Spring 2017

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Please consult ConnectCarolina (connectcarolina.unc.edu) for the most up-to-date information about FYS offerings and availability.

For more information about a specific instructor, please click on the instructor name, if highlighted.

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Art (ART)
Asian Studies (ASIA)
Biology (BIOL)
Classics (CLAR/CLAS)
Communication (COMM)
Computer Science (COMP)
Dramatic Art (DRAM)
Economics (ECON)
Education (EDUC)
English and Comparative Literature (CMPL/ENGL)
Geography (GEOG)
Geological Sciences (GEOL)
German and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GERM/GSLL/SLAV)
History (HIST)
Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST)
Information and Library Science (INLS)
Latin American Studies (LTAM)
Marine Sciences (MASC)
Mathematics (MATH)
Music (MUSC)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)
Political Science (POLI)
Psychology (PSYC)
Public Policy (PLCY)
Religious Studies (RELI)
Romance Studies (ROML)
Sociology (SOCI)
Statistics and Operations Research (STOR)
Women’s and Gender Studies (WMST)

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies

AAAD 52.001: Kings, Presidents, and Generals: Africa’s Bumpy Road to Democracy
BN, CI
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Bereket Selassie

Bereket Selassie is the William E. Leuchtenburg Professor of African Studies, and Professor of Law at UNC, Chapel Hill. After over 20 years of engagement in government, law and diplomacy, Professor Selassie chose university teaching as a career. He has always enjoyed teaching, even when in government, and he has been engaged in full-time teaching for over 30 years. Professor Selassie’s roles in government service have included serving as Attorney General and Associate Supreme Court Justice of Ethiopia, among other positions. More recently, he served as the Chairman of the Constitutional Commission of Eritrea (1994-1997), and he has been a senior consultant on the drafting of constitutions in Nigeria, Iraq, and other countries.

This seminar is designed to introduce students to Africa’s modern history and politics. Starting with a brief, recent history of the continent, we will focus on the variety of systems of government in Africa and the challenges facing them. Traditional institutions, juxtaposed with modern institutions, will be discussed with a special focus on the types of leadership involved in such institutions. A major part of the seminar will pose questions such as:

  • What has been Africa’s record in the march toward democracy?
  • What are the obstacles to democratic transition and how have Africans tried to overcome such obstacles?
  • What are the roles of the constitutional systems and the forms of government in advancing democracy?
  • What is the role of leadership?
  • What difference does the type of leadership (monarchy, republican, etc.) make in the march toward democracy?

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AAAD 89.001: African Boundaries, Migrations, and Displacements
BN, GL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Michael Lambert

Michael Lambert is an Associate Professor of African Studies and Anthropology. His research has principally been in francophone West Africa with a focus on issues related to migration. He has lived for over five years in Senegal and the neighboring nation of Mauritania, where he served as a Peace Corps volunteer, and he has travelled extensively throughout the continent. His first book, Longing for Exile: Migration and the Making of a Translocal Community in Senegal (West Africa) (Heinemann, 2002), explores the cultural and social history of urban migration in a Senegalese community. His most recent book (co-authored), Up from These Hills: Memories of Cherokee Boyhood (Nebraska [Bison Books], 2011), explores American Indian experience in the mid-20th century.

Boundary making, migration, and population displacement have been significant dimensions of the contemporary African experience. How has boundary making, broadly defined (inclusive of national borders, rural-urban distinctions, and ethnic and racial groupings, for example), shaped contemporary Africa? What types of and through what processes were boundaries were created? How did the African people respond to these processes? What population displacements unfolded in the context of this boundary making? And how did the people of Africa make sense of and understand boundary making, migration, and displacement? These are some of the questions we will be examining in this interactive and discussion oriented class. We will build our examination of these issues around six novels written by African authors. These novels will provide insight into the ways by which boundaries, migration, and displacement impacted the everyday lives of the African people.

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Anthropology

ANTH 60H.001: Crisis & Resilience: Past & Future of Human Societies
HS, BN, CI
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Patricia A. McAnany

Patricia A. McAnany is Kenan Eminent Professor of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. A Maya archaeologist, she serves as co-principal investigator of Proyecto Arqueológico Colaborativo del Oriente de Yucatán and as Executive Director of InHerit: Indigenous Heritage Passed to Present (www.in-herit.org). She is particularly interested in the intersection of ritual and economy and in the perspectives of descendant Maya peoples on cultural heritage. She is the author/co-editor of several books, most recently Maya Cultural Heritage: How Archaeologists and Indigenous Communities engage the Past; Textile Economies: Power & Value from the Local to the Transnational (2011) co-edited with Walter E. Little; Ancestral Maya Economies in Archaeological Perspective (2010); Questioning Collapse: Human Resilience, Ecological Vulnerability, and the Aftermath of Empire (2009) co-edited with Norman Yoffee; and Dimensions of Ritual Economy (2008) co-edited with E. Christian Wells. Her recent journal articles include “Casualties of Heritage Distancing: Children, Ch’ortí Indigeneity, and the Copán Archaeoscape” (co-authored with Shoshaunna Parks), Current Anthropology Vol. 53 (2011); and “Thinking About Stratigraphic Sequence in Social Terms” (co-authored with Ian Hodder), Archaeological Dialogues Vol. 16 (2009). She is the recipient of several research awards from the National Science Foundation and of fellowships from the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Institute for the Arts & Humanities (UNC, Chapel Hill), the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Radcliffe Center for Advanced Study at Harvard University. Currently, she works to provide rural communities in the Maya Region with opportunities to dialogue about and perform cultural heritage.

The goal of this FYS is to encourage students to adopt a long view of human societies and to examine responses to crises engendered by political, economic, and environmental factors over the longue durée. Perspectives on societal change—both apocalyptic and transformational—are critically examined in this seminar in light of a suite of case studies that reach back to Mesopotamia (3rd millennium B.C.), Classic Maya and U.S. Pueblo dwellers of the first millennium A.D. and also include contemporary situations such as the Rwandan genocide, nations such as Haiti that are alleged to be “failed” states, and the current global crisis of environmental sustainability. Students gain familiarity with evaluating archaeological, historical, and environmental information that is pertinent to social change. The aim of the seminar is to foster critical thinking and the ability to evaluate narratives (in both scholarly and popular media) about societal crises and human resilience.

Seminar research materials include books, journal articles, films, and student-run interviews. Class meetings generally consist of a short, introductory lecture followed by discussion headed by student discussion leaders who develop and circulate “talking points” before each class meeting based upon reading material for that day’s seminar. Additionally, each student selects a topic or a case study to research in depth, develops a short class presentation (about 10 minutes), and writes a final research paper.

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ANTH 77.036: Windows of Mystery and Wonder: Exploring Self-Taught Art – CANCELLED 12/16/2016
VP
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Glenn Hinson

As a folklorist (and associate professor) who teaches in the Departments of American Studies and Anthropology, Glenn Hinson studies everyday performances and the ways that they offer insights into the workings of culture. His current research focuses on oral poetry, self-taught art, and the intersections between faith and creativity.

Who has the right to define what counts as “art”? Both the market and the academy readily claim this prerogative, offering themselves as artistic gatekeepers who hold the rights of definition. Meanwhile, countless folk artists with neither formal training nor affiliation follow their own visions, creating works grounded more in the everyday aesthetics of their communities—and in the wonders of their imaginations—than in the traditions of mainstream art. The market is quick to label these artists “outsiders,” crafting biographies that highlight their presumed eccentricity and oddness. This seminar will turn the tables on this act of imposed definition, exploring the worlds of self-taught artistry by engaging the artists directly, asking questions about meaning, tradition, and the role of creativity in everyday life. It will also explore the manipulations of the market, investigating how stereotypes of race, class, and region affect the commercial valuing of vernacular art. Students in this seminar will work in groups to conduct fieldwork with a self-taught (or “folk”) artist, whom they will interview and photograph over the course of the semester. We will also host artists in class, and visit some in their homes.

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ANTH 89.001: American Indian Societies
SS, US
MWF, 12:20 PM – 1:10 PM
Valerie Lambert

Valerie Lambert, Ph.D., is an associate professor in anthropology and an enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation. She is an award-winning teacher and has published an award-winning book about her Tribe. In addition, she has published scholarly articles in American Indian and Indigenous Studies. Professor Lambert is currently President-elect of the Association of Indigenous Anthropologists, a section of the American Anthropological Association.

This course explores the tremendous diversity that exists within and across American Indian tribes in the United States and engages with a range of concerns, issues, and challenges that are helping shape the kinds of futures American Indians are charting for themselves. Students will learn and use various methodologies in anthropology and American Indian and Indigenous Studies to critically examine and analyze the social, legal, and political landscapes that Indians and non-Indians are creatively negotiating.

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ANTH 89.062: Blackness and Racialization: A Multidimensional Approach
HS, US
MWF, 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Charles Price

Charles Price is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Charles’s research, writing and activity focus on Black racial identity, Rastafari identity, life narrative genres, action research, community organizations and community organizing, people-centered community development, and social movements, with a geographic concentration on the United States and Jamaica. Charles authored the book Becoming Rasta: The Origins of Rastafari Identity in Jamaica (2009, New York University Press), co-authored the monograph Community Collaborations: Promoting Community Organizing (2009, Ford Foundation), and is under contract with NYU Press to write a sequel to Becoming Rasta, a book on collective identity formation and ethnogenesis among the Rastafari people of Jamaica. He is developing a historically grounded qualitative approach to explaining collective identity formation. Another project in development involves a collaboration with a faculty member to develop an action-oriented study of how Black men in North Carolina and Connecticut negotiate challenges and obstacles in their lives.

Blackness and Racialization is an introduction to the history, social construction, cultural production, and lived experience of race. The course focuses on Blackness in the United States and Jamaica (for comparison), though it necessarily addresses other race formations such as Whiteness and Brownness. The course approaches racialization from three angles: historical; social; and personal. It utilizes historical, theoretical, ethnographic, and popular culture productions to explain the effects, uses, durability, and pliability of racial formations.
Some questions that the course will address include:

  • What does the social construction of race mean in practice? How is race socially constructed?
  • How do racial categories and identities develop, persist, and change?
  • How does race work at various “levels,” such as the level of the individual, collectivity, and history?
  • What are the origins of various racial stereotypes?
  • Why do people have very different understandings of race, some embracing race, some rejecting race, and some claiming to not understand race at all?

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ANTH 89.067: Inequality Stress and Health
SS, US, CI
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Mark Sorensen

Mark Sorensen is a biological anthropologist specializing in biocultural and evolutionary approaches to human variation. His research focuses on the linkages between social and cultural processes, human biology, and health. His research focuses on: inflammation, cardiovascular and metabolic risk; immune function and psychosocial stress; nutrition, growth and immune function. He is particularly interested in the biological impacts of globalization, modernization, and cultural change, in human adaptability and in ecological models for hominid evolution. He conducts his research in Russia and in Ecuador.

We will explore the social, cultural and biological processes linking inequalities and health (psychosocial, contextual, and material) from a comparative and historical perspective. We will evaluate competing explanations for the links between wealth and health. Central to the course will be an examination of psychosocial stress as a key biological link between inequality and health. We will also investigate the health consequences of rapid culture change and economic development. Key questions we will consider include: How does poverty/inequality ‘get under our skin’ to affect health? What is stress and how does it affect health? Why are more egalitarian societies healthier and more socially cohesive? How have different perspectives on causes of poverty and inequality been used to understand and justify health disparities? The goals of the course are elucidate patterns of health and economic change, and to understand the role of cultural context, individual behavior, and human biology in shaping physical and mental health status. We will consider a life course perspective to examine early life influences on inequalities and health, and will examine how processes of globalization, modernization and economic change have impacted health status throughout the world in order to understand the biology of poverty and inequality.

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ANTH 89.084: Forced Out and Fenced In: New Ethnographies of Latino Immigration
SS, US
MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM
Angela Stuesse

Dr. Angela Stuesse is a cultural anthropologist of Latino and Latin America who studies immigration, race, labor, social movements, and activist research. Her new book, Scratching Out a Living, explores how Latino migration has transformed the U.S. South. Other recent work focuses on the policing, detention, and deportation of Latino communities and on undocumented young people’s access to higher education. She believes in the transformative potential of education, fostering horizontal relationships of shared learning, and creating opportunities for students to problem-solve real world issues. www.AngelaStuesse.com

Undocumented immigration receives considerable media attention in the United States today. But what does it actually mean to be undocumented? How does illegality shape the lived realities of migrants themselves? Through in-depth engagement with five new ethnographies on the topic, this course examines the social, political, and legal challenges faced by undocumented Latino immigrants and their families. Through the lens of legal anthropology, which seeks to understand the relationship between law/policy, social relations, and inequality, students will explore the hazards of unauthorized crossing at the U.S.-Mexico border, processes of and obstacles to legalization, economic and health effects of workplace exploitation, coming-of-age challenges of undocumented youth, and consequences of detention and deportation. The authors of each ethnography will be invited to join us via Skype for an informal Q&A conversation.

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Art

ARTH 53.001: Art and the Body
VP, NA
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Katherine Guinness

Katherine Guinness is a theorist and historian of contemporary art. She received her Ph.D. in Art History and Visual Studies from the University of Manchester, and has previously taught at the University of Sydney and the University of New South Wales. Her research includes issues of bodily identity, selfie culture, and the aesthetic category of zaniness within video and performance art. She is currently completing a monograph on artist Rosemarie Trockel, entitled Rosemarie Trockel: Schizogenesis. Recently, she received the Lisa Visser Writer’s Award from arts magazine KAPSULA, and has an essay on Heath Franco in the forthcoming collection The National, a survey of contemporary Australian art.

This course will examine presentations and representations of the body in Western art and how such portrayals relate to their social, cultural, and political contexts. From classical Greek nudes to the crucified Christ to the mutilated victims of modern warfare, representations of the human form have always signified essential norms, ideals and aspirations—both personal and communal. This course will examine manifestations of “the body” in Western art. Focusing on depictions of the body in art as well as the use of the body as art, we will explore how such portrayals relate to broad social, cultural and political contexts. We will consider whether particular works of art reinforce or undermine traditional oppositions between normalcy and perversity, attraction and repulsion, nature and culture. Particular attention will be paid to art in which the body functions as a form of dissent, challenging conventions of gender, race or sexuality, with a focus on feminist artists and contemporary artwork.

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ARTH 89H.001: Copies and Counterfeits: A History of Visual Representation
VP
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Maggie Cao

Maggie Cao is an Assistant Professor who specializes in the history of American art. She received her B.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard and held a humanities fellowship of the Society of Fellows at Columbia before joining the faculty at UNC in 2016. Her intellectual interests include intersections of art and economic theory, the visual culture of science and technology, and artifacts of the global mercantile world. She has always been fascinated by forgery, counterfeiting, and other forms of illicit imitation.

Whether celebrated or condemned, replication has long been central the production and reception of images in the Western world. This seminar explores image making since the Renaissance through the lens of authenticity and replication, covering such diverse topics as art pedagogy, scientific documentation, currency debates, copyright law, and industrial design. The material artifacts we will study—originals, copies, and their instruments of production—include ceramic dishes, penmanship manuals, banknotes, death masks, trompe l’oeil paintings, automata, polygraphs, and optical toys. We will examine manual, mechanical, and digital means of reproduction and their overlapping histories in the fine arts, natural sciences, and commerce. What challenges were involved in replicating across media, whether translating a painting to print, or a print to painted porcelain? How have new technologies of reproduction from copperplate engraving to 3D printing changed the aims and experiences of visual communication? How have our understandings of the copy evolved in response to theories of artistic imitation emerging from the guild system, romantic bohemianism, or postmodernism? How have they been shaped by new economic circumstances like the proliferation of paper money or the advent of the assembly line? This course teaches ways of looking at, thinking about, and engaging in critical discussion about the visual world, and introduces students to research and writing about art and material culture. Museum visits and hands-on experiences will be an integral component of learning.

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ARTS 50H.001: The Artistic Temperament
VP
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Jim Hirschfield

Jim Hirschfield has been teaching art at UNC since 1988. He has been a practicing artist since 1978. And yet he still ponders the motivation to make and to experience art in all its forms. Jim has received a number of art commissions from cities across the country: From Anchorage, Alaska to Fort Lauderdale, Florida and from San Diego, California to Orono, Maine. He has also received numerous awards for his artwork, which he describes as being closely knit to place and time.

As a means to understanding our own personal goals, this class examines the wide-ranging questions of what it means to be an artist. We will begin with: What is art and Who are artists. We will consider: Is there such a thing as an artistic disposition? Where and when does art happen? How does art get made? What are the impediments to success? And Why do we make art and why is it important that we do?

While looking at the work and lives of musicians, playwrights, film makers, writers and visual artists, we will ponder not only what it means to be a “successful” artist, but examine the importance of creativity and hard work in any successful endeavor. This class intends to grapple with what it means to be in the business of self-expression.

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Asian Studies

ASIA 53.001: Israeli Popular Culture: The Case of Music
BN, CI
MWF, 12:20 PM – 1:10 PM
Ana Laura Sprintzik

Ana Laura Sprintzik was born in Argentina and grew up in Israel. She is a foreign language teacher and a community educator. In Argentina, before coming to the US, she completed dental school and practiced dentistry for two years. During that time, she was involved in National Health Education Campaigns as well as research initiatives in undeserved local communities. After coming to the US in 2005, Ms. Sprintzik earned a Master of Education from Arizona State University, becoming a fully certified foreign language educator. Since then, Hanna has been teaching Hebrew and Spanish within Jewish and non-Jewish institutions, becoming especially interested in curriculum development, the use of technology in the classroom, and the teaching of Israeli culture.

This seminar is an introduction to the field of Israeli Popular Culture and is oriented toward students who are interested in learning about Israeli popular culture in a transnational and interdisciplinary frame. Focusing mainly on Israeli popular music, students will make a journey through different genres and styles that represent the cultural richness developed since early Zionism, going through deep social and cultural changes during the last two centuries. In addition, along the way students will engage with interdisciplinary cultural productions such as literature, film, television, and dance through their interaction with different musical styles helping students ultimately develop a broad and knowledgeable understating of social and cultural processes in the Israeli society.

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ASIA 67H.001: Japanese Fashion: History and Culture
VP, BN, CI
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Janice Bardsley

Janice Bardsley is a graduate of UC Davis (Dramatic Art) and UCLA (Asian Languages and Cultures) and has been a Tar Heel since 1994. She enjoys teaching Japanese literature, theater, and women’s studies at Carolina. In designing this new seminar, she read widely in Japanese fashion history and theory, watched movies, read fiction, and collected images, all the while fascinated by how people used fashion to tell competing stories of personal and group identity. In her research, she has worked on the politics of fashioning Japanese royalty, beauty queens and kings, transgender celebrities, and the new fad for kosupure (costume play). She loves traveling in Japan, catching up on pop cultural fads, and scouting new vegetarian cafes. She looks forward to working with students in this new seminar.

This Humanities course opens an interdisciplinary inquiry into fashion’s role in constructing and displaying identity. Throughout the late 19th and 20th centuries, clothing trends emerged in Japan aimed at variously expressing stylish modernity, political rebellion, a native past, and a cosmopolitan identity. The tough-guy bankara style affected by male political activists in the 1890s, the Modern Girl’s scarlet lipstick in the 1920s, and even the Ivy Boy’s neat sweaters and preppy look in the 1960s incited alarm. In turn, foreign adaptations of Japanese styles have long inspired Japanophilia abroad, at times provoking charges of cultural appropriation. Exploring key moments in Japanese fashion history and its reinvention abroad, we understand the role that fashion has played in narrating nation, culture, and identity. Scholarly articles that scrutinize such narratives and provide insight into their historical context enhance our inquiry.

Through regularly writing short essays, participating in class discussion and small-group tutorials, and conducting, presenting, and revising a research project, students in this Communications Intensive course develop ways of speaking and writing about fashion that relate to many of the questions animating Japanese Studies today: What role does Japan play in the global imaginary? How have Japanese domesticated cultural forms from abroad and how have people abroad re-invented Japanese styles and clothing? How are concepts of gender, class, and race in Japan constructed, muted, and reinvented through fashion? A field trip to the Ackland Art Museum, guest speakers, and the chance to do your own research make this seminar productive and fun. No background knowledge of Japan, Japanese, or fashion studies is required.

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ASIA 68.001: Power of Music/Music of Power: Cultural Politics of 20th-Century Arabic Music
BN, CI, GL
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Zeina Halabi

Zeina Halabi teaches Arabic language, literature, and cinema. Her research focuses on the depiction of Arab intellectuals in modern Arabic literature. She is particularly interested in new media and the works of underrepresented writers and filmmakers.

This course examines the dynamics of power and music in the Arab world in the last century. It explores the relationship between music, composers, and listeners in times of independence wars, national victory, and uprising.

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ASIA 89.001: Wars and Veterans: Iran, Iraq, and Afghanistan
LA, CI, GL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Claudia Yaghoobi

Claudia Yaghoobi is a Roshan Institute Assistant Professor in Persian Studies in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She teaches courses on Middle Eastern and Persian Literature. Yaghoobi’s recent publications include “Yusuf’s Queer Beauty in Persian Cultural Productions”, Comparatist (2016); “Socially Peripheral, Symbolically Central: Sima in Behrouz Afkhami’s Showkaran”, Journal of Asian Cinema (2016); “Subjectivity in ʿAṭṭār’s Shaykh San’an Story in The Conference of the Birds”, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture (2014); and “Sexual Trauma and Spiritual Experience: Rabiʿa al-ʿAdawiyya and Margery Kempe”, Persian Literary Studies Journal (2014). Her book, Subjectivity in ‘Attar, Persian Sufism, and European Mysticism, will be released in May 2017 by Purdue University Press.

In this course, we will explore the various ways that wars and conflicts, particularly Iran-Iraq, U.S.-Iraq, and U.S.-Afghanistan wars, have been portrayed in literature, film, and photography. We will attempt to deepen and enrich our understanding of war experienced by both veterans and civilians of each country. We will examine the impact of war on the human psyche in regards with violence. We will read books by American war veterans and Middle East authors contemplating the wars and their consequences. We will look at each writer’s perspective on war and their interpretation of it comparatively. In order to enhance our understanding of the phenomenon of war, we will also read supplementary articles on criticism of war and a few on psychology of war. There will be film screening on these wars which will give students the opportunity to examine these wars in a different medium than just literature. We will also look at war photography and analyze the perspectives of each photographer and the impact war has not only on people who are involved but on outside observers as well. All readings will be in English. The class will be conducted in the form of a combination of lectures, discussion, and experimentations.

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Biology

BIOL 53.001: Biotechnology: Genetically Modified Foods to the Sequence of the Human Genome
PL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Jill Dowen

Jill Dowen, PhD, is a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Integrative Program in Biological and Genome Sciences, and an Assistant Professor in the Biochemistry and Biophysics Department and the Biology Department at UNC-Chapel Hill. Dr. Dowen’s lab is investigating the function of DNA loops involving genes and their regulatory elements. Projects in her lab address how genome organization impacts the expression of genes in different cell types during development and how disruptions in these mechanisms lead to human diseases such as cancers and developmental syndromes.

A good life depends on access to adequate food and medical care. Advances in biotechnology have made possible both agriculture and medicine, and further advances may allow us to feed and keep healthy a burgeoning population in both developed and undeveloped countries. This seminar will examine the science behind a number of striking recent advances in biology, including animal cloning, genetic engineering of crop plants, development of new therapeutic drugs, development of embryonic stem cells, and deciphering of the complete human genome sequence. Students will debate how specific technological advances force us to confront new social and ethical choices, such as whether you want your own genome to be sequenced. We will also consider how new technologies are actually implemented, and we will visit an academic lab and a biotechnology company. The seminar should bring together the humanistic and technical impulses in students, and is open to students planning careers in scientific or humanities fields.

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Classics

CLAR 50H.001: Art in the Ancient City
VP, BN, WB
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Donald Haggis

Donald Haggis studied Latin, Greek, and Classical Archaeology at the University of Minnesota. He conducted his Ph.D. coursework in both the Department of Classical Studies and the Center for Ancient Studies, where he developed an interest in Aegean state formation and the use of intensive archaeological survey to explore cultural dynamics on a regional scale. His current research interests include settlement structure in the Aegean; the archaeology of Prepalatial, Protopalatial and Early Iron Age Crete; and the development of early cities and small-scale states on Crete after the abandonment of Bronze Age palatial centers (ca. 1200-600 B.C.).

This course offers a comparative perspective on the archaeology of ancient Egypt, Bronze Age Greece and Crete (3000-1100 B.C.), and the classical Greek world (800-100 B.C.), exploring the public art produced by these early Mediterranean societies: the Bronze Age palaces of the Aegean, the territorial state of ancient Egypt, and the classical city-states of ancient Greece.

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Communication

COMM63.001: The Creative Process in Performance
VP, CI, US
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Joseph Megel

Joseph Megel has spent the last 20 years focusing on the direction and development of new works, for theatre, film and video. Mr. Megel is a member of SSDC (Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers), Co-Artistic Director of StreetSigns Center for Literature and Performance in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and an Associate Artist for The Working Theatre in New York. He holds the M.F.A. degree from the Peter Stark Motion Picture Producing Program at the University of Southern California, a Master of Arts from the University of Cincinnati’s College Conservatory of Music and a B.S. in Speech from Northwestern University. He served for six years as Artistic Director of Playwrights Theatre of New Jersey, a new play development theatre, and continues to serve as Co-Executive Producer of Harland’s Creek Productions, producer of New York premieres of new plays, developmental producer of screenplays, readings and films.

Students in this seminar will attend and study the production process of multimedia, music, dance and theater performances in campus venues: The Memorial Hall Carolina Performing Arts Series, the Process Series of the Performance Studies program in the Department of Communication Studies, Playmakers, and others across campus. We will explore the ways that these performances engage us, communicating powerful ideas and emotions through their various media of expression. Students will research performance pieces, interview the performers, attend rehearsals and performances, and write essays that combine their own experiences of the performances with readings in performance studies. Students will also create their own performance pieces as they observe the relationship of preparation and practice to the spontaneity and surprise of performance.

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COMM85.001: Think, Speak, Argue
CI
MW, 1:25 PM – 2:40 PM
Christian Lundberg

Christian Lundberg is an Assistant Professor in Communication Studies, where he conducts research on the public sphere, rhetoric, and contemporary American religious discourse. He received his Ph.D. from Northwestern University’s program in Rhetoric and Public Culture, and currently teaches a class in globalization and communication. One of his passions is teaching people how to debate. He coached teams at three universities to national championships in intercollegiate debate and has taught debate classes at Northwestern, Emory University, and Georgia State, as well as teaching summer workshops on debate at Northwestern, Dartmouth, Miami University of Ohio, and the University of Kentucky.

This seminar helps students learn to think more critically, speak more persuasively, and argue more effectively by focusing on practical skill development in reasoning and debate. Students at Carolina learn to sharpen their thinking, speaking, and argument skills in the course of their normal classwork, but this happens more or less indirectly. This seminar will focus directly on improving each of these skills. Students will learn to think more critically by reflecting on the work of philosophers who deal with reasoning and informal logic, to speak with conviction and clarity through hands-on learning about the tradition of rhetoric, and to argue more effectively by debating the pressing issues of our day. The skills that we hone in on in this course will help students become more effective in the classroom, in their chosen vocation, and as citizens in an increasingly complex global public sphere.

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COMM89.001: Introduction to Networked Societies
SS
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
Neal Thomas

Dr. Neal Thomas’ academic work draws out connections between digital media technologies, knowledge, power, and everyday social life. From a critical humanities perspective, his current research looks at some core computer programming techniques at work in social media, to see how the technology encodes philosophical ideas about what it means to be social, and even what it means to /mean/ in the first place. If you’ve been noticing the rising effects of algorithms and network gadgets in contemporary culture, then this seminar might just be for YOU.

This seminar is designed to introduce early-career students to the role that networks play in contemporary global societies. Over the course of the semester, we will examine key ways to think about network societies, by taking up the idea of the network in social, political, economic, cultural and technological terms. With help from popular and academic writing, we will ask: What does it mean to organize the world through networks? How do identity, commerce, science, and political life function according to network thinking? In formulating responses to such questions, the seminar will center on in-class discussion, taking theories about networks and applying them to everyday life both within and outside a North American context.

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COMM 89.002: Make a Zine! Do-It-Yourself Writing, Publishing, & Distribution
LA
MW, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Bill Brown

Bill Brown is a writer and filmmaker living in North Carolina where he is an Associate Professor of Media Production in the Department of Communication. He received a BA from Harvard University and an MFA from the California Institute of the Arts.

Brown’s films have screened at venues around the world, including the Rotterdam Film Festival, the London Film Festival, the Sundance Film Festival, and Lincoln Center.

Brown is the co-founder of The Zine Machine: Durham Printed Matter Festival, now entering its third year. His travel zine, Dream Whip, is published by Microcosm Publishing.

Zines (pronounced “zeens”) are self-published labors of love. Though they take a multitude of forms (hand-written pamphlets, comic books, collages), tackle all manner of topics (from romance to rock n’ roll, graffiti to global politics), and explore a variety of genres (self-help, sci-fi, teen lit, punk rock, poetry), they all share a passion for uncompromising creative expression. In a world of virtual media, zines are things you can hold in your hands and that circulate in the world.

This is a hands-on seminar. You will be introduced to the history, culture, and politics of zines; you will be visited by local zine makers and participate in zine-making workshops; and you will conceive and create your own zine, and organize a zine festival to share the zines you make.

This seminar is a perfect fit for budding writers, poets, cartoonists, and anyone with an interest in personal, creative expression.

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Computer Science

COMP 50H.001: Everyday Computing
QI
MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM
Ming C. Lin

Ming C. Lin received her B.S., M.S., Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 1988, 1991, 1993 respectively from the University of California, Berkeley. She is currently the John R. & Louise S. Parker Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina (UNC), Chapel Hill. She has received numerous honors and awards, including the NSF Young Faculty Career Award in 1995, Honda Research Initiation Award in 1997, UNC/IBM Junior Faculty Development Award in 1999, UNC Hettleman Award for Scholarly Achievements in 2002, Beverly W. Long Distinguished Term Professor 2007-2010, Carolina Women’s Center Faculty Scholar in 2008, Carolina’s WOWS Scholar 2009-2011, IEEE VGTC VR Technical Achievement Award 2010, and 8 best paper awards. She is also a 2011 Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and a 2012 Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Her research interests include computer graphics, robotics, and human-computer interaction, with focuses on physically-based modeling, haptics, algorithmic robotics, virtual environments, interactive techniques, geometric computing, and distributed interactive simulation. She has (co-)authored more than 250 refereed scientific publications, co-edited/authored four books, including “Applied Computation Geometry” by Springer-Verlag, “High-Fidelity Haptic Rendering” by Morgan-Claypool, “Haptic Rendering: Foundations, Algorithms and Applications” by A.K. Peters, and “Algorithmic Foundations of Robotics” by Springer-Verlag.

The goal of this first year honor seminar is to understand the use of computing technology in our daily activities. In this course, we will study various examples on how computing solve problems in different aspects of our daily life in today’s society. Students will learn about computational thinking for solving many different problems in the physical and virtual world. We will discuss various considerations and tradeoffs (e.g. time, storage, ease of implementation, and generality) used in designing computational methodologies, including data structures, algorithms, computational methods, complexity, and design issues.

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Dramatic Art

DRAM 83.001: Spectacle in the Theatre
VP
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
David Navalinsky

David Navalinsky is the Director of Undergraduate Production in the Department of Dramatic Art and has served on the First Year Seminars Steering Committee. David has taught at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Mississippi. David has worked professionally at South Coast Repertory in Orange County California, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, The Illinois Shakespeare Festival, and the Karamu Performing Arts Theatre in Cleveland, OH. Some of David’s favorite projects were at the Dallas Children’s Theater where he made a dinosaur collapse and pirates walk the plank.

This seminar will explore the artists, art and technology involved in creating the world of the play. It is intended as an overview for students who want to learn about theatrical design. Students will create their own designs in the areas of scenery, costumes, and lighting for three plays throughout the semester. These plays will be placed outside of their traditional setting while still maintaining the story and themes. Students have placed Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a trailer park and a daycare center for example. Careful historical research, close reading and analysis, text and source material, and collaboration will be the focus of the student projects. In addition, the seminar will look at theatrical technology and how spectacle has evolved from the Greeks to Cirque du Soleil.

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DRAM 87H.001: Style: A Mode of Expression
VP, CI, NA
MW, 12:20 PM – 1:35 PM
McKay Coble

McKay Coble teaches design, both scenic and costume for the theatre and the history of material culture. She fell in love with the power of choice as far as visuals are concerned early in her career as a Carolina student and has never turned back. She is a professor in the Department of Dramatic Art and a resident designer for PlayMakers Repertory Company. Professor Coble uses the many and varied artistic venues on campus as co-instructors and the class will have many opportunities to visit them. You will likely join Professor Coble on a design journey as she creates the scenery for a production for PRC, and you will have the opportunity to see the process and product.

This seminar studies the elements of design in their pure form and in context, surveys a history of period styles and theatre, and identifies their causes.
Consider Oscar Wilde’s statement from The Decay of Living 1889:

“Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life. This results not merely from Life’s imitative instincts, but from the fact that the self conscious aim of Life is to find expression, and that Art offers it certain beautiful forms through which it may realize that energy…”

Do you agree or disagree?

Art and design have frequently shown the inner life of humankind throughout history better than political, intellectual or social history. While a period’s style is seldom defined by the everyday choices of everyday people and is most often recorded in the works of artists, writers and intellectuals we must recognize the “times” as a major motivator for all stylistic choices. Even minor arts reflect major events.

We will study the elements of design as they exist in their pure form; a “tool box” of elements available to artists and practice the principles to which design is bound. We will survey a history of period styles, period theatre and identify their causes. We will explore one period’s style as a foundation for the next and dispel the Star Trek premise that future styles will only reflect the future.

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Economics

ECON 53.001: The Costs and Benefits of the Drug War
SS
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Arthur Benavie

Arthur Benavie received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. He has been at UNC since 1967. His specialty is macroeconomic theory and policy. His book, Deficit Hysteria: A Common Sense Look at America’s Rush to Balance the Budget, was written for the general public. His most recent book is Social Security under the Gun. In his former life he was a concert violinist, and playing violin is now his main avocation.

The basic question examined in this seminar will be the costs and benefits of the U.S policy of drug prohibition. Does drug prohibition decrease drug abuse? Affect violence in our society? Aid terrorism? Diminish our civil liberties? Affect the public’s health? Corrupt public officials? Should drugs be decriminalized or legalized and if so, how? Should different illicit drugs be treated differently? What is the evidence in the United States and in other countries on decriminalization or legalization? Students will write a paper and present it in class, and prepare an interview with individuals who are on the frontline of the drug war, such as police or attorneys. As a seminar, classroom activity will consist of discussions and debates.

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ECON 57H.001: Engines of Innovation: the Entrepreneurial University in the 21st Century
SS, CI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Buck Goldstein, Matthew Rascoff

Buck Goldstein is the University Entrepreneur in Residence and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Economics. Prior to returning to the University, Goldstein co-founded Information America, an online information company which was publicly traded and subsequently acquired by the Thomson Corporation. Subsequently, he was a partner in Mellon Ventures, the venture capital arm of Mellon Bank. He is the author, with Holden Thorp, of Engines of Innovation–The Entrepreneurial University in the 21st Century.

Matthew Rascoff is Vice President for Technology-Based Learning and Innovation at the University of North Carolina—General Administration and Founder of its Office of Learning Technology and Innovation. He has served as a Senior Advisor to the Robert Bosch Foundation, the Bertelsmann Foundation, and many others. He graduated with honors from Columbia University and the Harvard Business School and was a Fulbright Scholar at Bagazici University in Istanbul. He has also worked extensively on “Ed-Tech” in the private sector and published on the subject.

This class will explore the current state of American higher education and attempt to apply basic principles of entrepreneurship and the lean start up methodology to the problems facing our colleges and universities. The class will involve readings on current issues in higher education and the study of key concepts in innovation and entrepreneurship. Class teams will then develop and test novel approaches to some of the most important problems in higher ed. Small grants will be available to facilitate this process. The class will also participate in a series of symposiums on higher education. Speakers at the symposiums will also meet with the class

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ECON 89.001: History of Financial Crisis, 1637-2013
HS, NA
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
John Komlos

John Komlos is Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Munich (Germany). He also taught at Harvard, Duke and in Austria and Switzerland. Born in Budapest, he became a refugee during the revolution of 1956, and grew up in Chicago where he received Ph.D.s in both history and economics from the University of Chicago where Nobel-Prize winning economist Robert Fogel induced him to study the effect of economic processes on human biology. Komlos devoted most of his academic career developing this research agenda, which culminated in his founding the journal “Economics and Human Biology” in 2003.

Would you like to find out about the financial crisis of 2008? This seminar will discuss the reasons why the crisis happened, examine critically how the government responded to the crisis, and why it has been difficult for the economy to regain its pre-crisis momentum. We will also discuss the similarities between the Meltdown and other historical financial crisis. Students will gain a broader understanding of the global economy in which we live and work. In addition, the historical perspective will enable students to gain a more thorough appreciation of the challenges that lie ahead for their generation. The aim of the seminar is not to concentrate on facts but rather to comprehend the big picture of economic processes in their social and political context in a very long-run perspective. Lots of discussion, lots of audio visual material will make this an exciting way to start your college career.

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Education

EDUC 65.001: School Daze: What’s School Got to do with Getting an Education?
T, 4:30 PM – 7:15 PM
Madeleine R. Grumet

Madeleine R. Grumet is a professor in the School of Education and in the Department of Communication Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences. In the School of Education, she teaches courses in curriculum theory in the Culture, Curriculum and Change Area and the Curriculum and Instruction Program. In the Department of Communication Studies, she teaches courses in performance studies. From 1998-2003, Grumet was dean of the School of Education, a position she previously held in the School of Education at Brooklyn College, City University, NY.

Drawing her scholarship from literature and philosophy, Grumet is interested in understanding how society influences what goes on in schools. Grumet’s early work explored the use of autobiographical narratives in the study of educational experience. In Bitter Milk: Women and Teaching, Grumet addressed the influence of gender on knowledge and teaching. Current projects address the arts and their integration into the curriculum of the academic disciplines and analyses of current trends in curriculum theory.

Grumet’s research and scholarship explore issues of subjectivity and the ways that students and teachers bring their own experiences to the symbolic codes and social and political structures of institutional knowledge to make sense of the world. This agenda takes many forms: a comparative study of resources in the neighboring school districts of Orange County and Chapel Hill-Carrboro; an analysis of cognitive, social and emotional processes of arts integration programs; and a study of how deans of schools of education perceive the effects of accreditation. Her recent essay, The Public Expression of Citizen Teachers, published in the Journal of Teacher Education, expresses her strong interest in supporting the dignity and agency of teachers.

What does it mean to be an educated person? What function do schools serve? This seminar builds on the experiences of schooling that students bring to the university. It invites them to re-consider and de-construct what they know about education and schools as a result of those experiences. The seminar considers traditional schooling along with non-traditional and international approaches to educating youngsters. Included are provocative readings, discussions and invitations to brainstorm schooling as it relates to education. Students will be challenged to re-consider their experiences and notions about school and to examine alternatives. Students’ first-hand knowledge and experiences combined with a critical perspective will encourage innovative thinking about ways and places of learning with the aim of generating proposals for new or reformed schools and new forms of public education for the future.

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English and Comparative Literature

CMPL 89.001: Curiosity and the Birth of the Imagination
LA, WB
TTH 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Marsha S. Collins

Marsha S. Collins is Professor of Comparative Literature and Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education. Her research focuses on Early Modern Spanish Literature and Culture in the context of Early Modern Europe, Literature and the Visual Arts, and Idealizing Forms of Literature. She is the author of three books, most recently of “Imagining Arcadia in Renaissance Romance” (Routledge, 2016) and over thirty articles. She loves dogs, yoga, piano, travel, being at the ocean, and spending time with family and friends.

Today we tend to see curiosity and imagination as two peas in a very positive pod. Yet, although they have often been linked together, neither curiosity nor the imagination has always been viewed in such a favorable light. Pandora’s curiosity supposedly unleashed all ills and calamities upon the world. In the sixteenth century, Michel de Montaigne famously called the imagination a “runaway horse” and asserted that the imagination brings fevers and death to those who give it a free hand and encourage it. How did we get from Pandora’s calamitous curiosity and Montaigne’s death-dealing imagination to Epcot Center’s gleeful celebration of curiosity and the imagination? In this course, we will seek answers to this question by looking back in time to the thought and literature of classical antiquity and Early Modern Europe–to writings by Plato, Lucian, Cervantes, Shakespeare, and others.

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ENGL 52.001: Computers and English Studies
LA, CI
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
Daniel Anderson

Daniel Anderson has been teaching computer-assisted composition courses for 16 years. His work occupies the intersections of technology, teaching, and publication. He has developed award winning Web-based software for writing instruction and has published multiple books devoted to teaching and studying writing and literature. He has taught First Year Seminar courses at UNC–CH since the inception of the FYS program. He directs the Studio for Instructional Technology and English Studies at Carolina. His interests include teaching writing through the use of emerging communication media such as the World Wide Web and guiding students as they work together to investigate and create resources for studying literature.

This seminar explores ways that technology reshapes the study of literature and the ways writers compose. It emphasizes lessons in how to read and write about literary works, exploring how definitions of literature change as we consider not only fiction, poetry, and drama, but also music, art, and film. We also look at what it means to compose in the twenty first century, exploring blogging, podcasts, playlists, collages, videos, as well as familiar written forms. Class activities will feature some lecture, more discussion, and lots of project-based work.

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ENGL 54H.001: The War to End All Wars? The First World War and the Modern World
LA, GL, NA
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Heidi Kim

Heidi Kim is an Associate Professor in the Department English and Comparative Literature. She teaches chiefly contemporary American literature, with an emphasis on historical and cultural context. Some of her favorite authors to teach are William Faulkner, Junot Díaz, and John Steinbeck, and she also teaches drama and memoir. Her students have created digital exhibits and/or held public events on their original archival research in Wilson Library almost every year that she has taught. First-year seminars are some of her favorite courses to teach, and her work was recognized with the Sitterson Award for Freshman Teaching in 2013. She is currently at work on a book project about the literary depiction of illegal immigration during the Cold War.

What did the young American soldiers of WWI experience, and how did they express their trauma and concern in literature? We will look at the biography and works of famed writers such as William Faulkner, UNC alumnus Paul Green, Ernest Hemingway, and John Dos Passos to consider how these authors narrated their experience of war. Our study of Paul Green will make use of the original literary manuscripts and historical artifacts from UNC’s Wilson Library [some are available electronically here http://search.lib.unc.edu/search?R=UNCb4156587]. We will also investigate the papers of Ernest McKissick, an African American soldier from North Carolina, to consider the experiences of these men, who served in segregated units and faced continued or even increased prejudice upon their return.

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ENGL 55H.001: Reading and Writing Women’s Lives
LA, CI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Jane Danielewicz

Although she is an English professor, Jane Danielewicz is curious about almost all fields, from plant biology and architecture, to American history and literature. She can’t help but live the life of the mind and is a passionate reader, writer, and teacher. At UC Berkeley, her graduate education focused on linguistics and literacy, writing and rhetoric. Professor Danielewicz’s work at UNC continues in this vein. She investigates the nature of written language, the teaching of writing, and forms of creative non-fiction. Her special interest is in life-writing, particularly the study of contemporary American memoir. She is proud to have been named the Richard Grant Hiskey Distinguished Professor in Research and Undergraduate Teaching. She has twice received the J. Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award and has a particular affinity for working with first-year students. She enjoys creating assignments that tempt students to push the envelope and try something new, especially to conduct research in their fields. An associate professor in the department of English and Comparative Literature, she also directs the Writing in the Disciplines Program. Professor Danielewicz has recently finished a book, How to Do Things with Memoir, which talks about how memoirs are not simply interesting narratives but act to solve social problems or produce new ways of understanding the world.

How do our lives become stories? This simple question provokes writers to produce autobiographies or memoirs or biographies. This honors seminar narrows the scope, focusing on contemporary stories that involve personal and lived experience by and about women. Not only will we be reading autobiographical stories and theories that describe women’s experience, but we will also try producing creative nonfiction ourselves. What stories will students—as women or as men—tell about their lives? Students will be challenged to investigate questions of self and identity by composing (using traditional written or new media formats) four genres of life writing during the course: autobiography, autoethnography, biography, and personal essay. Students will learn the research methods involved in life writing. The seminar will be conducted daily as a workshop to promote interactive, experiential learning. Students will be organized into working groups to facilitate community building. Published authors will visit the class. Students will publish their work through public readings and on-line venues.

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ENGL 71.001: Doctors and Patients – Added 11/3/2016
LA
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Jane F. Thrailkill

Jane F. Thrailkill swerved away from a career in health care and instead earned her Ph.D. in English and American Literature. Her interest in medicine has persisted, however: her first book studied the influence of medical ideas on American authors such as Mark Twain, Henry James, and Kate Chopin. She has worked with the Honors Program to develop a new minor in Literature, Medicine, and Culture at UNC. Her recent talk for TEDxUNC looks at the serious issue of hospital-based delirium and describes how literary study can give insight into medical problems. Dr. Thrailkill has been recognized for her commitment to undergraduate teaching by a number of university-wide teaching awards and a Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguish Term Chair.

When the medical anthropologist Arthur Kleinman writes that “illness has meaning,” he reminds us that the human experience of being sick involves more than just an ailing body. In this course we will analyze a diverse collection of writers who have taken as their topic the human struggle to make sense of suffering and debility. The course is divided into five units that will allow us to explore the personal, ethical, cultural, spiritual, and political facets of illness. Central texts will include Anne Fadiman’s /The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down/, Alan Shapiro’s /Vigil/, and Rebecca Skloot’s /The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks/. We will also screen films (e.g. “Still Alice”) and read shorter selections from an array of authors, including Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Susan Sontag, Audre Lorde, Atul Gawande, Damon Tweedy, and Paul Kalanithi. We will draw on the many talented writers and researchers in the area for a series of guest lectures. Students will keep a reading journal, write short essays, and collaborate on a final project. Reading, Writing, and Discussion heavy!

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ENGL 73.001: Literature of War from World War I to the 21st Century
LA, CI
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Hilary Lithgow

Hilary Lithgow is interested in the value that literature can have for people in their everyday lives, and what literature might be able to show us about our lives that we might not otherwise be able to see. Hilary’s graduate work focused on Victorian and early twentieth century British literature, and on what a writer’s style tells us about his or her values and commitments. In doing that work, she got especially interested in the literature of war and the ways in which war experience shapes the writings of everyday soldiers from World War I to the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan; this semester’s first year seminar grows directly out of that interest. She holds two BA’s in English, one from Haverford College and the other from Oxford University, and a PhD in English from Stanford; her teaching has been recognized by multiple awards, including most recently the Joseph Flora Award here at UNC.

This is a class about literature and war and what each one of these subjects might teach us about the other. We will consider a range of war texts (including novels, poems, movies, scholarly writings and live and videotaped conversations with veterans) and our work will be oriented around one central question: what, if anything, can a work of art help us see or understand about war that cannot be shown by any other means? A large part of our work in this course will involve close attention to the particular choices that those who write about war make in their use of language and literary form. While attending to the crucial historical, political, technological and logistical differences among the wars we consider, we will also engage broader general questions about the nature of human beings, art, language and war. Themes we’ll address will include: the place of reading and writing in the face of death, the limits of language in the representation of combat, violence and human experience, moral concerns about aestheticizing and possibly falsifying experience, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as it shapes (and is potentially reduced by) self-expression and storytelling.

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ENGL 81.001: Jane Eyre and Its Afterlives
LA, CI, NA
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Jeanne Moskal

Jeanne Moskal is an award-winning teacher and mentor. She has authored a study of the poet William Blake and has edited the travel writings of Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein. Moskal’s book-in-progress analyzes twentieth-century adaptations of Jane Eyre.

Class members will reflect upon Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847) in its original contexts and study subsequent novels and films that engage with it. What makes a literary work a “classic”? How do later readers’ concerns affect their responses? Lovers of Jane Eyre are welcome, as are newcomers and skeptics. We will read Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847), ed. Richard J. Dunn; Grace Zaring Stone, The Bitter Tea of General Yen (1930); Daphne Du Maurier, Rebecca (1938); Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea (1966); and two books by Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (1985) and Why Be Happy When You Could be Normal? (2013). Films will be drawn from this list. English-language adaptions of 1934, 1943, 1970, and 2011; film adaptions in Spanish, Hindi, Tamil, and Mandarin; The Bitter Tea of General Yen, dir. Frank Capra (1933); Rebecca, dir. Alfred Hitchcock (1940); Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (BBC-TV, 1990); Wide Sargasso Sea (1993), dir. John Duigan. Your grade will be determined by a Creative Assignment, presented orally and in writing (8 pages; 45%), a Conversational Bibliography, presented orally and in writing (8 pages; 45%), and engaged, thoughtful participation in class discussions(10%).

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ENGL 86.001: The Cities of Modernism
LA, CI
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
Rebecka Rutledge Fisher

Rebecka Rutledge Fisher holds a Ph.D. in comparative literature, and regularly teaches seminars on cross-cultural poetics and aesthetics. She has published essays on the work of W.E.B. Du Bois, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, and Richard Wright, and has also published an edition of Olaudah Equiano’s 18th century autobiography. She is interested in the intersection of philosophy and literature, poetry and poetics, and comparative literatures of the African diaspora. Her research areas also include the Francophone Caribbean literatures of Martinique and Guadeloupe. Her edited collection of critical essays on the work of the cultural theorist Paul Gilroy will appear next year. She is currently completing a book-length study entitled Habitations of the Veil: Metaphor and the Poetics of Being before and after Du Bois.

The Cities of Modernism is a cross-cultural and inter-medial exploration of representations of the “Great City” in High Modernist works of literature, art, and film. Our choice of cities is necessarily restricted by the time allotted for the course, and so we will limit our examination to Harlem/New York, Paris, St. Petersburg (Russia), Chicago, and London. Materials may include texts by Andrei Bely, W.E.B. Du Bois, T.S. Eliot, Jean Toomer, and Virginia Woolf, paintings by cubists, dadaists, futurists, German expressionists, and artists of the Harlem Renaissance, and the films “Metropolis,” by Fritz Lang and “Modern Times,” by Charlie Chaplin. Discussions may include reference to contemporary theoretical essays on the modern city by Walter Benjamin, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, Georg Simmel, and Oswald Spengler. Students will also be exposed to the historical contexts that surround our primary readings. In the past, a Study Gallery, where original modernist art works related to our course materials are exhibited in a space reserved for our class at UNC’s Ackland Art Museum, has been curated for this course by the professor. If possible, a Study Gallery will be dedicated to this class for five weeks during Fall 2011. Teaching methodology for this course emphasizes active learning, and is therefore discussion-based. Close readings of the texts, where students are asked to comment upon, analyze, and interpret specific passages, will be undertaken each class period.

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ENGL 87.001: Jane Austen, Then and Now
VP
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Jeanne Moskal

Jeanne Moskal is an award-winning teacher and mentor. She has authored a study of the poet William Blake and has edited the travel writings of Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein. Moskal’s book-in-progress analyzes twentieth-century adaptations of Jane Eyre.

Pride and Prejudice, often cited as the best-loved novel in English, is the focus of this semester’s course in Austen and present-day responses to her oeuvre. We will begin with in-depth reading of Austen’s 1813 novel, with attention to its form (genre and narrative style) and to its historical and biographical contexts; we will examine recent re-workings, in fiction and in film, in light of present-day concerns and the students’ interests. Several film adaptations will be considered as part of our research into Austen’s current influence. First-time readers of Austen are welcome in the course, as are those deeply familiar with Austen’s oeuvre. Interested students are welcome to contact the instructor in advance of registration with any questions or concerns.

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ENGL 89.001: How We Read
LA, CI
TTH, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM
Whitney Trettien

Whitney Trettien (http://whitneyannetrettien.com) is a scholar, creator, and teacher whose work weaves together archival research and creative use of technologies. She has written and designed scholarship on the history of reading, writing, books, media, sound, feminism, remix culture, and digital technologies. Once, she made a talking tree stump of books that chats via text message. She has a PhD from Duke University, an MS from MIT, and is Assistant Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC Chapel Hill.

Perhaps no single activity defines college more than reading. We read textbooks and text messages, perform “close readings” of literature and “read between the lines” of course descriptions. Some readings are dense, and we struggle to discern their meaning; other texts are skimmed quickly. We take our literacy for granted, giving barely a thought to the complex neurological processes that enable us to interpret these lines. In an age of artificial intelligences, even machines “read.”

In this seminar, we explore the histories, sciences, and technologies of reading. Guest lectures and visits to archives, labs, and artists’ studios introduce different disciplinary approaches, as we ask: How did people read in the past? How do novelists, poets, and book artists conceptualize the act of reading? What happens in the brain when we read? And how do machines read differently from humans? Our investigations culminate in a multimodal exhibit, produced collaboratively.

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ENGL 89.002: Disability Literatures of Early Modern England
LA, WB
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Melissa Hull Geil

Melissa Hull Geil, Ph.D. is a Lecturer in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She holds B.A.s in English and Economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a M.A. and Ph.D. in English from Vanderbilt University. Her current manuscript, “The Monstrous Shape of Books: Authorship, Disability, and the Rise of Print Culture in Early Modern England,” concerns how representations of authorship that take the form of monstrous reproduction contribute to discourses print culture, disability, and gender in early modern England. She has received a number of awards to support this research, including grants from the Folger Shakespeare Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, and Vanderbilt University. Most recently, her articles appeared in The Age of Nashe (Ashgate, 2013), and are forthcoming in Renaissance Papers (November 2016), Shakespeare Criticism (January 2018), and Monstrosity, Disability, and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World (Palgrave, 2018).

What does it mean to explore the connection between modern disability theory and the portrayal of disability in early modern literature by authors including Shakespeare, Jonson, and Milton. Richard III’s physicality, King Lear’s madness, Volpone’s disability masquerade: how are physical and mental differences exhibited in texts; how are they performed on stage? This class will provide an introduction to key debates in disability studies and then put those theories into practice through an analysis of the literature of the early modern period.

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ENGL 89.003: Catholic Literature: Scriptures, Saints, and Skeptics – CANCELLED 12/14/2016
LA
MWF, 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Danielle Christmas

Danielle Christmas is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC. She holds a B.A. in English from Washington University in St. Louis and a Ph.D. in English from University of Illinois at Chicago. Her current manuscript, “Auschwitz and the Plantation: Labor, Sex, and Death in American Holocaust and Slavery Fiction,” concerns how representations of slavery and the Holocaust contribute to American socioeconomic discourses. She has received a number of national awards to support this research, including a Cummings Foundation Fellowship at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and a Mellon / ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship. Deeply interested in comparative frameworks, Danielle co-convened an international conference through Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia in July 2014 entitled, “The Future of the Past: Representing the Holocaust, Genocide, and Mass Trauma in the 21st Century” and she is proud to have been included in the USHMM’s interdisciplinary symposium of scholars working on genocide and literature. Most recently, her articles have appeared in Twentieth-Century Literature (2015) and Aftermath: Genocide, Memory, and History (Monash University, 2015). When she’s not working, Danielle’s taking a Nia class, drinking wine, playing a board game, or attempting to knit. You can find out more about Danielle’s work at her website, www.daniellechristmas.com.

In this FYS, you are invited to engage with a fascinating collection of ancient, medieval, and modern Catholic literature. We will consider several questions including: What is the “Catholic way” of reading the Bible as literature? Are there any tensions between literary production and Catholic belief? How does a “Catholic imagination” shape the way authors, in medieval and modern times, struggle with questions of meaning, purpose, and suffering? How can close textual readings develop our skills for literary analysis and critical thinking in classroom, personal, written, and inner discourse? This class is not a religious seminar or inducement to any particular belief, Catholic or otherwise; rather, we will work together to critically understand the often unnoticed ways in which a Catholic aesthetic has constructed what we understand to be literature and art, ethics and morals, saints and sinners. And that kind of critical turn requires an ability and eagerness for rigorous modes of reading, a kind of reading that is distinct from the eye we bring to Oprah’s Book Club, a psychology textbook, The New Yorker, or Twitter. Considering the influence of each form of writing we will encounter—Biblical narratives; spiritual biographies; and contemporary fiction that challenges and tests religious belief—doesn’t it seem like a good idea to learn how to read and think about these works, critically engage and argue about them, appreciate and challenge them? Because learning to read Catholic literature will allow you to better imagine and articulate your own moral worldview and ethical discourse, and participate in the public conversations that use religious belief to (re)form social and political boundaries.

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Geography

GEOG 56.001: Local Places in a Globalizing World
SS, GL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Altha Cravey

Altha Cravey became a geographer because she loves to travel and see new things. Her research focuses on globalization, labor, and gender issues in contemporary Mexico. She is beginning to publish on globalization in the US South as well. Cravey was born and raised in Illinois and Indiana and worked as a construction electrician for eleven years before finishing her undergraduate education. Her dissertation at the University of Iowa was supported by a four-year Iowa Fellowship and was published as Women and Work in Mexico’s Maquiladoras (Rowman and Littlefield, 1998). Cravey loves to bicycle around campus and Chapel Hill.

Globalization is a word we hear every day, but what does it mean for us in local places? Specifically, what can an understanding of globalization tell us about Carolina and nearby places? This seminar weaves together perspectives on globalization with hands-on exploration of Carolina and its place in today’s global “knowledge economy,” and the University’s founding in relation to the globalizing forces of that day. Our focus will shift back and forth between the global and the local, even to the microscale of our campus. We will learn through a variety of experiences and approaches, including fieldwork, old documents, and some introductory GIS (geographic information systems) exercises in addition to readings, class discussion, and group work. By the end of the seminar, students will not only have an understanding of globalization and the very real connections between the global and the local, but also a unique perspective on our university.

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GEOG 89.001: Red State/Blue State: A Geography of Voting Behavior
SS, NA
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
John Florin

Reared in Kansas and Nebraska, and educated in Kansas and Pennsylvania, John Florin joined the Carolina geography faculty in 1969. He continues to teach part time in retirement. His teaching interests center on the American South, and on cultural and agricultural geography. He has won two College-wide teaching awards. Additionally, he was chair of the geography department for 10 years.

This seminar starts with the geography of the vote for president of the United States, and for president and senator for North Carolina, in the 2016 election. It borrows the “Red State/Blue State” analogy to introduce and examine the question of why the current voting pattern(s) exists. We will follow the emergence of the pattern back into the late 20th century and to the early development of regional differences in the country. The course is meant as both an introduction to voting behavior in a strongly dichotomized political environment and to methods of geographic analysis.

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Geological Sciences

GEOL 76.001: Energy Resources for a Hungry Planet
PL
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
José Rial

José Rial has a Ph.D. in Geophysics from Cal Tech and a MSc. in Geology from the University of Michigan. Rial’s expertise includes mathematical modeling of natural systems, seismic wave propagation and climatology. In recent years Rial’s academic interests include the role of science and scientific discovery on global environmental issues, such as global warming, climate change and policy.

The seminar first describes today’s fundamental sources of energy: oil, natural gas and coal, how and where to find them, and the latest statistics on how long the present reserves will last. We will then explore alternative energy resources and why it is so important for society to understand that fossil fuel reserves are finite, and will be depleted in 40 years (cheap oil) or in 200 years (coal). The course stimulates student participation through class debates (e.g., Can nuclear energy become a viable and safe substitute for coal?, Is the current US energy policy a threat to national security?).

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German and Slavic Languages and Literatures

GERM 60.001: Avant-Garde Cinema: History, Themes, Textures – CANCELLED 11/17/2016
VP
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM (screenings TH, 5:30 PM – 8:30 PM)
Richard Langston

Richard Langston received his bachelor’s degree in German at the University of Vermont in 1993 and continued his studies at Washington University in St. Louis, where he finished his master’s degree in 1995 and his Ph.D. in 2002. The foci of his graduate studies included twentieth-century German literature, European intellectual history, literary theory and cultural studies. He joined the faculty at Carolina in the fall of 2002. In the spring of 2008, he was promoted to the rank of associate professor.

A common theme in much of his research is the historically contingent aesthetic politics at work both in and between media like literature and moving images. What do texts of the twenty and twenty-first century claim to know? What do they claim to do? What do they hope for? What do they say about us human beings? These questions are just some of what guides his scholarly interests.

Students explore the international history, filmic techniques and cultural meanings of non-narrative cinema of the 20th century. Students also transform in-class discussions and individual essays into video projects.

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SLAV 85.001: Children and War – ADDED 11/21/2016
LA, GL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Hana Pichova

Hana Pichova specializes in twentieth century Czech prose. Her published work focuses on literature in exile; on literary representations of cultural and sculptural events; and on literary historiography.

In this course we will explore narratives and films about WWII and post-war realities as experienced by children and teens. Forced to grow up quickly and unnaturally, children seek normalcy in the most unexpected places. Their imaginary escapes and creative endeavors become not only a means of their survival, but also a form of documenting the suffering humans inflict upon each other. As we read these “documents” we will consider the historical realities they reveal, while paying close attention to the literary quality of each narrative and how it shapes our understanding of, and response to, the narrated events.

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SLAV 86.001: Literature and Madness
LA
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Radislav Lapushin

Radislav Lapushin, Assistant Professor of Russian Literature, received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. His primary research interests are Chekhov; interrelationship between prose and poetry; and Russian literature on stage and screen. His recent book—“Dew on the Grass”: The Poetics of Inbetweenness in Chekhov—focuses on the poetic dimensions of Anton Chekhov’s prose and drama. He is the author of several volumes of poetry.

This seminar considers the relationship between literature and madness through the works of major Russian writers (Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Chekhov). We will examine how these artistic texts differently construct representations of madness. Students’ reading, writing, class discussions and presentations will be directed by a series of topics, such as the origin of madness, awareness or unawareness of madness, the theme of the mad artist, and madness as a literary device.

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Global Studies

GLBL 89H.001: Beg, Borrow, and Steal: The Political Economy of Aid, FDI, and Corruption
SS, GL
W, 2:30 PM – 5:00 PM
Brigitte Seim

Dr. Brigitte Seim is a scholar of comparative politics, focusing on the political economy of development. Her research agenda examines the relationship between citizens and political officials, with a particular emphasis on accountability in consolidating democracies. She obtained her PhD in Political Science from the University of California, San Diego in August of 2014. For the 2014-2015 academic year, she was a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow with the Varieties of Democracy (V-Dem) Project and joined the faculty of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Public Policy and Peter Thacher Grauer Fellow in 2015.

This course examines how politics and economics condition different countries’ path towards and experience with foreign aid, foreign investment, and corruption. In doing so, we will examine the effect of political conditions on economic outcomes and the effect of economic conditions on political outcomes. Through the exploration of the academic literature, popular (including non-Western) media, and policy briefs, students are encouraged to critically examine the prevailing views on these topics and to build the analytical and communication skills necessary to contribute to some of the most salient policy arenas facing our world today.

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History

HIST 63H.001: Water, Conflict, and Connection: the Middle East and Ottoman Lands
BN, GL
MT, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM
Sarah Shields

Sarah Shields teaches courses on the modern Middle East, the history of Iraq, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the development and consequences of nationalism and borders in the region. She has been named a “Favorite Geek” by the Independent Weekly. Shields took ten outstanding UNC students to Turkey as part of the Burch Field Research Seminar program, and plans to lead a tour to the Black Sea in 2013. In addition to her new work on water issues in the region, she is currently researching the long-term impact of the League of Nations on the Middle East.

Despite its centrality for the lives and the livelihoods of people in the Middle East, water has seldom been examined in its own right as a contributing factor to its history. This new First Year Seminar will explore the many ways in which water has shaped the history of the region, and the effects it currently has on life in the Middle East.

Along the Mediterranean and Aegean coasts as well as the Red Sea and Arab/Persian Gulf, seafaring and fishing played important roles in the economy; in the Gulf, pearl-diving became an important local industry as well. Agricultural innovations allowed permanent settlement in areas with little rainfall. Rivers and seas were essential for transportation, connecting populations of far-flung parts of the Middle East with each other, facilitating commerce and pilgrimage. The availability of clean water has become an increasing problem as industrialization and consumerism soil beaches and sully the region’s drinking supplies. Water and conflict have been indivisible in the region, since water is one of the crucial and rare resources in the Middle East. Some have argued, for example, that the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians can only be resolved by taking water resources into account; others have pointed to recent drought in Syria as a major factor contributing to the uprising that began in 2011. This course will focus in turn on the historical, cultural, and contemporary issues surrounding the presence and absence of water in the Middle East.

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HIST 85.001: What Concentration Camp Survivors Tell Us
HS, NA
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Donald Reid

Donald Reid is an historian of modern France. He is a labor historian, but works on the “long 1968” as an intellectual, social and political phenomenon and on the history of collective memory in modern France as well.

This is a seminar about reading so as to learn as much as we can from individuals expressing the inexpressible. It asks what (if anything) only camp survivors can tell us about the experience and what we can learn by exploring the effects of this experience on survivors.

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HIST 89.001: African American Music as History
VP, US
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Jerma A. Jackson

Jerma A. Jackson’s main research interest is twentieth century social and cultural history, with a special interest on African American life, religion, music and women’s history. In her first book Jackson engaged music to examine black life and culture, tracing gospel from its beginnings as a mode of worship to its expansion into commercialized culture during the forties and fifties. Jackson uses the music to examine some of the mounting changes that unfolded in the twentieth century—expanding industrialization and urban migration, the growth of consumer values and materialism, and the emergence of mass produced culture.

The influence hip-hop exerts on American popular culture today underscores the power of music in African American life. Yet rather than focusing on hip-hop, we will move back in time to examine the social and political significance of African American music from the 1890s to the 1970s. In this course we will consider how black people have rendered music a receptacle of identity and hope. What compelled African Americans to invest their hope in a resource as amorphous as sound? Engaging a broad range of styles, we will consider how black people across time and place used music to nurture a sense of community. Our investigation will consider this process from a range of perspectives: musicians, audiences, and businesses. The music assumed added significance in a society that dismissed African Americans as inferior and relegated them to second-class citizenship. Even as black people enlisted music to cultivate a sense of belonging, the appeal the music enjoyed among whites made it intensely political. Hence we will also consider the variety of ways singers and musicians navigated these racial politics. Throughout the term we will listen to music in the classroom. We will also engage several live musical performances over the course of the semester.

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HIST 89.002: Gender and the Law in United States History
HS, US
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Katherine Turk

Katherine Turk is a U.S. historian who is interested in the history of women, gender and sexuality, the law and social movements, and the twentieth century. In particular, she studies post-World War II American feminist activism and the challenges of defining and creating sex equality amidst different interest groups, state agencies, diverse populations of workers, and changes in the American economy. Professor Turk is currently finishing her first book, entitled Equality on Trial: Sex and Gender at Work in the Age of Title VII, which examines workplace rights struggles waged by women and men between the 1960s and the 1990s. Before joining the faculty at Carolina, she taught at the University of Texas at Dallas and held a postdoctoral fellowship at Indiana University Maurer School of Law in Bloomington. When she is not thinking about feminism, work and the law, she is often out for a jog, baking or cooking something, or working on a crochet project.

Since the colonial era, the law has shaped how Americans have worked, socialized, and understood themselves and each other—affecting even our most basic identities and intimate lives. At the same time, Americans across the centuries have invoked the law to claim political rights and to challenge or reinforce divisions among us. This course will explore how the law in America has defined and regulated gender and sexuality. Through readings, discussions, and written assignments, we will evaluate how assumptions about men and women have influenced the development of the law. We will consider how seemingly neutral laws can have different effects upon men and women across race and class divides, challenging some differences while naturalizing others. Finally, we will examine the power and shortcomings of appeals to legal equality waged by diverse groups and individuals. In so doing, we will begin to explore how to use legal evidence as a window into the past. We will cover topics including marriage, reproduction and the family to suffrage, work, and military service. On Tuesdays, we will discuss books and articles written by historians. On Thursdays, we will discuss primary sources: landmark cases, laws, and legal writing. You will not be expected to have any prior knowledge of the law.

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HIST 89H.001: Race and Rights in the American Legal System: The Case of the Japanese American Internment
HS, US
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Eric L. Muller

Eric L. Muller is Dan K. Moore Distinguished Professor of Law in Jurisprudence and Ethics. Muller joined the UNC faculty in the fall of 1998. He has published articles in the Yale Law Journal, the Harvard Law Review, and the University of Chicago Law Review, among many other academic journals. His book “Free to Die for their Country: The Story of the Japanese American Draft Resisters of World War II,” was published in August of 2001 by the University of Chicago Press, and was named one of the Washington Post Book World’s Top Nonfiction Titles of 2001. His second book, “American Inquisition: The Hunt for Japanese American Disloyalty in World War II,” was published by the University of North Carolina Press in October of 2007. His most recent book, “Colors of Confinement: Rare Kodachrome Photographs of Japanese American Incarceration in World War II”, published by the University of North Carolina Press in association with the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, was profiled in the New York Times in June of 2012. It won the Joan Patterson Kerr Book Award from the Western History Association in 2013.

From 2008 through 2011, Muller served at the law school as Associate Dean for Faculty Development. In both 2010 and 2011, he received the Frederick B. McCall Award for Teaching Excellence, voted by the graduating classes.

Muller serves as Chair of the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina Press and is a member of the university-level Appointments, Promotion and Tenure Committee at UNC-Chapel Hill.

From January of 2012 through December of 2015, Muller served as Director of the Center for Faculty Excellence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the campus’s faculty development center.

This seminar introduces students to the workings of the American legal system and examines the historical development of the constitutional norm of equal protection of the laws, using one notorious historical episode – the removal and confinement of Japanese Americans in World War II – as its central example. Rather than presenting constitutional law as a group of static, binding pronouncements, it shows how constitutional principles evolve as a conversation among the branches of the federal government, between the federal and the state governments, and between ordinary citizens and their governments. Along the way, the seminar offers an overview of the ways in which the law treated Asian immigrants and Asian Americans in the late nineteenth and the twentieth centuries, and poses questions about the legacy of the Japanese American imprisonment for later problems of individual rights and liberties.

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Interdisciplinary Studies

IDST 89.001: The Measured Life
SS, CI
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Note: This course will be taught by three Royster Fellows under the supervision of the Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education, Dr. Marsha Collins.
Katy Ascanio, Michael Little, Nathan Markiewitz, Marsha Collins

Katy Ascanio is a second year doctoral student in the Economics department. Katy researches topics in applied microeconomics. Her research predominantly seeks to answer questions in education and health economics.

Michael Little is a doctoral student in the School of Education. Michael’s research focuses on educational policies and programs that aim to improve the life outcomes of students from low-socioeconomic backgrounds. He is primarily interested in early childhood education, with a focus on the alignment of preschool through third grade services.

Nathan Markiewitz is a second year doctoral student in the Psychology department. Nathan’s research focuses on improving models for measures and processes relevant to developmental psychopathology research.

Marsha S. Collins is Professor of Comparative Literature and Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education. Her research focuses on Early Modern Spanish Literature and Culture in the context of Early Modern Europe, Literature and the Visual Arts, and Idealizing Forms of Literature. She is the author of three books, most recently of “Imagining Arcadia in Renaissance Romance” (Routledge, 2016) and over thirty articles. She loves dogs, yoga, piano, travel, being at the ocean, and spending time with family and friends.

Whether it’s by the ACT or Buzzfeed, we’ve been measured since we can remember, and that, like it or not, changes our lives. This measurement, especially the measurement of indirectly observable human traits–ability, personality, disorder–is both entirely necessary and terribly difficult to do well. Do it poorly and you disenfranchise people from the opportunities they deserve. Do it well and our world might become just a bit better.

But human measurement is not just one thing; it permeates the social and behavioral sciences and public policy from education to health to the workplace. To understand it, we must take a truly interdisciplinary approach. Only by tackling issues from college admissions to personnel selection to IQ testing, can we begin to see how our society measures itself.

For this class to succeed, we are asking everyone to bring their skills and perspectives to the table. Every meeting will be about applying social and behavioral science to defend, to question, and to change how we see the world. By the end, you will be equipped to use measurement in a way that recognizes its potential and limitations, no matter what your interests may be.

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Information and Library Science

INLS 89.001: Social Media and New Movements
SS
MT, 10:10 AM – 11:25 AM
Zeynep Tufekci

Zeynep Tufekci is an assistant professor in the School of Information and Library Science and an adjunct professor in the Department of Sociology. Her research interests are social impacts of technology, privacy and surveillance, inequality, research methods and complex systems. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Science, Washington Post, and other media.

Movements ranging from uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt and beyond to “Occupy” protests in the United States have been using new media technologies to coordinate, organize, and intervene in the public sphere as well as to document, share, and shape their own stories. Using a range of tools from Facebook to Twitter, from satellite modems to landlines to ad-hoc mesh networks, these movements have made their mark in history. The objective of this seminar is to enhance our conceptual and empirical understanding of the interaction between the new media ecology and social change. We will explore various approaches to studying social movements and social change and look at specific cases. Governments and powerful institutions are also responding to the challenge posed by the emergence of the Internet as a mundane and global technology. From increased surveillance and filtering capacity, to delivering propaganda over the Internet to their own, governments around the world are broadening their repertoire of social, technical, and legal tools for control and suppression of—and through—the Internet. We will explore the integration of new media tools within these movements as well governmental and institutional responses to these developments. Materials for this class will include readings, videos (not to be viewed in class but as material to be viewed), and a variety of visiting speakers (both in person and via Skype).

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INLS 89.002: Smart Cities
GL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Arcot Rajasekar

Arcot Rajasekar is a Professor in the School of Library and Information Sciences, a Chief Scientist at the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) and co-Director of Data Intensive Cyber Environments (DICE) Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A leading proponent of policy-oriented large-scale data management, Rajasekar has several research projects funded by the NSF, NARA, NIH and other funding agencies. Rajasekar has a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Maryland at College Park and has more than 100 publications in the areas of data grids, digital library, persistent archives, logic programming and artificial intelligence. His latest projects include the Datanet Federation Consortium and the Data Bridge that is building a social network platform for scientific data.

A smart city is one where the needs of a populace meet the needs of environmental sustainability. The balance between the social and environmental issues is governed by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) that power a smart city infrastructure. In this course, we learn about the influence of urban networks, smart city urban planning, energy as a catalyst of sustainable development, smart city infrastructure, sustainable transportation, flow of information and communications, smart grids, digital infrastructure and the role of data and information technology. We will discuss criteria for measuring the smartness of a city, including quality of life, citizen governance, and discuss issues that go towards the making of a future smart city. Several case studies will be presented with guest lecturers invited to present on critical thinking and practices in smart city development.

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INLS 89.003: Storytelling: Hidden Voices and Social Justice
VP, CI
TH, 6:00 PM – 8:45 PM
Brian Sturm

Dr. Brian Sturm’s research and teaching emphasize the power of narrative in many forms to engage and immerse those who interact with it, whether in oral, print, or video form. He has been a professional folktale storyteller for over 20 years, and he brings this practical experience to his classes by “spicing up” his student interactions with teaching stories. He is also fascinated by how stories create and challenge history and cultural identity.

This seminar will explore the value of storytelling to help make under-represented viewpoints public. By examining stories from folk literature, corporate marketing, and our own lives, we will see how stories contribute to privilege, power, and cultural blindness, but also how they can be a subversive, rebellious, and powerful voice for those struggling to be heard. We will also perform stories to build our communication and presentation skills.

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Latin American Studies

LTAM 89.001: The United States and Cuba
HS, GL
T, 3:30 PM – 6:15 PM
Louis A. Pérez, Jr.

Principal teaching fields for Louis A. Pérez, Jr. include twentieth-century Latin America, the Caribbean, and Cuba. Recent publications include: Cuba and the United States: Ties of Singular Intimacy, 1770s-1980s (3rd ed., Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2003); Cuba: Between Reform and Revolution (5th ed., New York: Oxford University Press, 2014); On Becoming Cuban: Identity, Nationality and Culture (2nd ed., Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2007); Cuba in the American Imagination: Metaphor and the Imperial Ethos (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008): The Structure of Cuban History: Meaning and Purpose of the Past (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013). Pérez has served on a number of journal editorial boards, including: Inter-American Economic Affairs, Latin American Research Review, The Americas, and the American Historical Review. He is presently the series editor of “Envisioning Cuba” at the University of North Carolina Press.

This course will examine the multiple-faceted and often conflict-ridden relationship between the United States and Cuba. Each country entered the imagination of the other at decisive moments during nineteenth-century national formation. Cuba developed into an object of U.S. obsession, as the United States expanded onto the Gulf of Mexico during the early decades of the 19th century, whereupon American political leaders contemplated the incorporation of Cuba into the U.S. national system a matter of national interest. Cuba, on the other hand, contemplated a different destiny, one based on national sovereignty and self-determination, sentiments that sustained the Cuban pursuit of independence through the second half of the 19th century. These have developed into the principal undercurrents of U.S.-Cuba relations: U.S. resolve to possess Cuba and the Cuban determination to resist possession.

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Marine Sciences

MASC 53.001: The Ends of the Earth: Polar Oceanography and Exploration
PL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Carol Arnosti

Carol Arnosti grew up in Wisconsin, where she developed an early appreciation for snow and ice. As an undergraduate at Lawrence University, she majored in chemistry, studied history, and played intercollegiate basketball. After completing a Ph.D. in oceanography at M.I.T. and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, she went to the Max-Planck Institute in Bremen, Germany, where she rapidly became involved in a new project investigating microbial life at low temperatures. Continued involvement in this project since moving to Chapel Hill in 1995 has led to repeated research work in the Arctic as well as a trip to Antarctica, and a permanent case of ‘Polar Fever’.

What explains the ‘pull of the Poles’? What motivated early explorers to undergo great hardships to investigate the Arctic and Antarctic, and what did they discover about these regions? What have we discovered in the intervening decades, and what do we still not understand about polar regions? Why do the Arctic and Antarctic play such a critical role in global climate? This seminar will combine scientific and historical perspectives to investigate the ‘ends of the earth’, the Arctic and Antarctica. We will begin by surveying the geography and oceanography of these regions, and then step back into the past and follow in the footsteps of some of the early polar explorers by reading their own accounts of their explorations. Modern accounts will help us compare and contrast these early explorations. The seminar will also include readings and discussions about current questions and problems of the polar regions, in particular human impacts and potential effects of global warming. Class discussions, short writing assignments, a term paper, and group presentations will be used to hone critical thinking and communication skills, and to help develop both scientific and historical understanding of these unique regions of the earth.

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Mathematics

MATH 58.001: Math, Art, and the Human Experience
QI
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Mark McCombs

Mark McCombs received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics from UNC-Chapel Hill. He is entering his 23rd year as a UNC faculty member and is a recent recipient of both a Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and a Students’ Undergraduate Teaching Award. He has also served as the mathematics department’s Director of Teacher Training, as well as an academic adviser in the College of Arts and Sciences. He authored the textbook (and companion website) used in Math 110 (college algebra) and supervises TAs who teach pre-calculus and calculus courses. He is especially committed to helping students discover more confidence in their own mathematical abilities. He enjoys writing, photography, film making, and UNC basketball.

This seminar is designed to engage students in an exploration of the relevance of mathematical ideas to fields typically perceived as “non-mathematical” (e.g., art, music, film, literature). Equally important will be an exploration of how these “non-mathematical” fields influence mathematical thought. Course activities and assignments have been designed to illuminate the fact that even the most complex mathematical concepts grow out of real people’s attempts to understand their world. By the end of the seminar, students should be able to

  • Identify and assess how mathematical ideas influence and are influenced by ideas expressed through art, music, literature, religion, etc
  • Compare and contrast different philosophies concerning the nature of mathematics
  • Articulate their own well-reasoned ideas concerning the nature of mathematics
  • Discuss the evolution of fundamental mathematical concepts in a historical as well as a cultural context
  • Discuss the work and lives of important mathematicians in relation to the “non-mathematical” work of their contemporaries
  • Identify and assess how their own understanding of mathematical ideas influences the way they interact with the world

Course assignments and activities will include weekly readings and short homework writing assignments (2–3 paragraphs), quizzes, and a portfolio of mathematical art (e.g., painting, origami, poetry, music). No prerequisite is required.

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MATH 60H.001: Simulated Life
QI
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Laura A. Miller

Laura A. Miller (PhD, NYU) is Associate Professor of Mathematics and Biology. Using her training in both mathematics and biology, she applies mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamics to better understand how organisms interact with their environments. Her current research interests include topics such as the aerodynamics of insect flight, the group behavior of pulsing corals, the fluid dynamics of jellyfish swimming, and the mechanical properties of trees that allow them to withstand hurricane force winds. Outside of the lab, Miller enjoys horseback riding, rowing, and scuba diving.

The focus of this semester’s Simulated Life seminar will be on organisms living within moving fluids. The natural world is replete with examples of animals and plants whose shape influences flow to their benefit. For example, the shape of a maple seed generates lift to allow for farther dispersal. The structure of a pinecone helps it to filter pollen from the air. A falcon’s form during a dive reduces drag and allows it to reach greater speeds.

We will mathematically describe the shape of organisms using 3D computer aided design (CAD). We will use the 3D objects in numerical simulations of flow around an organism. We will also 3D print these objects and place them inside flow tanks for comparison to simulation.

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Create 3D models of organs and organisms.
  • Run numerical simulations on a remote cluster.
  • Explain how the flow around an organism can be important to feeding, nutrient exchange, dispersal, and survivability.
  • Visualize flows experimentally and using numerically generated data.

The goals of this course are not specifically to:

  • Provide an introduction to numerical analysis.
  • Learn the detailed mathematics behind computer-aided design.
  • Teach students how to code.

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Music

MUSC 51.001: The Interplay of Music and Physics
PL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Laurie McNeil, Brent Wissick

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her Ph.D. in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. Her seminar grows out of her life as a choral singer (and, earlier, a violinist and recorder player). When not singing with the Choral Society of Durham, she can be found in her laboratory using lasers to study the properties of materials.

Brent Wissick (Professor of Music) specializes in cello, viola da gamba and chamber music. He has a particular interest in performance practices of the 16th-18th centuries and is Past President of the Viola da Gamba Society of America. He has recorded numerous CDs with American Bach Soloists and other important groups; and has given concerts and lectures throughout North America, Europe, Asia and Australia.

This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects.

Students may also register for this seminar under PHYS 51.

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MUSC 63.001: Music on Stage and Screen
VP, CI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Anne MacNeil

Before joining the faculty at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where she holds appointments in the Department of Music and the Department of English and Comparative Literatures, Professor Anne MacNeil taught at Northwestern University and the University of Texas at Austin. Her areas of specialization include Renaissance music, music and spectacle, commedia dell’arte, opera, performance studies, historiography, and digital humanities. Her current research encompasses digital humanities, the use of boats, barges, and waterways as venues for musical and theatrical performance in and around Renaissance Mantua; early-modern laments; operatic settings of tales of the Trojan Wars; and the intersections of music, ceremony, and biography in the lives of Isabella d’Este, Margherita Farnese, and Eleonora de’ Medici. Professor MacNeil is Co-Director of the international consortium IDEA: Isabella d’Este Archive (https://isabelladeste.web.unc.edu), an interdisciplinary digital humanities environment for studies relating to Isabella d’Este (1474-1539).

This seminar is designed to offer students the tools and techniques for understanding multi-media, staged musical works like opera, musical theater, and film. The goal of the seminar is to develop students’ analytical skills in verbal and non-verbal media and to encourage their visualization of the potential and implications of artistic forms and structures. No ability to read music is required. We will discuss musical, visual, and textual narratives, source materials, and the various means by which such multi-media artworks are transmitted to modern audiences (e.g., written scores, LPs/CDs, staged performances, movies, etc.). We will focus on music for silent films, and students will create their own soundtracks for silent film scenes.

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MUSC 89H.001: Augment your Reality!
VP, EE
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Anne MacNeil

Before joining the faculty at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where she holds appointments in the Department of Music and the Department of English and Comparative Literatures, Professor Anne MacNeil taught at Northwestern University and the University of Texas at Austin. Her areas of specialization include Renaissance music, music and spectacle, commedia dell’arte, opera, performance studies, historiography, and digital humanities. Her current research encompasses digital humanities, the use of boats, barges, and waterways as venues for musical and theatrical performance in and around Renaissance Mantua; early-modern laments; operatic settings of tales of the Trojan Wars; and the intersections of music, ceremony, and biography in the lives of Isabella d’Este, Margherita Farnese, and Eleonora de’ Medici. Professor MacNeil is Co-Director of the international consortium IDEA: Isabella d’Este Archive (https://isabelladeste.web.unc.edu), an interdisciplinary digital humanities environment for studies relating to Isabella d’Este (1474-1539).

Bring your own research ideas and learn how to design digital projects for them, including creating visualizations and audio widgets. Learn how to write grant applications for digital humanities, and explore virtual reality projects. Visit the immersion cave at NCState, talk with researchers at Duke’s Wired! Lab, and work with programmers at UNC’s own Digital Innovation Lab. Enjoy special behind-the-scenes access to The Cosmic Egg: Hildegard of Bingen’s 12th-Century Vision of the Cosmos at the Morehead Planetarium. This class has a particular focus on acoustics and sound.

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Philosophy

PHIL 54.001: Thinking about Time
PH, WB
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Carla Merino-Rajme

Carla Merino-Rajme is an assistant professor in philosophy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Before coming to Chapel Hill, she was an assistant professor of philosophy at Arizona State University and a Bersoff Fellow at New York University. She works mainly in philosophy of mind and metaphysics.

In this seminar, we will discuss questions such as: What is the nature of time? Is there a fundamental asymmetry between the past and the future? Are the past and the future real? Does time pass or is it rather like another spatial dimension? Can we change the past? Is time travel possible? If so, could you travel to the past and talk to yourself? Are the different philosophical views on time compatible with our current scientific understanding? Students will analyze and produce arguments concerning these and related topics.

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Physics and Astronomy

PHYS 51.001: The Interplay of Music and Physics
PL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Laurie McNeil, Brent Wissick

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her Ph.D. in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. Her seminar grows out of her life as a choral singer (and, earlier, a violinist and recorder player). When not singing with the Choral Society of Durham, she can be found in her laboratory using lasers to study the properties of materials.

Brent Wissick (Professor of Music) specializes in cello, viola da gamba and chamber music. He has a particular interest in performance practices of the 16th-18th centuries and is Past President of the Viola da Gamba Society of America. He has recorded numerous CDs with American Bach Soloists and other important groups; and has given concerts and lectures throughout North America, Europe, Asia and Australia.

This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects.

Students may also register for this seminar under MUSC 51.

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PHYS 53.001: Handcrafting in the Nanoworld: Building Models and Manipulating Molecules
PL
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Michael R. Falvo

Michael R. Falvo is a Research Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. He received his BS in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1991, and his PhD in physics from UNC-CH in 1997. He is a former winner of the UNC Student Undergraduate Teaching Award presented annually to three professors by the undergraduate student body, and is a member of the UNC Academy of Distinguished Teaching Scholars. His current research focuses is on the physics of proteins and cells. He stretches, pokes and prods nanometer scale biological systems such as viruses, biopolymer strands, and individual protein molecules to test their mechanical properties. Falvo has a long standing interest in science outreach and frequently presents workshops for the public and k-12 teachers. He has also co-authored two books on nanoscience for middle school science teachers.

he nanoworld is a strange and captivating place. It is a world of molecules vibrating trillions of times a second, quantum dots emitting rainbow colors, DNA encoding information in molecular bonds, and protein motors driving the complex machinery of the cell. At this scale, nature has unique rules and behaviors, some of which are amazing and unexpected. We are still uncovering these rules, and are only beginning to apply this new knowledge to technology. Can we build molecular machines that cure disease or clean up the environment? Can we make computers using single molecule transistors? How do viruses and other bio systems “assemble” themselves? In this seminar, we dive into the basic physics, chemistry and biology that describe the nanometer scale world. We will also try to distinguish the true promise of nanoscience from the hype. Students will engage in class discussions informed by their weekly reading of selected scientific literature. They will also participate in small group projects building physical models of nanoscale objects and phenomena, and perform calculations to gain a quantitative understanding of the physics underlying the nanoworld. No prerequisite is required for this course, but a spirit of adventure is.

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Political Science

POLI 54.001: The American Worker: Sociology, Politics, and History of Labor in the United States
NA
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Michele M. Hoyman

Michele M. Hoyman teaches in the Political Science Department and in the Master of Public Administration program. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Michigan. Professor Hoyman’s interests are in economic development, sustainable development, industrial labor relations, and public sector personnel. On a personal level, she is an avid UNC basketball fan and spends her spare time being walked in the park by her dog, Tilly. She is afflicted with an unrelenting sense of humor.

The face of the American worker is changing and the challenges American workers face are ever evolving. In the wake of recent events like the Occupy Wall Street protests, the public in general is becoming more aware of issues like income inequality, living wages, and the role of unions in the workplace. This seminar will explore the American worker from a legal, economic, and social justice perspective. Additionally, the legal framework Americans operate within in respect to labor law will be compared and contrasted with international standards and labor rights. The seminar will also feature an analysis of the American worker through classic film and fictional literature.

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POLI 70.001: The Politics of the European Union
SS
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Gary Marks

Gary Marks is Burton Craige Professor of Political Science and Professor in the Chair for the study of multi-level governance at the Free University of Amsterdam. He served for twelve years as founding director of the UNC Center for European Studies and has served as Chair of the European Community Studies Association. Marks’ teaching and research interests lie in the field of comparative politics. His recent books include Multi-Level Governance and European Integration (with Liesbet Hooghe; Rowman & Littlefield, 2001), It Didn’t Happen Here: Why Socialism Failed in the United States (with Seymour Martin Lipset; Norton, 2000), Continuity and Change in Contemporary Capitalism (coedited with Herbert Kitschelt, Peter Lange, and John Stephens; CUP 1999) and European Integration and Political Conflict (co-edited with Marco Steenbergen, CUP 2004). He recently edited a special issue of Electoral Studies, “Comparing Measures Of Party Positioning: Expert, Manifesto, And Survey Data.”

This course is concerned with the European Union and the major debates that have shaped it. Why is there a European Union? How does it operate? How has it developed? Is multi-level governance emerging within and among national states? What are the major lines of disagreement among Europeans? How has the Euro-Crisis affected Europe. What is the future of the European Union? The class will consist of lectures, discussion, and debates, giving students the opportunity to discuss and debate the vital issues facing Europe.

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POLI 73H.001: Politics and Animal Life
PH
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Hollie Sue Mann

Dr. Hollie Sue Mann teaches political theory in the Political Science department and is the departmental advisor for the major. Her research and writing explores questions related to gender and sexuality, the body in Western political thought, and animals and politics. When she isn’t teaching political theory, she spends time running in the forest with her dogs, and practicing and teaching Jivamukti yoga.

Humans and non-human animals have lived together since time immemorial, our relationships exhibiting a range of qualities, including interdependence, hostility, indifference, and care. Despite the fact that our form of life is always one lived in close proximity to the animal world, we tend to think of non-human animals as existing outside the boundaries of political life; indeed, animal life has been, at best, a marginal topic in the field of political science. But animals have always played a fundamental role in our political and ethical thought, even since ancient times. The ancients figured their encounters with animals in a much different way than we do to today. Talk of “rights” was nowhere to be found, nor was talk of suffering particularly present. The ancients did talk of animals’ intellectual and affective capacities but had only a marginal role. What sorts of arguments, then, were made on their behalf, if any? How do those compare with the early moderns figuring of animals, and with ours today? Over time, a range of different arguments have come to be made on behalf of animals and we will look carefully at some of these in the course, as many of these claims play out on explicitly political grounds.

Increasingly, political thinkers are challenging commonly held beliefs about the political and ethical standing of animals and attempting to illuminate the ways in which animal life actually animates much of political theory and politics today. In the spirit of these emerging debates, this seminar will shed light on the ways in which non-human animals have been central to the construction of meaning in the history of political thought and to our own self-understandings. Once we get this picture in clearer view, questions concerning our relationships and interactions with animals today will be pressed upon us, and together we will reconsider the view that nonhuman animals can be legitimately excluded from political life and thought. More specifically, we will explore the implications of including them in political life and thought and how that fact might be brought to bear on particular problems concerning our relationships with animals in late modernity.

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Psychology

PSYC 58H.001: The Psychology of Mental States and Language Use
SS
TTH, 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM
Jennifer Arnold

Dr. Jennifer Arnold is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. She studies the ways that our minds handle the jobs of speaking and understanding. How do speakers choose words and produce them? How do listeners pick out the speaker’s meaning? Her research is guided by questions about how people represent the thoughts, intentions, and mental activities of other people, and how this information influences specific linguistic processes.

As adults we constantly make judgments about other people’s beliefs, desires, goals, knowledge, and intentions from evidence like eye gaze and inferences from their words and actions. These judgments together can be called mindreading, or theory of mind (where “theory” refers to the theory someone might hold about another’s mental state, not a scientific theory). This information is known to guide some aspects of language use — for example, you wouldn’t ask someone to hand you “that book” if they don’t know it exists. But sometimes you might ignore what someone else does or does not know – for instance asking someone for “the red book” when that person is sitting in front of two red books. This course examines how children, adults, and individuals with autism infer other people’s mental states, and how they use it to guide decisions during speaking and understanding. This seminar will follow a discussion format.

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PSYC 61.001: Drug Addiction: Fact and Fiction
PL, CI
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Kathryn (Kate) Reissner

Kathryn (Kate) Reissner received her PhD from the University of California, where she performed research on the neurobiology of learning and memory. Dr. Reissner went on to perform postdoctoral research at the Medical University of South Carolina, where she studied the role of glutamate transport in the development of cocaine addiction. She joined the Department of Psychology at UNC-CH as an Assistant Professor in 2014. Research in the Reissner lab is focused on the long lasting changes in the brain’s reward circuitry induced by cocaine abuse which mediate enduring vulnerability to relapse, with emphasis on neuron-astrocyte interactions.

Illicit and legal drugs make the user feel good but also promote the development of dependence and long-lasting changes in brain physiology. In this biological psychology seminar, we will take a multi-disciplinary approach to learn about the neurobiology of drug addiction with a focus on the following questions: How do we define addiction? Are media depictions of drug addiction accurate? What are the beneficial and harmful psychological effects of abused drugs? What has scientific research revealed about the neurobiology of the “brain on drugs”? Do most users become addicts? We will tackle these questions through classroom discussions/debates, lectures, movies, and writing assignments. In this communication intensive seminar, critical analysis of information about the neurobiology of addiction will be used to separate fact from fiction.

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Public Policy

PLCY 71.001: Justice and Inequality
PH
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Douglas MacKay

Douglas MacKay holds a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Toronto. Prior to joining the Department of Public Policy on July 1, 2013, he completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. MacKay’s research and teaching interests concern questions at the intersection of justice and public policy. He is currently working on projects concerning the justice of economic inequality – both domestic and global; the ethics of immigration policy; priority setting in health care; the ethics of international clinical research; and justice in the division of responsibilities within federal systems of government.

The value of equality is a foundational principle of the United States of America. The Declaration of Independence proclaims that “all men are created equal” and possess unalienable rights to “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” The Constitution of the United States requires that no State “deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” Additionally, equality has been the goal of a number of influential political movements, including the Civil Rights movement, the Feminist movement, Occupy Wall Street, and the LGBT movement. Yet despite this prominence of the value of equality, the U.S. is becoming a more unequal society in a number of domains, particularly, with respect to the distribution of income, political influence, and social mobility. This course investigates the value of equality, and asks which forms of inequality are unjust and ought to be remedied. We will focus on a variety of different spheres of U.S. social, political, and economic life, including the distribution of income and opportunities, marriage, health outcomes, education, voting and political influence, and employment. We will also ask whether equality is a value that applies beyond U.S. borders, particularly with respect to global disparities in income and wealth, and climate change. The course will feature a combination of lectures and class discussion. Significant instructional time will also be dedicated to developing students’ critical thinking, reading, and writing skills.

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PLCY 85H.001: Reforming America’s Schools
SS, NA
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Douglas Lauen

Dr. Douglas Lauen’s work seeks to understand the effects of educational policies, school types, and school contextual factors on student outcomes. I focus on areas that policymakers can control and that have high relevance to current educational policy debates. To date my academic research covers four areas: 1) classroom poverty composition, 2) educational accountability, 3) performance incentives, and 4) school choice. Sociological and economic theory and policy relevance guide my work, which employs rigorous quantitative research designs. My work often examines the heterogeneity of effects across socially, economically, and educationally disadvantaged student subgroups because reducing educational inequality depends on whether policies and settings have differential effects on disadvantaged and minority students.

This seminar will examine the role of schools and other institutions play in determining life chances, which educational interventions work well for economically and academically disadvantaged students, and what to do when institutions cease to work well. Students will learn how to analyze complex educational public policy problems while exploring questions of effectiveness, inequality, resource management, and politics.

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PLCY 89.001: Ending Poverty
SS, BN
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Sudhanshu Handa

Professor Sudhanshu Handa is a development economist specializing in human capital, poverty and social protection. He is one of the lead researchers on the Transfer Project (https://transfer.cpc.unc.edu/), a multi-country research initiative led by UNICEF to understand the impact of social protection programs in Africa on households and children. Prof. Handa has lived and worked in Jamaica, Mozambique, Kenya and Mexico. He is returning to UNC this fall after three years serving as the Head of Economic and Social Policy at UNICEF’s Office of Research. Dr. Handa received his PhD from University of Toronto and his BA from Johns Hopkins University.

Ending poverty is the underlying goal of almost all social policy initiatives, yet poverty remains a serious problem world-wide. In the United States alone about one-fifth of all children live in poverty, and in poorer developing nations over half the population typically live in poverty. Why is ending poverty such a seemingly elusive goal for social policy? Using Poor Economics as one of the core texts, we will address common debates and conceptions about poverty ranging from ’the poor are lazy and wasteful’ to ‘poor but efficient’. The seminar will review typical poverty alleviation initiatives, focusing primarily on low-income countries while also referring to the U.S. and European approaches to social protection. The seminar will compare a rights-based approach to poverty policy with an economic approach and use both approaches to discuss the appropriateness of specific programs. There is no pre requisite for this seminar.

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Religious Studies

RELI 73H.001: From Dragons to Pokemon: Animals in Japanese Myth, Folklore, and Religion
LA, BN, CI
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Barbara Ambros

Barbara Ambros
Field of specialization: Religions of Asia Research interests: Religions in early modern through contemporary Japan; gender studies; critical animal studies; place and space; and pilgrimage.

Fun fact: she holds a second-degree black belt in Shotokan karate and serves as the faculty advisor for the UNC Shotokan Club.

This seminar examines the cultural construction of animals in Japanese myth, folklore, and religion. We will discuss various kinds of animals: those that occur in the natural world, those that are found in myths and folklore, and those that have appeared in popular media such as animation. We will explore how images of various animals were culturally constructed as tricksters, gods, monsters, or anthropomorphic companions; how animals were ritualized as divine, demonic, or sentient beings in Buddhism, Shinto, and folk religion; and how animals could serve as metaphors that embodied collective ideals or anxieties. Most of our readings will focus on primary and secondary texts from the Japanese tradition (in English), but we will also read theoretical texts on human-animal relationships and historical studies on animals in the larger Asian context. We will also view and analyze several Japanese films, both anime and documentaries, that deal with animals and environmental issues.

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RELI 88.001: Religion and Society in Historical Novels
LA, WB
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Evyatar Marienberg

Dr. Evyatar Marienberg, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies, is a graduate of a Yeshiva in Israel, the Catholic Institute in Paris, and the School of Social Studies, also in Paris. Before coming to UNC he had the pleasure to teach or be a fellow in many institutions, among them Yeshiva University, McGill, Tel Aviv University, Notre Dame, the Jewish Theological Seminary, and Harvard. He is interested mostly in Judaism and Catholicism. Currently, he is working on his fourth book, which will be about traditional Jewish sex manuals.

We will read several books together in this seminar: Donna Woolfolk Cross, Pope Joan: A Novel ; A. B. Yehoshua, A Journey to the end of the Millennium ; Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose ; Glueckel of Hameln, My Life. Most of these books (but not all of them) can be described as “Historical Novels.” Having these books as a starting point, we will explore various aspects of religion and society in Europe and in the Middle East in the medieval and early modern period. Students will be requested to read a section from one of the books for each session, as well as related scholarly material, and to prepare presentations on their topic of choice (or on topics provided by the instructor) every other session. By using both literature and scholarship, we will reflect on religious concepts, social tensions, technological inventions, health issues, economic transformations, gender, political conflicts, and more, as hinted in these works.

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Romance Studies

ROML 56.001: Italians in Search of Harmony
LA
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Ennio Rao

Ennio Rao is Professor of Italian and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Romance Languages. He earned his Ph.D. at Columbia University, concentrating in the Classics and Italian Renaissance literature. In his years at Carolina he has received a Tanner Award for excellence in undergraduate teaching and taught a wide range of courses, spanning such areas as the humanist invective, Italian chivalric literature, Renaissance theater, the history of the Italian language, and Italian dialectology. He is currently studying the revival of Epicureanism in 15th-century Italy.

This seminar explores the concept of harmony in selected Italian writers, from Dante to contemporary writers. In the 14th century, Dante dreamed of a universal empire that would assure peace on earth, thus allowing mankind to pursue knowledge and wisdom and to achieve the ultimate harmony in the next world: the natural reunion of creature and creator. Dante himself directs his readers to interpret the journey of the pilgrim in the Divine Comedy as Everyman’s quest for transcendental harmony with God. This quest for harmony is characteristic of many Italian writers, from Petrarch to Leopardi, to many contemporary poets, novelists, and film directors. Students will be reading and discussing works by Dante, Petrarch, Leopardi, Pirandello, Vittorini and Moravia, and will view films by Antonioni and Bertolucci. They will also be divided into groups and invited to produce an original work (theatrical, cinematic, literary, artistic, etc.) that illustrates the concept of harmony.

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ROML 89.002: “Destination Italy”: A Traveler’s Guide to WWII Italy
HS, NA, CI
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Marisa Escolar

A former Fulbright scholar who has studied in Rome and Bologna, Marisa Escolar’s current research interests are the interactions between US and Italian culture, as represented in literature and film in the twentieth century. In addition to her book project centered around the Allied occupation of Italy in WWII, she also works on translation, censorship and gender studies.

As Allied soldiers invaded Sicily in 1943, they landed in the same country that was one of the most sought-after destinations for Northern European and American travelers. This first-year-seminar will ask the question: what does it mean to go to war with Italy, a nation associated with art and beauty? And after victory, how do Allies and Italians represent that war —first fought as enemies, then “co-belligerents”, then friends—in visual, literary and cinematic terms? We will read military guidebooks, memoirs and short stories, watch films and examine wartime cartoons to explore how the fantasy of “destination Italy” is transformed by the devastation of war. Students will perform close readings of these texts, placing them in an array of cultural and disciplinary contexts.

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Sociology

SOCI 72.001: Race and Ethnicity in the United States
SS, US
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Anthony Perez

Anthony Perez studies the measurement, meaning and implications of race/ethnicity in the United States and abroad. His research focuses on the interplay between formal and informal conceptualizations of race and ethnicity and de facto measures of race/ethnic populations used in the Census, social surveys and demographic data; causes of uncertainty in the reporting of race across generations and throughout the life course; and the consequences of racial uncertainty for research on inequality, race-attentive social policy and demographic projections of past and future diversity.

It is impossible to understand the structure of American society, or the lived experiences of its people, without understanding both the meaning and consequences of race and ethnicity. Yet, while examples of what race does are well known to students interested in questions of social justice and inequality, the question of what race is receives considerably less attention. Any student familiar with U.S. society can identify myriad, often striking examples of racial inequality—from highly disproportionate rates of poverty, unemployment and disease to racially disparate treatment at the hands of police, teachers and neighbors. But what, exactly, is “race?” The geographic origins of our ancestors? The social categories that others perceive from our appearance? The identities we claim based on a sense of belonging or attachment to a particular culture or community? Or can race be any and all of these things, depending on the context in which individuals perceive and react to one another? These are just some of pressing questions with which students will grapple in this seminar, as we delve into the meaning and measurement of race in society, how it changes over time and space and what it signals for the future of race/ethnic relations in the United States. In pursuit of these aims, we will incorporate a variety of instructional strategies and active learning techniques, including primary data collection and analysis, critical examination of race/ethnicity in popular culture (including music, literature, and film) and in-class group activities.

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SOCI 89.001: American Universities: At a Crossroads?
SS
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Barbara Entwisle

Barbara Entwisle, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Sociology, recently completed a six-year term as Vice Chancellor for Research. This C-suite position involved her in a variety of strategic initiatives around, e.g., innovation, relationships between the university and industry, and collaboration across disciplines. It engaged her in debates about funding educational policy locally, regionally, and nationally. Most importantly, serving as Vice Chancellor gave her the opportunity to view the organization, operation, and context of UNC-Chapel Hill through a sociological lens. Now that she has returned to the full-time faculty, she is eager to share what she learned in her teaching and research.

Are American universities at a crossroads? In this First Year Seminar, we will consider the purpose and mission of universities, their importance for global and regional competitiveness, and their role in job preparation and meeting employer needs. We will engage in debates about the liberal arts, investments in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics), and where humanities fit. We will examine universities as hubs of innovation, poised to help solve the world’s great problems, and strategies for enhancing this impact. We will talk about student admissions, trends in tuition and debt, and what (if anything) should be done about it. We will also describe and assess varying perspectives on the place of athletics in the life of the university. Some argue that higher education is ripe for disruption. Are they right? In this FYS, we will draw on the methods and materials of social science to develop answers to this question.

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Statistic and Operations Research

STOR 64.001: A Random Walk down Wall Street
QI
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Chuanshu Ji

Chuanshu Ji joined the Department of Statistics and Operations Research after getting his Ph.D. in 1988 from Columbia University. Ji’s research involves using statistics to quantify uncertainty and randomness in various problems in natural and social science. One example is to understand patterns of stock markets and predict their behaviors, where it becomes useful to present financial data graphically and run related computer simulation. He also teaches statistics and probability courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

The ups and downs of many stocks, bonds, and mutual funds in the past few years have made a significant impact on our society. Accordingly, a good understanding of financial markets becomes a necessary part of our education. This seminar is intended to provide students with a multimedia platform on which they can learn some basic concepts in finance and economics, useful tools for collecting and summarizing financial data, and simple probability models for quantification of the market uncertainty. Students will actively participate in the seminar’s organization. A number of small projects will be assigned to students, supervised by the instructor. The projects include data analysis using Excel, experimentation of simple investment strategies and portfolios through “virtual trading,” discussions on the performance of those portfolios and related probability calculation. Students will present what they conduct in the assigned projects. Grades will be based on students’ performance in their homework, projects, and presentations.

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Women’s and Gender Studies

WMST 68.001: Assumed Identities: Performance in Photography
VP
T, 3:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Susan Harbage Page

Susan Harbage Page is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. Harbage Page is a visual artist with a background in photography and lens-based work that explores immigration, race, and gender. Her most recent work is an archeological look at the U.S. – Mexico Border through photography and site-specific art interventions.

Have you ever made a “selfie” and posted it on the internet? What image of yourself were you trying to reinforce? This seminar uses photography and its aspects of role-playing, performance, and documentation to understand the construction of identity and the changing roles that we take on in society. We will look at historical and contemporary photographers who use assumed identities to create their own realities and challenge society’s stereotypes. Through a series of photographic self-portraits and performative experiences we will query our own identities and how they have been constructed. No specific camera equipment required. You may use any camera you have access to including smart phones for this seminar.