Fall 2014

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Please consult ConnectCarolina (through MyUNC) for the most up-to-date information about FYS offerings and availability.

For more information about a specific instructor, please click on the instructor name, if highlighted.

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)
American Studies (AMST)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Art History (ARTH)
Studio Art (ARTS)
Asian Studies (ASIA)
Biology (BIOL)
Chemistry (CHEM)
City and Regional Planning (PLAN)
Classics (CLAS)
Communication Studies (COMM)
Computer Science (COMP)
Dramatic Art (DRAM)
English (ENGL)
Exercise and Sports Science (EXSS)
Folklore (FOLK)
Geography (GEOG)
Geology (GEOL)
German Languages and Literatures (GERM)
History (HIST)
Journalism and Mass Communication (JOMC)
Marine Sciences (MASC)
Mathematics (MATH)
Music (MUSC)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)
Political Science (POLI)
Psychology (PSYC)
Public Policy (PLCY)
Religious Studies (RELI)
Romance Languages and Literatures (ROML)
Slavic Languages and Literatures (SLAV)
Sociology (SOCI)
Statistics and Operations Research (STOR)
Women’s and Gender Studies (WMST)
Special One-Time Opportunities

AFRICAN, AFRICAN AMERICAN, AND DIASPORA STUDIES

AAAD 50: Defining Blackness
SS, US
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Timothy McMillan

Timothy McMillan is senior lecturer in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies. He received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from UNC-Chapel Hill in 1988. McMillan has taught Afro-American studies, African studies, and anthropology at UNC-Chapel Hill, at NC State, and at Humboldt State University. His research has included fieldwork in Kenya; Haiti; Salem, MA; and Chapel Hill, NC. In 2007 he won the Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and has won the Black Student Movement’s Hortense McClinton Faculty Award three times. Dr. McMillan is currently writing a book about race and remembrance at UNC, and often conducts a “Black and Blue” tour of campus.

America is an increasingly multicultural and diverse nation. And yet, the central concepts of race and diversity are often poorly defined. Racial categories have been used in the U.S. from the earliest colonial times, but their meanings have changed with every generation. What makes a person black in the 21st century is increasingly complex and a subject of much debate. In this seminar, we will focus on the creation of black identity in the U.S. and internationally. As we move beyond the 10th anniversary of the September 11th attacks on the United States, how does race play a role in our personal lives, our national identity, and our international concerns? Position papers written in response to films, readings, and blogs; class discussion; and a final documentary project exploring race and society will be used to enhance and evaluate students’ understanding of the meaning of blackness in the U.S. and the larger global community.

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AAAD 51: Masquerades of Blackness
VP, US
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Charlene Regester

Charlene Regester is an Associate Professor in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies and Affiliate Faculty for the Global Cinema Minor. She received her BA, MA, Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is the author of African American Actresses: The Struggle for Visibility, 1900-1960 (which was nominated by the press to the NAACP Image Awards). She is the 2011 recipient of the Trailblazer Award Hayti Heritage Film Festival and 2007 Oscar Micheaux Book and Film Award from the Oscar Micheaux Film Festival, South Dakota. She has appeared on North Carolina Bookwatch with UNC-TV 2011; WUNC-FM Radio “The State of Things;” and Turner Movie Classics. Documentaries in which she has appeared include: Movies of Color: Black Southern Cinema, (2003 directed by Tom Thurman), Beyond Tara: The Extraordinary Life of Hattie McDaniel (directed by Madison Davis Lacy 2001), and I’ll Make Me a World (1999 directed by Denise Greene and Samuel Pollard).

This seminar is designed to investigate how the concept of race has been represented in cinema historically, with a particular focus on representations of race when blackness is masqueraded. Its intent is to launch an investigative inquiry into how African Americans are represented on screen in various time periods, how we as spectators are manipulated by these cinematic constructions of race, and how race is marked or coded other than through visual representation. Students will view films that deal with “passing” from the various historical periods and will utilize theoretical concepts introduced in class to read these visual representations. Films selected for viewing include the pre-World War II Era, the Civil Rights Era, and the “Post-Racial” era. Students will be required to write three papers that reflect their ability to apply theoretical concepts to reading racialized representions on screen in these three historical periods to demonstrate their understanding of how racial masquerades have evolved over time and continue to persist in contemporary culture.

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American Studies

AMST 55H: Birth and Death in the United States (HONORS)
PH, CI, US
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Timothy Marr

Timothy Marr is the Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Associate Professor in the Department of American Studies, where since 2000 he has taught courses on mating and marriage, cultural memory, and tobacco. His research interests include the life and works of Herman Melville and American approaches to Islam and Muslims.

This course explores birth and death as common human rites of passage impacted by changing American historical and cultural contexts. Since both are defining life events that remain beyond experiential recall, studying them in interdisciplinary ways opens powerful insights into how culture mediates the construction of bodies, social identities, and philosophical meanings. Readings and assignments are designed to examine changing anthropological rituals, medical procedures, scientific technologies, and ethical quandaries. We will also explore a variety of representations of birth and death in literary expression, film, and material culture as well as in hospitals, funeral homes, and cemeteries.

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AMST 89: Native American Artists
VP, US
MWF, 10:00 – 10:50am
Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote

Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote is an Assistant Professor in American Studies where she teaches courses on American Indian history and material culture. Her current research project examines the history and expressive culture of the Kiowa, an American Indian nation in Oklahoma, during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Professor Tone-Pah-Hote’s research stems from her interests in American Indian social and cultural history, Plains Indian art, tourism, museums, and the representation of American Indian people.

This seminar analyzes the multifaceted roles that Native American artists play within their families, communities, and the world at large, and connects Native American artists and art to vital conversations in American Indian studies such as colonialism, gender, and tribal sovereignty. It analyzes how Native people and others have created and contested the idea of the “Native American Artist.” It further explores how artists have represented themselves not just though their art but through other texts as well. We will examine the lives, works, and representation of Native American artists through biographical and autobiographical texts, articles, books, and art itself. The class encourages students to critically examine and analyze representations of Native artists and the items they have produced. It hones critical thinking skills though in-class discussion, informal, and formal writing assignments. Students will also produce a research paper and present their work in class.

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ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 62: Indian Country Today
SS, US
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Jean Dennison

Jean Dennison is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology. Her book, Colonial Entanglement is on the Osage Nation’s recent citizenship and government reform process. Her areas of interest include: representation, visual anthropology, bodily politics, and North American Indian citizenship, governance, and sovereignty.

This seminar examines current topics in American Indian country through the use of films and interactive case studies. Working both alone and in groups, students will conduct research on various topics including: American Indian treaty rights, land, sovereignty, environment, health, economy and identity. They will also participate in engaged and situated discussions and write short position papers to prepare for class exercises. In addition to introducing students to current topics of importance within American Indian communities, this seminar will explore how these issues are debated within and outside Indian communities. Ultimately the seminar will seek to help students better understand the challenges facing American Indian communities both internally and externally, and encourage them to look for creative solutions to these problems.

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ANTH 65: Humans and Animals: Anthropological Perspectives
HS
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Ben Arbuckle

Ben Arbuckle is an Anthropologist with a specialty in Middle Eastern Archaeology. He runs the Zooarchaeology Laboratory in the Department of Anthropology and the Research Labs in Archaeology where he studies animal bones from archaeological sites. Professor Arbuckle uses these bones, which represent the trash from ancient meals, parties and sacrifices, in order to understand how our ancestors created a world whose technologies and social and political systems we have inherited. He is currently working on a National Geographic funded project exploring the origins of domestic horses, and another trying to understand the origins of wool.

In this seminar we explore the complex relationships between people and animals in our own culture and in other cultures, now and also in the past. We will explore the origins and uses of domesticated animals, the role of dogs and cats in human societies, as companions, pets, and food. We will also examine the symbolic uses of animals and talk about current issues including animal rights and the growing popularity of hunting.

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ANTH 66H: Saving the World? Humanitarianism in Action (HONORS)
SS, GL
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Peter Redfield

Peter Redfielde is Professor of Anthropology. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard University and his doctorate from U.C. Berkeley. His specialty concerns relations between science, technology and society, particularly in post-colonial settings. He also teaches courses on human rights and humanitarianism, and recently completed a book project on the organization Doctors Without Borders.

What happens when people try to “do good”, especially at a global scale? In this seminar we will explore international aid, with an emphasis on its medical end and the set of organizations and institutions that exist to offer assistance to people suffering from disaster, endemic poverty and health disparities. The current aid complex includes a wide variety of forms and activities, from large bureaucracies to tiny NGOs, massive health campaigns to lonely clinics. We will approach this phenomenon from the critical and comparative perspective of anthropology, focusing on actual human practice. Which forms of suffering receive international attention, and which do not? How do money and services flow and stop relative to inequality? What range of outcomes do different aid projects produce?

Over the semester we will engage in two collective endeavors. First, to better situate current problems, we will review the background history of humanitarianism and development, including colonial missions as well as state oriented projects of social welfare. Thus equipped, we will then examine a number of case studies. During this section of the course students will engage in research projects, exploring specific examples in greater depth.

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ART HISTORY

ARTH 52: Celts—Druid Culture
WB
MWF, 9:00 – 9:50am
Dorothy Verkerk

Dorothy Verkerk received her M.A. and Ph.D. from Rutgers University. Her area of specialization is early medieval art, and her research interests include the interplay between images and texts in early medieval manuscripts, particularly the ways in which images interpret the meanings of texts through visual references to extra-textual elements such as popular sermons, liturgical rites, political necessities, and catechisms. She has been studying Celts (defined as those who speak/spoke a Celtic language) since 1995, when she first began teaching the course Celtic Art and Cultures. She received a small grant from Chancellor Hooker’s CCI funds to create the web site Celtic Art and Cultures, which has become the “most linked to” at the university. As she developed the course, she shifted the interest from the historical Celts to how “Celts” were an 18th-century construct, specifically the Druid class.

The ancient Druids (the intellectual class) have fascinated writers for centuries, though there is little reliable information about them, opening the door for fanciful theories and exposing the foibles of the so-called experts on Druids. This seminar will begin with what is known about Druids from primary textual sources such as Julius Caesar’s De bello gallico. The focus will then shift to early modern and modern authors who created a vast array of Druids that provide insights into the development of British national identities, and established ‘alternative’ religions, visual culture, and protest movements. The Druids are cast in roles as patriotic, wise, and environmentally sensitive, and at other times they are cast as demonic and wicked. The seminar will examine how identities are created.

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ARTH 56H: Lives of East Asian Artworks at the Ackland Art Museum
VP, GL
W, 3:00 – 5:50pm
Wei-Cheng Lin

Wei-Cheng Lin is Assistant Professor of history of Chinese art and architecture in the Department of Art. He received his PhD from the University of Chicago in 2006 and arrived at UNC at Chapel Hill in 2008. He has also previously worked at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City and the Field Museum in Chicago. In the past years, he has been involved closely with various initiatives related to Asian art organized by the Ackland Art Museum. Dr. Lin is the author of several articles on a wide range of topics related to both pre-modern and modern Chinese art. His book, Building a Sacred Mountain: Buddhist Architecture of China’s Mount Wutai, is forthcoming with the University of Washington Press in Spring 2014.

This course traces the “lives” of East Asian artworks as to how they entered the Ackland Art Museum and became part of its collection. Each museum object has a history, called provenance, before entering the museum collection, but this life history does not end with its entry into the museum. In fact, it is after the entry, which marks the point of transition, that an object becomes a work of art through restoration, classification, labeling, and exhibition. In this course, students will be introduced to the entire process of “becoming art” by studying the East Asian artworks in the collection of the Ackland Art Museum. Students will learn about how museum “works,” from acquisition, preservation, and registration, to display, with a focus on the physical and conceptual transformation of objects. In so doing, students will be asked to reconsider how the notion of art is conceived, defined, and materialized; in particular, the course will ask how we should understand East Asian art through its artworks in the context of a western museum.

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ARTH 61: Introduction to African American Art
VP
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
John Bowles

John Bowles received his Ph.D. from UCLA in 2002 and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Program. He is an historian of African American art, who works from the assumption that art plays an important role in determining how we see ourselves as morally responsible individuals. In his research and teaching, he attempts to convey the urgency of art by addressing moral and political dilemmas we would often rather ignore. He has published articles and art criticism in various journals and has recently completed a book that examines the work of artist Adrian Piper. He is currently writing a book that explores how African American artists have engaged simultaneously with modernism, globalization and diaspora from the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s until today.

Focusing on the Carolinas, this seminar explores the many ways African Americans have used art to define themselves and their communities. We will ask how art has been used to maintain cultural traditions, shape American culture, and build political solidarity from the era of colonialism and slavery to the present. We will study the cultivation of artistic practices from Africa; African American painters, sculptors, and craftsmen who earned national reputations for the quality of their work; artists who re-imagined and redefined African American identity through art; and artists throughout the 20th century who represented the daily lives and hardships of rural and working-class blacks. Students will visit campus museums and archives, and conduct original research using regional sources. Persistent questions throughout the semester will include, How does the art of African Americans in the Carolinas provoke us to question our own identities and roles within the region, and what is the contemporary role of art in shaping public discourse?

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ARTH 77: Seeing the Past
VP
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Mary Sheriff

Mary Sheriff is W. R. Kenan Distinguished Professor of Art History, as well as an avid scuba diver hiker, bird-watcher and gym rat. Her research and teaching focuses on European art and culture of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and she has published widely on diverse topics in those fields. Here at UNC she teaches a variety of courses in these areas as well as on women and the visual arts. She has recently been honored as one of the “great teachers” of the American Society of Eighteenth-Century Studies. This summer she will be traveling and conducting research in France and Portugal, and hiking in Canada.

What do art works tell us about the past? Do visual images simply illustrate the people and events of the past or do they form a history that comments on the past?  How does the study of visual images help us to understand the past, and how do historical documents and literature help us to understand visual images? This seminar will take up these questions in relation to art works held in the Ackland Art Museum. Students will have the opportunity to work with original works of painting, sculpture, photography and the graphic arts created in Europe and the Americas, dating from the Renaissance to the end of World War II, with special emphasis on the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We will read together and discuss textual sources (such as literature, documents and historical accounts) from the periods in which the works were made, and we will also read what recent scholars have to say about the works we are studying. No experience in working with the visual arts is necessary; the seminar will also aim to develop skills of visual analysis and interpretation that are applicable to other visual images as diverse as film and advertising. Throughout the semester students will be asked to write brief 2-page papers on reading assignments. For their final projects, students will prepare a discussion of one work of art to be delivered as a gallery talk in the museum or will produce a digital presentation of their collective research to be posted on the web. Students will have the opportunity to choose the works of art that will be the focus of their research projects.

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STUDIO ART

ARTS 82: Please Save This: Exploring Personal Histories through Visual Language
VP
MW, 3:00 – 4:15pm
Roxana Pérez-Méndez

Roxana Pérez-Méndez is an Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in Studio Art in UNC’s Art Department. She specializes in video performance and installation art. In addition to this FYS, she teaches undergraduate sculpture courses. Pérez-Méndez is originally from Puerto Rico and her art often explores her immigrant experience – working to understand someone caught between experiences in Puerto Rico and the United States.

This seminar will investigate the idea of personal histories in visual art. As a studio class, the course will be organized around several art making projects. As a catalyst to our own art making, we will explore the idea of personal history and memory through readings, as well as looking at contemporary artists whose work functions in an autobiographical framework.

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ASIAN STUDIES

ASIA 60: Israeli Culture and Society: Collective Memories and Fragmented Identities
BN
TuTh, 12:30pm – 1:45pm
Yaron Shemer

Yaron Shemer was born in Jerusalem, Israel.  He is a Levine/Sklut Fellow in Jewish Studies and an associate professor of Israeli Culture and Modern Hebrew in the Department of Asian Studies.   He earned his degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Film & Television from Tel Aviv University in 1983 and then worked as an assistant director at the Israeli Educational Television in Tel Aviv.  He earned his M.A. and Ph.D. in Film Studies from the University of Texas at Austin.  From 1991 to 2008 he taught at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr.  Shemer’s current research interests include Jewish and Islamic terrorism in Middle Eastern and North African cinema, and the Jew in Arab cinema. Dr. Shemer is the author of “Identity, Place, and Subversion in Contemporary Mizrahi Cinema in Israel”  (U. of Michigan Press, 2013).

This seminar is oriented toward students who are interested in learning about the culture and society of modern Israel. Specifically, we will examine the transformative power of the early Zionist discourse in the formation of the new State of Israel and the challenges to this discourse in years that followed. Consequently, the emphasis in this class will be on the cultural and social manifestation of the tensions between the creeds of “one nation” and “the melting pot” on the one hand, and the reiteration of ethnic, gender, and religious identities on the other. The first five sessions will provide contextual and background accounts for later discussions. Then, until the middle of the semester, the seminar will focus on various arenas of Israeli culture, past and present. The second part of the semester will be devoted to selected themes and case studies pertinent to culture and society in modern Israel.

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ASIA 65: Philosophy on Bamboo: Rethinking Early Chinese Thought
PH, WB
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Uffe Bergeton

Uffe Bergeton is a historian of early China with a focus on pre-Qin (i.e. pre-221 BCE) culture, history and thought. Originally from Denmark, he has lived and studied in France, Taiwan and China. His research projects include early Chinese theories of epistemology and the political of reclusion, as well as comparisons between pre-Qin China and ancient Greece.

Over the last few decades a large number of bamboo manuscripts of hitherto unknown texts dating to the 4th to the 1st centuries BCE have been excavated from various sites in China. This wealth of new material has led many scholars to rethink longstanding assumptions about early Chinese thought. In order to enable students to engage directly with the recently discovered texts and cutting-edge research on them, this course will briefly introduce students to the received classics of the pre-Qin period, such as the Analects, the Mozi, the Mencius, the Xunzi, the Daodejing, the Zhuangzi, and the Hanfeizi. Rather than merely providing an introduction to these traditional texts, we will study how recently discovered texts challenge traditional readings of pre-Qin works and lead us to question traditional classifications of pre-Qin works into “schools of thought” or isms such as Confucianism, Legalism, Daoism, etc.

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BIOLOGY

BIOL 53: Biotechnology: Genetically Modified Foods to the Sequence of the Human Genome
PL
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Jason Reed

Jason Reed grew up in the upstate New York snow belt, and was trained at Yale, M.I.T., and the Salk Institute. At UNC since 1995, he studies how plant hormones regulate growth and reproduction. He enjoys music and gardening, and hopes that technological and cultural changes will make the world better.

A good life depends on access to adequate food and medical care. Advances in biotechnology have made possible both agriculture and medicine, and further advances may allow us to feed and keep healthy a burgeoning population in both developed and undeveloped countries. This seminar will examine the science behind a number of striking recent advances in biology, including animal cloning, genetic engineering of crop plants, development of new therapeutic drugs, development of embryonic stem cells, and deciphering of the complete human genome sequence. Students will debate how specific technological advances force us to confront new social and ethical choices, such as whether you want your own genome to be sequenced. We will also consider how new technologies are actually implemented, and we will visit nearby biotechnology companies. The seminar should bring together the humanistic and technical impulses in students, and is open to students planning careers in scientific or humanities fields.

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BIOL 62: Mountains Beyond Mountains: Infectious Disease in the Developing World
PL, GL
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Mark Peifer

Mark Peifer is the Hooker Distinguished Professor of Biology who has been at Carolina since 1992. He is a cell and developmental biologist, and his lab explores how cells communicate and assemble into tissues and organs during embryonic development. He also has an active interest in international development, and believes Americans can and should help our neighbors in the developing world, acting in partnership to solve problems and meet challenges.

Billions of people in the developing world live without the benefit of the most basic health care services, and they often die of diseases that are easily treated in the developed world. The scale of the problem is immense, and this fact often leads clinicians and public health officials to despair of ever having any impact on the problem. Dr. Paul Farmer belies this impression. Beginning as a medical student at Harvard, he created what is now a multinational health care network, Partners in Health. His entrepreneurial effort provides a revolutionary example of how one can successfully address infectious disease and its root causes in some of the poorest areas of the world. This seminar will explore the inequities in health care between the developed and developing worlds, and the root causes of these inequities. We will examine the biology of infectious disease and the challenges of treating them in the developing world, and explore how Partners in Health and other entrepreneurial non-profit groups provide a model for how the developed world can partner with the poor to meet this challenge.

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CHEMISTRY

CHEM 89.001: Chemistry of Biomedical Implants
PL
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Mark Schoenfisch

Mark Schoenfisch is a Professor of Chemistry and Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering. He is an analytical chemist, and his lab explores the design and fabrication of chemical sensors for probing physiological analytes including glucose and nitric oxide. Outside of chemistry he enjoys coffee, travel, and photography.

Recent scientific advances have led to major innovations in medicine and patient care. While biomedical implants improve the quality of life of many individuals, the true utility of most devices remains rather limited due to insufficient biocompatibility. This first-year seminar will focus on the underlying chemical composition and physical properties of materials used to fabricate medical implants. We will focus on how such properties impact cost, physiological response, and intended utility. Readings and discussions will form the basis for developing a questioning mind and an objective attitude toward chemistry. Ethical issues and legal aspects related to the development of new biomaterials will also be discussed.

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CHEM 89.002: Society, Ethics and Biotechnology
PH, CI
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Brian Hogan

Brian Hogan has taught at UNC for 11 years and been the instructor for a wide range of courses. He has won two Tanner Awards for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, the Chemistry Department teaching award, the Center for Global Education course development award, and the Chapman Family Faculty Fellowship for teaching excellence. He is an Institute of Arts and Humanities Fellow, and teaches as an adjunct in the Honors College. Dr. Hogan is a member of the Center for Faculty Excellence, CFE, and his techniques and interviews for the CFE 100+ Initiative, Engaging Students in Large classes, are featured online.

This seminar provides students with a scientific, political, and sociological view of biotechnology in our current world. Students will use a variety of sources (primary literature, textbooks, popular literature/newspapers, web-based applications, Ted Talks, etc.) to investigate the role of scientists, politicians and the public in directing the course of biotechnology. The impact of biotechnology on individual citizens in both developed and emerging economies will be examined from a variety of different perspectives.

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CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING

PLAN 52: Race, Sex and Place in America
SS
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Mai Nguyen

Dr. Mai Thi Nguyen is an associate professor in the City and Regional Planning Department and focuses her teaching and research on housing and community development. She applies both her Sociology and Urban Planning degrees to address vexing urban and regional dilemmas. She employs both quantitative and qualitative methods to examine problems related to social and spatial inequality, urban growth phenomena, the relationship between the built and social environments, and socially vulnerable populations. She is an expert in housing policy, community development, economic development, immigration, disasters, and urban growth phenomena (e.g. demographic change, sprawl, and urbanization). Dr. Nguyen is also an award winning teacher. She was awarded the J. Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award in January 2013 for excellence in undergraduate teaching.

This seminar will expose students to the complex dynamics of race, ethnicity, and gender and how these have shaped the American city since 1945. It will examine both the historical record as well as contemporary works of literature and film to probe the ways race and ethnicity have contributed to the culture of urban life in the United States. It will also explore the different ways women and men perceive, understand, occupy and use urban space and the built environment. Drawing upon the scholarship of several disciplines (urban planning, ethnic studies, sociology and American history), the seminar will examine a broad spectrum of topics, including the social construction of race, the creation of the underclass label, residential segregation, the significance of Hurricane Katrina, sexual identity and space, and immigration. The last portion of the course will focus on planning and policy tools that have the potential to alleviate racial/ethnic and gender inequality in space.

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PLAN 55: Sustainable Cities
SS
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Todd BenDor

Todd BenDor is an associate professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning. He received his Ph.D. in Regional Planning from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research uses computer modeling to better understand the impacts that human activities and development can have on sensitive environmental systems. His recent work has focused on understanding the social and economic consequences of environmental policies that require environmental restoration during the urban development process. Todd enjoys traveling, nature photography, and skiing, and he laments the loss of his amateur status after winning 40 dollars in a pool tournament years ago.

This seminar examines the sustainability of cities and regions. A sustainable community is one in which new development improves the quality of life of people in the community, while preserving environmental functions into the future. We will look at how cities have evolved and how different approaches to property rights and urban development affect sustainability and quality of life in America. We will critically examine a vision for more sustainable places, and we will look at actions that can be taken by citizens, businesses, and governments to help improve sustainability. In this seminar, students will engage in discussions about the economic, social, and environmental conditions of cities, and make presentations about urban sustainability topics that interest them. Students will also examine several different cities in detail to understand how their actions have transformed their urban environments. By the end of this seminar, students will understand what constitutes a sustainable urban community and be able to articulate the major threats to sustainable development. Students will also have developed a sound base of knowledge about the validity, effectiveness, feasibility, strengths and weaknesses of various strategies and methods for fostering sustainability.

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CLASSICS

CLAS 60H: Love, War, Death, and Family Life in Classical Myth (Honors)
LA
MWF, 3:00 – 3:50pm
Sharon James

Professor Sharon James specializes in Roman comedy, Latin poetry, and women in ancient Greece and Rome. She has published many articles on these subjects, as well as a book on Roman love elegy (published in 2003); she is currently completing a large-scale book on women in Greek and Roman New Comedy (the plays of Menander, Plautus, and Terence). She is also the co-editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Women in the Ancient World (published 2012). Professor James regularly teaches all these subjects at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Her lecture courses, CLAS/WMST 240/240H (Women in Ancient Greece) and CLAS/WMST 241/241H (Women in Ancient Rome) are cross-listed between Classics and Women’s Studies. In summer 2012 she co-directed an NEH Institute “Roman comedy in Performance,” which produced videotaped performances that can be found on YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmBs1K1ruw2i48CmDku1HrQ/videos?view=0). She has a very funny dog named Lindley, named after a very funny musician, who keeps her busy at home.

The myths and legends of ancient Greece often focus on family relationships, particularly as they are affected by trouble (power, rule, love, war, death, magic, the interference of the gods, and so on). We will study these mythic families, looking especially at parent-child relations, gender dynamics, and family conflict. What aspects of ancient culture are revealed by these legends and stories. Why do some families remain loving and supportive, while others fall into murderous internal conflict? How do war or sexual conflicts affect family relationships? (This subject is particularly relevant now, given that the U.S. has been involved in military action for more than ten years.) What is the connection between families and politics, even government? What are the relationships of men and women? Finally, we will consider the relation of Greek mythic families to the modern world: why do we continue to draw upon these legends as a means of understanding ourselves? In addition to the ancient texts, we will read from some modern scholarship on war trauma, PTSD, and family issues that arise from warfare. These materials study the Greek poems and plays very carefully, and have much to offer our discussions.

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CLAS 89: Travel Writing in the Ancient World
LA, CI, WB
Janet Downie
MWF, 3:00 – 3:50pm
Janet Downie

Janet Downie studies the literature and culture of the Ancient Mediterranean, especially Greek writing and its place within the vast and multi-cultural Roman Empire. She is interested in life-writing of all kinds: biography, autobiography, medical case histories and, of course, travel narratives. Professor Downie’s first book made a case for the literary value of an extraordinary ancient memoir – an imperial orator’s first-person account of his illness, divine healing, and professional escapades in western Asia Minor. Her current research is concerned with the relationship between story and place: she is investigating how individuals and communities preserved and enhanced memories of the heroic past in the physical landscapes of the imperial world.

What does it mean to leave home, physically or intellectually? People travel for a variety of reasons – for trade and commerce, for purposes of war, conquest, and colonization, on pilgrimage, out of curiosity, and in search of education and scientific discovery. For many, travel is a choice. Others are forced into travel by political or economic need. Leaving home, for whatever reason, involves encountering people, places, and ways of life that are different from one’s own: how have writers documented and reflected on this experience? In this seminar we will read some outstanding and influential pieces of travel writing from ancient Greco-Roman authors – including Homer, Herodotus, Pausanias, and Egeria – alongside examples from a variety of different times and places. Through cross-cultural comparison, and taking inspiration from modern essayists and theorists, we will ask: why and how did ancient authors write about travel? And, what do we gain from reading about other people’s journeys, both real and imaginary?

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COMMUNICATION STUDIES

COMM 51: Communicating and Organizing for Social Entrepreneurs
SS
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Steve May

Steve May is Associate Professor of Communication Studies and is an Ethics Fellow with the Parr Center for Ethics. He received his B.A. and M.A. from Purdue University and his Ph.D. from the University of Utah. His research focuses on communication, ethics, and corporate social responsibility. He has taught courses in Organizational Communication, Teamwork, and Organizational Ethics. He has also taught several APPLES service learning courses in which students provided consulting services to non-profit agencies. He is currently serving as a consultant for the Kenan Institute for Ethic’s new initiative, Ethics at Work. He also provides facilitation and community problem-solving expertise to the Dispute Settlement Center. Originally from Indiana, Steve enjoys basketball, hiking, and international travel.

This seminar is designed to show how we can better understand organizational communication through the medium of different metaphors (e.g., machine, organism, culture, political system, psychic prison). More specifically, the seminar is designed to show how social entrepreneurs—or any other organizational members—can use these metaphors of organizational communication as tools for informing and guiding their entrepreneurial efforts. The course has four primary objectives. First, to introduce students to the theory and practice of social entrepreneurship, with particular attention to successful social entrepreneurs. Second, to provide students with a systematic and critical understanding of organizational communication theory and research related to social entrepreneurship, including the factors involved in the functioning and analysis of today’s complex organizations. Third, to show students how this understanding can be used as a practical tool for their own social entrepreneurship. Finally, to allow students to explore the ways in which organizations are simultaneously the medium and outcome for social, political, economic, technological, and ideological change in our culture.

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COMM 57: Is There Life after College?: The Meaning of Work in Contemporary Life
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Dennis Mumby

Dennis Mumby is a Professor in the Department of Communication Studies, and a Fellow in the Institute for the Arts and Humanities. He received his B.A from Sheffield Hallam University in the U.K., and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. Before coming to UNC in 2002 he taught at Purdue University in Indiana. His research focuses on the place of work and organizations in everyday life, particularly with regard to issues of gender, power, and identity. He has taught courses on organizational communication, work and gender, and organizational culture, among others. Born and raised in the U.K., Dennis enjoys running, reading novels, hanging out in coffee shops, and supporting Liverpool FC (aka, “the Mighty Reds”).

This course examines the historical emergence of work as a defining feature of contemporary life. As students beginning college and preparing for a professional career, you will be asked to explore the place of work in your lives. As a class we will think about the question posed by philosopher Alain de Botton: What are “the pleasures and sorrows of work?” We will explore this question in the context of economic, political, and social conditions that are often referred to as neoliberalism and post-Fordism. Furthermore, we will explore the relationships between work and other aspects of our lives, including family, leisure activities, personal relationships, consumption, and self-identity. Through various readings, written assignments and field projects that examine the phenomenon of work, the goal of the class is to get you to think critically and self-reflectively about the numerous factors that shape your development of a professional identity.

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COMM 61: The Politics of Performance
VP
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Della Pollock

Della Pollock is a Professor in the Department of Communication Studies specializing in the areas of Performance and Cultural Studies. Her primary research concerns how the power of performance is mobilized in the aesthetics and politics of everyday culture. She is the editor of Exceptional Spaces: Essays in Performance and History and Remembering: Oral History Performance, and author of Telling Bodies Performing Birth.

In this seminar students will critically examine the role of politics in performance. Students will watch live dance and theater performances on campus (The Memorial Hall Carolina Performing Arts Series, Playmakers, the Process Series of the Performance Studies program in the Department of Communication Studies), will view filmed dance and theater performances, and working singly and in groups, will create performances. Through our viewing and performance practices we will explore the role of politics in performance, the ways in which identity (individual and cultural) is represented through performance, how performers and audiences create meaning, and how the power of our performing bodies may contribute to processes of social change.

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COMM 63: The Creative Process in Performance
VP, CI, US
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Madeleine Grumet

Madeleine Grumet is a professor in the School of Education and in the Performance Studies Strand of the Department of Communication Studies. She has served as Dean of the School of Education here, and at Brooklyn College, CUNY, where she worked with the arts in education programs of Lincoln Center.

Students in this seminar will attend and study the production process of multimedia, music, dance and theater performances in campus venues: The Memorial Hall Carolina Performing Arts Series, the Process Series of the Performance Studies program in the Department of Communication Studies, Playmakers, and others across campus. We will explore the ways that these performances engage us, communicating powerful ideas and emotions through their various media of expression. Students will research performance pieces, interview the performers, attend rehearsals and performances, and write essays that combine their own experiences of the performances with readings in performance studies. Students will also create their own performance pieces as they observe the relationship of preparation and practice to the spontaneity and surprise of performance.

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COMM 89: Stop Motion Animation
VP
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Francesca Talenti

Francesca Talenti is a filmmaker and animator who has exhibited her work from Sundance to PBS National, by way of Mumbai, Göteborg, Casablanca, and many others. She has won a number of audience and “best of” awards, and has received grants from the Independent Television Service, Latino Public Broadcasting, and the Kauffman Foundation. In the past few years Francesca has also created media for live theater and interactive installations.

This seminar is a deep exploration of Stop-Motion Animation, in which you will gain historical, aesthetic, and technical knowledge of this particular form of cinematic expression. The primary focus is on the making of stop-motion films, with a particular emphasis on the analog and the tactile, as bolstered by digital tools. In the process you will learn about broader cinematic principles. You will also be introduced to collaborative and creative practices as you design storyboards, environments, characters, and stories, with the larger goal of exercising, flexing, and strengthening your creative abilities.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

COMP 60: Robotics with LEGO®
QI
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Henry Fuchs

Henry Fuchs (PhD, University of Utah, 1975) is the Federico Gil Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and adjunct professor of Biomedical Engineering. His teaching and research have focused on 3D graphics and virtual reality, especially for medical and training applications. He is one of three co-directors of the BeingThere International Research Center on Telepresence and Tele-collaboration, a partnership between UNC Chapel Hill, ETH Zurich (Switzerland), and NTU Singapore. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He’s long been interested in building hardware and software systems of all kinds, including those made from LEGO.

We will explore the process of design, and the nature of computers, by designing, building, and programming LEGO robots. We will learn how to program computers to read sensor values, to control actuators, and to perform increasingly complex tasks. Each student will be lent, for the semester, a complete Lego Mindstorms NXT kit. Once or twice during the semester we will hold friendly competitions to evaluate our robots. Some time during the semester, each student will individually study and make a presentation on a chosen aspect or application of robotics. Previous programming experience is not required.

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DRAMATIC ART

DRAM 81H: The American Drama (Honors)
VP, CI, NA
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Gregory Kable

Gregory Kable is a senior lecturer in the Department of Dramatic Art, where he teaches dramatic literature, theatre history, and performance courses and serves as an associate dramaturg for PlayMakers Repertory Company. He also teaches seminars on American Musicals and Modern British Drama for the Honors program. He has directed dozens of productions at UNC and throughout the local community, and is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama.

This seminar examines our national drama from its colonial origins to the present. Students will read plays and criticism, screen videos, engage in critical writing, and explore scenes in performance as related means of exploring the visions and revisions constituting American dramatic history. We will approach American drama as both a literary and commercial art form, and look to its history to provide a context for current American theater practice. Readings are chosen for their intrinsic merit and historical importance, but also for their treatment of key issues and events in American life. Our focus throughout will be on the forces that shaped the American drama as well as, in turn, drama’s ability to shed new light on the national experience.

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DRAM 83: Spectacle in the Theatre
VP
MWF, 10:00 – 10:50am
David Navalinsky

David Navalinsky is the Director of Undergraduate Production in the Department of Dramatic Art and has served on the First Year Seminars Steering Committee. David has taught at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Mississippi. David has worked professionally at South Coast Repertory in Orange County California, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, The Illinois Shakespeare Festival, and the Karamu Performing Arts Theatre in Cleveland, OH. Some of David’s favorite projects were at the Dallas Children’s Theater where he made a dinosaur collapse and pirates walk the plank.

This seminar will explore the artists, art and technology involved in creating the world of the play. It is intended as an overview for students who want to learn about theatrical design. Students will create their own designs in the areas of scenery, costumes, and lighting for three plays throughout the semester. These plays will be placed outside of their traditional setting while still maintaining the story and themes. Students have placed Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a trailer park and a daycare center for example. Careful historical research, close reading and analysis, text and source material, and collaboration will be the focus of the student projects. In addition, the seminar will look at theatrical technology and how spectacle has evolved from the Greeks to Cirque du Soleil.

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DRAM 87H: Style: A Mode of Expression (Honors)
VP, CI, NA
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
McKay Coble

McKay Coble teaches design, both scenic and costume for the theatre and the history of material culture. She fell in love with the power of choice as far as visuals are concerned early in her career as a Carolina student and has never turned back. Formerly the chair of the Department of Dramatic Art, she is a resident designer for PlayMakers Repertory Company. She uses the many and varied artistic venues on campus as co-instructors and the FYS will be visiting them together. You will likely join her on a design journey as she creates the scenery for a production for PRC and you will have the opportunity to see the process and product.

Consider Oscar Wilde’s statement from The Decay of Living 1889: “Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life. This results not merely from Life’s imitative instincts, but from the fact that the self-conscious aim of Life is to find expression, and that Art offers it certain beautiful forms through which it may realize that energy…” Do you agree or disagree? This seminar studies the elements of design in their pure form, surveys a history of period styles and theatre, and identifies their causes. Art and design have frequently shown the inner life of humankind throughout history better than political, intellectual, or social history. While a period’s style is seldom defined by the everyday choices of everyday people and is most often recorded in the works of artists, writers and intellectuals must recognize the “times” as a major motivator for all stylistic choices. Even minor arts reflect major events. We will study the elements of design as they exist in their pure form; a “tool box” of elements available to artists and practice the principles to which design is bound. We will survey a history of period styles, period theatre and identify their causes. We will explore one period’s style as a foundation for the next and dispel the Star Trek premise that future styles will only reflect the future. Student progress will be assessed through an in-class presentation on a topic of period style or context and final creative project/paper. The text for the class is A History of the World in 100 Objects by Neil MacGregor which will be a daily discussion.

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DRAM 88: Ecology and Performance
VP, EE
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Karen O’Brien

Karen O’Brien is David G. Frey Fellow Assistant Professor in UNC’s Department of Dramatic Art. Her research and creative interests include inquiries in artistic, cultural, and textual performance, particularly in the environmental arts and in the geo-political context of Irish Studies. She holds a Ph.D. in Drama and Theatre from University of California, Irvine and San Diego. She also received an MFA in Directing and a BFA in Electronic Media from the College-Conservatory of Music at University of Cincinnati.

This seminar will guide students through the process of researching, developing, and producing new performance pieces inspired by socio-ecological issues. This task will involve: learning and practicing a range of collaborative performance techniques; gaining knowledge about the environmental arts, theatre for social change, and core principles surrounding notions of sustainability; researching and engaging in current ecological debates; and synthesizing critical inquiry and creative endeavor in the form of a new ecologically-driven performance. The seminar will culminate in the presentation of new performance pieces aimed at promoting socio-ecological sustainability. Students will be expected to: closely read assigned texts; keep a journal throughout the semester; conduct and present individual and group research; collaborate with a group to integrate research into performance; and attend one group field outing and one performance event outside of the scheduled course time. No prerequisites are required.

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DRAM 89: The Heart of the Drama: Fundamentals of Acting, Playwriting and Collaboration
VP, EE
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Mark Perry

Mark Perry teaches play analysis and playwriting in UNC’s Department of Dramatic Art. His play A New Dress for Mona, about the wrongful execution of a young Iranian woman, and his one-man show, On the Rooftop with Bill Sears, are published in a book of his plays called The Lover at the Wall (Drama Circle, 2011). He serves as a production dramaturg for Playmakers Repertory Company, most recently on Metamorphoses. Mark is a graduate of the University of Iowa’s Playwrights Workshop, and was a former recipient of the North Carolina Arts Council’s Literature Fellowship for playwriting.

The goal of this seminar is to get you doing theatre, to spark your creativity, and to connect you with the deeper lessons of this dynamic art form. You will act. You will write. You will work with others. It will not always be easy, but if you are willing to stretch yourself, you should have a great time. Each lesson is organized around a principle or virtue inherent in the practice of the art. Participants study a quotation or two that relate to that principle and then engage in drama exercises that spring from that principle. By the end of the course, you will have gained skills to make you comfortable to write, stage, and perform your own 10 minute plays. Not just for those interested in pursuing theatre, this seminar will give you a more holistic understanding of essential principles in the practice of your life.

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ENGLISH

ENGL 52: Computers and English Studies
LA, CI
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Daniel Anderson

Daniel Anderson has been teaching computer-assisted composition courses for 16 years. His work occupies the intersections of technology, teaching, and publication. He has developed award winning Web-based software for writing instruction and has published multiple books devoted to teaching and studying writing and literature. He has taught First Year Seminar courses at UNC–CH since the inception of the FYS program. He directs the Studio for Instructional Technology and English Studies at Carolina. His interests include teaching writing through the use of emerging communication media such as the World Wide Web and guiding students as they work together to investigate and create resources for studying literature.

This seminar explores ways that technology reshapes the study of literature and the ways writers compose. It emphasizes lessons in how to read and write about literary works, exploring how definitions of literature change as we consider not only fiction, poetry, and drama, but also music, art, and film. We also look at what it means to compose in the twenty first century, exploring blogging, podcasts, playlists, collages, videos, as well as familiar written forms. Class activities will feature some lecture, more discussion, and lots of project-based work.

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ENGL 53: Slavery and Freedom in African American Literature and Film
John. L. Townsend III FYS in English
LA, US
MWF, 1:00 – 1:50pm
William L. Andrews

William L. Andrews teaches courses on African American literature, American autobiography studies, and Southern literature. Since the mid-1980s he has done a considerable amount of editing of African American and Southern literature and criticism. Professor Andrews is the series editor of North American Slave Narratives, Beginnings to 1920, a complete digitized library of autobiographies and biographies of North American slaves and ex-slaves.

The purpose of this seminar is to explore the African American slave narrative tradition from its 19th-century origins in autobiography to its present manifestations in prize-winning fiction and film. The most famous 19th-century slave narrative, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845) was an international best seller. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), the amazing but utterly truthful story of Harriet Jacobs’s slave experience in Edenton, North Carolina, is extensively read and taught in college and university classrooms around the world. In the 20th century, many important African American autobiographies and novels—Washington’s Up From Slavery (1901), Wright’s Black Boy (1945), Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952), Haley’s The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1965), and Morrison’s Beloved (1987) —are products, formally and thematically, of the ongoing slave narrative tradition. The slave narrative has also given rise to a number of notable films, from major studio releases like Spielberg’s Amistad (1997) to TV-films like Charles Burnett’s Nightjohn (1996). The 1977 television series based on Haley’s Roots enabled the slave narrative tradition to have a profound impact on late 20th-century American culture. Slave narratives have also had strong influence on popular films such as Blade Runner (1982), The Handmaid’s Tale (1990), Django Unchained (2013), and 12 Years a Slave (2013). Because of the widespread incidence of human trafficking and other forms of involuntary servitude in the world today, slavery remains a major human rights issue.

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ENGL 54.001: The War to End All Wars? The First World War and the Modern World
LA, GL, NA
MW, 3:00 – 4:15pm
John McGowan

John McGowan works on British and American culture of the 20th century, taking culture in its widest possible sense. His great-uncle fought in World War I—and never recovered from the “shell shock” (what today we call PTSD) he brought home from the Western Front. Having grown up with his father’s stories of fighting in World War II, Professor McGowan has been fascinated with how soldiers and civilians alike describe their war-time experiences, and how societies are altered by the always unexpected outcomes of going to war.

World War I began 100 years ago in the summer of 1914. To mark this centenary, UNC is hosting a series of events, including lectures, conferences, theatrical performances, and artistic exhibitions. This course will take advantage of the events on campus as we explore how World War I created the modern world. We will focus especially on the connection between the war and “modernism” in the arts. But we will also attend to the war’s destruction of three empires—the Russian, the Ottoman, and the Austro-Hungarian—and the new political forms that took empire’s place. And we will consider the new, modern technologies the war introduced, from the airplane and the tank, to chemical warfare and new medical techniques. Mixing insights from literature, art, history, and political science, our goal will be to understand the ways this war shaped the whole twentieth century. We will examine British, Irish, French, German, Australian, and American works of literature and films that bear on the subject. There will be several two-page papers, oral presentations from groups, and a final research project.

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ENGL 54.002: The War to End All Wars? The First World War and the Modern World
LA, GL, NA
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Heidi Kim

Heidi Kim joined the faculty at Carolina in 2010, and not a year has gone by without her teaching a first-year seminar. Her research ranges through nineteenth and 20th-century American literature and Asian American studies, currently focusing on authors such as William Faulkner, John Steinbeck, and Ralph Ellison. Her teaching focuses on 20th and 21st century American and comparative ethnic literature. She is always looking for ways to bring her students’ work into conversation with the campus and public. You can find out more about her work at http://heidikim.web.unc.edu.

What did the young Americans involved in WWI experience, and how did they express their trauma and concern in literature? We will look at the biography and works of famed writers such as William Faulkner, UNC alumnus Paul Green, Ernest Hemingway, and John Dos Passos. Our study of Paul Green will make use of the original literary manuscripts and historical artifacts from UNC’s Wilson Library; students will conduct in-depth research that will culminate in a digital exhibit and other special projects to be determined. We will also attend and study the special performance of Green and Kurt Weill’s musical play Johnny Johnson and other events associated with the campuswide centennial remembrance of WWI.

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ENGL 55H: Reading and Writing Women’s Lives (Honors)
LA, CI
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Jane Danielewicz

Jane Danielewicz is curious about almost everything; she can’t help but live the life of the mind. She is a passionate reader, writer, and teacher. At UC Berkeley, Jane’s graduate work focused on linguistics and literacy, writing and rhetoric. Her work at UNC continues in this vein. She investigates the nature of written language and also the teaching of writing. Her special interest is in life-writing, particularly the study of contemporary autobiography. She has a particular affinity for working with first-year students. In 2014, she was awarded (for the second time) the J. Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award. For her commitment to undergraduate research, she was named the Richard Grant Hiskey Distinguished Professor in Research and Undergraduate Teaching from 2009-2013. She enjoys creating assignments that tempt students to push the envelope. An associate professor in the department of English and Comparative Literature, she also directs the Writing in the Disciplines Program. Jane is currently writing a book, Autobiographical Actions: Genre and Agency, about how autobiographical texts are not simply interesting narratives but act to solve social problems or produce new ways of understanding the world.

How do our lives become stories? This simple question provokes writers to produce autobiographies or memoirs or biographies. This honors seminar narrows the scope, focusing on contemporary stories that involve personal and lived experience by and about women. Not only will we be reading autobiographical stories and theories that describe women’s experience, but we will also be writing these forms of creative nonfiction ourselves. What stories will students—as women or as men—tell about their lives? Students will be challenged to investigate questions of self and identity by composing (using traditional written or new media formats) four genres of life writing during the course: autobiography, autoethnography, biography, and the new media personal essay. Students will learn the research methods involved in life writing. The seminar will be conducted daily as a workshop to promote interactive, experiential learning. Students will be organized into working groups to facilitate community building. Published authors will visit the class. Students will publish their work through public readings and on-line venues.

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ENGL 57: Future Perfect: Science Fictions and Social Form
LA
MWF, 1:00 – 1:50pm
Matthew Taylor

Matthew A. Taylor received his PhD in American Literature from Johns Hopkins University and is an assistant professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. His essays have appeared in or are forthcoming from various academic journals, and his first book, on 19th- and early 20th-century literary cosmologies, was published in December 2013. His research interests include science and literature studies, posthumanism, and interdisciplinary critical theory. When not writing about other worlds, he enjoys living in this one, especially when hiking with his dog.

What will our world look like in ten years? Fifty? One hundred? Will the future be a utopian paradise or a dystopian wasteland? Through a wide-ranging survey of popular science writing, novels, films, and manifestos, this first year seminar will examine fictional and nonfictional attempts to imagine the future, from the nineteenth century to the present. We will explore everything from futurology (the science and industry of predicting possible futures) and transhumanism (the movement to radically enhance human beings through emerging technologies) to warnings of imminent environmental collapse and depictions of post-apocalyptic landscapes. Our focus will be less on assessing the accuracy of these predictions and more on determining what they tell us about the hopes and fears of the present. Occasional film screenings outside of class may be required. The class will include lecture and discussion. Students will be responsible for writing two papers (with the possibility of revisions), collaborative group work, in-class presentations and a final project.

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ENGL 72: Literature of 9/11
LA, CI, GL
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Neel Ahuja

Neel Ahuja grew up in Topeka, Kansas. He studied gender studies at Northwestern University before completing a Ph.D. in transnational cultural studies at the University of California-San Diego. Since 2008, Neel has been Assistant Professor of postcolonial literature and theory in the English Department at UNC–Chapel Hill, and he teaches courses on security culture, world literatures, medical humanities, and environmental studies. Neel is currently writing a book on the relationship of biosecurity initiatives to the territorial expansion of the United States since 1893, and has recently written a series of essays concerning the relationships between international politics, animals, and the environment.

This seminar will explore representations of the 9/11 attacks and their aftermath in literature and popular culture. Following an introduction to the concept of terrorism and to the production of knowledge about political violence in the fields of law, politics, religious studies, and terrorism studies, we will explore a diverse array of themes related to the 9/11 attacks and the “war on terror” as depicted in memoirs, poetry, novels, public art, graphic novels, film, and music: explanations of the causes and consequences of political violence; the role of religion in public culture and state institutions; national security discourse; mourning and public trauma; depictions of the US military in Iraq, Pakistan, and Afghanistan; and the perspectives of detainees and minority communities on the attacks and their aftermath. Students will read both critical scholarship and literary texts, discuss major controversies in organized debates, compose two papers, and complete group presentations on topics of their choice.

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ENGL 75: Interpreting the South from Manuscripts
HS, CI, EE
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Connie Eble and Laura Clark Brown

Connie Eble, Professor of English, has been a faculty member at the University for 43 years. She is a linguist by training, and her teaching and research focus on the structure and history of the English language. Dr. Eble is a long-time teacher of expository writing and served for 10 years as editor of the Journal of American Speech.

Laura Clark Brown, Senior Librarian in Technical Services at Wilson Library, has Master’s degrees in both History and Library Science and for a decade was the public programming director of the Southern Historical Collection.

Professors Eble and Brown have co-taught English 75 for seven years.

The Southern Historical Collection, housed in the Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library, contains the raw materials of people’s lives—their letters, diaries, writings, scrapbooks, photographs, and other personal and professional documents that open windows to the past as it was lived. Students in this seminar will gain hands-on experience working with manuscript collections. By learning how to conduct archival research and how to analyze and interpret historical records, they will have opportunities to contribute to our understandings of the past and the past’s reflections in the present. This fall the seminar will focus on Appalachia. The seminar is built around student-led class discussions of archival readings, a portfolio of short written responses to the readings, three 1,000-word analytical essays based on archival research, and a culminating research project producing a YouTube video for presentation. Archival readings for class discussions will be available online, but the three essays will require between 3–5 hours each working with original documents in Wilson Library, and the final project will require several hours in special collections during the final four weeks of the semester. Most class meetings will be discussions led by small groups of students. In other class meetings students will view documentary films and hear guest lectures by conservators, oral historians, and a photographic archivist. Much attention is given to the fine points of oral presentation and excellent expository writing, including correct grammar and usage, and appropriate word choice and sentence structure. Students who possess solid writing skills and who are comfortable expressing their ideas in class discussions are well-suited to succeed in this seminar. Attendance and class participation are critical components of this seminar, and students are expected to attend every class.

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ENGL 85H: Economic Saints and Villains (Honors)
John. L. Townsend III FYS in English
LA, CI, WB
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Ritchie Kendall

Ritchie Kendall is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature who joined the UNC faculty in 1980. He holds a B.A. in English from Yale University (1973) and an M.A. and Ph.D. in English from Harvard University (1980). His specialty is in English Renaissance drama with an emphasis on the socio-economic dimensions of early modern theater. He has taught Honors courses in Shakespeare, Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, comedy and social class, epic and drama, and early modern ideas of entrepreneurship.

The rise of new economic activities—whether the birth of international banking, trading in future commodities, or the marketing of junk bonds—bring with them both excitement and trepidation. Literature about how ordinary and extraordinary people go about the business of getting and spending is one way that a culture comes to terms with emergent and potentially revolutionary economic formations. This seminar will explore how early modern England from the 16th to the 19th centuries imagined new economic orders through plays and novels. We will examine how Renaissance plays by Marlowe, Shakespeare, Dekker, and Heywood present economic scoundrels such as Barabas and Shylock as well as heroic entrepreneurs such as Simon Eyre and Thomas Gresham. In the 18th century we will sample the work of Daniel Defoe who crafted a guide for early tradesmen but also produced subversive novels with dubious heroines who use sex and business acumen to acquire and lose great fortunes. From the 19th century, we will read two works, a little known melodrama, The Game of Speculation, as well as the iconic A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Both stories speculate on the compatibility of economic and spiritual success. We will conclude with a modern epilogue: three satiric films from the era of Reagonomics including Oliver Stone’s Wall Street, Mike Nichols’ Working Girl, and Jon Landis’ Trading Places. Our objective throughout will be to analyze how literary art, itself a form of economic activity, simultaneously demonizes and celebrates the “miracle of the marketplace” and those financial pioneers that perform its magic.

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EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE

EXSS 50: Discrimination and Sport
SS, US
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Barbara Osborne

Barbara Osborne, J.D., is an associate professor with 16 years of teaching experience at UNC. She teaches sports law at the undergraduate and graduate levels and at the UNC Law School. Prior to her appointment at UNC, Barbara worked for 14 years as an athletics administrator in intercollegiate athletics. She has worked for a sports agent and also has experience as a track and field coach, television sports commentator, publisher and sports information director. Her current research focuses on legal issues in intercollegiate athletics, Title IX, and women’s issues in sport. She was awarded the Edward Kidder Graham Outstanding Faculty Award in 2005.

Most Americans love sports. Our speech is peppered with sporting metaphors. Athletes are role models, celebrities, and heroes. Sport is often referred to as a microcosm of society, but it also significantly influences our society. Sport also celebrates the elite: the strongest, the fastest, and the most skilled. However, “elite” by definition is exclusionary. This seminar will examine the American ethos by looking at those who have been discriminated against in sport because of race, gender, sexual orientation, or disability. Students will write reaction papers, create poster presentations, and engage in formal debate on “hot” topics.

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FOLKLORE

FOLK 77: The Poetic Roots of Hip-Hop: Hidden Histories of African American Rhyme
VP, US
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Glenn Hinson

Glenn Hinson’s engagement with African American expressive culture emerges from decades of work with artists that range from blues musicians and gospel singers to tapdancers, vaudeville comics, and hip-hop emcees. As a folklorist (and associate professor) who teaches in the Departments of American Studies and Anthropology, he studies everyday performances and the ways that they offer insights into the workings of culture. Professor Hinson’s current research focuses on oral poetry, self-taught art, and the intersections between faith and creativity.

“There ain’t nothing new about rapping.” That’s what elders from a host of African American communities declared when hip-hop first exploded onto the scene. This “new” form, they claimed, was just a skilled re-working of poetic forms that had been around for generations. Each elder seemed to point to a different form—some to the wordplay of rhyming radio deejays, others to the bawdy flow of streetcorner poets, still others to the rhymed storytelling of sanctified singers. And each was right; elegant rhyming has indeed marked African American talk for generations. Yet because most such rhyming was spoken, its history remains hidden. In this seminar, we’ll explore this lost history, talking to poets and hip-hop emcees while probing the archives to uncover the hidden heritage of African American eloquence. Our goal is nothing short of writing the prehistory of hip-hop, and in so doing demonstrating rhyme’s longstanding role as a key marker of African American identity.

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GEOGRAPHY

GEOG 56: Local Places in a Globalizing World
SS, GL
M, 3:00 – 5:30pm
Altha Cravey

Altha Cravey became a geographer because she loves to travel and see new things. Her research focuses on globalization, labor, and gender issues in contemporary Mexico. She is beginning to publish on globalization in the US South as well. Cravey was born and raised in Illinois and Indiana and worked as a construction electrician for eleven years before finishing her undergraduate education. Her dissertation at the University of Iowa was supported by a four-year Iowa Fellowship and was published as Women and Work in Mexico’s Maquiladoras (Rowman and Littlefield, 1998). Cravey loves to bicycle around campus and Chapel Hill.

Globalization is a word we hear every day, but what does it mean for us in local places? Specifically, what can an understanding of globalization tell us about Carolina and nearby places? This seminar weaves together perspectives on globalization with hands-on exploration of Carolina and its place in today’s global “knowledge economy,” and the University’s founding in relation to the globalizing forces of that day. Our focus will shift back and forth between the global and the local, even to the microscale of our campus. We will learn through a variety of experiences and approaches, including fieldwork, old documents, and some introductory GIS (geographic information systems) exercises in addition to readings, class discussion, and group work. By the end of the seminar, students will not only have an understanding of globalization and the very real connections between the global and the local, but also a unique perspective on our university.

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GEOG 64: Vietnam
HS, BN
MWF, 2:00 – 2:50pm
Christian Lentz

When Christian C. Lentz was growing up in a small Rhode Island town, he wanted to experience places just over the horizon, if not the other side of the earth. So in college he learned Indonesian and studied abroad there before turning towards Vietnamese and Vietnam. He continues to work in Southeast Asia and is interested in how everyday folk—farmers, soldiers, and traders—negotiate a social world enlivened by their thoughts and actions. His research looks at Vietnam during war and revolution, when ordinary people changed their world and, in many ways, turned it upside down. After earning his PhD from Cornell University, he became Assistant Professor of Geography at UNC in 2011.

What do we think of when we think of Vietnam? For many, Vietnam was and remains a war that haunts veterans, families, and politicians. But to think only of the “Vietnam War” overlooks a country and its story. In fact, many Vietnamese wonder why Americans are so preoccupied with the “American War”!
We will explore modern Vietnam in order to situate the American War in a broader spatial and historical context. Landscapes range from forests, over mountains, through fields, and down stream to river deltas. Vietnamese move from village to city, meander through cafes and rice paddies, cross oceans and land again. Our journey begins with royal unification and collapse, winds through colonialism and nationalist struggles, pauses in the Cold War, and ends with ongoing reforms. This seminar aims to introduce a fascinating place rich in history and to animate a geographic imagination students can take anywhere. Through forays to the university library and media center, we learn how to locate and appreciate fact and fiction, primary and secondary sources, text and picture, film and map. Through reading and writing exercises as well as film screenings and class discussions, students encounter new points of view, engage scholarly debates, and develop informed perspectives.

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GEOG 89: The Politics of Everyday Life
SS, GL
MWF, 10:00 – 10:50am
Sara Smith

Sara Smith is a political geographer with a South Asia focus, specializing in feminist political geography and political geographies of youth and the future. She has been involved in non-profit work and research in India since 1999. Her Ph.D. is in geography, and she has been an Assistant Professor in UNC’s Department of Geography since 2009. Professor Smith’s current research in the Ladakh region of India’s Jammu and Kashmir State addresses the ways that individuals’ personal lives (especially their decisions about love and babies) are entangled in territorial struggle. Smith is developing a new project about how marginalized young people from India’s remote mountain regions experience university life in major Indian cities, and how this shapes their politics. If you are curious, you can find out more about this work on her faculty Web site at http://geography.unc.edu/people/faculty-1.

This seminar examines the ways that politics, especially contests over territory, are part of our day-to-day life. We will explore a range of cases, from immigration policy and rhetoric in the US, to popular representations of geopolitics in film, to the politics of family planning in India. How do questions of love, friendship, family, and youth identity tie into the international and national political stories that we see on the news? What does national identity have to do with our individual sense of self? We will also explore alternative ways that international politics have been studied, as feminist geopolitics or anti-geopolitics, and questions of citizenship. Work for the seminar will involve original research on intersections of international politics and students’ daily life, as well as exploring representations of geopolitical issues in the media, film, and fiction.

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GEOLOGY

GEOL 72H: Field Geology of Eastern California (Honors)
PL, EE
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Allen Glazner

Allen Glazner’s research focuses on volcanoes, earthquakes, and the processes that build the earth’s crust. In a typical year he spends several weeks doing field work with UNC students in the mountains and deserts of California. He was schooled at Pomona College and UCLA, began his teaching career at UNC in 1981, and has won two teaching awards. Geologic field trips have taken him to Argentina, Greece, Mexico, Italy, Switzerland, Alaska, Chile, British Columbia, Scotland, France, and Hawaii in recent years. He likes mountains, hiking, cycling, jazz, and cool science stuff.

Have you ever wanted to stand on a volcano, see a glacier, trace out an earthquake fault, or see the Earth’s oldest living things? This seminar is designed around a one-week field trip to eastern California, where students will study geologic features including active volcanoes, earthquake-producing faults, and evidence for recent glaciation and extreme climate change. Before the field trip (which will take place the week of Fall Break and be based at a research station near Bishop, California), the class will meet twice a week to learn basic geologic principles and to work on developing field research topics. During the field trip students will work on field exercises (e.g. mapping, measuring, and describing an active fault; observing and recording glacial features) and collect data for the research projects. After the field trip, students will obtain laboratory data from samples collected during the trip and test research hypotheses using field and laboratory data. Grading will be based on presentation of group research projects, and on a variety of small projects during the trip (notebook descriptions, mapping projects, etc.). Students will be required to pay some of the costs of the trip (estimated at about $850.) This course will require missing three days of classes. The course is designed to teach basic geology “on the rocks”, so there are no prerequisites. Link to Yosemite Nature Notes video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5RQp77uVPA

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GEOL 79: Coasts in Crisis
PL
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Laura Moore

Laura Moore’s research focuses on large-scale geological and modern evolution of coastal environments with an emphasis on understanding the impacts of climate change on modern coastal systems. In her study of coastal systems she uses a combination of field techniques and computer modeling approaches. She appreciates that her research allows her to spend time at the coast, which is one of her favorite places to be.

Rising sea level and severe storms continue to cause coastal erosion yet coastal areas are more populated than ever. In light of this, what is the future of the American beach and beaches worldwide? In this seminar we will investigate the evolution and function of coastal environments over geologic time. We will also consider the recent effects of development and engineering solutions on coastal environments. We will then examine the factors that have led to existing coastal management strategies and the tensions between coastal development and the desire to preserve natural coastal environments. A mixture of readings, lecture, hands-on activities, lively class discussions, and role play exercises will provide a variety of means for interacting with course material.

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GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

GERM 51: Stalin and Hitler: Historical Issues in Cultural and Other Perspectives
HS, GL
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
David Pike

David Pike received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1978 in German Studies with a minor in Russian and has taught at UNC–CH since 1980. He is the author of three books, The Politics of Culture in Soviet -Occupied Germany, 1945-1949 (1993), Lukács and Brecht (1985), and German Writers in Soviet Exile, 1933-1945 (1982). His research takes him regularly to Berlin and Moscow.

This course deals with critical issues, and in the broadest possible context, that dominated the twentieth century: the rise of fascism out of the carnage of World War One and the Bolshevik revolution to which the war and Czarist Russia’s involvement in it helped contribute. As the semester unfolds, drawing on a variety of historical and documentary films, and literature (memoirs, novels), we will take a comparative look at singular personalities like Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler and examine the role played by such key figures in historical events of this magnitude. More towards the end of the semester, we glance briefly at the situation created in Western and Eastern Europe by the defeat of fascism and contemplate the origins and evolution of the cold war. We conclude with a consideration of the dissolution and democratization of Eastern European countries, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and, against the tragic background of the past, the general for democracy in the future.

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GERM 67: Blackness in the European Imaginary, Europe in the Black Imaginary
GL, NA
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Priscilla Layne

Priscilla Layne is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in African, African American, and Diaspora Studies. She is a native of Chicago and before moving to North Carolina, she received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2011. Her fields of research and teaching interests are 20th- and 21st-century literature, film, music, (post)subculture studies, multiculturalism, African Diaspora studies and gender studies. She is the author of several essays about German film, Turkish German literature, popular music and counterculture in Germany. In her free time she enjoys live music, traveling with her husband and son, and collecting punk records.

This seminar addresses how encounters between Europe and the African Diaspora changed notions of race, nation, identity and belonging in the 20th century. From the jazz age to the present, Blackness has posed both an allure as well as a danger for Europeans, especially those who view Black culture as challenging “old world” traditions. How does one explain Europeans’ fear and simultaneous love of Blackness? How have many Black intellectuals and artists responded to this puzzling binary? And what do discourses on and encounters with Blackness mean for Europe’s future? In the past ten years, interest in African Diaspora Studies and Black European culture has increased dramatically. This seminar will not only introduce students to these dynamic fields, but also introduce them to the study of the humanities by having them engage with theoretical and historical texts, learn literary and cultural analysis and conduct their own research. Class discussion will focus on a variety of media, ranging from essays, novels and poems to films and a musical. Through engaging with these texts, students will explore the construction of Blackness in various national and historical contexts including Germany, England, France, Russia, and Scandanavia.

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HISTORY

HIST 72H: Women’s Voices: 20th-Century European History in Female Memory (Honors)
John. L. Townsend III FYS in History
HS, CI, NA
T, 4:00 – 6:30pm
Karen Hagemann

Karen Hagemann is the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of History and Adjunct Professor of the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense. She published widely Modern European and German history as well as military and gender history. Currently she has finished a book entitled Revisiting Prussia’s Wars against Napoleon: History, Culture, Memory (Cambridge University Press) and is working as the general editor of the Oxford Handbook Gender, War and the Western World since 1650. (http://history.unc.edu/people/faculty/karenhagemann)

The seminar examines twentieth century European history through the lens of women’s autobiographical writings. It explores women’s voices from different generational, social and national backgrounds. We will read and discuss autobiographical texts by six women, who grew up in middle class families in Austria, Britain, France and Germany and wrote about their lives in the first half of the twentieth century. They all tried to make a difference in society and politics: Emmeline Pankhurst (1958-1928), a leader of the British suffragette movement; Alice Salomon (1872-1948), a liberal Jewish-German social reformer; Vera Brittain (1893-1970), a British peace activist and writer; Toni Sender (1888-1964), one of the first female parliamentarians in Weimar Germany; Geneviève de Gaulle-Anthonioz (1920-2002), a French resistance fighter and a survivor of the women’s concentration camp Ravensbrück; and Ruth Klüger (1931-), an Austrian-Jewish student who survived Auschwitz and became a professor in the U.S . The overarching theme of the seminar is the struggle of women for equal economic, social and political rights. We will explore what effects political changes, revolutions and wars as well as the Holocaust had on this struggle and the lives of women more general. Through intensive discussions of the reading in class, group work and the opportunity to write a research paper on a female autobiography of their own choice, the seminar offers students a unique approach to twentieth century European history and will introduce them to historical research and writing.

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HIST 89: Gender and the Law in United States History
HS, US
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Katherine Turk

Katherine Turk is a U.S. historian who is interested in the history of women, gender and sexuality, the law and social movements, and the twentieth century. In particular, she studies post-World War II American feminist activism and the challenges of defining and creating sex equality amidst different interest groups, state agencies, diverse populations of workers, and changes in the American economy. Professor Turk is currently finishing her first book, entitled Equality on Trial: Sex and Gender at Work in the Age of Title VII, which examines workplace rights struggles waged by women and men between the 1960s and the 1990s. Before joining the faculty at Carolina, she taught at the University of Texas at Dallas and held a postdoctoral fellowship at Indiana University Maurer School of Law in Bloomington. When she is not thinking about feminism, work and the law, she is often out for a jog, baking or cooking something, or working on a crochet project.

Since the colonial era, the law has shaped how Americans have worked, socialized, and understood themselves and each other—affecting even our most basic identities and intimate lives. At the same time, Americans across the centuries have invoked the law to claim political rights and to challenge or reinforce divisions among us. This course will explore how the law in America has defined and regulated gender and sexuality. Through readings, discussions, and written assignments, we will evaluate how assumptions about men and women have influenced the development of the law. We will consider how seemingly neutral laws can have different effects upon men and women across race and class divides, challenging some differences while naturalizing others. Finally, we will examine the power and shortcomings of appeals to legal equality waged by diverse groups and individuals. In so doing, we will begin to explore how to use legal evidence as a window into the past. We will cover topics including marriage, reproduction and the family to suffrage, work, and military service. On Tuesdays, we will discuss books and articles written by historians. On Thursdays, we will discuss primary sources: landmark cases, laws, and legal writing. You will not be expected to have any prior knowledge of the law.

HIST 89H: Water in the Middle East (Honors) (CANCELLED)

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JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION

JOMC 89.001: Entrepreneurism in American Journalism
HS, NA
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Ferrel Guillory

Ferrel Guillory is a Professor of the practice in the UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communication and an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Public Policy. He founded the Program on Public Life in 1997 and is a senior fellow at MDC, Inc., a non-profit research firm in Chapel Hill. Guillory serves on the Council on the Southern Community of the Southern Growth Policies Board and on the board of trustees of the North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching.

This seminar considers the development of news through radio, through television, through newspapers and magazines and now through digital means of delivery. Throughout the seminar, students will examine enterprising journalists and journalistic institutions—and their roles in assembling both a mass audience and niche audiences —and how in doing so they exert influence on the political and cultural dynamics of the United States. This seminar seeks to give students experience in writing interpretative journalism. It places a special focus on analyzing the formation of journalistic enterprises, and students will have an opportunity to produce their own entrepreneurial ideas for journalistic enterprises that fit current technology and that serve to inform the public agenda. At the conclusion of the seminar, students will have a deeper appreciation for ethics, media-citizen relationships, and the complexities of people wielding power through a free press in a free, democratic society.

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JOMC 89.002: Science, Media, and Public Life
SS, CI
TuTh, 1:00 – 2:15pm
Daniel Kreiss

Daniel Kreiss is Assistant Professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Kreiss’s research explores the impact of technological change on the public sphere and political practice. In Taking Our Country Back: The Crafting of Networked Politics from Howard Dean to Barack Obama (Oxford University Press, 2012), Kreiss presents the history of new media and Democratic Party political campaigning over the last decade. Kreiss is currently working on a second book project, provisionally titled Networked Ward Politics: Parties, Databases, and Campaigning in the Information Age (under contract with Oxford University Press and due out in 2016). Kreiss is an affiliated fellow of the Information Society Project at Yale Law School and received a Ph.D. in Communication from Stanford University. Kreiss’s work has appeared in New Media and Society, Qualitative Sociology, Critical Studies in Media Communication, Research in Social Movements, Conflict, and Change, The Journal of Information Technology and Politics, and The International Journal of Communication, in addition to other academic journals.

How does the media cover scientific controversies? What role does science play in political controversies? What is the relationship between science, media, and democracy? This seminar explores the interaction of media, politics, and science through a series of case studies about contemporary controversies around issues such as fracking, climate change, stem cells, and Obamacare. We will trace public debate about these controversies through social media, journalism, science blogs, and popular culture such as films and television shows. To help us make sense of these public debates, throughout the semester we will read a number of academic works about scientific and technical controversies. Through class discussions and course assignments we will analyze the stakeholders involved in contemporary controversies and how they communicate and justify their public actions. We will examine how scientists communicate their findings to broader publics and the nature of scientific debate, as well as how journalists cover controversies and understand science. We will analyze when and how elected officials and candidates invoke or critique science, and the role of science in policymaking more broadly. We will also hear from UNC professors, journalists, representatives of social movement and advocacy organizations, Triangle companies, and elected officials and candidates about their roles in public debate.

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MARINE SCIENCES

MASC 52: Living with Our Oceans and Atmosphere
PL
TuTh, 11:00 – 12:15pm
John Bane

Born in his mother’s home town of Kalamazoo, Michigan, John Bane lived in several locations throughout the U.S and abroad with his military family (his father was an Air Force pilot). He returned to earn his B.S. in Physics and Mathematics at Western Michigan University before going on to Florida State University for a Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography. Following a year at LSU where he studied coastal processes in the Gulf of Mexico, John joined the faculty at UNC. He has just completed his twenty-fifth year at UNC, and in June 2000 completed a five-year term as chair of the Dept. of Marine Sciences. He teaches and does research in the areas of ocean circulation and
ocean-atmosphere interactions, and he presently has projects in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. John has been an associate editor with the Journal of Physical Oceanography since 1992. John’s main activity outside of work is flying, and he is a 3000-hour commercial pilot who flies his own twin-engine aircraft. John enjoys travel, meteorology, and spending as much time as possible with his three children (all now out of college) and two granddaughters.

This seminar will introduce students to the nature of the Earth’s oceans and atmosphere, with emphasis on developing an understanding of the processes that lead to our weather patterns and global climate. Modern theories of changing weather, severe weather events, oceanic hazards, interactions between the oceans and the atmosphere, and oceanic and atmospheric changes that are linked to increasing human activity will be studied. Examples of presently active research being conducted at UNC and other institutions will be used to highlight how the above topics are investigated scientifically. Readings will be taken from: introductory meteorology and oceanography textbooks; modern articles in periodicals such as Scientific American, Nature, American Scientist, and Weatherwise; numerous websites, including those within the UNC Department of Marine Sciences; and video presentations. Classroom presentations in seminar format and group participation discussions and debates will be utilized. There may be a short field trip or two. Visits to active research laboratories involved in marine and atmospheric projects will be made as possible. Grading will be based principally on homework assignments, one student presentation, and two exams.

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MATHEMATICS

MATH 53: Symmetry and Tilings
QI
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Linda Green

Linda Green grew up in Durham, North Carolina and graduated from the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Chicago and her Ph.D. from Princeton University, specializing in in three-dimensional topology and geometry. Before coming to UNC, she worked in industry, using mathematical models of breast cancer to help guide health care policy. She also directed math enrichment programs for middle and high school students in the San Francisco Bay Area. She joined the UNC faculty as a lecturer in 2013. Her non-mathematical interests include soccer and hiking.

Repeating symmetry patterns and tilings are present all around us, from the brickwork on campus, to designs on tapestries and wallpaper, to paintings like those of M.C. Escher, to crystals including snowflakes and quartz. In this class, students will explore symmetry patterns, learn to identify and classify two-dimensional patterns, and use software to create their own tiling designs. Students will relate tiling patterns to their folded up counterparts, called orbifolds, and use mathematical ideas of curvature and cone points to determine which patterns are possible and which patterns can never be achieved. In addition to analyzing repeating patterns of tiles, students will examine non-periodic patterns, such as Penrose’s kite and dart tilings, and use mathematical ideas of self-similarity and limits to understand why these patterns can never exactly repeat. Course assignments will include readings, mathematical investigations, design projects such as virtual and physical kaleidoscopes, quizzes, and a final project. The final project will allow students to delve more deeply into a theoretical topic (e.g. hyperbolic tilings or crystallographic groups) or an application (e.g. quasicrystals or basket weave patterns). There are no prerequisites.

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MATH 56H: Information and Coding (Honors)
QI
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Karl Petersen

Karl Petersen was born in Tallinn, Estonia, and grew up in East Orange, N.J. His degrees are from Princeton and Yale, and he has held visiting positions in Austria, Chile, France, and India. He is a Professor in the Department of Mathematics. Petersen’s research area is ergodic theory, a fairly new branch of mathematics that applies probability and analysis to study the long-term average behavior of complicated systems, with applications ranging from celestial dynamics through interactions of biological populations to the efficient transmission and recording of information. Favorite activities include tennis and hiking.

It is common to say that we are now living in the information age. What are the ways in which information is stored, transmitted, presented, and protected? What is information anyway? Topics for this seminar will be drawn from cryptography (secret writing throughout history, including Thomas Jefferson’s cipher machine, the German Enigma machine, and security and privacy on the internet); image compression and processing (compact disks, MP3 and JPEG, transforms, error correction, noise removal); symbolic dynamics (encoding of symbol streams, like the genetic code, and associated dynamical systems and formal languages); visualization (how can different kinds of information be vividly and usefully presented, combined, and compared?), and especially the mathematics behind these things: combinatorics, probability, number theory, and information theory. These topics offer many possibilities for experimentation and theoretical exploration. Students will undertake individual or group projects going in depth into topics they select, possibly using existing software for encoding and decoding messages, enhancing and compressing images, transforming and filtering signals, measuring properties of information sources, and so on. They will report on their work in writing and orally to the seminar. Discussions will be based on readings from a course pack as well as Simon Singh’s The Code Book (Doubleday, 1999), with associated theoretical investigations.

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MATH 58: Math, Art, and the Human Experience
QI
Mark McCombs
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Mark McCombs

Mark McCombs received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics from UNC-Chapel Hill. He is entering his 23rd year as a UNC faculty member and is a recent recipient of both a Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and a Students’ Undergraduate Teaching Award. He has also served as the mathematics department’s Director of Teacher Training, as well as an academic adviser in the College of Arts and Sciences. He authored the textbook (and companion website) used in Math 110 (college algebra) and supervises TAs who teach pre-calculus and calculus courses. He is especially committed to helping students discover more confidence in their own mathematical abilities. He enjoys writing, photography, film making, and UNC basketball.

This seminar is designed to engage students in an exploration of the relevance of mathematical ideas to fields typically perceived as “non-mathematical” (e.g., art, music, film, literature). Equally important will be an exploration of how these “non-mathematical” fields influence mathematical thought. Course activities and assignments have been designed to illuminate the fact that even the most complex mathematical concepts grow out of real people’s attempts to understand their world. By the end of the seminar, students should be able to

  • Identify and assess how mathematical ideas influence and are influenced by ideas expressed through art, music, literature, religion, etc.
  • Compare and contrast different philosophies concerning the nature of mathematics
  • Articulate their own well-reasoned ideas concerning the nature of mathematics
  • Discuss the evolution of fundamental mathematical concepts in a historical as well as a cultural context
  • Discuss the work and lives of important mathematicians in relation to the “non-mathematical” work of their contemporaries
  • Identify and assess how their own understanding of mathematical ideas influences the way they interact with the world

Course assignments and activities will include weekly readings and short homework writing assignments (2–3 paragraphs), quizzes, and a portfolio of mathematical art (e.g., painting, origami, poetry, music). No prerequisite is required.

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MUSIC

MUSC 65: Music and Culture: Understanding the World through Music
VP, NA
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Emil Kang and James Moeser

Emil Kang is Executive Director for the Arts and Professor of the Practice of Music. Kang arrived in 2005 as UNC–Chapel Hill’s first Executive Director for the Arts, a senior administrative post created to help unify and elevate the performing arts at the University. In September 2012, Kang was appointed by President Obama to serve on the National Council on the Arts, an 18-member body charged with advising the Chairman of the National Endowment of the Arts on programs and policies. Prior to coming to Chapel Hill, Kang served as President and Executive Director of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

James Moeser is Chancellor Emeritus and Professor of Music. He served as UNC’s chancellor for eight years, stepping down from that position in July, 2008. With degrees in music (organ performance) from the Universities of Texas and Michigan and Fulbright study in Berlin and Paris, he had a distinguished career as a concert organist before beginning a new career in academic administration. One of his proudest achievements was the creation of the Carolina Performing Arts series and the position of Executive Director of the Arts. In 2013-14, he served as Interim Chancellor of the UNC School of the Arts.

This seminar will focus on the incredibly wide variety of performances presented by Carolina Performing Arts. Through research on and attendance at performances, including opportunities to meet the artists, students will explore questions such as: How does music reflect culture? What makes great music? What is the role of music in other genres? What are the obligations of the performer to the composer? What goes into the preparation of a performance? What is the impact of the audience on the performer? How much improvisation takes place in a live performance? What makes a particular performance outstanding, or by contrast, unsuccessful? We will also examine the ideas of virtuosity, curiosity, and re-invention. Students will be provided tickets and will be expected to attend all performances listed below. Musical ability and training is not a requirement for this seminar, although students with musical experiences are welcome. Program and dates are subject to change.

Students will attend these performances:

September 5, Vidya Kolyur: Yakshagana Opera Theatre (India)
September 16, Youssou N’Dour (Senegal)
September 25, Dorrance Dance: The Blues Project (USA)
September 28, Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra (USA)
October 1, Taylor Mac: 1910s (USA)
October 8, Jazz at Lincoln Center with Wynton Marsalis (USA)
October 22, Gabriel Kahane and yMusic (USA)
Nov. 6/7, Benjamin Britten’s Curlew River (UK)
Nov. 21, Batsheva Dance Company (Israel)
Nov. 22, Milton Nascimiento (Brazil)

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MUSC 89: From Medieval Manuscript to iPod: Music in Material Culture
HS, NA
MWF, 9:00am – 9:50am
Lauren Jennings

Dr. Lauren Jennings’ teaching and research interests include song, poetry, and manuscript culture in late-medieval Italy and music making in America during the early 19th century. Her research has been supported by grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the US-Italy Fulbright Committee, the American Musicological Society, and the Medieval Academy of America. Dr. Jennings has taught courses on medieval song, manuscripts, and general music history at the University of Southern California and the University of Pennsylvania. Her first book, Senza Vestimenta: The Literary Tradition of Trecento Song, will be published by Ashgate in the fall of 2014.

Music is perhaps the most intangible and fleeting of the arts—once a note is played, it disappears from existence, remaining only in our memories. Yet we encounter music daily through physical, tangible objects from printed and handwritten sheet music to LPs, CDs, and iPods. In this seminar, we will explore these objects and more, considering how they shape our experience and interpretation of music as listeners, performers, and music enthusiasts. Working directly with original materials around campus including medieval manuscripts in the Rare Books Collection, vintage LPs in the Music Library, and wax cylinder recordings the Southern Folk Life Collection and with other relevant musical collections in and around Chapel Hill, we will also examine the roles musical objects have played in constructing and preserving cultural and historical memory from the Middle Ages to the present day. No previous musical knowledge or abilities required.

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PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 51: Who Was Socrates?
PH, NA, WB
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Mariska Leunissen

Mariska Leunissen works in ancient philosophy, with special interests in Aristotelian natural philosophy and philosophy of science. Leunissen’s Explanation and Teleology in Aristotle’s Science of Nature has recently been published by Cambridge University Press. Her current work focuses on the biological foundations of Aristotle’s ethics. She joined the faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill in fall of 2011. Before coming to Chapel Hill, she completed an MA in Classics and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy at Leiden University, The Netherlands.

Socrates is by far the most famous Greek philosopher and, perhaps, the first real philosopher known in the Western tradition. In this seminar, we explore the intellectual and historical context within which Socrates is thought to have revolutionized philosophy so as to better understand his significance for his contemporaries and for us. Our focus, however, will be on the large and perennial human questions that Socrates made his own: How should we live? What is justice? What is virtue? What sort of society should we strive to provide for our families and for ourselves? Each week we will read a part of one of the primary texts and discuss it carefully in the class. These discussions will serve both as a testing-ground for ideas and as preparation for the writing assignments. By learning to talk and write in an engaging but disciplined ways about books and ideas that are both exciting and significant, we will not only be finding out about Socrates but also be taking up the Socratic challenge to live the examined life.

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PHIL 78: Death as a Problem for Philosophy: Metaphysical and Ethical
PH
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Ryan Preston

Ryan Preston joined the philosophy department in Fall 2008. He specializes in moral and political philosophy and philosophy of religion. He also has interests in medical ethics. His current work focuses on moral rights, the moral significance of trust, and justifications for promoting our own projects, rather than promoting the greater good. Before joining the philosophy department, Ryan was a Faculty Fellow at the Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics at Harvard.

We all are going to die, but is death the end? Could it be that some time after your death you are alive again? But what would make it you who is alive again, rather than someone else who thinks they are you? Is it bad to die? Would it be better to live forever? It is clear that we can harm those who are alive, but can you harm those who have died? Can you harm those who aren’t alive yet, but will be alive? How about those who will never live at all? When we are considering the consequences of our actions, should we only focus on those who are alive now, or also those who did or will live? What about those who will never live at all? Is our worrying about death related to our perception of time as passing? Does time actually pass, or is it more like space? Why are we more concerned about when we will die than when we were born? We will discuss these and other questions related to death, time, value, and existence. We will read articles that some clever people have written about these questions, and we’ll try to find out, with their help, what the right answers are.

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PHYSICS

PHYS 52: Making the Right Connections
MW, 11:00am – 12:15pm
M, 1:00 – 3:00pm (Lab) or M, 3:00 – 5:00pm (Lab)
Hugon Karwowski

Hugon J. Karwowski, who is a native of Poland, is a physicist and a teacher. His research is in applied nuclear physics, neutrino physics and astrophysics. Most of his experimental work is performed using accelerators at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. His other interests are politics, world history and grade inflation. He is a winner of numerous teaching awards and has served as a mentor of students on all levels.

This seminar will investigate the multiple roles that computers perform in scientific investigations. We will discuss and test in practice how the connections are made between measuring devices and computers. We will investigate how the collected data are evaluated, and how the decisions based on the experimental results are made. We will also discuss the role of the computer simulations in scientific research, and the societal consequences of recent technological advances. In the lab students will learn programming and gain working knowledge of data acquisition techniques with primary focus on flow of data from and to scientific instruments. We will visit a number of research labs on and off campus and talk to young researchers about their work. This seminar will be of particular interest for prospective science majors, but there are no prerequisites.

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI 50: Movies and Politics
SS, CI
MW, 9:00 – 11:20am
Pamela Conover

Pamela Conover, Burton Craige Professor of Political Science, was educated at Emory University, and received her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota. Professor Conover teaches courses dealing with political psychology, and women and politics. In the past, Professor Conover’s research has concerned the nature of political thinking, and the politics of identity and citizenship. She also coauthored the book Feminism and the New Right. Her current research is focused on the politics of identity, partisan polarization, and the nature of citizenship and political culture. In her spare time, she enjoys cycling and being walked by her two golden retrievers, Ally and Gracie.

In this seminar, we will consider the interplay between films and politics—filmmakers and citizens. We will discuss production values, what movies “mean,” and the intent of filmmakers, but our major focus will be on the contribution of films to political life and what we can learn from films about our political system as well as ourselves as citizens. Towards this end, we will watch both fictitious and documentary films. One theme will be to evaluate whether political films provide accurate understandings of reality. Another theme will be to explore the changing influence of documentary filmmakers in shaping the political role of films in our society. A third theme will be to consider how political life is shaped by diversity—race, class, gender, sexuality, and religion—and the extent to which that diversity is represented in films. A final theme will be to examine how our self-understandings as citizens are shaped by the experience of watching films. Among the topics covered will be propaganda, industry and governmental censorship, campaigning, interest groups and corruption, congress and the presidency, the judicial system, foreign affairs, and contemporary wars. In addition to watching films and reading about them, students will engage in seminar discussions, wiki writing, and online discussions. Grades will be based on several writing projects, a group project, and a final exam.

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POLI 62: How Leaders Lead Others
SS, CI
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Terry Sullivan

Terry Sullivan (Ph.D., University of Texas) focuses on political leadership, the tradecraft of politicians, bargaining and persuasion, and White House operations. Since 1997, Professor Sullivan has directed the White House Transition Project, which provides help to all the presidential campaigns, the past two president elects as they prepared to assume the presidency, and the last outgoing president. Professor Sullivan served on President Bush’s Presidential Transition Coordinating Council where he helped coordinate the Bush to Obama transition and now serves on the National Commission on Reform of the Federal Appointments Process.

The use of political leadership stands at the center of an organized society; yet we know little about how leaders exercise their influence with other decision-makers. In this seminar, students will examine theories of leadership ranging from ancient models of good character through the medieval theories of the religious tutors (Machiavelli and Erasmus) to modern business leadership, and then compare those theories with what real leaders do. To obtain this perspective, students will listen to secret recordings of bargaining between the president and other national leaders. This seminar teaches students about the differences between real leadership and theories of leadership. It also exposes them to the rigors of research projects conducted on the basis of real data they develop. In addition, this class will help students learn how to write more effectively to sound smart.

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POLI 71H: Politics of Race, Ethnicity, Language, Religion, and Gender (HONORS)
SS, US
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Andrea Benjamin

Andrea Benjamin’s research interests include race and politics, elections and voting behavior, identity, urban politics, and public opinion. She is currently working on a book that explores the potential for Black-Latino coalitions in local elections. Professor Benjamin is originally from Northern California. She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of California at Davis and earned her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

In many parts of the world, race, ethnicity, language, religion, and gender are explicitly linked to politics. In the United States, we tend to link these identities to politics through political parties. In this seminar, we will explore the concepts of race, ethnicity, language, religion, and gender in a comparative context in order to gain a better understanding of their application in the United States. From there we will consider the relationship between race, ethnicity, language, religion, gender, and politics, from the perspective of citizens, candidates, policies, and institutions. We will use scholarly texts as the foundation for the seminar, but we will couple those with newspaper articles and narratives to gain a first-hand perspective as needed. This seminar will not have a final exam, but students will work on a group project and make a presentation to the class.

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POLI 89: Thinking about Law
PH
TuTh, 8:00 – 9:15am
Charles Szypszak

Professor Charles Szypszak has been with the School of Government since 2005. Prior to that, he was an attorney and director of a general practice firm in New Hampshire. He provides counsel to state, national, and international institutions, organizations, and public officials on real property registration and conveyance laws, and he teaches Law for Public Administration in the graduate program in public administration. He has worked on law reforms in Russia and Poland. He is the recipient of the School of Government’s Coates Distinguished Professorship for Teaching Excellence.

Are you interested in being a lawyer or public official? Do you know what it means to “think like a lawyer”? Have you considered why people mostly honor the law? Where do you find “the law”? How do judges decide difficult cases? This seminar will explore the notion of a rule of law, formal and customary law, legal analysis, judicial interpretation, and the realities of the adversarial system and law practice. We will consider what makes law seem legitimate and how to assess whether it promotes liberty and justice. This seminar will challenge students to be reflective and critical about their own perspectives and to explore personal responsibility for promoting a rule of law. Students will be engaged in analytical thinking and expression through readings, classroom discussions, and research and writing assignments. Reading materials will include selections from court cases, scholarly articles, and other sources that provide an introduction to the notion of a rule of law, the sources of law that govern us and protect our individual rights, the nature of legal analysis, the different methods of judicial interpretation, and the realities of law practice and the adversarial system.

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PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 68.001: Psychology of Emotion
SS
MWF, 2:00 – 2:50pm
Kristen Lindquist

Dr. Kristen Lindquist is director of the Carolina Affective Science Lab and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Boston College and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Harvard University Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative and the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Lindquist’s research uses social cognitive, psychophysiological, and neuroscience methods to understand the nature of human emotion.

This seminar is designed especially for students interested in exploring the psychological study of emotion. Topics will include theoretical models of emotion process and structure, as well as discussions of psychological research bearing on questions such as “Can you read emotions in the faces of other people?” (emotional expressions), “How is emotion expressed in the body?” (autonomic physiology), “Where do emotions live in the brain?” (affective neuroscience), “Is emotion a source of wisdom or the enemy of rationality?” (emotion and reasoning), “Does emotion help or hurt your relationships with other people?” (emotion and social behavior), “Can you control your emotions or do they control you?” (emotion regulation), “Do emotions drive you crazy?” (emotion and psychopathology), and “Are women really the more emotional sex?” (gender and emotion). A range of perspectives in psychology will be explored, spanning social, cultural, developmental, clinical, cognitive, and comparative psychology disciplines. Mondays and Wednesdays will be discussions of research studies led by Dr. Lindquist and Fridays will be less formal group-based discussions and demonstrations. Friday discussions will be used to explain or demonstrate especially important ideas, to discuss concepts covered in the assigned readings, and to discuss the “real world” implications of class topics. Several Friday sessions will be dedicated to visits Dr. Lindquist’s psychology lab, where students can experience research techniques and methods in a hands-on setting. Students will be evaluated based on exam performance, on a written research proposal, on an oral presentation of the research proposal, and on participation in Friday discussions.

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PSYC 68.002: Psychology of Emotion
SS
MWF, 1:00 – 1:50pm
Kristen Lindquist
See seminar description above.
See faculty biography above.

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PUBLIC POLICY

PLCY 70: National Policy: Who Sets the Agenda?
SS, CI, NA
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
William Hodding Carter

William Hodding Carter has been actively involved in local, state, and national politics, held high level federal office, and reported and commented extensively on public events of the past 47 years as a print and television journalist. As a tenured professor at the University of Maryland, he taught courses on the close relationship between media and government, and the failure of both to serve adequately the interests of the people. As President Jimmy Carter’s Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs and State Department spokesman, he was the public face of the nation’s foreign policy. As a private citizen, he has taken leadership and advocacy roles on significant domestic and foreign policy issues. He was president and CEO of the $2.4 billion John S. and James L. Knight Foundation before coming to Chapel Hill in 2006. While an active television correspondent, anchor and commentator, he won four national Emmy Awards.

The U.S. is governed by democratically elected leaders. According to theory, they both represent the people and lead them, setting and implementing policies to further prosperity and justice at home and security abroad. But who and what actually sets the nation’s policy agenda? The President? Congress? The media? Special interests? Dramatic and unexpected events—9/11, for example—or carefully calibrated long-term plans? Variable public opinion or inflexible ideological zeal? These are some of the questions that we will attempt to answer. We will examine closely the work of agenda—setting theorists as well as contemporary case studies. There will be individual presentations based on assigned papers throughout the semester. Team projects aimed at creating agenda-setting campaigns will take up much of the final weeks of the seminar.

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PLCY 80: Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Economic Growth
MW, 3:00 – 4:15pm
Jason Marc Cross

Jason Marc Cross is a lawyer and anthropologist. His teaching, scholarship, and consulting address the role of law and technology in global health, human rights, international development, and science and technology governance. Cross¿ research examines how law and technology are used to manage expert knowledge and public participation in decision-making with humanitarian objectives. His writing addresses this use of law and technology concerning access to medicines for developing countries, transparency and accountability reform in economic law, and the promotion of democracy and human rights. Cross is writing a book manuscript entitled Metrics & Democratization: Law, Technology & Democratic Expertise in Postwar El Salvador.

This seminar provides an introduction to entrepreneurship and innovation, and considers their relationship to economic growth. The focus is on historical examples of entrepreneurs who created enduring innovations, emphasizing the context that set the stage, the strategy employed by the entrepreneur, and the public policies that supported the opportunity and the growth of the enterprise. The objective is to recognize the potential of new technologies, changes in consumer taste and shifts in the external environment as economic opportunities.  The course emphasizes entrepreneurs as part of a larger societal system that both determines what is possible and also changes in response to entrepreneurial actions. The role of public policy in providing incentives for entrepreneurship and innovation and setting social priorities is discussed.

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PLCY 85: Reforming America’s High Schools
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Douglas Lauen

Douglas Lauen work seeks to understand the effects of educational policies, school types, and school contextual factors on student outcomes. He focuses on areas that policymakers can control and that have high relevance to current educational policy debates. To date his academic research covers four areas: 1) classroom poverty composition, 2) educational accountability, 3) performance incentives, and 4) school choice. Sociological and economic theory and policy relevance guide his work, which employs rigorous quantitative research designs. His work often examines the heterogeneity of effects across socially, economically, and educationally disadvantaged student subgroups because reducing educational inequality depends on whether policies and settings have differential effects on disadvantaged and minority students.

It has been estimated that 10 percent of the high schools in the U.S. produce over 50 percent of the nation’s drop-outs. Transforming these schools that have been referred to as “Drop-out Factories” has been a high priority for the federal government and here in North Carolina. Indeed, relative to other states, North Carolina has a remarkably high fraction of these schools. In this seminar, we will examine the causes, consequences, and reform strategies that have been developed to address problems of chronically low performing schools. The class will analyze data to find the underlying problems in these schools, examine research on the effectiveness of various strategies that have been used in North Carolina and elsewhere, and design a reform plan for high schools in North Carolina.

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PLCY 89.001: Justice and Inequality
PH, CI
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Douglas MacKay

Douglas MacKay holds a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Toronto. Prior to joining the Department of Public Policy on July 1, 2013, he completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. MacKay’s research and teaching interests concern questions at the intersection of justice and public policy. He is currently working on projects concerning the justice of economic inequality – both domestic and global; the ethics of immigration policy; priority setting in health care; the ethics of international clinical research; and justice in the division of responsibilities within federal systems of government.

The value of equality is a foundational principle of the United States of America. The Declaration of Independence proclaims that “all men are created equal” and possess unalienable rights to “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” The Constitution of the United States requires that no State “deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” Additionally, equality has been the goal of a number of influential political movements, including the Civil Rights movement, the Feminist movement, Occupy Wall Street, and the LGBT movement. Yet despite this prominence of the value of equality, the U.S. is becoming a more unequal society in a number of domains, particularly, with respect to the distribution of income, political influence, and social mobility. This course investigates the value of equality, and asks which forms of inequality are unjust and ought to be remedied. We will focus on a variety of different spheres of U.S. social, political, and economic life, including the distribution of income and opportunities, marriage, health outcomes, education, voting and political influence, and employment. We will also ask whether equality is a value that applies beyond U.S. borders, particularly with respect to global disparities in income and wealth, and climate change. The course will feature a combination of lectures and class discussion. Significant instructional time will also be dedicated to developing students’ critical thinking, reading, and writing skills.

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PLCY 89.002: The Global Environment in the 21st Century
SS, GL
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Elizabeth Sasser

Elizabeth Sasser is a public policy practitioner with extensive experience in federal and state government. Prior to joining UNC Public Policy as a Lecturer, Elizabeth served as policy advisor at the U.S. Department of Energy during the first term of the Obama Administration. She worked with Administration leadership on strategies to advance the nation’s interests on environmental and energy issues, focusing primarily on bilateral relations with China. Prior to her time in the Administration, she was a policy advisor to two North Carolina governors on energy and education issues. Elizabeth worked to develop strategies to improve the environment of the state and the lives of its citizens. She has a B.A. and an M.P.P. from Duke University and studied at Peking University in Beijing, China, where she developed a fluency in Mandarin.

Many serious environmental threats are global in scope. Just think of the way we produce and consume energy; how waste produced in one corner of the world travels by air, sea and land to pollute another corner; and how ecosystems that transcend national boundaries are impacted by human behavior. Who is responsible for governing these global environmental challenges? This seminar explores linkages among nations, global environmental institutions and the environmental problems they cause and seek to rectify. We will examine how global environmental policy is made, with specific attention to the roles of institutions, nations, commercial and non-profit entities. Topics include the evolution of environmental policy in the United States; China, India and other developing countries’ impact on the global environment; global environmental institutions such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change; the role of environmental non-profit organizations; risks to the environment through pollution of land and sea by waste; global energy and environmental implications of shale gas and fracking; and the Fukushima-Dai-ichi nuclear disaster and its global repercussions.

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELI 63: The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls
HS, WB
MW, 5:00 – 6:15pm
Jodi Magness

Jodi Magness is the Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism. Before coming to UNC–Chapel Hill in 2002, she taught at Tufts University for ten years. Professor Magness received her B.A. in Archaeology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and her Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from the University of Pennsylvania. She has participated on numerous excavations in Israel and Greece, and currently directs excavations at Huqoq in Israel. Professor Magness’ publications include a book entitled The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls (2002).

The Dead Sea Scrolls have been described as the most important archaeological discovery of the 20th century. The first scrolls were discovered in 1947, in a cave near the site of Qumran by the Dead Sea. Eventually the remains of over 900 scrolls were found in 11 caves around Qumran. The scrolls date to the time of Jesus and include the earliest preserved copies of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). They were deposited in the caves by members of a Jewish sect called the Essenes who lived at Qumran. In this seminar we discuss the archaeology of the site of Qumran and the contents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, which have been the subject of much controversy and speculation.

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RELI 70: Jesus in Scholarship and Film
SS
W, 9:00 – 11:50am
Bart Ehrman

Bart Ehrman is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies. He has taught at Carolina since 1988. He is author or editor of fourteen books, and is widely regarded as a leading expert on the New Testament and the history of the early Christian church. He is also a well-known teacher on campus, having won the Undergraduate Students Teaching Award and the Bowman and Gordon Gray Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

This seminar will examine how historians have reconstructed the life, teachings, and death of the historical Jesus. We will look at the Gospels of the New Testament, as well as references to Jesus in other writings (Roman and Jewish sources, as well as Gospels that did not make it into the New Testament). In addition, we will explore how Jesus has been portrayed in modern film, including such Biblical “epics” as The Greatest Story Ever Told, such “period pieces” as Jesus Christ Superstar, such brilliant retellings as Jesus of Montreal, and such controversial films as The Last Temptation of Christ, and The Passion of the Christ. The ultimate goals of the seminar are to see what we can say about the historical man Jesus himself and how Jesus came to be portrayed in both ancient sources and modern imagination.

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RELI 73H: From Dragons to Pokemon: Animals in Japanese Myth, Folklore, and Religion (Honors)
LA, BN, CI
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Barbara Ambros

Barbara Ambros is an associate professor in the Department of Religious Studies where she teaches East Asian religions. Her research interests include religion in early modern through contemporary Japan; gender studies; critical animal studies; and place, space, and pilgrimage. She is the author of “Bones of Contention: Animals and Religion in Contemporary Japan” (University of Hawaii Press, 2010). Fun fact: she holds a second-degree black belt in Shotokan Karate and serves as the faculty advisor for the UNC Shotokan Club.

This seminar examines the cultural construction of animals in Japanese myth, folklore, and religion. We will discuss various kinds of animals: those that occur in the natural world (insects, snakes, foxes, badgers, monkeys), those that are found in myths (dragons, tengu (goblins), oni (demons)), and those that have appeared in popular media such as science fiction and animation (Godzilla, Pokemon). We will explore how images of various animals were culturally constructed as tricksters, gods, monsters, or anthropomorphic companions; how animals were ritualized as divine, demonic, or sentient beings in Buddhism, Shinto, and folk religion; and how animals could serve as metaphors that embodied collective ideals or nightmares. Most of our readings will focus on primary and secondary texts from the Japanese tradition (in English), but we will also read theoretical texts on human-animal relationships and historical studies on animals in premodern Europe and China. We will also view and analyze several Japanese animated films that deal with animals and environmental issues, such as The Princess Mononoke and Pompoko.

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ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

ROML 55H: Writing with an Accent: Latino Literature and Culture (Honors)
LA
TuTh, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Rosa Perelmuter

Dr. Rosa Perelmuter is Professor of Spanish and Director of the Moore Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program. She has held several fellowships, including two Pogue Foundation Research Leaves and a National Endowment for the Humanities summer grant. Her first book, Noche intelectual, a study of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz’s Primero sueño, was published by the Universidad Autónoma de México Press in 1982, and her second, Los límites de la femineidad en Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz: Estrategias retóricas y recepción literaria, was published in Madrid/Frankfurt by Iberoamericana/Vervuert in 2004. Since then, she has continued to think and write about Sor Juana and other writers of Colonial Spanish America, and is currently at work on two projects: a book-length study of the description of nature in epic poems written in Spanish America in the 16th and 17th centuries and a personal memoir and history of the Cuban Jewish Community between 1920 and 1960.

In this seminar we will study the literary production of Hispanics living in the U.S. Using a variety of materials (essays, documentaries, films, music) and English-language texts (novels, short stories, plays, poetry) we will examine works by Chicano, Puertorican, Nuyorican, Dominican, and Cuban-American writers. Topics to be discussed include: Latino or Hispanic? What’s in a Name?; Negotiating the Barrio; The politics of Bilingualism; The search for Home in Migrant, Rural, and Urban Environments; The Many Faces of Machismo; Religion and Spirituality in Latino Communities; Forms of Prejudice and Discrimination; Music as a Cultural Bridge. All readings will be in English, though knowledge of Spanish is desirable.

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ROML 62: What Happened to Latin?
HS, GL
MWF, 12:00 – 12:50pm
Patrícia Amaral

Dr. Patrícia Amaral joined the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures at Carolina in 2011 and teaches advanced undergraduate courses of the major in Hispanic Linguistics. She has a Ph.D. in Hispanic Linguistics from The Ohio State University (2007). She has published extensively in the areas of Semantics and Pragmatics as well as Historical Linguistics, with a focus on Spanish, Portuguese, and other Romance Languages. Dr. Amaral has an upcoming edited volume (Portuguese/Spanish Interfaces, co-edited with Ana Maria Carvalho, to appear in the series “Issues in Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics” by John Benjamins).

Latin transformed the linguistic configuration of the world and had a lasting impact on culture and science. Interestingly, this happened because Latin changed. In this seminar, we analyze the role of both linguistic and non-linguistic factors in this change and consider it within a broader frame. How and why do languages change over time? How do linguists determine genetic relations between languages and find a common ancestor? Does language change necessarily involve migration and language contact? How many Romance varieties are there? What are the challenges faced by non-standard Romance varieties? Students will gain tools to address these questions and will conduct a small research project in this field. No previous knowledge of Latin or of any Romance language is necessary.

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SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

SLAV 86: Literature and Madness
LA
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Radislav Lapushin

Radislav Lapushin, Assistant Professor of Russian Literature, received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. His primary research interests are Chekhov; interrelationship between prose and poetry; and Russian literature on stage and screen. His recent book—“Dew on the Grass”: The Poetics of Inbetweenness in Chekhov—focuses on the poetic dimensions of Anton Chekhov’s prose and drama. He is the author of several volumes of poetry.

This seminar considers the relationship between literature and madness through the works of major Russian writers (Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Chekhov). We will examine how these artistic texts differently construct representations of madness. Students’ reading, writing, class discussions and presentations will be directed by a series of topics, such as the origin of madness, awareness or unawareness of madness, the theme of the mad artist, and madness as a literary device.

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SLAV 88H: Gender and Fiction in Central and Eastern Europe (Honors)
LA, BN
TuTh, 12:30 – 1:45pm
Ewa Wampuszyc

Ewa Wampuszyc is happy to be starting her fourth year at UNC as a faculty member in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures. She received her Ph.D. in 2004 from the University of Michigan. Before coming to UNC, she taught courses in literature, language, and European studies at the University of Florida. Her enthusiasm for teaching was awarded at both Michigan and Florida. Dr. W.’s research interests include: representations of Warsaw in literature and film, cultural capital as it relates to economic capital, post-communist cultural transformation, 19th century and 20th century Polish literature and culture, and foreign language teaching. While she has many outside interests, she enjoys her work so much that she also considers it a hobby.

Studying culture through the prism of gender can be a great introduction to a region like Central and Eastern Europe. In this seminar, we will have a chance to explore definitions of “masculine” and “feminine” in fiction, film, and essays by and about women from Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Romania. We will discuss how gender concepts shed light on self-identity, nationalism, private property, public spaces, values, ethics, political dissent and oppression, and consumerism. We will consider the connection between the 19th century “Woman Question” and nationalism. We will study how communist ideology promised gender equality, but failed. We will discuss perceptions of gender and consumerism after the fall of communism. Students will learn how political and economic transition affected Central/Eastern Europe; about everyday life under communism; about the geography of Central and Eastern Europe; and how the language and discourses we use shapes our world view. Student progress and grades will be assessed through class participation, a group presentation, and writing assignments (ranging from short responses to a longer paper).

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SOCIOLOGY

SOCI 58: Globalization, Work, and Inequality
SS, GL
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Ted Mouw

Ted Mouw is a sociologist who studies social demography, labor markets, and inequality. He received his Ph.D. (in sociology) and M.A. (in economics) in 1999 from Michigan. He is currently working on a project on globalization and low-wage labor markets. There are three components to this project: 1) Longitudinal evidence on “dead end jobs” and working poverty in the U.S., 2) immigration and the labor market for Mexican migrants, and 3) industrialization and labor conditions in Mexico and Indonesia. He has also researched the use of job contacts to find work and racial friendship segregation in schools. After college he lived in Indonesia for two years, where he taught English, studied Indonesian and Javanese, and climbed volcanoes.

This seminar, which presents a comparative and multidisciplinary perspective on how globalization affects labor markets and inequality, will consist of two parts. First, we will discuss basic sociological and economic models of work and globalization, and then students will apply these models to three case studies: 1) “sweatshops” and the question of international labor standards, 2) industrialization and development in China and Indonesia, and 3) immigration and economic integration between the U.S. and Mexico. Students will prepare research papers on one of the three case studies. Course readings will be supplemented by the teacher’s current research on two questions: 1) What are conditions actually like for workers in Nike plants in Indonesia? (Interviews and a photo-narrative). 2) How does the labor market work for undocumented Mexican workers? (Interviews from Carrboro, NC, part of my personal research project.)

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SOCI 66: Citizenship and Society in the United States
SS, NA
TuTh, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Andrew Perrin

Andrew Perrin is a cultural sociologist who specializes in American democracy, citizenship, and public opinion. He received his Ph.D. in sociology in 2001 from the University of California, Berkeley. His 2006 book, Citizen Speak: The Democratic Imagination in American Life, explores the links between everyday life and democratic citizenship. He has conducted research in the past, among other topics, on letters to the editor; on the importance of, and contests over, time in American politics; on human rights in the U.S.; and on just what we mean when we talk about “public opinion.” He is currently continuing research on how Americans use letters to the editor as a way of enacting good citizenship and completing a translation of a lost public opinion experiment from 1940s Germany.

Americans are taught that democracy and citizenship go hand in hand: being a good citizen may mean voting, writing letters, and taking other actions to “make one’s voice heard.” This seminar examines what citizenship means, and what it has meant during the course of American history. Through intensive observations of the election campaign and the voting process, we examine the extent to which our current ways of doing citizenship match historical and current ideas about how democracy ought to work. Throughout the course, we challenge both the conventional wisdom about democracy and our own assumptions about citizenship and America’s civic health. On election day, students will fan out across Chapel Hill and Carrboro to watch and learn as citizens engage in the core practice of democracy—voting. We will bring those experiences back to the classroom to understand the strengths and potentials of democratic citizenship in a real-world context.

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STATISTICS AND OPERATIONS RESEARCH

STOR 62: Probability and Paradoxes
QI
TuTh, 2:00 – 3:15pm
Douglas Kelly

Douglas G. Kelly has taught statistics, operations research, and mathematics at UNC for over 40 years, and is a full-time faculty member in the Department of Statistics and Operations Research. Previously he served as Chair of the Department of Statistics and later as the Senior Associate Dean for the Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences. His research interests have centered on the concept of randomness, and on how the study of random phenomena can shed light on other areas of science. He has worked in recent years as a collaborator with neuroscientists, and currently is interested in studying models of the evolution of cooperative behavior. Outside his professional life he is interested in, among other things, music and baseball.

Did you know the following? Among 40 randomly chosen people, it is very likely that two of them will have the same birthday, and even with only 23 people, the chance of a match is better than 50%. A test for a disease may be 99% accurate, and yet if you test positive, your probability of having the disease may be only 10%. It is possible for baseball player A to have a higher batting average than player B for the first half of the season, and also for the second half of the season, but for player B to have a higher average for the whole season. In mathematics there are either true statements that can never be proved, or false statements that can be proved true, or both. There are competitive situations in which it is in everyone’s advantage to act selfishly, but everyone does better if all act cooperatively. Mathematics and logic, in particular the theory of probability, are powerful tools for understanding the world around us, but they lead to some surprising conclusions, as in the examples above. Studying such surprises adds to our understanding of randomness, logic, and behavior. In this seminar, we will look at these and other seeming paradoxes, and learn how thinkers in various fields try to explain them. No previous knowledge of mathematics beyond basic algebra is required. Grades are based on class participation, a few written assignments, and an end-of-term project.

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STOR 64: A Random Walk Down Wall Street (CANCELLED)

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STOR 89: Adventures in Statistics (NEW! Added 6/5/2014)
QI
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
Jan Hannig

Jan Hannig is a Professor in the Department of Statistics and Operations Research. His current research interests are in foundations of statistics. He and his co-authors can be partially credited with resurrection of fiducial statistics. Fiducial statistics was created in the 1930s and since inception was wrought with controversy. By mid 1960s the topic was largely dormant and stayed ignored until mid-2000s. Since it is experiencing a renaissance with several groups contributing publications in leading statistical journals. Jan is married to Dr. Shevaun Neupert a professor of Psychology at NCSU with keen interest in applied statistics. This makes for some wonderfully nerdy Saturday morning chats. They have a daughter named Klára.

The aim of this seminar is to show that contrary to the common belief, statistics can be exciting and fun. We will focus on the big picture ideas. Instead of memorizing confusing formulas, many of the technical ideas will be demonstrated by computer experiments. We will view some recent movies and discuss the role statistics plays in sports, gambling, medicine, politics, finance, etc. Then we will study randomness and discover why casino always wins. Finally we will discuss the basic principle of statistical reasoning “if it is unlikely do not believe it”, get to understand why a relatively small sample can carry a big punch and learn how to lift ourselves by our bootstraps. This seminar is not a replacement for an introductory statistics course.

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WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES

WMST 68: Assumed Identities: Performance in Photography
VP
M, 3:00 – 5:50pm
Susan Page

Susan Harbage Page is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. Harbage Page is a visual artist with a background in photography and lens-based work that explores immigration, race, and gender. Her most recent work is an archeological look at the U.S. – Mexico Border through photography and site-specific art interventions.

Have you ever made a “selfie” and posted it on the internet? What image of yourself were you trying to reinforce? This seminar uses photography and its aspects of role-playing, performance, and documentation to understand the construction of identity and the changing roles that we take on in society. We will look at historical and contemporary photographers who use assumed identities to create their own realities and challenge society’s stereotypes. Through a series of photographic self-portraits and performative experiences we will query our own identities and how they have been constructed. No specific camera equipment required. You may use any camera you have access to including smart phones for this seminar.

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SCIENCE SEMINARS: SPECIAL ONE-TIME OPPORTUNITIES

GEOL 190 From Crest to Coast: Geology, Landscapes, and Human Nature of North Carolina
PL
MWF, 9:00 – 9:50am
Magdalena Ellis

Maggie Ellis grew up in the DC area and received her bachelor’s degree from Ohio Wesleyan University. After graduation she attended the University of Texas at Austin where she received her master’s degree researching fractured rock in the Scottish Highlands. Ellis then worked for ExxonMobil for two years as an exploration and production geologist before returning to graduate school for a Ph.D. She left the industry to pursue her passion for teaching and her interests in mountain growth. Ellis currently studies how mountains grow and evolve over time. Her other interests include running, camping, playing soccer, climbing rocks, and the success of the Washington Redskins.

This seminar will address the geologic forces that form landscapes and the relation of human culture to those landscapes. There is constant tension between societal demands and nature’s power and resources, a tension that is increasingly strained by global climate shifts and natural disasters. North Carolina is a land with diverse geology and abundant natural resources; many communities rely on the geologic landscape and are in turn at the mercy of nature. From the Appalachian Trail to the Outer Banks, and from hydraulic fracturing to beach restoration, North Carolinians have a long history of interacting with and attempting to control nature. This Science Seminar will introduce basic geologic principles and explore the relationship of humans to our natural world. Topics will range from considering how culture and geology intersect, to the critical examination of the exploitation of Carolina’s natural resources. Several current topics will be considered within a geologic context. In addition to several small writing assignments, students will work on small group research projects that will include collecting and analyzing geologic data. Students will present the results of their research projects to the department in a poster session at the end of the semester.

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MASC 190 Ocean Exploration: Evaluating Past and Present Changes
PL
TuTh, 9:30 – 10:45am
John Paul Balmonte

John Paul Balmonte is a Ph.D. student whose research experiences have taken him from the rivers of North Carolina, to the retreating Arctic sea-ice, and to the Hawaiian Islands. He is a microbial ecologist striving to unravel the key bacterial taxa involved in organic matter degradation in the Arctic. He is actively involved with outreach and education and is currently an Ocean Exploration Trust Science Communication Fellow. He views the scientific enterprise as a collaborative entity, requiring brilliant and passionate scientists, educators, and students to advance and disseminate knowledge. He loves his puppy and travelling, although the two sometimes conflict.

Oceanographic exploration leads us to uncover new sites for research and discover changes that have impacted the oceans: from the coasts, to the gyres, to the seafloor. The goal of this science seminar is to bring students to the forefront of knowledge to investigate exciting discoveries of our time and devastating changes that have impacted our oceans. Students will learn various biological, chemical, geological and physical concepts and processes relevant to oceanography and how these processes have been affected by climatic and anthropogenic pressures, resulting in widespread changes. Students will virtually visit sites with a long history of scientific research. In addition, students will gain insight into shipboard life of researchers through live video interactions with scientists on board the Exploration Vessel Nautilus. Finally, experts will impart their research and experiences during guest lectures and lab visits, exposing students to diverse opportunities for scientific research and engagement.

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