 001: Art, Gender, and Power in Early Modern Europe
VP, WB
MWF 9:00-9:50AM
Tatiana String
What did it mean to be a man or to be a woman in the Renaissance? This seminar will explore the ways in which constructions of gender are critical to understandings of the visual arts in the early modern period (c. 1400-1650). We will discuss and analyze a focused group of representations of men and women: portraits, mythological and biblical paintings and sculptures, and even turn our attention to the buildings these men and women inhabited. We will study the work of artists such as Michelangelo, Donatello, Titian, Holbein, and Rubens, amongst others, to find ways of understanding how masculinity and femininity were central concerns in early modern society and in the art produced in this period.

ART 89 Section 002: Artist and Site
VP
TuTh 6:00-8:50PM
David Colagiovanni
This seminar will explore Site-Oriented artistic practice or the various sites, locations and opportunities that artists can insert their practice within. The class will discover locations that give the artist an opportunity to explore ways of creating within a given context. This is a class for makers and thinkers particularly suited to those wishing to pursue their education in art, music, communications, creative writing, journalism, and drama as well as those interested in the development of collaborative artistic communities. Starting with the Artist as Site we will explore through reading and projects ways to incorporate art into our everyday lives. We will then move towards locating our practice within our group, our community, and our campus and continue to expand into larger and more abstract ideas of site like the web, the globe, the universe, etc. Each section of the course will end in the presentation of our work through events, exhibitions, and site-oriented arts projects. The class will culminate in large-scale outdoor video projection onto campus and community architecture.

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ASIAN STUDIES

ASIA 56: Writing Women in Modern China
LA, BN
TuTh 9:30-10:45AM
Robin Visser
In “liberating” China from its traditional cultural practices, Chairman Mao denounced the oppression of women by famously declaring that “women hold up half the sky.” One of the Chinese Communist Party’s achievements was its elevation of women. After the Party initiated capitalist economic reforms in the 1980s, however, women may have lost ground. This seminar compares the rhetoric of equality between the sexes presented during China’s feminist movements by late Imperial, May Fourth Era, and communist thinkers to perspectives by women writers. We examine how several generations of women reconciled themselves to, and resisted, the expectations of women under Confucianism, Communism, and Capitalism in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Students read (in translation) Chinese literature and essays, discuss ideas of gender, liberation, and literature, and learn to write short position papers and a research paper. The evolution of women’s status provides a fascinating perspective on China’s past century of modernization, and insight into its development in the twenty-first century. No previous knowledge of China is required.

ASIA 59: Media Masala: Popular Music, TV, and the Internet in Modern India and Pakistan
VP, BN
MW 4:30-5:45PM
Afroz Taj
“Media Masala” explores different types of broadcast and digital media, examining various cultural examples (e.g., music videos, television soap operas and reality shows, radio, and the Internet) and covering a variety of topics, including gender, sexuality, globalization, religion (personal and public), and activism. We will also discuss the ways traditional art forms (e.g., qawwali, ghazal, epic, classical dance) are transformed and given relevance in the modern South Asian media. An important theme of this course is how India and Pakistan, despite historical tensions, are linked by a common media culture that interprets and sometimes transcends geopolitical differences. This seminar will be particularly useful and fun for students who like to consider a variety of multimedia and textual sources in thinking about a provocative issue or question. Each student will design a short research project and make a presentation, and with a small group, produce a music video, giving the class an experiential perspective on the media in modern India and Pakistan. There are no prerequisites.

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BUSINESS

BUSI 51: Business Accounting
CI
MW 2:00-3:15PM
Edward Blocher
Corporate financial reporting is the key means that companies have to communicate to their investors, regulators, and the general public who rely on the integrity and objectivity of these reports. Think about a company that you are interested in (e.g., Wal-Mart, McDonald’s, or any company): How would you interpret the information and evaluate the trustworthiness of the company’s financial report? Students in this seminar will develop the skills needed to examine and understand company financial reports. Understanding financial reports is becoming more important every day for two reasons. One is the increasing complexity and volatility of the stock markets, as illustrated in the recent economic downturn; these changes increase the importance of a careful analysis of a company’s reported earnings and overall financial position. Also, the financial reports themselves have become more complex as large banks and other large companies have developed entirely new financial transactions which are, at least initially, difficult to account for in the financial report.

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CHEMISTRY

CHEM 70: You Don’t Have to be a Rocket Scientist
PL
MW 2:00-3:15PM
Malcolm Forbes
Often the science presented in the mass media is shallow and one–sided. To truly understand whether a presentation has value, one must critically evaluate it. While the non-scientist may find this a daunting proposition, developing the skills to do so is really not difficult. The underlying theme of this First Year Seminar is to learn how the Scientific Method can be used to extract information from the mass media and discuss scientific development and interpretation knowledgeably.  Readings and discussions will form the basis for developing a questioning mind and an objective attitude toward science.  We will study the public’s perception of science and scientists, the Scientific Method, and the peer review process as we address controversial subjects such as homeopathic medicine, chiropractic, cold fusion, polywater, creationism, psychics/ESP, and perpetual motion machines.  We will learn to apply healthy skepticism to assess the value of these treatments/theories.  Required Readings: Why People Believe Weird Things: Pseudoscience, Superstition, and Other Confusions of Our Time by Michael Shermer,  Did Adam and Eve Have Navels?: Debunking Pseudoscience by Martin Gardner, and Voodoo Science by Robert L. Park.

 

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CLASSICS

CLAS 53: Famous Courtroom Trials of Antiquity
LA, NA, WB
MWF 3:00-3:50PM
Cecil Wooten
In this seminar we will look at speeches delivered in some of the most famous trials of antiquity. We will examine the facts of the case, the laws relevant to it, legal procedure used in the ancient world, and, most importantly, how the speaker presents his case, including types of argument, structure of speeches, and stylistic considerations. After we have examined a particular speech, students will be asked to construct and deliver a speech that might have been presented on the other side, using the precepts of ancient rhetoric to construct their speech. This seminar provides a very useful experience for students who want to attend law school.

CLAS 62: Barbarians in Greek and Roman Culture
HS, CI, WB
MWF 1:00-1:50PM
James Rives
This seminar focuses on the ways that Greeks and Romans depicted ‘barbarians’, that is, the non-Greek and non-Roman peoples with whom they came into contact, especially Egyptians, Persians, Scythians, Gauls, and Germans. We will engage in close study of selected primary sources, history and drama in particular, as well as sample some of the modern scholarly approaches to this subject. The chief goal is to analyze the way that Greeks and Romans constructed and employed the various stereotypes of barbarians for their own purposes; this investigation will culminate in a major research paper. We will also consider the relevance of this Greek and Roman material to our own society, by using it to reflect on the ways that people of different ethnic, cultural, and religious backgrounds are characterized in our own society; the other major assignment in the seminar will be a group project in which you will ‘translate’ one of the ancient works that we study by reframing it in contemporary terms.

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COMMUNICATION STUDIES

COMM 53: Collective Leadership for Community Change
MWF 5:00-6:15PM
SS, EE
Patricia Parker
This seminar will explore communication models for collective leadership involving youth and adults in vulnerable communities. Partnering with local youth-focused organizations, students will work in teams to research and design community-based change projects. Projects will focus on three key strategies that engage youth as leaders and stakeholders in communities: youth media arts, youth organizing, and youth participatory action research. Course readings, guest speakers and class field trips will provide exemplars of successful work in these three areas as students develop their own community-based collaborative projects. Sample projects include creating and publishing a teen magazine, organizing a health fair, and researching “carbon footprints” in public housing. Final projects will be presented in class and may be selected for presentation at a leadership conference first convened in 2009 and organized by participants in the inaugural class of this FYS with support from the Robertson Scholars Fund. The conference brings together student groups, community organizations, and local activists who share knowledge and resources about working with youth in collective leadership projects that cross traditional divides of culture, race, age, and economics. FYS participants will write personal essays reflecting on their work in the class, engagement with the community, and participation at the conference (when applicable).

COMM 63: The Creative Process in Performance
VP, CI, US
TuTh 12:30-1:45PM
Madeleine Grumet
Innovative, exciting, and moving, performances on the UNC campus bring us experiences from all over the world that are both provocative and filled with beauty. Students in this seminar will attend and study the production process of multimedia, music, dance and theater performances in campus venues: The Memorial Hall Carolina Performing Arts Series, the Process Series of the Performance Studies program in the Department of Communication Studies, and others across campus. Students will research performance pieces, interview the performers, attend rehearsals and performances, and write essays that combine their own experiences of the performances with readings in performance studies. Students will also create their own performance pieces as they observe the relationship of preparation and practice to the spontaneity and surprise of performance.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

COMP 66: Random Thoughts
QI
TuTh 12:30-1:45PM
Jan-Michael Frahm
This seminar explores randomness in our daily lives as well as the typical misunderstandings of randomness by most people. We will collectively conduct experiments using subjects from our daily lives like sports statistics and medical treatment effectiveness to understand “What does random mean?” and “How can we tell what kind of randomness we face?” Beyond the understanding of randomness in general we will learn how computers generate “random numbers” and how random those numbers really are. The experiments in the course will be performed in Excel providing a solid knowledge of spreadsheets to every participant. Additionally, we will explore the following questions: Is the addition of random noise to a signal always bad for perceiving the signal’s content? (The answer is no!) How are random numbers used in simulation and image processing? Students will prepare short research reports from a list of topics, and will present their findings to the seminar. Each student will also select from a list of computational experiments to perform. Computer programming skills will be helpful, but are not required. Grades will be based on participation in class discussions, research papers and presentations, and a final exam.

COMP 89: Everyday Computing
PL
TuTh 2:00-3:15PM
Ming Lin
The goal of this seminar is to understand the use of computing technology in our daily activities. We will study various examples on how computing affects different aspects of our daily life in today’s society. Specifically, students will learn about use of computing technology in areas such as: artistic and creative processes, bioinformatics, computer animation, computer game dynamics, digital music & audio synthesis, medical simulation and training, robotics and automation, special effects generation, and virtual environments. Students will learn about computational thinking for solving many different problems in the physical and virtual world. We will discuss various considerations and tradeoffs (e.g. time, storage, ease of implementation, and generality) used in designing computer algorithms. In addition to class discussion and lectures given by the instructor and guest speakers from industry and the campus community, students will form small groups to give a presentation on a topic of their choice and investigate methods for solving problems using computers, software tools, and computing techniques learned in class. No prerequisites are required, but basic literacy in using a computer is helpful.

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DRAMATIC ARTS

DRAM 80: The Psychology of Clothing
VP, CI
TuTh 12:30-1:45PM
Jade Bettin
Through traditional and innovative teaching methods, this seminar will help students find ways to articulate their own motivations for dress and then apply the ideas they have discovered to the ways in which individuality as well as group attitudes are expressed through clothing. The seminar will begin “on location” wherever clothing is worn throughout the community. In the classroom, students will discuss readings from basic texts to create a shared vocabulary. They will also discover common (and occasionally uncommon) motivations for dress, not only in our own culture, but also in others in the world today as well as during selected historical periods. Working in pairs or small groups, students will make class presentations and create web sites to share findings about the visual messages conveyed by clothing. A seminar paper presented both orally and in writing will be the culmination of the term.

DRAM 81: Staging America: The American Drama
VP, CI, NA
TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM
Gregory Kable
This seminar will examine drama in our nation from its colonial origins to the present. Students will read plays and criticism, screen videos, engage in critical writing, and attend live performances as a means of exploring the visions and revisions that constitute American dramatic history. The seminar will consider American drama as both a literary and commercial art form, and look to its history to provide a context for current American theater practice. The focus throughout will be on the forces that shaped American drama as well as drama’s ability to shed light on the national experience.

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ECONOMICS

ECON 57H: Engines of Innovation
SS, CI
TuTh 12:30-1:45PM
Buck Goldstein
This seminar will explore ways that research universities, among our nations most affluent and influential institutions, can have even greater impact on solving the world’s biggest problems. Our explorations will be based on a book published in the fall of 2010 and co-authored by Buck Goldstein and Chancellor Holden Thorp. The seminar will explore all of the major themes and issues raised in the book, and for some of our discussions, we will have guests with first-hand knowledge of the subject matter. In addition, each student will gain first-hand experience by working on an entrepreneurial project currently taking place in the university community. Last year the class created and implemented Revupinnovation, a nationally known website designed to foster a conversation about increasing the impact of our nation’s leading research universities. No prerequisites are required for this seminar.

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EDUCATION

Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative
EDUC 65: School Daze: What’s School Got to Do with Getting an Education?
TuTh 2:00-3:50PM
Suzanne Gulledge
What does it mean to be an educated person? What function do schools serve? This seminar builds on the experiences of schooling that students bring to the university. It invites them to re-consider and de-construct what they know about education and schools as a result of those experiences. The seminar considers traditional schooling along with non-traditional and international approaches to educating youngsters. Included are provocative readings, discussions and invitations to brainstorm schooling as it relates to education. Students will be challenged to re-consider their experiences and notions about school and to examine alternatives. Students’ first-hand knowledge and experiences combined with a critical perspective will encourage innovative thinking about ways and places of learning with the aim of generating proposals for new or reformed schools and new forms of public education for the future.

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ENGLISH

ENGL 50: Multimedia North Carolina
VP, CI, EE
TuTh 9:30-10:45AM
Todd Taylor
Each student in this seminar will author a documentary about a current issue important to North Carolinians. For example, students may be interested in one of the State’s environmental problems or about housing for the rapidly growing Hispanic population. Each documentary will be published on the World Wide Web and will incorporate text, photographs, audio, and video composed by the students. In these documentaries, students will tell creative, well-researched, carefully crafted, true stories about intriguing people and places, and how they relate to a pressing issue. The goals of the course are for native and non-native students alike to deepen their understanding and appreciation of North Carolina, to improve their writing skills, and to conduct research with immediate, real-world connections. Multimedia North Carolina is an APPLES course, requiring 3-5 hours of community service-learning per week instead of typical homework.

Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative
ENGL 69: Entrepreneurial Writing on the Web
LA, CI
MWF 1:00-1:50PM
Daniel Anderson
This seminar will explore the current state of computer-assisted composition and help students develop new media writing projects for emerging online cultural and economic spaces. Content will range from understanding the economic dimensions of cultural production on the Web (e.g., viral popularity on YouTube and advertising-supported blogs) to developing new media composition skills necessary for success in emerging online environments, to successfully establishing online domains, and to creating virtual professional spaces.

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GEOGRAPHY

GEOG 50: Mountain Environments
PL
MW 2:00-3:15PM
Aaron Moody
This seminar focuses on understanding the physical geography of mountain environments and the processes that have created them, shaped them, and sustained them. There are several reasons for studying the environments of mountains: (a) they reveal integrative earth systems processes that can be readily observed and understood; (b) the processes are not oversimplified, but have spatial complexity at scales that can be readily comprehended; and (c) they also reveal human interactions with and impacts on their environment. We will explore mountain environments by concentrating on processes that shape the landscape, patterns that are apparent because of those active processes, and how the concept of scale (both through space and time) define the patterns that we see that are shaped by sets of scale-dependent processes. Although we will talk about mountain environments in general, we will also focus on specifics by emphasizing a single region – Glacier National Park, Montana – as a case study site. We will explore biophysical processes shaping the landscapes of Mt. Mitchell, Grandfather Mountain, and Linville Gorge and make note of the patterns seen on the landscape that have resulted over time and been captured on maps and photographs as well as being contained within computerized databases.

GEOG 56: Local Places in a Globalizing World
SS, GL
MWF 10:00-10:50AM
Rebecca Dobbs
Globalization is a word we hear every day, but what does it mean once we focus in on local places? What does it mean for specific human groups in those local places, around the world? In this seminar students will examine globalization–in both its current and historical forms–through the lens of geography, and in doing so come to understand something about the discipline of human geography as well. Interwoven with our look at globalization will be an overview of the world’s indigenous peoples, in global context–examining what indigeneity means, and seeing what broad global forces have shaped the situation of indigenous peoples generally. Student work will then focus in on the specific local circumstances of particular indigenous groups and explore how current and historical globalization is influencing and has influenced these circumstances, and how these indigenous groups are both resisting and selectively engaging with the structures of globalization to further their own goals. Class meetings will involve a good deal of interaction and discussion of ideas, plus some opportunities to get outside the “box” with field trips and guest speakers. We’ll also work together on coming up with creative ways to present student research results.

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GEOLOGY

GEOL 76: Energy Resources for a Hungry Planet
PL
MWF 11:00-11:50AM
José Rial
The seminar first describes today’s fundamental sources of energy: oil, natural gas and coal, how and where to find them, and the latest statistics on how long the present reserves will last. The seminar then explores alternative energy resources and why it is so important for society to understand that fossil fuel reserves are finite, and will be depleted soon, with some like cheap oil in less than 40 years. The course stimulates student participation through class debates in which a controversial topic is argued for and against (e.g., Can nuclear energy become a viable and safe substitute for oil?).

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GERMANIC STUDIES

GERM 51: Stalin and Hitler: Historical Issues in Cultural and Other Perspectives
HS, GL
TuTh 2:00-3:15PM
David Pike
This seminar deals in the broadest possible context with two critical issues that dominated the twentieth century: the rise of fascism out of the carnage of World War I and the Bolshevik revolution to which the war and Czarist Russia’s involvement in it helped contribute. As the semester unfolds, drawing on a variety of historical and documentary films, and literature (memoirs, novels), we will take a comparative look at singular personalities like Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler and examine the role played by such key figures in historical events of this magnitude. Towards the end of the semester, we will glance briefly at the situation created in Western and Eastern Europe by the defeat of fascism and contemplate the origins and evolution of the cold war. We will conclude the seminar with a consideration of the dissolution and democratization of Eastern European countries, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and, against the tragic background of the past, the general prognosis for democracy in the future.

GERM 53: Early Germanic Culture: Myth, Magic, Murder, and Mayhem
HS, NA, WB
TuTh 12:30-1:45PM
Paul Roberge
This seminar is an introduction to the culture of the Germanic-language areas of northwestern Europe (Germany, Scandinavia, Anglo-Saxon England) from the Middle and Late Roman Empire (100-476 CE) through the Viking Age (traditionally 973-1066 CE). We shall study creation myths and mythic heroes as well as examine the nature of myth (as explanatory stories). From a specimen of sagas, poems, and historical documents (supplemented by inscriptions and charms), we shall explore political and legal structures, the use and abuse of power, gender roles, feuding, the ethos of might-makes-right, and expansionism (e.g., Viking exploration and settlement of North America). All texts are in Modern English translation. Class meetings will focus on analysis of readings, with the instructor providing the historical backdrop. Student will take turns preparing study questions and leading class discussion. Students will also research topics that are germane to the readings and present their findings orally to the members of the seminar.

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HISTORY

HIST 51: Ideology and Revolution in Latin America
HS, BN
TuTh 12:30-1:45PM
Miguel LaSerna
This seminar explores the problem of revolutionary upheaval in Latin American history. Students will develop their interpretive skills through a close reading of English-language primary sources from the wars of the independence to the guerrilla insurgencies of the late-20th century. The seminar begins with an exploration of the various causes, manifestations, and outcomes of revolutionary violence during the independence era (1810-1825). Students will then analyze the twentieth-century revolutions in Mexico (1910-1917), Cuba (1953-1959), and Nicaragua (1979). The course concludes with an exploration of the late-20th century guerrilla insurgencies of the Shining Path (Peru), FARC (Columbia), and Zapatistas (Mexico).

HIST 89 Section 001: Violence in Early Modern Europe and America
HS, WB, NA
TuTh 3:30-4:15PM
Wayne Lee
This seminar will explore how people in Europe and colonial America used violence, both at home, in public arenas, and at war. They understood violence differently than we do. For them it was a tool: to be used, directed, and patterned according to generally understood standards, whether rioting against land reforms, fighting ritual duels on Venetian bridges, or killing one another on the battlefield. Students will learn how texts and descriptions of behavior can be used to analyze the past, to understand how people’s minds worked, and to find the meanings in what people did. The course concludes with an extensive look at the Regulator Rebellion in North Carolina that includes site visits to Alamance and Hillsborough. There are no prerequisites for this seminar.

HIST 89 Section 002: History and Myth in Film
HS
TuTh 9:30-10:45AM
Marcus Bull
Everyone goes to the movies, and over the course of our lives most of us will see thousands of films. It comes as no surprise, therefore, that the cinema is one of the main ways in which Western culture learns about the past – a past that stretches from ancient and medieval history (e.g. GladiatorRobin Hood) to recent events (e.g. Frost/Nixon). This seminar, which has no prerequisites, will ask why films are such an important source of ideas and images about the past. It will not be about the history of film; rather, it will be about history in film. Most of the films that will be studied will be American, because Hollywood has long dominated world film production, but we will also ask whether other countries absorb Hollywood’s visions of the past into their own traditions and myths by focusing on the national cinemas of Japan and Britain in detail. The grading will be based on two five-page papers, a ten-minute oral presentation, a research portfolio on five films chosen by the student, and participation in class. Classes will be devoted to discussions of both key readings and films themselves; students will be encouraged to view set films in groups between classes.

HIST 89 Section 003: The Political Economy of African American Music
VP, US
TuTh 2:00-3:15PM
Jerma Jackson
Over the course of the twentieth century, African Americans built new communities and moved across the country in search of opportunity and freedom. In the process they produced a rich array of music styles and traditions. We will investigate how African Americans, across time and space, in pursuit of freedom, have created and used music. We will direct our attention to three different groups: black musicians, consumers, and entrepreneurs. From these perspectives, we will consider how music styles nurtured distinctive communities. Finally we will consider the social and cultural contexts in which these communities emerged, flourished and changed. Group and individual projects offer an opportunity to investigate how these issues unfold in particular locales. Throughout the term we will listen to music in the classroom. We will also engage several live musical performances over the course of the semester.

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INFORMATION AND LIBRARY SCIENCE

INLS 89: Information Policy: Privacy and Identity
HS,GL
ThTh 2:00-3:15PM
Evelyn Daniel
As creators, consumers, and distributors of information, we are constantly faced with decisions regarding how to interact with information in an active and responsible manner. We need to think critically about individual assumptions and behaviors and how these actions impact and inform the larger society. At the same time, the influences of information activities by others (both individuals, organizations, and nations) help shape our identity. Through the lens of the information society, this seminar addresses major debates regarding the ideal characteristics of the world in which we are living. In addition, this seminar explores, traces, and analyzes major individual and societal issues regarding the ethics and policy of the information life-cycle in various contexts. As a member of the global information society, this course will guide you in understanding the rights and responsibilities of various stakeholders in information policy decisions; it will challenge you to defend and analyze your behavior and opinions in this information environment.

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INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

IDST 89: We the People: How We Imagine Collectives in America
US
TuTh 1:00-2:15PM
Julia Wood, Instructor of Record
Freya Thimsen, Brenda Baletti, Jenna Tiitsman
The U.S. was founded on the idea of individual rights, but politics also require a vision of what it means to be part of a larger group of people. In this seminar we will explore four possible groups that people imagine themselves to be a part of: the world, the public, the nation, and the common. We will study these different visions of collective life by examining the assumptions they make about what that “collective” is. What is necessary for political action within each of these forms, and who are the ideal people that act within them? How does people’s vision of the collective of which they are part shape their actions? We will look at specific historical and contemporary examples of people in the US that understood themselves as being part of these types of collectives. What does it mean to you to be part of a group like a nation, a common, a public or the world? Students will explore these questions through reading, writing, field trips and discussion in order to think about how we all look beyond our immediate situations and engage with the “world” around us.

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JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION

JOMC 61: Sex, Drugs, and Rock-n-Roll
TuTh 9:30-10:45AM
Jane Brown, Instructor of Record
Rebecca Ortiz
American adolescents currently spend five to six hours a day on average with some form of media (e.g., music, television, movies, video games, magazines and the Internet). In this seminar, students will examine the research exploring how such media exposure may affect teens’ health (e.g., early, unprotected sex; aggressive behavior, alcohol/tobacco/illicit drug use, body image, obesity and eating disorders). Students will create a media literacy exercise to help teens interpret and/or resist negative health messages. As media consumers and possibly parents of adolescents in the future, it is important for students to know how the media may be influencing their health, that what they do as media producers may affect the health of their audiences, and that consumers can develop healthier media use habits.

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MARINE SCIENCES

MASC 58: Connections to the Sea: The Challenges of Using and Living Near Coastal Inlets
PL
TuTh 2:00-3:15PM
Harvey Seim
This seminar will explore the natural history of several inlets, how human intervention has altered their development, and the political challenges that have resulted. We will focus on inlets in the southeast where natural variability is a hallmark of these dynamic coastline features. Students will first document known historical changes of selected inlets, and we will discuss the processes that drive natural variability. We will then examine the ways in which inlets have been stabilized and discuss the pros and cons of the mechanisms that have been used. Finally, we will examine policy decisions related to inlet maintenance and the controversies surrounding them. Group projects and presentations will constitute the bulk of the work for the class, and a field trip to the coast and a coastal inlet (Oregon Inlet on the Outer Banks) will be included.  Students will gain an appreciation for the range of topics involved in coastal processes and coastal management.  There are no pre-requisites for the course.

MASC 59: Extreme Microorganisms: Pushing the Limits of Life on Earth and Beyond
PL
TuTh 12:30-1:45PM
Andreas Teske
We will expand our horizons in biology by learning about some of the most extreme microorganisms on the planet – microorganisms that thrive without oxygen, under high temperatures (e.g., in pressurized water above the boiling point), and under chemical stress factors that were once thought to be incompatible with life. Numerous representatives of these microorganisms can be cultured in the laboratory; others have been observed in nature but have so far resisted being tamed. We will look into the unusual habitats where these organisms are found, for example hot springs and volcanic areas on land (Yellowstone) and in the ocean (deep-sea hydrothermal vents). We will also study their evolution during Earth’s early history, and learn about the potential of extreme microorganisms as model cases and analogs for life elsewhere in the universe.

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MATHEMATICS

MATH 56H: Information and Coding

QI
TuTh 12:30-01:45PM
Karl Petersen
It is common to say that we are now living in the information age. What are the ways in which information is stored, transmitted, presented, and protected? What is information anyway? Topics for this seminar will be drawn from cryptography (secret writing throughout history, including Thomas Jefferson’s cipher machine, the German Enigma machine, and security and privacy on the internet); image compression and processing (compact disks, MP3 and JPEG, transforms, error correction, noise removal); symbolic dynamics (encoding of symbol streams, like the genetic code, and associated dynamical systems and formal languages); and visualization (how can different kinds of information be vividly and usefully presented, combined, and compared?) These topics are mathematically accessible to anyone with a high school background and offer many possibilities for experimentation and theoretical exploration. Students will undertake individual or group projects using existing software for encoding and decoding messages, enhancing and compressing images, transforming and filtering signals, measuring properties of information sources, and so on. They will report on their work in writing and orally to the seminar. Discussions will be based on readings from a course pack as well as Simon Singh’s The Code Book (Doubleday, 1999), with investigations in probability, number theory, combinatorics, and information theory to provide theoretical foundations.

MATH 67: Mathematics of Climate Change
PL, CI, GL, QI
TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM
Chris Jones
There is widespread agreement in the scientific community that the Earth is warming. But, do we know when critical benchmarks will be reached? Planning and policy-making demand predictions of future climate change and even specific climate events, but these predictions are based largely on complex mathematical models containing assumptions and estimations applied to chaotic dynamical systems. We must ask if it is even possible to make predictions about the future climate. Background on climate change will be covered in this seminar and extensive discussions will be held about what we know and what we do not know. The emphasis will then be on the issues surrounding predictability of climate events and changes and the limitations of mathematical models in relation to making predictions. This is an exciting scientific area where applied mathematics comes together with many other scientific areas in a political context that is of enormous importance to us all. There is plenty of room for different viewpoints and deep thinking about how mathematics can contribute. Considerable time will be given to open discussions in class. There will be readings, and groups of students will make presentations on relevant topics as part of the course requirement. Further, each student will conduct a project and report on it at the end of the semester.

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MUSIC

MUSC 51: The Interplay of Music and Physics
PL
M 2-2:50PM, W 2:00-3:00PM
Brent Wissick and Laurie McNeil
This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects.

Students may also register for this seminar under PHYS 51.

MUSC 63: Music on Stage and Screen
VP, CI
MWF 10:00-10:50AM
Anne MacNeil
This seminar is designed to offer students the tools and techniques for understanding multi-media, staged musical works like opera, musical theater, and film. The goal of the seminar is to develop students’ analytical skills in verbal and non-verbal media and to encourage their visualization of the potential and implications of artistic forms and structures. No ability to read music is required. We will discuss musical, visual, and textual narratives, source materials, and the various means by which such multi-media artworks are transmitted to modern audiences (e.g., written scores, LPs/CDs, staged performances, movies, etc.). For spring 2011, we will focus on music for silent films, and students will create their own soundtracks for silent film scenes.

MUSC 89 Section 001: Music and Philosophy 
PH
MWF 11:00-11:50AM
Jon Finson and William Lycan
We will discuss philosophical issues regarding music, such as: What makes a piece of music a good one, or better than another?; emotional content in music; the relation between music and language; the unique problem of what constitutes a “work” of art in the context of the performance; questions of “authentic” performance; the social and cultural context of various musical styles in conjunction with how we apply labels such as “classical,” “popular,” “folk,” and so forth. There will be reading of one book and online articles on such topics. Assignments will include essays on music-philosophical questions, critiques of various recorded performances available on a dedicated website, and at least one visit to a “digital concert hall.”

Students may also register for this seminar under PHIL 89.

MUSC 89 Section 002: Berlin as Metropolis: Modernism, Music, and Mass Culture in the 1920s
VP
TuTh 9:30-10:45AM
Felix Woerner
During the “age of the golden twentieth”, Berlin, the capital of Germany at the time of the Weimar Republic (1919-1933), was famous for its rich cultural life. Music, literature and fine arts served various purposes and were seen as a way to reaffirm traditional values, as entertainment, and as critical commentary on contemporary society. Many art works considered the city as a microcosm of modern live, and described the role of the individual in modern society, a topic of great importance up to today. By looking at different art forms such as novel (A. Doblin, “Alexanderplatz”), film (“Berlin, Symphony of a Big City” by W. Ruttmann), fine arts, and, above all, music of different genres and styles (e.g. instrumental music by A. Schoenberg, operas by A. Berg, P. Hindemith and K. Weill, jazz as American art), we will ask how the arts redefined the place of the individual in early twentieth century culture and society.

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PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 66 Ethics: Theoretical and Practical
PH
TuTh 9:30-10:45AM
Jeanette Boxill
This seminar aims to encourage students to think seriously and clearly about ethical problems by means of class discussion, group research projects, and examination of philosophical and literary works. Theoretical issues to be considered include relativism, utilitarianism, deontological ethics, and virtue ethics. Practical issues may include abortion, substance abuse, treatment of animals and the environment, and sex, love, and marriage.

PHIL 89: Music and Philosophy
PH
MWF 11:00-11:50AM
Jon Finson and William Lycan
We will discuss philosophical issues regarding music, such as: What makes a piece of music a good one, or better than another?; emotional content in music; the relation between music and language; the unique problem of what constitutes a “work” of art in the context of the performance; questions of “authentic” performance; the social and cultural context of various musical styles in conjunction with how we apply labels such as “classical,” “popular,” “folk,” and so forth. There will be reading of one book and online articles on such topics. Assignments will include essays on music-philosophical questions, critiques of various recorded performances available on a dedicated website, and at least one visit to a “digital concert hall.”

Students may also register for this seminar under MUSC 89 section 001.

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PHYSICS

PHYS 51: The Interplay of Music and Physics
PL
M 2-2:50PM, W 2:00-3:00PM
Brent Wissick and Laurie McNeil
This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects.

Students may also register for this course under MUSC 51.

PHYS 53: Handcrafting in the Nanoworld: Building Models and Manipulating Molecules
PL
TuTh 9:30-10:45AM
Michael Falvo
What is nanotechnology anyway? Scientists of all stripes are now actively exploring the wonderful and bizarre world of the nanoscale (one nanometer equals one billionth of a meter). This is the scale of DNA, viruses, carbon nanotubes and a host of other fascinating nano-objects. At this scale, nature has different rules, some of which are beautiful and unexpected. Scientists have only begun to learn these rules. We have also only begun applying this new knowledge to technology. Can we make computers using single molecule transistors? How do viruses and other bio systems “assemble” themselves? Can we build molecular machines that cure disease or clean up the environment? In looking at these questions, we will try to distinguishing the true promise of nanoscience from the hype. We will explore this topic through readings from the current scientific literature, class discussion, calculations, and hands-on activities that include model building (with molecular model kits, Lego etc). You will work in teams to perform “nanocalculations” and to construct models that demonstrate nanoscale systems and concepts. Our focus in the course will begin with the basic physics, chemistry and biology of the molecular world, and move onto how nanoscience is impacting biomedical, materials and computing technologies. No prior expertise in any area is required, but enthusiasm about strange and wonderful science is.

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CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING

PLAN 52: Race, Sex and Place in America

SS
MW 10:00-11:15am
Michele Berger
This seminar will expose students to the complex dynamics of race, ethnicity, gender and how these have shaped the American city since 1945. We will examine both the historical record as well as contemporary works of literature, film, and music to probe the ways race, sex, and ethnicity have contributed to the culture of our cities and popular perceptions of urban life in the United States. We will also explore the different ways women and men perceive, understand, occupy and use urban space and the built environment. Drawing upon the scholarship of several disciplines (sociology, political science, urban planning, women’s studies, and American history), the seminar will examine a broad spectrum of topics, including ghettoization and the inner city; the Harlem Renaissance and its influence; “redlining” and restrictive covenants; suburbanization, “white flight” and the “urban crisis” of the 1960s; sexual identity and space; immigration and ethnic enclaving; the multiple meanings of “the hood” and “the ghetto” and hip hop culture. Assignments are self-directed and could include a film review, a discography, a critical essay and a group project.

Students may also register for this course under WMST 51.

PLAN 53: The Changing American Job
CI, NA
11:00AM-12:15PM
Nichola Lowe
What will the U.S. labor market look like when first-year UNC students graduate four years from now? How will employment opportunities differ from those facing their parents and relatives a generation or two ago, or even those of recent college graduates? This seminar explores these questions by looking at the changing nature of the American job and the transformative forces—from global trade and outsourcing to corporate restructuring, deregulation and new skill demands—that have influenced this change in recent decades and have added to economic insecurity in recent years and especially during the “Great Recession.” We will consider how these forces are experienced differently by urban and rural residents, by men and women, and by members of different socio-economic and ethnic groups, including native-born and immigrant workers. We will also consider local and regional strategies for helping workers adapt to this changing economic environment. Class discussions and small group activities will help students think about the larger economic and policy implications of U.S. labor market restructuring. Through a series of research-backed “jobsblogs” and with help from career advisors, students will also reflect on how the forces behind this change might affect their own career goals and advancement opportunities.

PLAN 54: Bringing Life Back to the Downtown
SS
TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM
Robin Howarth
This seminar’s objective is to understand the current realities of inner-city communities in the context of their historical evolution and the current proposals for revitalization. Each student will select one city or town for case study work and become familiar with 1) the current situation to include redevelopment problems facing the area, the strategies supported by community leaders, the sites under consideration for commercial redevelopment, and the redevelopment plans for those sites; 2) the history of the place with emphasis on the community’s early economic functions, why the area has failed to experience relative prosperity over time, and how current problems came to the fore; 3) plausible explanations of redevelopment problems; and 4) the viability of commercial redevelopment strategies and site-specific proposals. An important skill that will be developed in the course is the ability to use scholarly research to understand the issues and to evaluate alternative redevelopment strategies.

PLAN 89: Urban Growth, Structure and the Response to Economic Crises 
SS
TuTh 3:30-4:45PM
T. William Lester
Since the start of the Great Recession in 2007, the US economy has lost nearly 8 million jobs. While the impact is of national concern, these job losses have been concentrated inside metropolitan areas where 87 percent of the US population now lives. As a result, urban policy makers face a host of problems, including fiscal distress and high unemployment while simultaneously facing unique urban issues such as intense concentration of poverty and sprawl. This seminar will study trends in both economic change and urbanization and how they overlap in order to shed light on how planners and policy makers can offer solutions to solve the economic crisis in their communities. This seminar is organized around three themes. The first asks, Why do cities exist, and How do they grow? Next, we will turn our attention on the issues of urban industrial decline and suburbanization and examine how these processes impact the spatial structure of US metropolitan areas and define the ‘problems of economic development’ that policy makers seek to address. Lastly, we will introduce and critique the policy “toolbox” that urban leaders use to address employment decline, including business recruitment, industrial retention, and regionalism. We will conclude by evaluating the merits the most recent and often citied policy solution to the contemporary economic crisis—growing a so-called green economy.  This seminar introduces students to the issues of urban economic development, spatial structure, and the policy responses aimed at increasing and improving economic opportunities.  While this seminar focuses on a diverse and rigorous reading list, it includes several hands-on assignments that ask students to engage the themes of the course by studying their own home towns. The seminar will be a launching point for students interested in sociology, economics, political science, and geography. However, there are no pre-requisites and due to its structure and the critical thinking and writing skills attained through this course, PLAN 089 will be useful to students from a variety of academic disciplines.

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PUBLIC HEALTH

PUBH 89: The Health of the Nation
SS
TuTh 2:00-3:15PM
Anthony Viera, Diane Calleson
President Obama, McDonald’s, sidewalks, seatbelts, school vending machines—what do all of these have in common? They all affect the health of the nation! Many people think the responsibility of ensuring people’s health rests solely with the medical and nursing professions. The U.S. spends more than any other country on health care, yet is one of the unhealthiest developed nations in the world. Health care reform is a critical issue, but few American citizens truly understand its context or what is needed to improve the health of the nation. In this seminar, we will discuss health care reform efforts, but first we will get you thinking about other important drivers of health. Regardless of your field of study, this seminar will be hugely relevant and influential in how you think about health. No prerequisite is needed. We will assign readings and expect students to come prepared to think deeply about the topics. There will be written assignments, an experience trip, and a photo-voice project.

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PUBLIC POLICY

Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative
PLCY 61: Policy Entrepreneurship and Public-Private Partnerships
MW 10:00-11:15AM
Daniel Gitterman
The theme of this seminar is to define “policy entrepreneur” and examine strategies used by policy entrepreneurs to achieve policy change or innovation in the policy-making process. We will also explore models of innovative public-private partnerships in the delivery of public goods. The seminar will examine nonprofit policy entrepreneurs within policy advocacy organizations who push innovation and change in public policy. We will evaluate the ways policy and non-profit advocacy entrepreneurs advocate for their ideas causes and attempt to achieve lasting policy change. In small groups, students will write mock grant proposals for funding to develop a model public-private partnership or new policy innovation. We will visit with several leaders of successful public-private partnerships and other key innovative non-profit organizations in North Carolina.

PLCY 70: National Policy: Who Sets the Agenda?
SS, CI, NA
TuTh 2:00-3:15PM
W. Hodding Carter
The U.S. is governed by democratically elected leaders. According to theory, they both represent the people and lead them, setting and implementing policies to further prosperity and justice at home and security abroad. But who and what actually sets the nation’s policy agenda? The President? Congress? The media? Special interests? Dramatic and unexpected events—9/11, for example—or carefully calibrated long-term plans? Variable public opinion or inflexible ideological zeal? These are some of the questions that we will attempt to answer. We will examine closely the work of agenda setting theorists as well as contemporary case studies. There will be individual presentations based on assigned papers throughout the semester. Team projects aimed at creating agenda-setting campaigns will take up much of the last fourth of the course.

PLCY 89: State Parks and Conservation Policy 
HS
TuTh 3:30-4:45PM
Jonathan Howes
North Carolina has 34 state parks, four state recreation areas and 19 state natural areas stretching
from Jockey’s Ridge, the highest sand dune on the East Coast to Mount Mitchell, the highest point in the
Eastern United States.  Between these points, the parks include a mysterious swamp at Merchants Millpond, Piedmont River systems on the Haw and Mayo, the highest point in Orange County at Occoneechee Mountain, bare stone faces at Stone Mountain, and sandhill forests at Weymouth Woods. All of these are permanently entrusted to the people of North Carolina and administered by the Division of Parks and Recreation in the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. The parks system constitutes a key element in the state’s land conservation program and is a major source of recreation and environmental education for citizens of all ages. This seminar will uncover North Carolina’s natural treasures in its state parks. Students will review the history and scope of the state parks program in the context of broader state environmental and conservation policy. Through field trips and seminar guests, students will meet key decision-makers from rangers to legislators, assess issues facing the parks, and consider policy alternatives for the future.

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI 55: Democracy and the Civic Ideal
BN
MWF 11:00-11:50AM
Stephen Leonard
This seminar explores the development of modern democratic sentiments and values in the history of the civic ideal in the West. We begin by examining the theory and practice of classical Greek democracy, then moving through Roman republicanism, early modern republicanism, the liberal revolutions of the 17th and 18th centuries (England, U.S., and France), and finishing with contemporary American democratic politics. We will use a variety of approaches and resources: simulations, films, re-enactments, panel discussions, and, of course, texts. Our goal will be to meet the challenge of marshalling good arguments and compelling evidence in political analysis. Students will put these skills to work by developing research projects on democratic politics.

POLI 61: The United States and Cuba: Making Sense of United States Foreign Policy
SS, CI, GL
TuTh 12:30-1:45PM
Lars Schoultz
This introductory seminar is designed for students who would like to understand U.S. foreign policy – what the United States attempts to accomplish in its relations with other countries, and why. Rather than approach these two questions on a global level, this seminar is focused upon one country – Cuba –and upon the enduring values and beliefs that underlie U.S. foreign policy. In addition to a research paper, students will prepare for twice-weekly discussions by reading primary documents drawn primarily from the U.S. Department of State, the Central Intelligence Agency, and the U.S. Congress.

POLI 63: Social Movements and Political Protests and Violence
SS, NA
TuTh 9:30-10:45AM
Pamela Conover
This seminar focuses on explaining and understanding social movements and the collective political behaviors that they promote (e.g. demonstrations, riots, strikes, and eco-terrorism). Our theoretical focus will be interdisciplinary, drawing on research in political behavior, social psychology, sociology, political theory, and the law. We will discuss when and why collective action occurs, who participates, what forms it takes, and how governments respond. Substantively, we will study a variety of movements including: the Environmental movement, the Animal Rights movement, the America Militia movement, the White Nationalist movement, and the Anti-Globalization movement. We will use a variety of approaches and resources: class discussions, films, wiki writing, online discussions, novels, and texts. Grades will be based on class participation, a writing project, and a group research project that studies a social movement organization.

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PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 56: Human Infancy: The Emergence of Mind in the Human Infant
SS
TuTh 9:30-10:45AM
Steve Reznick
The goals of this seminar are to explore the psychological development of human infants, evaluate the research procedures that inform this topic, and develop new procedures for describing and explaining infant psychological development. We will frame these general goals within the context of an overarching question: When does a human infant have a mind? We will first discuss what it means to have a mind and then examine research on neural development, behavioral abilities, and acquisition of social skills. Class discussion will be based on readings and personal experience, particularly the direct experience that each student will acquire by working a few hours each week with infants in a day care center located near campus. The internship will also help students gather insights into how infant behavior can be studied, leading to an in-class presentation describing a potential research project that would address the topic of when an infant has a mind.

PSYC 89: Eating Disorders and Body Image
SS
TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM
Anna Bardone-Cone
We all have bodies, we all eat; some people have a healthy relationship with both and do not give much thought to either. For some, however, intense body dissatisfaction and disordered eating infiltrate their lives and can lead to an eating disorder. In this seminar we will learn about the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, and explore factors related to these disorders from a psychosocial perspective. Some of the questions we will examine include: What messages do we get from the media about our bodies and eating, and who is most susceptible to these? What role can family and peers play in contributing to risk for eating disorders and in helping an individual out of an eating disorder? What do we know about how women of different racial/ethnic backgrounds and men experience body image and disordered eating? Can we prevent eating disorders? What treatments work? We will explore these issues though class discussion, readings, videos, guest speakers, experiential assignments, and writing assignments. Both male and female students are encouraged to enroll.

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative
RELI 68H: Charisma
PH
TuTh, 11:00AM-12:15PM
Ruel Tyson
The term “charisma” has become a cliché. Yet its history will disclose its usefulness to us as we investigate three types of innovative and subversive individuals: the prophet, the scientist, and the poet. Our studies will reveal that these extraordinary persons have strong ties to organizations, bands, sects, groups, parties as necessary conditions for their achievements. This is quite a different picture than the one we receive from contemporary media with its insatiable hunger for glamour of the isolated hero. Again our bias toward an ideology of individualism obscures both history and the dynamics between creative individuals and the conditions supporting and resisting their work. Our cases will be taken from a variety of historical locations and types of charismatic figures, such as prophets (ancient and modern), sages (ancient), philosophers (modern), scientists (key members of the scientific revolution in England), poets (nineteenth century England), and political figures (from 20/21st centuries). Students will work individually and in small groups on cases of each of the types indicated. Students will exploit the resources of the campus in their studies as well as ancient and modern sources. The social organization of the class will change according to what the members of the class learn about optimum conditions for encouraging the exercise of the imagination. The instructor is available for conversations about the course. Students should not purchase text books until after the first class in the semester.

RELI 89: Religion and Society in Historical Novels
HS, WB
MW 5:00-6:16PM
Evyatar Marienberg
In this seminar we will read several books together: Donna Woolfolk Cross, Pope Joan: A Novel; A. B. Yehoshua, A Journey to the end of the Millennium; Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose; Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre; Glueckel of Hameln, My Life. Most of these books (but not all of them) can be described as “Historical Novels.” Having these books as a starting point, we will explore various aspects of religion and society in Europe in the medieval and early modern period. By using both literature and scholarship, we will reflect on religious concepts, social tensions, technological inventions, health issues, economic transformations, gender, political conflicts, and more, as hinted in these works.

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ROMANCE LANGUAGES

ROML 56: Italians in Search of Harmony
LA
TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM
Ennio Rao
This seminar explores the concept of harmony in selected Italian writers, from Dante to contemporary writers. In the 14th century, Dante dreamed of a universal empire that would assure peace on earth, thus allowing mankind to pursue knowledge and wisdom and to achieve the ultimate harmony in the next world: the natural reunion of creature and creator. Dante himself directs his readers to interpret the journey of the pilgrim in the Divine Comedy as Everyman’s quest for transcendental harmony with God. This quest for harmony is characteristic of many Italian writers, from Petrarch to Leopardi, to many contemporary poets, novelists, and film directors. Students will be reading and discussing works by Dante, Petrarch, Leopardi, Pirandello, Vittorini and Moravia, and will view films by Antonioni and Bertolucci. They will also be divided into groups and invited to produce an original work (theatrical, cinematic, literary, artistic, etc.) that illustrates the concept of harmony.

ROML 59: Courts, Courtiers, and Court Culture in 16th- and 17th-Century Spain
HS, NA
TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM
Carmen Hsu
What was an early modern Spanish court like? Who and what were the key components that contributed to the making of a Spanish court of the 16th and 17th centuries? How did literature, visual arts, clothing, food, gifts, buildings, theater, and etiquettes make up the court culture of that time in Spain? This seminar, conducted in English, aims to engage students in discussions about the making of the fascinating court world in early modern Spain. We will embark on a shared intellectual adventure exploring how monarchs and courtiers lived; how they were educated; how literature and other cultural forms represented them; and the politics and reasoning behind these projections. Most of our readings will focus on selections from translated texts by Guevara, Cervantes, and Calderón de la Barca, among others, but key historical and critical readings will be used in class to enrich discussion and to encourage a deeper engagement with the theme. To keep the performing and visual dimension of early modern court world alive and spark discussion, we will also visit the Ackland Museum and Nasher Museum of Art at Duke; we will view and analyze two films that deal with early modern court life; and we will conclude the semester with presentations of students’ research projects.

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SOCIOLOGY

SOCI 54: Good Jobs, Bad Jobs, No Jobs
SS
TuTh 3:30-4:45PM
Arne Kalleberg
We will examine the nature and meaning of work in America at the beginning of the 21st Century. We will seek to answer questions such as: What are the main changes that are currently taking place in work and jobs in the United States? Why are some jobs “good” and others “bad”? What explains the growth of temporary work, and why do so many people work as temps? Why are so many companies downsizing their workforces? What are the consequences for workers being laid off and employed? We will try to answer these questions by reading books and articles, by collecting information using the internet, and by interviewing workers.

SOCI 64: Equality of Education Opportunity Then and Now
SS
TuTh 9:30-10:45AM
Karolyn Tyson
The 1954 Brown v. Topeka Board of Education Supreme Court case centered on one of the most significant and controversial issues in American public education: equality of educational opportunity. As we reflect on more than 50 years of this historic ruling on school segregation, this seminar will examine in-depth the social conditions that precipitated the case and the educational landscape since that time, including issues such as within- and between-school segregation, curriculum tracking and ability grouping, the black-white achievement gap, and other factors associated with equality of educational opportunity. Students will read historical and contemporary accounts and research reports on the move and progress toward equality of educational opportunity, view films related to the topic, conduct a research project exploring the experience of segregation among different segments of the U.S. population, and prepare oral presentations and a written research report.

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STATISTICS AND OPERATIONS RESEARCH

STOR 62: Probability and Paradoxes
QI
TuTh 3:30-4:45PM
Douglas Kelly
Did you know the following? Among 40 randomly chosen people, it is very likely that two of them will have the same birthday.  A test for a certain disease may be 99% accurate, and yet if you test positive, your chance of having the disease may be only 10%. It is possible for baseball player A to have a higher batting average than player B for the first half of the season, and also for the second half of the season, but for player B to have a higher average for the season. In mathematics there are either true statements that can never be proved, or false statements that can be proved true, or both. There are competitive situations in which it is in everyone’s advantage to be selfish, but everyone does better if all act altruistically. Mathematics and logic, and in particular the theory of probability, are powerful tools for understanding the world around us, but they lead, as indicated by the examples cited, to some surprising conclusions. Understanding these surprises adds to our understanding of randomness, logic, and behavior. In this seminar, we will look at these and other seeming paradoxes, and learn how we can attempt to explain them. Each paradox will lead us to one or more of the basic ideas of logic or probability. No previous knowledge of mathematics beyond basic algebra is required.

STOR 72: Unlocking the Genetic Code
QI
MWF 2:00-2:50PM
J. Scott Provan
On June 26, 2000, scientists announced the complete mapping of the human genome. While this is an achievement of enormous historical importance, there are still daunting technical, biological, and ethical questions and problems still to be addressed in understanding and using this information. This seminar is intended to be an introduction to the world of DNA – its structure, function, and importance. The students will discuss and try to understand the immensity and complexity of organizing knowledge of DNA and protein structure, and the resulting sizes of the genomic databases. This will be accompanied by a look at some of the questions that might be asked in connection with obtaining full knowledge of the human genome, and some of the problems that arise when trying to answer some of these questions. No previous computer skills or knowledge of mathematics beyond basic algebra are required.

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WOMEN’S STUDIES

WMST 51: Race, Sex, and Place in America
SS
MW 10:00-11:15AM
Michele Berger
This seminar will expose students to the complex dynamics of race, ethnicity, gender and how these have shaped the American city since 1945. We will examine both the historical record as well as contemporary works of literature, film, and music to probe the ways race, sex, and ethnicity have contributed to the culture of our cities and popular perceptions of urban life in the United States. We will also explore the different ways women and men perceive, understand, occupy and use urban space and the built environment. Drawing upon the scholarship of several disciplines (sociology, political science, urban planning, women’s studies, and American history), the seminar will examine a broad spectrum of topics, including ghettoization and the inner city; the Harlem Renaissance and its influence; “redlining” and restrictive covenants; suburbanization, “white flight” and the “urban crisis” of the 1960s; sexual identity and space; immigration and ethnic enclaving; the multiple meanings of “the hood” and “the ghetto”; and hip hop culture. Assignments are self-directed and could include a film review, a discography, a critical essay and a group project.

Students may also register for this course under PLAN 52.

WMST 66: World Literature by Women
MW 2:00-3:15PM
Tanya Shields
“Things started to fall apart at home when my brother, Jaja, did not go to Communion…” (Purple Hibiscus 1).

So begins Chimamanda Adichie’s novel about growing up. Bildungsroman, or the coming of age novel, asks us to reflect on terms such as “grown up,” “childhood”, “adult”, and the incidents/traumas that move us from the moral and psychological understandings of a child to the next developmental stage. Have you ever considered the joys and pitfalls of girls coming of age globally? And how their experiences might intersect with your own? In this class, we explore what surviving and/or enjoying adolescence looks like in different cultural, political, social, and economic contexts. In the end, you are asked to compare your experiences of emerging adulthood with those around you and from our texts. We will be using films, graphic novels, and other mediums to explore these themes.

Note: Please be advised that this class will expose you to ideas, themes, language, etc. of an explicit nature, which may be uncomfortable to you
.

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