Fall 2017

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Please consult ConnectCarolina (connectcarolina.unc.edu) for the most up-to-date information about FYS offerings and availability.

For more information about a specific instructor, please click on the instructor name, if highlighted.

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)
American Studies (AMST)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Art (ARTH)
Asian Studies (ASIA)
Chemistry (CHEM)
City and Regional Planning (PLAN)
Classics (CLAS)
Communication (COMM)
Dramatic Art (DRAM)
English (ENGL)
Geography (GEOG)
Geological Sciences (GEOL)
German and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)
History (HIST)
Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST)
Marine Sciences (MASC)
Mathematics (MATH)
Media and Journalism (MEJO)
Music (MUSC)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)
Political Science (POLI)
Psychology (PSYC)
Public Policy (PLCY)
Religious Studies (RELI)
Romance Studies (ROML)
Sociology (SOCI)
Statistics and Operations Research (STOR)
Women’s and Gender Studies (WGST)

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)

AAAD 51.001: Masquerades of Blackness
VP, US
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Charlene Regester

Charlene Regester is an Associate Professor in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies and Affiliate Faculty for the Global Cinema Minor. She received her BA, MA, Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is the author of African American Actresses: The Struggle for Visibility, 1900-1960 (which was nominated by the press to the NAACP Image Awards). She is the 2011 recipient of the Trailblazer Award Hayti Heritage Film Festival and 2007 Oscar Micheaux Book and Film Award from the Oscar Micheaux Film Festival, South Dakota. She has appeared on North Carolina Bookwatch with UNC-TV 2011; WUNC-FM Radio “The State of Things;” and Turner Movie Classics. Documentaries in which she has appeared include: Movies of Color: Black Southern Cinema (2003, Tom Thurman director), Beyond Tara: The Extraordinary Life of Hattie McDaniel (2001), Madison Davis Lacy director), and Birth of a Movement (2017, Bestor Cram and Susan Gray directors).

This seminar is designed to investigate how the concept of race has been represented in cinema historically, with a particular focus on representations of race when blackness is masqueraded. Its intent is to launch an investigative inquiry into how African Americans are represented on screen in various time periods, how we as spectators are manipulated by these cinematic constructions of race, and how race is marked or coded other than through visual representation. Students will view films that deal with “passing” from the various historical periods and will utilize theoretical concepts introduced in class to read these visual representations. Films selected for viewing include the pre-World War II Era, the Civil Rights Era, and the “Post-Racial” era. Students will be required to write three papers that reflect their ability to apply theoretical concepts to reading racialized representations on screen in these three historical periods to demonstrate their understanding of how racial masquerades have evolved over time and continue to persist in contemporary culture.

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American Studies (AMST)

AMST 53H.001: The Family and Social Change in America
HS, CI, NA
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Robert C. Allen

Robert C. Allen is the James Logan Godfrey Distinguished Professor of American Studies. He has served as Director of the UNC Digital Innovation Lab 2011-16); Co-Principal Investigator for the Mellon-Foundation-funded Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative (2012-14); and Director of the University Honors Program (1997-99). He is Faculty Co-Lead for the Community History Workshop. His work in the emerging field of digital humanities has earned him the American Historical Association’s Rosenzweig Prize for Innovation in Digital History, and the C. Felix Harvey Award to Advance Institutional Priorities at UNC. He has published widely in the fields of American cultural and media history (8 books, more than 40 book chapters and articles). In 2011 he received the Tanner Faculty Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

Inspired by successful television program, “Who Do You Think You Are?” and the popularity of such online genealogical resources as Ancestry.com and Family Search, millions of people are taking advantage of billions of digitized public records and publications (census enumerations, city directories, newspapers, military records, etc.) to become online historical detectives. Some are also becoming 21st century family “kinkeepers”: combining digital resources with local archival resources (including the Southern Historical Collection and North Carolina Collection at UNC and State Archives in Raleigh), family memorabilia from “the bottom drawer of grandma’s dresser” and recordings of family stories to create multimedia family archives, which can be shared with far-flung extended family members and passed down to future generations. This course unfolds the process and materials of genealogical research to larger historical issues and contexts; explores how family history can personalize and localize social, cultural, political, and economic history; and asks how the question “Who do you think you are?” can become the basis for examining “Who do we think we are?” as a diverse national culture. Participants will research and document the history of (at least!) the last four generations of their biological/cultural families; gather (and preserve) family history materials from living family members; and explore the complexities of family history in relation to gender, race, and ethnicity. In addition to learning more about your own and your family’s history, we will use the tools and resources that have revolutionized genealogy and family history to ask new questions about the social and cultural history of “ordinary” people in North Carolina over the past 150 years. In the process, participants will also gain valuable experience in using digital technologies to gather and represent historical data; using public records and other primary documents; conducting oral history interviews; and constructing historical narratives. This course benefits from and is designed as an introduction to the work of the Community Histories Workshop (http://communityhistories.org), a unit devoted to public digital history and humanities.

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AMST 59.001: American Indian Art in the Twentieth Century
VP, CI, US
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote

Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote is an Assistant Professor in the department of American Studies. She teaches courses on American Indian history, art and material culture. Her research interests include American Indian cultural and political history and expressive culture.

This course examines twentieth century American Indian art though secondary articles, books, and art itself. The class sharpens written and verbal communication though in-class discussion, informal, and formal assignments. Students will hone their visual critical thinking skills as well by examining and analyzing contemporary American Indian art and representations of Native people.

This course connects American Indian art to vital conversations in American Indian studies about topics such as colonialism, identity, gender, modernity, modernism, sovereignty, and representation. We will also address the following questions: How Native people and others have constructed and contested the idea of the American Indian art? How have Native artists engaged with modernism in their works? Additionally, we will examine how artists have engaged with and at times resisted the markets for their work and their influence on Native art. Over the course of the semester students will complete formal and informal writing and will produce at least ten pages of writing during the semester.

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AMST 61.001: Navigating the World through American Eye
GL
MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM
Rachel A. Willis

Rachel A. Willis is a Senior Fellow at the Global Research Institute and Associate Professor of American Studies and Economics at UNC. She has won numerous awards including the UNC Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, the Student Undergraduate Teaching Award, and the Robert Sigmon Award for Service Learning. Her teaching methods incorporate innovative field study, collaborative assignments and experiential learning through events and programs outside of the classroom. Her research focuses broadly on access to work and in recent years have focused on the impact of climate change on transportation infrastructure in port cities.

This first-year seminar is designed to better prepare students for future international travel, research, service, and work opportunities while understanding the implications of national identity and action in a global environment. Using group projects, collaborative field study, and individual proposal writing, we will explore a wide range of issues. Differences in geography, politics, religion, culture, gender roles, and more will be considered as students intensely develop individual plans for foreign travel, study, and work using readings, class exercises, documentary video and photography, and interviews. There will be a special focus on transportation systems and other forms of infrastructure that impact navigating places, people, and information. In addition, the class will have specialized access to professional resources to help identify funding sources for travel. Students will be individually guided through the fellowship application process of researching international travel opportunities and writing a competitive travel proposal and budget.

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AMST 89.001: Mobility, Cars, NASCAR, and the South
HS, US
MWF, 08:00 AM – 08:50 AM
Elizabeth Engelhardt

Elizabeth Engelhardt is the John Shelton Reed Distinguished Professor of Southern Studies. She teaches on southern cultures; food studies; gender, class, race, and region; environmentalism; Appalachia; and American studies. She’s written or co-edited six books and numerous articles, including ones on barbecue, moonshining, seed saving, and mountains. She’s on the board of the Southern Foodways Alliance, which documents and celebrates complicated stories of food in diverse southern communities. Dr. Engelhardt’s teaching has received a Silver Spurs and a President’s Associates Teaching Award from the University of Texas at Austin, where she was Professor and department chair before coming to UNC.

On July 10, 1949, three female drivers competed at the Daytona Beach Road Course, the second ever NASCAR event. That same year Victor Green published another volume of his Negro Motorist Green Book, which had helped African American travelers find friendly places to stay while on the road in the Jim Crow era since 1936. The Good Roads Movement, begun by enthusiastic bicyclists in the late nineteenth century, made grand plans for a Dixie Highway taking tourists from Maine to Florida and transforming automobile highways across the US South. This class looks at the culture, history, memories, and meanings of mobility for a diverse range of people in southern cultures. In particular, we read and discuss books and articles by scholars on roads, cars, access, and diverse southern cultures. Then we apply those ideas to documents such as maps, motor guides, advertisements, photographs, oral histories, and novels held in UNC’s Wilson Library to see what works and what we need to research to tell a more complicated story. Finally, individual research projects allow each course member to lead the way in this emerging field of southern studies through writing and digital image creation.

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Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 53H.037: Darwin’s Dangerous Idea
SS
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Paul Leslie

Paul Leslie’s professional interests focus on human ecology, and he has pursued this primarily through research among nomadic peoples in East Africa. His most recent project entails studying (while nursing an aged Land Rover across the African savanna) human-environment interactions in northern Tanzania, especially how the changing land use and livelihood patterns of the Maasai people living there affect and are affected by wildlife and conservation efforts. When not teaching or practicing anthropology, he enjoys bicycling, motorcycling, woodworking, and jazz.

Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to one of the most profound revolutions in the history of thought, generating stunning insights but also some misunderstanding and tragic abuse. This seminar aims to provide a clear understanding of how natural selection works, and how it doesn’t. We will examine objections to the theory; how the environmental and health problems we face today reflect processes of natural selection; and recent attempts to understand why we get sick, how we respond to disease, why we get old, why we choose mates the way we do, and more. Class sessions will feature a mix of lecture and discussion of concepts and issues. Students will also engage in small group projects—cooperative explorations of problems raised in class or in the readings and/or designing mini research projects.

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ANTH 65.086: Humans and Animals: Anthropological Perspectives
HS
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Ben Arbuckle

Ben Arbuckle is an Anthropologist with a specialty in Middle Eastern Archaeology. He runs the Zooarchaeology Laboratory in the Department of Anthropology and the Research Labs in Archaeology where he studies animal bones from archaeological sites. Professor Arbuckle uses these bones, which represent the trash from ancient meals, parties and sacrifices, in order to understand how our ancestors created a world whose technologies and social and political systems we have inherited. He is currently working on a National Geographic funded project exploring the origins of domestic horses and another trying to understand the origins of wool.

In this seminar we explore the complex relationships between people and animals in our own culture and in other cultures, now and also in the past. We will explore the origins and uses of domesticated animals, the role of dogs and cats in human societies, as companions, pets and food. We will also examine the symbolic uses of animals and talk about current issues including animal rights and the growing popularity of hunting.

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ANTH 66H.001: Saving the World? Humanitarianism in Action
SS, GL
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Peter Redfield

Peter Redfield is Professor of Anthropology. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard University and his doctorate from U.C. Berkeley. His specialty concerns relations between science, technology and society, particularly in post-colonial settings. He also teaches courses on human rights and humanitarianism, and recently completed a book project on the organization Doctors Without Borders.

What happens when people try to “do good”, especially at a global scale? In this seminar we will explore international aid, with an emphasis on its medical end and the set of organizations and institutions that exist to offer assistance to people suffering from disaster, endemic poverty and health disparities. The current aid complex includes a wide variety of forms and activities, from large bureaucracies to tiny NGOs, massive health campaigns to lonely clinics. We will approach this phenomenon from the critical and comparative perspective of anthropology, focusing on actual human practice. Which forms of suffering receive international attention, and which do not? How do money and services flow and stop relative to inequality? What range of outcomes do different aid projects produce?

Over the semester we will engage in two collective endeavors. First, to better situate current problems, we will review the background history of humanitarianism and development, including colonial missions as well as state oriented projects of social welfare. Thus equipped, we will then examine a number of case studies. During this section of the course students will engage in research projects, exploring specific examples in greater depth.”

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Art (ARTH)

ARTH 61.001: African American Art of the Carolinas
VP, CI
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
John Bowles

John Bowles received his Ph.D. from UCLA in 2002 and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Program. He is an historian of African American art, who works from the assumption that art plays an important role in determining how we see ourselves as morally responsible individuals. In his research and teaching, he attempts to convey the urgency of art by addressing moral and political dilemmas we would often rather ignore. He has published articles and art criticism in various journals and has recently completed a book that examines the work of artist Adrian Piper. He is currently writing a book that explores how African American artists have engaged simultaneously with modernism, globalization and diaspora from the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s until today.

Focusing on the Carolinas, this seminar explores the many ways African Americans have used art to define themselves and their communities. We will ask how art has been used to maintain cultural traditions, shape American culture and build political solidarity from the era of colonialism and slavery to the present. We will study the cultivation of artistic practices from Africa; African American painters, sculptors and craftsmen who earned national reputations for the quality of their work; artists who re-imagined and redefined African American identity through art; and artists throughout the 20th century who represented the daily lives and hardships of rural and working-class blacks. Students will visit campus museums and archives and conduct original research using regional sources. Persistent questions throughout the semester will include, How does the art of African Americans in the Carolinas provoke us to question our own identities and roles within the region, and what is the contemporary role of art in shaping public discourse?

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ARTH 85.001: Art and Technology
VP, NA
MWF, 12:20 PM – 01:10 PM
Katherine Guinness

Katherine Guinness is a theorist and historian of contemporary art. She received her Ph.D. in Art History and Visual Studies from the University of Manchester, and has previously taught at the University of Sydney and the University of New South Wales. Her research includes issues of bodily identity, selfie culture, and the aesthetic category of zaniness within video and performance art. She is currently completing a monograph on artist Rosemarie Trockel, entitled Rosemarie Trockel: Schizogenesis. Recently, she received the Lisa Visser Writer’s Award from arts magazine KAPSULA, and has an essay on Heath Franco in the forthcoming collection The National, a survey of contemporary Australian art.

We are immersed in technology. Virtually every facet of public and private life has been transformed by our devices, our screens and machines. Perpetually focused on the next new thing, we rarely look back to consider the long and multifaceted histories of our technologies and how those histories relate to our lives—to our understandings of each other and our interactions with the world around us. This course examines the relationships between the history of technology and artistic practice. Our conception of “technology” is broad, extending beyond gadgets and machines to include a host of apparatuses that have effected perception, representation and communication. Art and visual culture provide a unique lens through which we can apprehend those effects. This course will explore the impacts of technological innovation on society and culture, and vice versa, along with the ways in which artists have addressed, responded to and critiqued technological progress and invention.

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Asian Studies (ASIA)

ASIA 52.001: Food in Chinese Culture – CANCELLED 7/25/2017
LA, BN
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Gang Yue

Dr. Gang Yue teaches a variety of courses on modern China and Tibet.

“You are what you eat,” but equally important is how you eat it. The rich tradition of Chinese food and the even richer tradition of writing about food offer a great food for thought. This course uses latest food writings to explore the major themes and topics related to food and food culture of China as well as Chinese food in North America.

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ASIA 57.001: Dis-Orienting the Orient
VP, BN
TTH, 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM
Dwayne Dixon

Dwayne Dixon’s ethnographic research is focused on several intersecting issues within a broadly imagined Asia: youth culture, city spaces and urban life, media, and body experiences. These various interests coalesce in his work on Japanese young people situated in Tokyo, especially the lives and practices of skateboarders. As an anthropologist, he emphasizes fieldwork methods of extended engagement with his subjects, including the use of ethnographic video to produce visual documents that coincide with the use of video cameras by the young people themselves. His ongoing research into Asian skateboard culture involves studying the global incorporation of young skateboarders into the Olympic structure in preparation for the 2020 Tokyo Summer Games where skateboarding will be included for the first time. Additionally, he is doing research on guns as a prosthetic; investigating the ways training and imagination construct an embodied relationship between the physical perception of perpetual threat as it relates to the immediate environment and the unknown. This research is informed by changes in small arms use and the narratives around them since the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq reshaped the global arms trade and the specific American experience of conflict in Western Asia.

Examines how the East is constructed as the Orient in different historical periods: 19th-century European colonialism, 1950s to 1960s Hollywood films, contemporary Japanese animation, and the current global war on terrorism.

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ASIA 58H.001: Chasing Madame Butterfly
VP, BN, CI
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Jan Bardsley

A Tar Heel since 1994, I teach classes in Japanese literature, theater, and women’s studies in the Department of Asian Studies. Currently, I am writing about how Japanese view apprentice geisha (maiko), exploring all kinds of popular media from Japanese movies, manga, and murder mysteries to tourist campaigns. I have taught Chasing Madame Butterfly three times since 2009. For me, the most fun of the class comes in the small-group discussions with students (tutorials) held in my office a few times throughout the semester. Tutorials give us a chance to get to know each other in a relaxed setting, review what we have learned, trade insights, and come up with new questions.

One of the most famous operas in the world, Puccini’s Madame Butterfly (1904), a tragic tale of love betrayed, has its roots in novels, a play, and the history of relations between Japanese and foreigners in the city of Nagasaki. Why have the stories of Madame Butterfly captured this attention, inspired such diverse interpretations, and incited debate? Students explore these questions by learning the history of Nagasaki and about tourism to the city, by reading the early stories of Madame Butterfly, and by considering the newer stage productions, M. Butterfly and Miss Saigon. We also read essays that offer widely different perspectives on Madame Butterfly, delving into the controversies that have erupted over representations of Japan, interracial romance, and cross-racial casting. A field trip to the Ackland Art Museum, a Butterfly movie night, a guest speaker, and students’ own class presentations on their Butterfly discoveries enliven our exploration.

No background knowledge of Japan, Japanese, or literary studies is required.

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ASIA 65.001: Philosophy on Bamboo: Rethinking Early Chinese Thought
PH, WB
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Uffe Bergeton

Uffe Bergeton is a historian of early China with a focus on pre-Qin (i.e. pre-221 BCE) culture, history and thought. Originally from Denmark, he has lived and studied in France, Taiwan and China. His research projects include early Chinese theories of epistemology and the politics of reclusion, as well as comparisons between pre-Qin China and ancient Greece.

Over the last few decades a large number of bamboo manuscripts of hitherto unknown texts dating to the 4th to the 1st centuries BCE have been excavated from various sites in China. This wealth of new material has led many scholars to rethink longstanding assumptions about early Chinese thought. In order to enable students to engage directly with the recently discovered texts and cutting-edge research on them, this course will briefly introduce students to the received classics of the pre-Qin period, such as the Analects, the Mozi, the Mencius, the Xunzi, the Daodejing, the Zhuangzi and the Hanfeizi. Rather than merely providing an introduction to these traditional texts, we will study how recently discovered texts challenge traditional readings of pre-Qin works and lead us to question traditional classifications of pre-Qin works into “schools of thought” or isms such as Confucianism, Legalism, Daoism, etc.

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Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 73.001: From Atomic Bombs to Cancer Treatments: The Broad Scope of Nuclear Chemistry
PL
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Todd Austell

Todd Austell received his BS in Chemistry in 1987 and his PhD in Chemistry in 1996, both at UNC. He spent one year working in the pharmaceutical industry prior to graduate school and another year as an Assistant Professor at the United States Air Force Academy prior to returning to his current position. As an undergraduate, he participated in the Department of Energy and American Chemistry Society’s Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry. Topical studies in nuclear chemistry have been a hobby of his since that time. His graduate research involved separation science, and he is currently involved in both curriculum development within the chemistry department and in a long-term study of how middle school and secondary math education/preparation affects student performances in college general chemistry. His hobbies include hiking, camping, disc golf and gardening as well as following all UNC athletics.

Nuclear chemistry is a field that touches the lives of everyone perhaps every day of their lives. This seminar will approach the topic of nuclear chemistry on the level of an introductory chemistry class with no prerequisite. Atomic structure, nuclear fission and nuclear fusion processes will be studied to provide the background necessary to understand their applications. Nuclear weapons and nuclear power will be covered in detail with discussion of topics relevant both for today’s society and for the future. Other topics including household applications, nuclear medicine, radiation safety and the problematic issue of radioactive waste storage will be discussed. The seminar will include guest lecturers from the various fields of nuclear chemistry, selected reading assignments, topical student-led discussions, possible facility trips/tours and a final project presentation on a relevant topic.

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City and Regional Planning (PLAN)

PLAN 53.001: The Changing American Job
CI, NA
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Nichola Lowe

Nichola Lowe received her Ph.D. in Urban Studies and Planning from MIT in 2003. She joined the Department of City and Regional Planning at UNC in 2005 as a specialist in workforce and economic development. Her research focuses on the institutional arrangements that lead to more inclusive forms of urban and regional economic development and specifically, the role that practitioners can play in aligning growth, innovation and equity goals.

What will the jobs look like when first-year UNC students graduate and enter the labor market? How will employment opportunities differ from those facing their parents and relatives a generation or two ago, or even those of recent college graduates? This seminar explores these questions by looking at the changing nature of the American job and the transformative forces—from global trade and corporate restructuring to automation, the rise of the ‘sharing’ economy and shifting skill demands—that have influenced this change in recent decades and have added to economic insecurity in recent years and in the aftermath of the “Great Recession.” We will consider how these forces are experienced differently by urban and rural residents, by men and women, and by members of different socio-economic and ethnic groups, including native-born and immigrant workers. We will also consider local, regional and rural strategies for helping workers and job seekers adapt to this changing economic environment. Class discussions and small group activities will help students think about the larger economic and policy implications of U.S. labor market restructuring. Through a series of research-backed “jobsblogs” and with help from career advisors, students will also reflect on how the forces behind this change might affect their own career goals and advancement opportunities.

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Classics (CLAS)

CLAS 61.001: Writing the Past
LA, CI, WB
MWF, 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM
Emily Baragwanath

Emily Baragwanath studied at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, before taking up a Rhodes Scholarship to the University of Oxford, U.K. where she gained her doctorate in Classics. She has since held research fellowships at Christ Church, Oxford, at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington D.C., and in Heidelberg. Her main area of scholarly interest is the literary techniques employed by Greek historians in their construction of historical narratives. Her first book, Motivation and Narrative in Herodotus, winner of Oxford’s Conington Prize and the CAMWS Award for Outstanding Publication 2010, explores the representation of human motivation in Herodotus’ Histories. She is now examining the representation of women in the historian and philosopher Xenophon.

The intersection of history-writing, cinema and fiction will be our focus as we engage with the greatest Greek historians—Herodotus, Thucydides, Polybius—against the backdrop of modern renditions of the past and of war in cinema (including Peter Weir’s Gallipoli, Wolfgang Petersen’s Troy and Zack Snyder’s 300), documentaries (including Tolga Ornek’s Gallipoli), news footage and short stories. We will examine the strategies of each ancient writer in confronting challenges that remain pressing for directors, journalists, and historians today. These include difficulties of conflicting perspectives, biased evidence, and the limitations of memory, as well as broader questions about the nature of historical representation. The aim is for students to engage in critical and informed analysis of the strategies of our three ancient historians in ‘writing the past’, and to draw appropriate comparisons with the challenges that confront modern counterparts. The course will center on in-class group discussion and debate focused on questions arising from the week’s reading or viewing assignments. Students will write two short essays and a longer paper arising from their course project.

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CLAS 89H.001: Greek Drama on Page and Stage
LA, WB
MWF, 03:35 PM – 04:25 PM
Al Duncan

Al Duncan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics. He holds a B.A. in English and Classical Languages & Literature from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in Classics and the Humanities from Stanford University. Having previously taught in Classics and Comparative Literature at the University at Utah, he joined the Carolina faculty in 2015 and offers a variety of courses on ancient Greek language and literature and ancient Mediterranean culture. Professor Duncan’s research focuses on theatrical production, aesthetics, and genre. He is currently preparing a book on ugliness in Greek drama, as well as several chapters and articles on the material and cognitive aspects of ancient theater.

Taking a participatory approach to ancient Greek drama, this course pairs readings of three Athenian playwrights (Aeschylus, Euripides, and Aristophanes) with performance-oriented activities, readings, and writings. At its most traditional, this course surveys the much-discussed and much-theorized historio-cultural context of “classical” Athens, with particular focus on the political, religious, and aesthetic forces that gave rise to humankind’s first recorded theater.

More innovatively, this course probes the dual nature of theater—that is, its distinct but intertwined existences as script and performance—through sustained investigations of some of its earliest and most influential texts. Through a variety of writing compositions (e.g., Tweets, press releases, director’s and dramaturg’s notes, performance reviews, and scholarly analyses) students will acquire practical and theoretical experience in the ways text and performance interact. Through improvisational activities, scene rehearsals led by the instructor and fellow-students, and the creation of basic aspects of production using UNC’s BeAM Makerspaces, students will become budding thespians in their own right in order to consider how performance extends beyond the theater.”

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Communication (COMM)

COMM 61.001: The Politics of Performance
VP
MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM
Tony Perucci

Tony Perucci is Associate Professor of Performance Studies in the Department of Communication. After receiving his MA at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he went on to receive his Ph.D. in Performance Studies from New York University in 2004. His research and writing investigates the ways in which artistic practice can intervene in politics as well as how governmental and corporate institutions utilize performance in the interests of power. His work also explores the ways in which “experimental” artistic practices can construct alternate forms of community, perception and imagined futures. In addition to his scholarly articles, Dr. Perucci is the author of Paul Robeson and the Cold War Performance Complex (University of Michigan Press 2012) and the editor of the forthcoming book On the Horizontal: Mary Overlie and The Viewpoints. His original performance work has been performed throughout the US as well as in Brazil and Germany. In 2016-17, he served as the Mellon Curatorial Fellow for Carolina Performing Arts. The series will be presented as part of the 2017-18 season and will include performances and residencies from The Netherlands (Wunderbaum, Stop Acting Now!), Germany (Gob Squad, Revolution Now!) and Oakland, CA (the hip-hop group, The Coup).

This seminar explores performance as a practice of political engagement. In an era when politicians are increasingly judged by their success as performers and the makers of spectacles, how can we engage with politics as a force for substantial and positive change? When confronted with the rise of “post-truth politics,” how do social movements and individuals speak “truth to power”? In this seminar, we will examine the creative processes with artists and arts collectives who create work for social change. We will investigate the artistic practices of activists and social movements in local, national and global contexts, such as the Black Power movement, ACT-UP, anti-sexual assault protests on college campuses, Occupy Wall Street, Black Lives Matter as well as both pro- and anti-refugee activism in Europe. A key concern throughout the semester will be performances that blur the boundary between the “actual” and “fictional,” where it is at times unclear to audiences whether they are witnessing (or participating in) a staged event or a “real” one. The course will also feature class visits by international artists who engage politics through their work, including the Dutch actor group, Wunderbaum. The course is organized around an arts-based pedagogy, where students will explore collaborative practices through performance-based projects.

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COMM 62.001: African American Literature and Performance
VP
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Renée Alexander Craft

Renée Alexander Craft is an associate professor with a joint appointment in the Department of Communication and Curriculum in Global Studies. Her research and teaching focus on Black Diaspora literature and culture.  More specifically, Alexander Craft investigates the ways Black Diaspora communities have and continue to use imagination as a tool for liberation. For the past seventeen years, her research and creative projects have centered on an Afro-Latin community located on the Caribbean coast of Panama who call themselves and their carnival performance tradition “Congo.”  She has completed three projects that reflect this focus: an ethnographic monograph titled When the Devil Knocks: The Congo Tradition and the Politics of Blackness in 20th Century Panama, a digital humanities project titled Digital Portobelo: Art + Scholarship + Cultural Preservation (digitalportobelo.org), and a novel based in large part on her field research titled She Looks Like Us.

What if Black pirates raided European slave ships to liberate enslaved Africans? What if African Americans could time travel? What if the most powerful being the world has ever seen were a Black female vampire or telepath? Those “what if’s” fit within a genre called Black speculative fiction. Focused on speculative fiction, fantasy, and science fiction written by Black Diaspora authors, this semester challenges students to think critically and creatively about modern structures of race and racism. Using historical and theoretical readings to guide us, we travel to the worlds these authors create, seek to understand the workings of race there, and return to our contemporary contexts to reflect and critique what we have witnessed. How do understandings of race and racism in these worlds help us engage with structures of race and racism in ours? What racial logics motivate the main characters and the sociopolitical movements of which they are apart? What is the relationship between Blackness there and Blackness here?

“Performance” will serve as a process–oriented, participatory, and experiential way to interpret, analyze, and re-present course materials. This includes collaborative in-class workshop performances as well as short, rehearsed solo and ensemble performances. Performance, then, will function as part of our repertoire of engagement alongside readings, screenings, critical discussions, journal assignments, and analytical papers.

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COMM 73.001: Understanding Place through Rhetoric
MWF, 12:20 PM – 01:10 PM
Carole Blair

Carole Blair’s research focuses on the rhetorical and cultural significance of U.S. commemorative places and artworks. She teaches related courses on visual and material rhetorics, rhetoric and emory, and rhetorics of place, as well as on contemporary rhetorical theory and criticism. Her current research focuses on contemporary rhetorical theory and criticism, attending especially to rhetoric’s crucial role in understanding visual and material phenomena. In particular, she studies the rhetorics of commemorative places and artworks of the twentieth-century U.S.

This seminar explores how we come to understand what places are and how they are meaningful. We will look at places “rhetorically”: how they were designed to persuade those who inhabit them, how we actually experience them, and how we make sense of them in our individual lives.

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COMM 83.001: Networked Societies
SS
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Neal Thomas

Dr. Neal Thomas’ academic work draws out connections between digital media technologies, knowledge, power and everyday social life. From a critical humanities perspective, his current research looks at some core computer programming techniques at work in social media to see how the technology encodes philosophical ideas about what it means to be social and even what it means to /mean/ in the first place. If you’ve been noticing the rising effects of algorithms and network gadgets in contemporary culture, then this seminar might just be for YOU.

This seminar is designed to introduce early-career students to the role that networks play in contemporary global societies. Over the course of the semester, we will examine key ways to think about network societies by taking up the idea of the network in social, political, economic, cultural and technological terms. With help from popular and academic writing, we will ask: What does it mean to organize the world through networks? How do identity, commerce, science and political life function according to network thinking? In formulating responses to such questions, the seminar will center on in-class discussion, taking theories about networks and applying them to everyday life both within and outside a North American context.

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COMM 88.001: Technologies of Popular Culture
CI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Michael Palm

Michael Palm’s teaching interests include media history and cultural studies of technology. His research focuses on technologies introduced into people’s everyday lives, and their role in the emergence and interplay between new forms of work, commerce and consumption. His book Technologies of Consumer Labor (Routledge, 2017) is a history of self-service technology, spanning from the telephone dial to the ATM. His current book project combines labor ethnography, cultural history and critical political economy to explore the contemporary revival of vinyl records.

This seminar takes an historical approach to the relationship between popular culture and technological change, focusing on how artists and other workers in the film, TV and especially music industries have incorporated new technology into the production, distribution and consumption of popular cultural products and experiences. From vinyl records to CDs to mp3s, we will track pivotal format ‘upgrades’ and analyze their aesthetic, economic, legal and political ramifications. Controversies such as sampling and piracy will be debated in class, and influential companies including Apple and Amazon will be subject to our collective research. Students’ own expertise and investments in pop culture will inform discussions and, ideally, research projects culminating in individual terms papers and group presentations.

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COMM 89.001: Mediating the US-Mexico Border
VP, US
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
China Medel

Dr. Medel’s research and teaching interests include U.S.-Mexico border studies, Chicana/o and Latina/o literature and art, visual media studies, performance, and social movements. She received her Ph.D. from the Graduate Program in Literature at Duke University and her dissertation was titled “Border Images and Imaginaries: Spectral Aesthetics and Visual Medias of Americanity at the U.S.-Mexico Border.” As postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Communication at UNC Carolina, Dr. Medel is at work on a book project, “Spectral Aesthetics: Media and Movement(s) at the U.S.-Mexico Border.” The book expands the scope of her dissertation to put art and filmmaking practices into dialog with the experiments and thinking emerging from on the ground activist projects in immigration justice in order to understand the crucial role of these different types of praxis in imagining and shaping new forms of political life. She has taught courses in film and media studies and border studies. In addition to her research and teaching Dr. Medel is an active SONG member working on two local anti-criminalization campaigns.

The US-Mexico border is a contentious site in public culture, media, and the lives of the people who daily navigate it. A remote site for many, understanding the border takes place largely through the images that mediate it. This course is an investigation into cultural mediations of the US-Mexico border through film, photography, music, performance, and digital media. Critically examining these mediations we will seek to ground the images and ideas they convey by putting them into conversation with ethnography, investigative journalism, and historical narrative. The border, as image, idea, and concrete reality, produces a set of visualizing relationships that influence how we see and understand migration, the nation, labor, race, gender and other structuring paradigms. Focusing on the visual culture, film, art, and activism of the US-Mexico border we will think about the ways in which art and media produce, or resist, dominant ways of seeing that take place at the border.

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Dramatic Art (DRAM)

DRAM 81H.001: Staging America: The American Drama
VP, CI, NA
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Gregory Kable

Gregory Kable is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Dramatic Art, where he teaches dramatic literature, theatre history, and performance courses and serves as an Associate Dramaturg for PlayMakers Repertory Company. He also teaches seminars on Modern British Drama and American Musicals for the Honors program. He has directed dozens of productions at UNC and throughout the local community, and is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama.

This seminar examines our national drama from its colonial origins to the present. Participants read plays and criticism, screen videos, engage in critical writing, and consider performance as related means of exploring the visions and revisions constituting American dramatic history. We will approach American drama as both a literary and commercial art form, and look to its history to provide a context for current American theater practice. Readings are chosen for their intrinsic merit and historical importance, but also for their treatment of key issues and events in American life. Our focus throughout will be on the forces that shaped the American drama as well as, in turn, that drama’s ability to shed new light on the national experience.

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DRAM 83.001: Spectacle in the Theatre
VP
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
David Navalinsky

David Navalinsky is the Director of Undergraduate Production in the Department of Dramatic Art. David has taught at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Mississippi. David’s recent design work includes scenery for The Uncanny Valley by Francesca Talenti. The Uncanny Valley featured a Robothespian™, which is exactly what it sounds like. He has also written a documentary theatre piece Priceless Gem: An Athlete Story, which tells the stories of UNC athletes. David has worked professionally at South Coast Repertory in Orange County California, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, The Illinois Shakespeare Festival, and the Karamu Performing Arts Theatre in Cleveland, OH. Some of David’s favorite projects were at the Dallas Children’s Theater where he made a dinosaur collapse and pirates walk the plank.

This seminar will explore the artists, art and technology involved in creating the world of the play. It is intended as an overview for students who want to learn about theatrical design. Students will create their own designs in the areas of scenery, costumes, and lighting for three plays throughout the semester. The plays will be placed outside of their traditional setting while still maintaining the story and themes. Students have placed Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a trailer park and a daycare center for example. Careful historical research, close reading and analysis, text and source material, and collaboration will be the focus of the student projects.

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DRAM 87H.001: Style: A Mode of Expression
VP, CI, NA
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
McKay Coble

McKay Coble teaches design, both scenic and costume for the theatre and the history of material culture. She fell in love with the power of choice as far as visuals are concerned early in her career as a Carolina student and has never turned back. She is a professor in the Department of Dramatic Art and a resident designer for PlayMakers Repertory Company. She uses the many and varied artistic venues on campus as co-instructors and the class will be visiting them together.

This seminar studies the elements of design in their pure form and in context, surveys a history of period styles and theatre, and identifies their causes.

Consider Oscar Wilde’s statement from The Decay of Lying 1889:

“Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life. This results not merely from Life’s imitative instincts, but from the fact that the self conscious aim of Life is to find expression, and that Art offers it certain beautiful forms through which it may realize that energy…”

Do you agree or disagree?

Art and design have frequently shown the inner life of humankind throughout history better than political, intellectual or social history. While a period’s style is seldom defined by the everyday choices of everyday people and is most often recorded in the works of artists, writers and intellectuals we must recognize the “times” as a major motivator for all stylistic choices. Even minor arts reflect major events.

We will study the elements of design as they exist in their pure form; a “tool box” of elements available to artists and practice the principles to which design is bound. We will survey a history of period styles, period theatre and identify their causes. We will explore one period’s style as a foundation for the next and dispel the Star Trek premise that future styles will only reflect the future.”

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English (ENGL)

ENGL 53.001: Slavery and Freedom in African American Literature and Film
LA, US
MWF, 01:25 PM – 02:15 PM
William L. Andrews

William L. Andrews teaches courses on African American literature, American autobiography studies and Southern literature. Since the mid-1980s he has done a considerable amount of editing of African American and Southern literature and criticism. Professor Andrews is the series editor of North American Slave Narratives, Beginnings to 1920, a complete digitized library of autobiographies and biographies of North American slaves and ex-slaves.

The purpose of this seminar is to explore the African American slave narrative tradition from its 19th-century origins in autobiography to its present manifestations in prize-winning fiction and film. The most famous 19th-century slave narrative, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845) was an international best seller. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), the amazing but utterly truthful story of Harriet Jacobs’s slave experience in Edenton, North Carolina, is extensively read and taught in college and university classrooms around the world. In the 20th century, many important African American autobiographies and novels—Washington’s Up From Slavery (1901), Wright’s Black Boy (1945), Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952), Haley’s The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1965) and Morrison’s Beloved (1987) —are products, formally and thematically, of the ongoing slave narrative tradition. The slave narrative has also given rise to a number of notable films, from major studio releases like Spielberg’s Amistad (1997) to TV-films like Charles Burnett’s Nightjohn (1996). The 1977 television series based on Haley’s Roots enabled the slave narrative tradition to have a profound impact on late 20th-century American culture. Slave narratives have also had strong influence on popular films such as Blade Runner (1982), The Handmaid’s Tale (1990), Django Unchained (2013) and 12 Years a Slave (2013). Because of the widespread incidence of human trafficking and other forms of involuntary servitude in the world today, slavery remains a major human rights issue.

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ENGL 55H.001: Reading and Writing Women’s Lives
John L. Townsend III FYS in English
LA, CI, EE
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Jane Danielewicz

Although she is an English professor, Jane Danielewicz is curious about almost all fields, from plant biology and architecture, to American history and literature. She can’t help but live the life of the mind and is a passionate reader, writer, and teacher. At UC Berkeley, her graduate education focused on linguistics and literacy, writing and rhetoric. Professor Danielewicz’s work at UNC continues in this vein. She investigates the nature of written language, the teaching of writing, and forms of creative non-fiction. Her special interest is in life-writing, particularly the study of contemporary American memoir. She is proud to have been named the Richard Grant Hiskey Distinguished Professor in Research and Undergraduate Teaching. She has twice received the J. Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award and has a particular affinity for working with first-year students. She enjoys creating assignments that tempt students to push the envelope and try something new, especially to conduct research in their fields. An associate professor in the department of English and Comparative Literature, she also directs the Writing in the Disciplines Program. Professor Danielewicz has recently finished a book, How to Do Things with Memoir, which talks about how memoirs are not simply interesting narratives but act to solve social problems or produce new ways of understanding the world.

How do our lives become stories? This simple question provokes writers to produce autobiographies or memoirs or biographies. This honors seminar narrows the scope, focusing on contemporary stories that involve personal and lived experience by and about women. Not only will we be reading autobiographical stories and theories that describe women’s experience, but we will also try producing creative nonfiction ourselves. What stories will students—as women or as men—tell about their lives? Students will be challenged to investigate questions of self and identity by composing (using traditional written or new media formats) four genres of life writing during the course: autobiography, autoethnography, biography, and new media personal essay. Students will learn the research methods involved in life writing. The seminar will be conducted daily as a workshop to promote interactive, experiential learning. Students will be organized into working groups to facilitate community building. Published authors will visit the class. Students will be encouraged to publish their work through public readings and in undergraduate journals.

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ENGL 57.001: Future Perfect: Science Fictions and Social Form
LA
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Tyler Curtain

Tyler Curtain is a theorist with the Department of English and Comparative Literature. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in theory, as well as courses in science fiction and fantasy. Professor Curtain is a member of the executive committee of the Discussion Group on Science Fiction and Utopian and Fantastic Literature of the Modern Language Association. He will be the group’s President in 2016-2017.

Will humans go extinct? If so, how? What are the ethical questions involved in human disappearance? How do humans themselves contribute to the possibilities, and what can be done to postpone the inevitable? This seminar will tackle some sobering (and, quite frankly, exciting and interesting) questions by reading cultural and scientific works that address human disappearance. We will read both science and fiction to think about the core concerns of the class. Our texts will include works ranging from Alien to the classic 1950s tale A Canticle for Leibowitz, from Danny Boyle’s 28 Days Later to Cormac McCarthy’s The Road. We will ask some fundamental questions about what it means to be human, how we imagine our societies and cultures to work (and not work) and what these texts and questions might tell us about how we are to live now. Students will read novels and short stories, watch movies and TV shows, and read scientific and philosophical papers that deal with human extinction. Students will also be required to write a paper and complete an original research project at the end of term that they will share with the rest of the class.

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ENGL 85H.001: Economic Saints and Villains
LA, CI, WB
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Ritchie Kendall

Ritchie Kendall is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature who joined the UNC faculty in 1980. He holds a B.A. in English from Yale University (1973) and an M.A. and Ph.D. in English from Harvard University (1980). His specialty is in English Renaissance drama with an emphasis on the socio-economic dimensions of early modern theater. He has taught Honors courses in Shakespeare, Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, comedy and social class, epic and drama, and early modern ideas of entrepreneurship.

The rise of new economic activities—whether the birth of international banking, trading in future commodities, or the marketing of junk bonds—bring with them both excitement and trepidation. Literature about how ordinary and extraordinary people go about the business of getting and spending is one way that a culture comes to terms with emergent and potentially revolutionary economic formations. This seminar will explore how early modern England from the 16th to the 19th centuries imagined new economic orders through plays and novels. We will examine how Renaissance plays by Marlowe, Shakespeare, Dekker and Heywood present economic scoundrels such as Barabas and Shylock as well as heroic entrepreneurs such as Simon Eyre and Thomas Gresham. In the 18th century we will sample the work of Daniel Defoe who crafted a guide for early tradesmen but also produced subversive novels with dubious heroines who use sex and business acumen to acquire and lose great fortunes. From the 19th century, we will read two works, a little known melodrama, The Game of Speculation, as well as the iconic A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Both stories speculate on the compatibility of economic and spiritual success. We will conclude with a modern epilogue: three satiric films from the era of Reagonomics including Oliver Stone’s Wall Street, Mike Nichols’ Working Girl and Jon Landis’ Trading Places. Our objective throughout will be to analyze how literary art, itself a form of economic activity, simultaneously demonizes and celebrates the “miracle of the marketplace” and those financial pioneers that perform its magic.

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ENGL 86.001: The Cities of Modernism
LA, CI
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Rebecka Rutledge Fisher

Rebecka Rutledge Fisher, associate professor of English and comparative literature and past director of the Program in Comparative Literature, has won a number of awards in student mentoring, and was, in spring 2017, named one of the “Carolina Women We Admire.” Her special interests are in the philosophy of literature as well as the critical philosophy of race, two subjects that are at the heart of her research and publications. She is the author of Habitations of the Veil: Metaphor and the Poetics of Black Being in African American Literature, has published an edition of Olaudah Equiano’s 18th century autobiography, and co-edited the volume Retrieving the Human: Reading Paul Gilroy, which was selected as recommended reading by the American Library Association’s Choice magazine. Her interest in the varied intersections of philosophy and literature encourages a synergy between academic work and personal worldview: she is especially drawn to beautiful works that delve into personal ethics, intellectual evolution, and inter-existence. She is currently writing a book (forthcoming from the University of South Carolina Press) on the Pulitzer Prize winning poet Natasha Trethewey, who served as Poet Laureate of the U.S. from 2012-2014.

The Cities of Modernism is a cross-cultural, inter-medial, and meta-critical exploration of the human condition in imagery of the “Great City” in modernist works of literature, art, and film. Numerous novels and poems of the early twentieth century, and even some appearing during the last decades of the nineteenth century, reflect the ways in which turn-of-the-century cities generated states of shock, exhilaration, alienation, anonymity, confusion, or thrill. Our work this semester will lead us to discover not only the origins of such sentiments as they are expressed through various works of art, but also the origins of – and theories behind –twentieth-century Western modernism itself.

In order to accomplish our goals, our source materials will be varied and diverse. Novels, poetry, and essays read will include texts – many in translation – by Arthur Rimbaud (French), Andrei Bely (Russian), W.E.B. Du Bois (African American), T.S. Eliot (British/Anglo-American), Jean Toomer (African American), and Virginia Woolf (British) and Aimé Césaire (Afro-French/Caribbean). Discussions of paintings by German expressionists and artists of the Harlem Renaissance, as well as screenings of films such as “Metropolis” by Fritz Lang and “Modern Times” by Charlie Chaplin will aid us in further developing a “visual literacy” with regard to modernism. Discussions will also draw upon contemporary theoretical essays by Walter Benjamin, W.E.B. Du Bois, Sigmund Freud, Georg Simmel, and Oswald Spengler. And, of course, since this period in history is also referred to as “The Jazz Age,” jazz music will serve as the “soundtrack” of our studies.

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ENGL 89.002: Charles Dickens on the Page, Stage, and Screen
VP, NA
TTH, 08:00 AM – 09:15 AM
James Thompson

James Thompson, Professor of English and Comparative Literature, former chair of the Department, and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Curricula, has taught at Carolina since 1982. He is passionate about Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, and Anthony Trollope, and could happily survive on a deserted island with sets of all three novelists, and perhaps even with only two sets.

Dickens’ novels have proved irresistible to dramatists and filmmakers from his day to ours. The serial publication of his major novels necessitated wildly extravagant and melodramatic plots, plus his reformist focus on poverty and exploitation have made screenwriters happy for generations. How his message gets altered as it passes among these different media is the subject of this seminar.

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ENGL 89.003: Blake 2.0: William Blake in Popular Culture
LA, NA
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Joseph Viscomi

Joseph Viscomi, the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of English Literature, directs and co-edits the William Blake Archive. His special interests are British Romantic literature, art and printmaking. He has co-edited 9 illuminated works for The William Blake Trust and over 90 electronic editions for the Blake Archive. He is the author of Prints by Blake and his Followers, Blake and the Idea of the Book and numerous essays on Blake’s illuminated printing, color printing and reception. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Rockefeller Foundation, Getty Foundation and National Humanities Center.

William Blake, the visionary poet, artist and printmaker of the British Romantic period, has had enormous influence on modern art and popular culture. His illuminated poetry integrated word and image anticipating graphic novels and influencing many modern musicians, poets, writers (including Pullman, His Dark Materials Trilogy, Bono, Patti Smith and Jim Morrison). Using the Blake Archive, a hypertext of Blake’s poetry and art, we will study key Blake works as well as the digital medium that enables us to study these works in new ways. We will also explore the Web for performances and adaptations of the works we study and for works by musicians, painters, poets, writers, actors, playwrights, performers, dancers and film and video makers who were or are inspired or influenced by Blake. Students will share their discoveries with the class and produce critical or creative responses to a work by Blake or by an influenced artist.

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ENGL 89.005: W. B. Yeats and Irish Independence – CANCELLED 8/7/2017
LA, NA, CI
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
John McGowan

John McGowan is the John W. and Anna H. Hanes Distinguished Professor of English. He has won multiple teaching awards including the Sitterson Award for Excellence in Freshmen Teaching. He is the author of six books about British literature and the theory and practice of democracy. Recently, he has been interested in how the First World War is the source of many of today’s political and social problems, ranging from the Middle East crisis to Brexit. The story of Ireland’s violent escape from the British Empire during the years between 1900 and 1925 is fascinating in itself, but also forms the context for the great Irish writers–Yeats, Synge, O’Casey, and Joyce–of that time.

William Butler Yeats is widely considered the greatest poet writing in English during the 20th century. But Yeats was also deeply involved in the political struggles for Irish independence, struggles that lasted for over 25 years and were the source of three separate bloody conflicts. This course will read Yeats’s poems and plays in the context of his political activities and of the wider Irish scene. Students will research the history of the fight for Irish independence, the contributions Yeats made to the development of Irish nationalism, and the intricacies of Yeats’s poetry and plays. Our work will encompass history, literary criticism, and theater studies.

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Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 50.001: Mountain Environments
PL
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Diego Riveros-Iregui

Dr. Riveros-Iregui received a Ph.D. in Ecology and Environmental Sciences from Montana State University (2008), a M.S. in Geology from the University of Minnesota (2004), and a B.S. in Geology from the National University of Colombia (1999). His research interests include watershed science, forest and soil processes, ecosystem ecology, and landscape biophysical responses to environmental change. His field studies include highly impacted sites of the Andes Mountains of Colombia and the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador. He publishes in journals such as Global Change Biology, Water Resources Research, and Geophysical Research Letters. He is an avid runner and can be followed on Twitter @carbonshed.

This seminar focuses on understanding the physical geography of mountain environments and the processes that have created them, shaped them, and sustained them. There are several reasons for studying the environments of mountains: (a) they reveal integrative earth systems processes that can be readily observed and understood; (b) the processes are not oversimplified, but have spatial complexity at scales that can be methodically analyzed; and (c) mountains often reveal the intricate dynamics of coupled human-natural systems. We will explore mountain environments by concentrating on processes that shape the landscape, patterns that are apparent because of those active processes, and how the concept of scale (both through space and time) define the patterns that we observe when go on a hike or when we drive across the country. We will draw examples from different environments, including the Appalachian Mountains, the Rocky Mountains, and the Andes.

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GEOG 62.001: The Culture of Technology
PH, CI
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Scott Kirsch

Scott Kirsch is a cultural, historical, and political geographer in the Geography Department at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He writes about social and political implications of technology; 19th & 20th century US science; history of scientific exploration and cartography; nuclear landscapes; US geopolitics, especially in Philippines and Asia/Pacific; and geographies of war and peace.

It is hard to define “technology”, but we know it when we see it: cell phones; global positioning systems; genetically-modified organisms; the internet; microchips; steam engines; railroad cars, automobiles, passenger jets; x-rays; nuclear bombs; satellites; magnetic resonance imaging. Technological systems and artifacts, as these examples suggest, have shaped our world in critical ways, from our means of dealing with nature to our modes of dealing with each other, and from economic production to political debates to the very dimensions of space and time around which social life is organized. And yet, though technology is arguably among the most human of social processes, its profound effects on social relations, everyday life, and the human environment are too often left unexamined. This seminar uses the lens of culture to explore codes of meaning and values, and relations of social power, that are invested in technologies. Focusing on representations of technology in film, literature, and new media, on one hand, and on the values that go into the making of actual technologies, on the other, the seminar encourages critical thinking and writing about our place in a technological world, and technology’s place in ours.

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GEOG 63.001: The Problem with Nature and Its Preservation
PH
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Gabriela Valdivia

Gabriela Valdivia is political ecologist in the Geography Department at UNC-CH. Her research examines the political dimensions of natural resource governance. Her research spans environmental justice, resource governance, and the ethics of modern lifestyles related to oil consumption. Her latest research project focuses on the impact of oil extraction, regulatory policy and environmental practices on Native Amazon and Afro-Ecuadorian communities. She grew up in Peru and conducted ethnographic research in Ecuador and Bolivia, and brings these experiences into her courses on Latin America and courses on political ecology and nature-society relations.

This seminar explores how different meanings of nature help create the societies in which we live and evaluate the implications of efforts to transform and preserve Nature. Students will address conceptions and models of nature-society relations relevant to today’s world, from resource extraction, to the transformation and movement of resources, to conservation. Through original research and discussions on “untouched” and “dirty” natures, students will develop informed perspectives on Nature’s heterogeneity, and how this powerful idea matters to the organization and future of different societies. The readings and discussion will evaluate Western (especially American) conceptions of Nature and compare with other perspectives, including indigenous world views on “the good life,” to better understand questions of sovereignty, value and sustainable futures.

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GEOG 64.001: Vietnam
HS, BN
MWF, 01:25 PM – 02:15 PM
Christian C. Lentz

When Christian C. Lentz was growing up in a small Rhode Island town, he wanted to experience places just over the horizon, if not the other side of the earth. So in college he learned Indonesian and studied abroad there before turning towards Vietnamese and Vietnam. He continues to work in Southeast Asia and is interested in how everyday folk—farmers, soldiers, and traders—negotiate a social world enlivened by their thoughts and actions. His research looks at Vietnam during war and revolution, when ordinary people changed their world and, in many ways, turned it upside down. After earning his PhD from Cornell University, he became Assistant Professor of Geography at UNC in 2011.

What do we think of when we think of Vietnam? For many, Vietnam was and remains a war that haunts veterans, families, and politicians. But to think only of the “Vietnam War” overlooks a country and its story. In fact, many Vietnamese wonder why Americans are so preoccupied with the “American War”!

We will explore modern Vietnam in order to situate the American War in a broader spatial and historical context. Landscapes range from forests, over mountains, through fields, and downstream to river deltas. Vietnamese move from village to city, meander through cafes and rice paddies, cross oceans and land again. Our journey begins with royal unification and collapse, winds through colonialism and nationalist struggles, pauses in the Cold War, and ends with ongoing reforms. This seminar aims to introduce a fascinating place rich in history and to animate a geographic imagination students can take anywhere. Through forays to the university library and media center, we learn how to locate and appreciate fact and fiction, primary and secondary sources, text and picture, film and map. Through reading and writing exercises as well as film screenings and class discussions, students encounter new points of view, engage scholarly debates, and develop informed perspectives.

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GEOG 67.001: Politics of Everyday Life
SS, GL
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Sara Smith

Sara Smith is a political geographer with a South Asia focus, specializing in feminist political geography and political geographies of youth and the future. She has been involved in non-profit work and research in India since 1999. Her Ph.D. is in geography, and she has been teaching in UNC’s Department of Geography since 2009. Professor Smith’s current research in the Ladakh region of India’s Jammu and Kashmir State addresses the ways that individuals’ personal lives (especially their decisions about love and babies) are entangled in territorial struggle. Smith is developing a new project about how marginalized young people from India’s remote mountain regions experience university life in major Indian cities and how this shapes their politics. If you are curious, you can find out more about this work on her faculty website: https://sarasmith.web.unc.edu/.

This seminar examines the ways that politics, especially contests over territory, are part of our day-to-day life. We will explore a range of cases, from immigration policy and rhetoric in the US, to popular representations of geopolitics in film, to the politics of family planning in India. How do questions of love, friendship, family and youth identity tie into the international and national political stories that we see on the news? What does national identity have to do with our individual sense of self? We will also explore alternative ways that international politics have been studied, as feminist geopolitics or anti-geopolitics and questions of citizenship. Work for the seminar will involve original research on intersections of international politics and students’ daily life, as well as exploring representations of geopolitical issues in the media, film and fiction.

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Geological Sciences (GEOL)

GEOL 72H.001: Field Geology of Eastern California
PL, EE
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Drew Coleman

Drew Coleman’s research focuses on understanding how the Earth works by determining the rates of processes (mountain building, extinction, volcanism, etc.) that occurred in the past. To accomplish this he and his students date rocks. His teaching is inquiry based and he is most happy when he is teaching “hands on” in the field or lab.

This seminar will be designed around a one-week field trip to eastern California, where students will study geologic features including active volcanoes, earthquake-producing faults, evidence for recent glaciations and extreme climate change, and how locals deal with living on active geologic features. Before the field trip (which will take place the week of Fall Break and be based at the White Mountain Research Station, Bishop, California), the class will meet twice a week to go over basic geologic principles and to work on field topics for which student groups will be responsible. During the trip students will work on specific projects (e.g., making a geologic map of a small area; mapping, measuring, and describing an active fault; observing and recording glacial features on a hike), and collect samples for an original, small group, research project. After the field trip students will complete laboratory analysis of samples and present the results of their research to the Department. Grading will be based on the research, group work presented on the trip, and on a variety of small projects during the trip (notebook descriptions, mapping projects, etc.). Students will be required to pay some of the costs (estimated about $900). This course will require missing three days of classes.

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German and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)

GSLL 50.001: Literary Fantasy and Historical Reality
LA, CI, NA
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Clayton Koelb

Clayton Koelb is Guy B. Johnson Distinguished Professor of German and Professor of English and Comparative Literature. Before coming to Carolina he was Professor of German and Comparative Literature at the University of Chicago, and he has been visiting Professor at Purdue, Minnesota, and Princeton. He has published many books on literary history and literary theory, including two that are especially relevant to this course: The Incredulous Reader, which deals with the issue of why we like stories we might not believe; and Legendary Figures, which examines the depiction of ancient history in modern novels.

This seminar focuses on five blockbuster pop novels about the distant past, from the time of early man (Clan of the Cave Bear) to the days of the conquistadors (Aztec). Each book tries to imagine how life might have been long ago. Do they get it right? We’ll check the facts and see. After working in small teams that report orally on evidence relating to the time and place treated fictionally in one of the works being read, students engage in research on a topic of their choice culminating in a substantial final project.

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GSLL 60.001: Avant-Garde Cinema: History, Themes, Textures
VP
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Richard Langston

Richard Langston received his bachelor’s degree in German at the University of Vermont in 1993 and continued his studies at Washington University in St. Louis, where he finished his master’s degree in 1995 and his Ph.D. in 2002. The foci of his graduate studies included twentieth-century German literature, European intellectual history, literary theory and cultural studies. He joined the faculty at Carolina in the fall of 2002. In the spring of 2008, he was promoted to the rank of associate professor.

A common theme in much of his research is the historically contingent aesthetic politics at work both in and between media like literature and moving images. What do texts of the twenty and twenty-first century claim to know? What do they claim to do? What do they hope for? What do they say about us human beings? These questions are just some of what guides his scholarly interests.”

Students explore the international history, filmic techniques and cultural meanings of non-narrative cinema of the 20th century. Students also transform in-class discussions and individual essays into video projects.

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GSLL 63.001: Performing America
VP
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Tin Wegel

Tin Wegel is a senior lecturer in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures. Her academic interests lie in drama and theater performances, as well as foreign language pedagogy. Since 2003, she has staged many plays in German with students at various colleges and universities. In Spring 2016, she staged “Standing on Ceremony: The Gay Marriage Plays” with her First-Year Seminar students. Her latest performance was Frank Wedekind’s 1891 play “Frühling Erwachen. Eine Kindertragödie” (“Spring Awakening. A Children’s Tragedy”) with students in a German senior seminar.

For this FYS, for which there are no prerequisites, we will take a close look at America today through the lens of the performing arts. Specifically, the intersection of performance in a theater space with performance in everyday life will serve as our springboard to investigate the diversity of contemporary America. We will read five short plays, as well as excerpts from theoretical texts, to examine how race, class, religion, gender, sexuality, and sexual orientation, as well as life and death are talked about and performed in America today. Part of the course will be a short theater performance for a general audience at the end of the semester.

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GSLL 82.001: Doctor Stories
LA
MWF, 12:20 PM – 01:10 PM
Kevin Reese

Kevin Reese’s primary areas of interest—both as an instructor and as a researcher—are Soviet science fiction and Russian poetry.

Poetry is the foundation of one of his ongoing (since the spring of 2013) teaching endeavors: the Maiakovskii Club, a weekly meeting devoted to reading, translating, and scanning Russian poetry.

He is working on a book—tentatively titled The Homemade Telescope—in which he examines the role of astronomy and cosmology across many of the works of Arkadii and Boris Strugatskii. Russian poetry plays a nontrivial role in this book, as many of the Strugatskiis’ key works feature a deep intertextual relationship with the works of Pushkin.” Explores and reflects on the experience and significance of being a doctor in Russia and the United States, analyzing “doctors’ stories” presented in fiction, nonfiction, film, and other media.

The course explores and reflects on the experience and significance of being a doctor in Russia and the United States, analyzing “doctors’ stories” presented in fiction, nonfiction, film, and other media.

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GSLL 84.001: Terror for the People: Terrorism in Russian Literature and History
LA, BN, CI
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Stanislav Shvabrin

Stanislav Shvabrin has researched, published and lectured on the history and culture of Russian diasporas, comparative verse theory, poetics and politics of national memory and translation studies. Apart from his scholarly and editorial work on Vladimir Nabokov, he has written on Georgy Ivanov, Andrei Kurbsky, Mikhail Kuzmin and Marina Tsvetaeva.

Before Timothy McVeigh, Taliban, Al-Qaeda and ISIS/ISIL, Russia provided the world with visual imagery and vocabulary to refer to terror perpetrated in the name of ostensibly lofty goals and ideals. This course offers you an opportunity to acquaint yourself with such key concepts as anarchism, nihilism and “Red Terror” as well as the minds responsible for their invention and application. As we delve into the substance of these ideas and attempt to understand the reasons for their enduring relevance, we will examine the different ways in which leading Russian intellectuals, including Ivan Turgenev, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Nikolay Chernyshevsky, Pyotr Kropotkin and others, envisaged their coming to fruition. In addition to a selection of literary texts and political manifestoes composed by visionaries of both conservative and libertarian persuasions, we will examine witness accounts of those at the receiving end of many progressive initiatives.

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History (HIST)

HIST 70.001: Seeing History in Everyday Places: Chapel Hill as a Case Study
John L. Townsend III FYS in History
HS, CI, EE
T, 03:30 PM – 06:00 PM
John Sweet

John Sweet is an American historian with wide-ranging interests. His research has focused on the colonial encounters of Africans, Native peoples, and Europeans–and how their interactions shaped the emergence of the American nation. He has also worked with other historians and literary scholars on the Jamestown colony and biographical approaches to the Black Atlantic. His current project explores the history of sex, dating, and the law in the early years of the American Republic; it is called Ruined: A Story of Rape and Retribution in Old New York.

This first-year seminar is an invitation to explore new ways of seeing the world around us. Our homes, our workplaces, our towns, our natural areas, our transportation networks—all are products of history, shaped by people, rich with meaning and full of surprises. The course explores the concept of cultural landscapes as a way of studying history and its legacies. Through a combination of field work, historical research and analysis, we will use maps, photographs, GIS resources and archival documents to understand how–and why–people in the past shaped our surroundings today.

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HIST 72H.001: Women’s Voices: 20th-Century European History in Female
HS, CI, NA
T, 03:35 PM – 06:05 PM
Karen Hagemann

Karen Hagemann is the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of History and Adjunct Professor of the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense. She published widely in Modern German, European and Transatlantic history combing political, social, cultural and military history with women’s and gender history. Her most recent monograph is Revisiting Prussia’s Wars against Napoleon: History, Culture, and Memory (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Currently she is finishing as the general editor the work on the Oxford Handbook on Gender, War and the Western World since 1600. (http://history.unc.edu/people/faculty/karen-hagemann/) and (https://hagemann.web.unc.edu/)

The seminar examines twentieth century European history through the lens of women’s autobiographical writings. It explores women’s voices from different generational, social and national backgrounds, who all tried to make a difference in society and politics: Emmeline Pankhurst (1958-1928), a leader of the militant British suffragette movement; Alice Salomon (1872-1948), a liberal Jewish-German social reformer and activist of the German middle class women’s movement; Vera Brittain (1893-1970), a British volunteer nurse during World War I, who became after the war a peace activist and writer; Toni Sender (1888-1964), a German-Jewish socialist and one of the first female parliamentarians in Weimar Germany, who like Salomon after the Nazi’s takeover in 1933 had to flee Germany; Genevieve De Gaulle-Anthonioz (1920-2002), a French resistance fighter during World War II and a survivor of the women’s concentration camp Ravensbrück; and Ruth Klüger (1931-), an Austrian-Jewish student who survived Auschwitz and became a professor in the U.S. The overarching theme of the seminar is the struggle of women for equal economic, social and political rights. We will explore what effects social and political changes, revolutions and wars as well as the Holocaust had on this struggle and the lives of women in Europe more general. Through intensive discussions of the reading in class, group work and the opportunity to do research on the female autobiography of their own choice, the seminar offers students a unique approach to twentieth century European history.

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HIST 74.001: Emperors, Courts, and Consumption: The Mughals of India
HS, BN
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Emma Flatt

Emma Flatt’s research has focused on mentalities and practices in the courtly societies of medieval South India. She is currently writing a book which examines how skills like perfume-making, astrological divination, gardening, magical spells and letter writing allowed nobles to succeed at court. She is also researching the history of friendship in medieval South Asia. Originally from the UK, she has lived, studied and worked in India, Italy and Singapore.

The Mughal Empire (1526-1858) is not only one of the most well-known of South Asian polities, it was also the grandest and longest lasting empire in Indian history. At its height this empire covered almost the entire subcontinent and its rulers and elites were responsible for much of the iconic architecture and painting associated with India in the popular mind today. Rich in textual, material and visual primary sources, in recent years this period has been the focus of vibrant and exciting scholarly work, which has re-evaluated long-held assumptions about the nature of pre-modern South Asia. Through a study of autobiographical texts, contemporary accounts, objects, architecture and later representations in scholarly works, films, novels and Wikipedia entries, we will analyze the complex ways in which this powerful dynasty portrayed itself and the various ways it is remembered today.

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HIST 84H.001: Monsters, Murders, and Mayhem in Microhistorical Analysis: French Case Studies
HS, NA
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Jay M. Smith

Jay M. Smith is a specialist of early-modern European history whose research focuses on old regime and revolutionary France. Author or editor of five books, his most recent book in French history is Monsters of the Gévaudan: The Making of a Beast (2011).

French history has recently witnessed an extraordinary outpouring of microhistorical studies covering a range of phenomena from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century. This course explores both the distinctive features of microhistorical approaches to the past and the attractions of microhistory for the practicing historian. Does the efflorescence of microhistory among French specialists signal the maturity of socio-cultural history as a branch of the discipline, or does it instead signal the field’s sad retreat from grand interpretation and synthesis? Does the new appeal of the small-scale express historians’ capitulation to post-modern attacks on “truth” or new commitments to finding the truth? What are the strengths and limitations inherent to the genre? Students will read a sampling of recent work (much of it featuring murder and mayhem) and also try their hand at writing and otherwise formulating their own microhistorical narratives.

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HIST 89.001: Diaries, Memoirs and Testimonies of the Holocaust
John L. Townsend III FYS in History
HS, NA
MWF, 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM
Karen Auerbach

Professor Karen Auerbach is assistant professor of history and Stuart E. Eizenstat Fellow in the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies. She is the author of The House at Ujazdowskie 16: Jewish Families in Warsaw after the Holocaust (2013) and editor of Aftermath: Genocide, Memory and History (2015). Prior to arriving at UNC, she taught at universities in Australia and England as well as at Virginia Tech and Brown University. She has lived for extended periods in Poland, where she was based at the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw.

In ghettos and hiding places during the Holocaust, European Jews and other victims of Nazism recorded their experiences in diaries and other chronicles. Efforts to preserve individual histories continued after the war as survivors wrote memoirs and gave oral testimonies beginning in the earliest postwar years. In this course, students will read diaries, memoirs and literature as well as listen to oral histories to understand the history of the Holocaust through life narratives and to explore tensions between history and memory.

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Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST)

IDST 89.001: From Madness to Mental Health: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Making of Mental Health
SS
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Elena Casey, Nithya Srinivas, Nikhil Tomar, Marsha S. Collins

Note: This course will be taught by three Royster Fellows under the supervision of the Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education, Dr. Marsha Collins.

Elena Casey (encasey@live.unc.edu) is a Ph.D. student of Spanish and Royster Fellow at UNC Chapel Hill. Originally from Ithaca, NY, she came to UNC after completing her M.A. through Middleburg College in Madrid, Spain. Elena researches representations of melancholy and mental illness in Early Modern Spanish theater. She currently teaches Spanish for the Professions (SPAN 265) and Introductory Spanish for Healthcare Professionals (PUBH610). She has previously taught beginning, intermediate, and advanced Spanish language and culture courses, and has worked as a Graduate Research Consultant for first year seminars on Early Modern Sexuality and Court Culture in Early Modern Spain.

Nithya Srinivas (nithyas@email.unc.edu) is a third-year PhD candidate in pharmaceutical sciences. After obtaining her Bachelor of Pharmacy degree from Bangalore, India in 2014, she moved to Chapel Hill where she joined the Kashuba Lab, a group that is world-renowned for their work on HIV research. Nithya’s research focuses on the distribution of anti-HIV drugs into the brain and how this might be linked to neurocognitive impairment in HIV positive individuals. She is an avid traveler and enjoys reading and trying out new recipes in her spare time.

Nikhil Tomar (nikhil_tomar@med.unc.edu)is a 4th year doctoral student in the Department of Allied Health Sciences. His research focuses on stigma towards mental illness and critique/understanding of mental healthcare systems/policies. His past research projects include: evaluating mental health concerns and stigma among college students, stigma and its influence in the context of probation in North Carolina, and exploring mental healthcare in India. His dissertation focuses on influence of stigma and mental healthcare policies on the participation at clubhouses (Psychosocial Rehabilitation Models) in North Carolina. He has also participated in policy efforts at the university, county, and national level.

Marsha S. Collins is Professor of Comparative Literature and Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education. Her research focuses on Early Modern Spanish Literature and Culture in the context of Early Modern Europe, Literature and the Visual Arts, and Idealizing Forms of Literature. She is the author of three books, most recently of “Imagining Arcadia in Renaissance Romance” (Routledge, 2016) and over thirty articles. She loves dogs, yoga, piano, travel, being at the ocean, and spending time with family and friends.”

What do we mean when we talk about “Mental Health” and “Mental Illness”? How do history, policy, and pharmacology shape our understanding of mental health and mental illness? And what is our role as students and community members in determining how we talk about, regulate, and treat mental health concerns? In contemporary American society, 20% of the population accesses or will require mental health care services. This course aims to engage students in active discussion, investigation, and participation in the history, policy, and pharmacology of mental health, beginning with 16th century Europe and ending in our contemporary understanding and treatment of mental health in local, national, and global contexts.

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Marine Sciences (MASC)

MASC 52.001: Living with our Oceans and Atmosphere
PL
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 PM
Wei Mei

Wei Mei is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Marine Sciences at UNC Chapel Hill. He holds a Ph.D. in Earth System Science from the University of California at Irvine, and a Master of Science in Meteorology and a Bachelor of Science in Atmospheric Sciences from Nanjing University (China).

Dr. Mei is the instructor of “Environmental Systems Modeling” (MASC/ENEC/GEOL 415) and “Living with Our Oceans and Atmosphere” (MASC 52) at UNC. He was a guest lecturer for several undergraduate and graduate courses on atmosphere, oceans and climate prior to coming to UNC.

Dr. Mei’s current research interests lie in extreme weather and climate events (including hurricanes and atmospheric rivers) and their effects on coastal hazards (e.g., storm surge, flooding, and high winds). His work has contributed to the recognition of the effect of ocean temperature on hurricane intensity and to the understanding of the link between hurricanes and climate.

Modern theories of changing weather, severe weather events, oceanic hazards, interactions between the oceans and atmosphere, and changes that are linked to human activity.

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MASC 55.001: Change in the Coastal Ocean
PL
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Christopher S. Martens

Christopher S. Martens earned his Ph.D. in Chemical Oceanography from Florida State University in 1972, then moved to Yale to complete two years of postdoctoral study before joining the faculty at UNC in 1974. His current research focuses on oil and gas seeps in deep sea environments including the northern Gulf of Mexico area impacted by the Deepwater Horizon disaster, greenhouse gases from wetland ecosystems, and on the role of sponges in nitrogen cycling in coral reef ecosystems. He publishes widely and has twice been recipient of the Geochemical Society’s Best Paper award in Organic Geochemistry. He is an experienced SCUBA diver and underwater videographer. He has received a “Favorite Faculty” award for recognized excellence in undergraduate teaching.

This seminar course provides students with opportunities to explore recent changes in marine and coastal environments caused by the interactions of fascinating oceanographic processes and human impacts. Discussions focus on published works of active marine scientists who combine their disciplinary training with knowledge and skills borrowed from other fields in order to attack research questions that could not be otherwise addressed. In preparation for discussions and laboratory visits, students will read recently published, non-technical research papers that focus on specific questions and environments of current interest such as rapid changes in the health of coral reef ecosystems, ocean acidification from fossil fuel burning, sea turtle migration utilizing ocean-scale geomagnetism, tsunamis and rogue waves, exchange of greenhouse gases between oceans, rain forests and atmosphere; contamination of coastal aquifers; fish kills and anoxia in the Neuse Estuary, nutrient enrichment of coastal waters and the accumulation of toxic substances in coastal sediments. During discussions covering each topic we will examine exciting research investigations that demonstrate how specific biological, geological, physical, and geochemical processes interact to influence coastal, open-ocean and tropical ecosystems and environments. During these discussions, students will be exposed to field study sites and modern oceanographic laboratory research methods through “video- and photo-trips”, demonstrations using state-of-the art instrumentation in my laboratory and “hands on” mini-experiments designed to emphasize the importance of the question rather than the technology involved.

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MASC 59.001: Extreme Microorganisms
PL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Andreas Teske

Andreas Teske is a biochemist by training, but became fascinated by the microbial world of the oceans and focused his Ph.D. research on the ecology and diversity of marine bacteria that catalyze the sulfur cycle. After completing his Ph.D. at Bremen University and the Max-Planck-Institute for Marine Microbiology in Germany in 1995, he spent his postdoc years at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and stayed on as Assistant Scientist. Andreas Teske joined the UNC Marine Sciences faculty in 2002. His research interests include the microbiology of the deep marine subsurface, and microbial ecosystems of petroleum seeps and hydrothermal vents. In search of novel extreme marine microorganisms, he and his students are participating in a wide range of research cruises.

We will expand our horizons in biology by learning about some of the most extreme microorganisms on the planet – microorganisms that thrive without oxygen in deep marine sediments and in the Earth’s crust, under high temperatures in boiling hot springs or in superheated deep-sea water under high pressure, and under chemical stress factors (high sulfide and heavy metal concentrations) that were once thought to be incompatible with life. Numerous extremophilic (extreme-loving) microorganisms of different metabolic types have been isolated in the laboratory as pure cultures; others have been observed in Nature but have so far resisted cultivation. Extremophiles provide opportunities to study the unusual and strange biochemistry that allows them to thrive in their unique habitats; they are also valuable model systems for potential life on other planets. We will get to know the unusual habitats where extremophiles are found, for example hot springs and volcanic areas on land (Yellowstone) and in the ocean (hydrothermal vents), and we will explore the earliest history of extremophiles as some of the most ancient microorganisms on Earth.

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Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 62H.001: Combinatorics
QI
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Ivan Cherednik

Professor Ivan Cherednik is Austin H. Carr Distinguished Professor of Mathematics. Trained at the Steklov Mathematics Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences and at Moscow State University, his areas of specialization are Representation Theory, Combinatorics, Number Theory, Harmonic Analysis, and Mathematical Physics. Cherednik’s particular affection for Combinatorics is well known: he proved the celebrated Constant term conjecture in Combinatorics.

A leading expert in Modern Combinatorics wants to share his vision of the subject with the students. The seminar is a perfect background for future specialists in mathematics, physics, computer science, biology, economics, for those who are curious what statistical physics is about, what is cryptography, and how stock market works, and for everyone who likes mathematics.

The course will be organized around the following topics:

  • Puzzles: dimer covering, magic squares, 36 officers
  • Combinations: from coin tossing to dice and poker
  • Fibonacci numbers: rabbits, population growth, etc.
  • Arithmetic: designs, cyphers, intro to finite fields
  • Catalan numbers: from playing roulette to stock market

The students will learn about the history of Combinatorics, its connections with the theory of numbers, its fundamental role in the natural sciences and various applications.

It is an advanced research course; all students are expected to participate in projects under the supervision of I.Ch. and the Graduate Research Consultant (the GRC Program). This seminar is partially supported by Honors Carolina.

The grades will be based on the exam, bi-weekly home assignments and the participation in the projects. The course requires focus and effort, but, generally, the students are quite satisfied with the progress they make (and their grades too).

From the Course Evaluation: “A difficult but wholly worthwhile course: I feel more competent for having taken it”, “I would recommend this FYS to others ONLY if they have a VERY strong affinity for and ability in Algebra (I thought I did, but I was wrong)”.”

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MATH 89.001: Networks: The Science of the Connected World – CANCELLED 8/09/2017
QI
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Peter Mucha

Peter Mucha is a Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professor (awarded for excellence in undergraduate teaching) in the Department of Mathematics. His data science research focuses on the mathematical and computational study of networks, developing tools for the study of real-world data, including collaborations with Archeology, Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Finance, Geography, Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, Pharmacology, Pharmacy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Public Policy, Sociology, and Statistics.

We live in a connected world, where the confluence of the different connections—social, political, financial, informational, technological, biological, behavioral, epidemiological—affects virtually every aspect of our lives. The study of networks provides a language for describing these connections and for attempting to describe the resulting impacts. Most people are familiar with the concept of a network in terms of hyperlinked Web pages or online social networks; but networks are also useful for studying a wider variety of applications, with “nodes” representing actors of interest and connecting “edges” representing relationships. We will explore the roles of networks in public health, political activity, economic markets, workplace interactions, and internet search, among others. We will explore classical ideas in graph theory, fundamental concepts in social network analysis, and more recent developments in network science. We will also meet with guest speakers who are leading mathematical and social scientists studying networks.

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Media and Journalism (MEJO)

MEJO 89.001: Our Post-Truth World
SS
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Deen Freelon

Deen Freelon is an associate professor in the School of Media and Journalism. He has two major areas of expertise: 1) political expression through digital media, and 2) the use of code and computational methods to extract, preprocess, and analyze very large digital datasets. Freelon has authored or co-authored over 30 journal articles, book chapters, public reports on these topics, along with one coedited scholarly book. He is the creator of ReCal, an online intercoder reliability application that has been used by thousands of researchers around the world; and TSM, a network analysis module for the Python programming language. Before starting at UNC in fall 2017, he taught at American University in Washington, DC.

The 2016 election campaign and its aftermath have signaled the arrival of the “post-truth era.” The term “post-truth,” which was the Oxford English Dictionary’s 2016 Word of the Year, refers to several related phenomena which include:

  • The loss of public consensus about what is true and false;
  • The increasing popularity of “fake news” online;
  • Deliberate attempts to spread falsehoods to obtain public support for particular policies or products;
  • The willingness to promote and believe information that supports one’s beliefs regardless of the strength of the evidence supporting it;
  • The unwillingness to revise one’s beliefs when confronted with facts that contradict them.

This course will explore the implications of these developments for democracy, society, and everyday life. It will focus specifically on what makes the post-truth era different from previous periods and how we as 21st-century citizens can best evaluate information quality.

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Music (MUSC)

MUSC 51.001: The Interplay of Music and Physics
PL
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Laurie McNeil, Brent Wissick

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her Ph.D. in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. Her seminar grows out of her life as a choral singer (and, earlier, a violinist and recorder player). When not singing with the Choral Society of Durham, she can be found in her laboratory using lasers to study the properties of materials.

Brent Wissick (Professor of Music) specializes in cello, viola da gamba and chamber music. He has a particular interest in performance practices of the 16th-18th centuries and is Past President of the Viola da Gamba Society of America. He has recorded numerous CDs with American Bach Soloists and other important groups; and has given concerts and lectures throughout North America, Europe, Asia and Australia.

This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects.

Students may also register for this course under PHYS 51.001.

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MUSC 89.001: Arts, Activism, Africa
VP, BN
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Chérie Rivers Ndaliko

Chérie Rivers Ndaliko (Assistant Professor) is an interdisciplinary scholar and activist who studies human creativity in African conflicts through ethnomusicology, film/media studies, and cultural theory. Her research engages ethnographic and community based participatory methods to explore the meanings local communities ascribe to art making in post-colonial warzones. Through critical analysis of music, films, music videos, and textual representations of war and violence in Africa, she advocates a paradigm shift in the global application of humanitarian and charitable aid. Her monograph, Necessary Noise: Music, Film, and Charitable Imperialism in the East of Congo (Oxford University Press, 2016), introduces into heated international debates on aid and sustainable development a case for the necessity of arts and culture in negotiating sustained peace. Currently she is working on two projects, the first is an edited volume exploring NGO-sponsored art production in conflicts across the African continent; the second is a monograph about musical mediations of race and (im)migration through the works of Congolese pianist and composer Ray Lema, whose music has animated social and political movements in Africa, Europe, and North- and South- America.

Ndaliko holds a B.M. in film scoring from the Berklee College of Music, an A.M. from Harvard University in Ethnomusicology, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University in African Studies (2012), where she was a pioneer of the University’s Social Engagement Initiative. In addition to her teaching and research, she also serves as Executive Director of the Yole!Africa cultural center in Goma DRC, Executive Director of the Congo International Film Festival, and founder and faculty advisor for Yole!Africa U.S.”

In the face of social and political unrest art is often viewed as a potential vehicle of change, whether as a catalyst of social justice, a source of healing, or a unifying force. But is arts activism effective? If so, what makes it so? If not, what hinders its efficacy? Drawing on historic and contemporary case studies from the African continent, this First Year Seminar introduces students to the intellectual, historical, practical, and creative aspects of addressing sociopolitical issues through art and creativity. We will explore the precedents, strategies, and shortcomings of arts initiatives, learn about pioneering movements and individuals, and also have the opportunity to participate in a project of arts activism in the east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Through all aspects of this course—from the analytical to the creative—students will engage in active learning, not only critiquing existing models, but also crafting new approaches that engage digital and social technologies.

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Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 66.001: Ethics: Theoretical and Practical
PH
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Markus Kohl

Markus Kohl was raised and began his philosophical studies in Germany. He has a PhD in philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley, and two masters degrees (in philosophy and literary studies) from the University of Oxford. Before joining UNC as an assistant professor of philosophy in 2017, he taught at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville for five years. His research focuses on the history of philosophy, particularly the philosophy of Immanuel Kant.

In this seminar, we will consider some foundational questions of moral philosophy and their relevance for concrete practical issues that we face today. Topics to be discussed include the following:

Does every human agent have a conclusive reason to do what morality requires, regardless of what her individual preferences and desires happen to be? Does God determine what is morally right or good? Are moral values relative to particular societies or cultural traditions? Are we morally required to produce the greatest total amount of happiness (as ‘utilitarians’ argue)? Or are there absolute moral constraints, such as respecting the rights of persons, that we must never disregard even if doing so would produce more happiness (as ‘deontologists’ argue)? More concretely: Is it morally permissible in warfare to sacrifice civilians? Are well-off people morally required to forego luxuries such as smartphones and fancy cars in order to help the poor and starving? Is abortion morally permissible? What, exactly, is wrong with exploitation and oppression, and what are the different forms that these moral evils can take?

We will explore these issues through open, respectful class discussion and careful study of influential (both classical and contemporary) philosophical texts. In later parts of the course, students will lead the discussion through their own presentations. There will be several shorter papers and a longer final paper.

The seminar will incorporate a workshop where we explore strategies for doing class presentations and writing college-level papers. For the long paper, students will have the opportunity to work with the instructor on a draft before submitting the final version.

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PHIL 76.001: Is Free Will an Illusion?
PH
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
John T. Roberts

John T. Roberts is a Professor of Philosophy. His primary research interests are in philosophy of science, philosophy of physics, and metaphysics. He has published many articles on these subjects, and one book, The Law-Governed Universe. He loves contra dancing and traditional Cajun dancing (though he keeps these interests out of the classroom).

The idea that we have free will seems to be crucial to the way we understand ourselves. The very idea of moral responsibility seems to take it for granted that we have free will, and so does the idea that we can express ourselves through our actions and our lives. But there are a variety of arguments that seem to show that we do not really have free will. Some of these come from modern science, but some come from philosophy and were well-known even to the ancient Greek philosophers. In this seminar, we will make a systematic exploration of the reasons that have been offered for thinking that we don’t have free will, from the 4th century BCE to the present century. We will also critically evaluate these arguments, and try to come to a reasoned and principled view on the question of free will. The seminar will be discussion-based, and each student will have a turn at doing a presentation and leading the discussion. There will be many short writing assignments and one long one.

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PHIL 89.001: Plato’s Symposium and Its Influence on Western Art and Literature
PH, NA
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
James Lesher

James Lesher is the author of four books and more than seventy articles on aspects of ancient Greek philosophy. He has held research appointments at Harvard, Princeton, the Center for Hellenic Studies, and the National Humanities Center. He has also received multiple citations for excellence in teaching and was named a Distinguished Scholar-Teacher in 2003. Major publications include: Xenophanes of Colophon; Fragments (Toronto, 1992); The Greek Philosophers: Greek Texts with Notes and Commentary (Bristol/Duckworth, 1998); Plato’s Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception (co-edited with Debra Nails and Frisbee Sheffield), (Harvard U. P., 2006); and Essays on Aristotle’s Posterior Analytics (2009).

Course Description: The goal of this course is to gain a detailed understanding of Plato’s philosophical and literary masterpiece, The Symposium, and its influence on later artists and writers. The first part of the course will be devoted to gaining a detailed understanding of the Symposium. In the second part, we will explore the ways in which the Symposium influenced later artists and writers through the publication of Plotinus’ Enneads and Marsilio Ficino’s Commentary on the Symposium on Love. In the third part of the course we will investigate the importance of the Platonic view of love for modern writers such as Shelley, Freud, Thomas Mann, and Yukio Mishima. We will also explore connections between Plato’s Symposium and the 1954 “Serenade for Small Orchestra” by Leonard Bernstein, the musical “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” by John Cameron Mitchell and Stephen Trask, and the 2016 “Symposium” ballet of Alexie Ratmansky. In the second and third parts of the course student reports will provide the starting points for our discussions.

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PHIL 89.002: Philosophy, Politics, and Economics
PH, CI
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Dan Shahar

Dan Shahar is a Research Assistant Professor in the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program. Before arriving at UNC, Dan completed his PhD in philosophy at the University of Arizona, where he was a graduate fellow of the Center for the Philosophy of Freedom. Dan’s research focuses on the implications of environmental challenges for liberal democracies and their members. He is currently co-editing a new edition of the popular textbook, Environmental Ethics: What Really Matters, What Really Works, with David Schmidtz.

It is easy to take modern civilization for granted, but it is an incredible achievement. Virtually all of us are wealthier, healthier, safer, and better-educated than our ancestors. And we can expect our children to be even better-off still. How has this been possible? How can our societies continue to improve? This seminar will draw on powerful insights and techniques from the fields of philosophy, politics, and economics to seek answers to these questions. Students will examine how property rights, markets, and political action combine to create flourishing civilizations. They will grapple with thorny issues like environmental degradation, distributive justice, and economic exploitation. And they will gain valuable analytical tools from rational choice theory, utility theory, game theory, and public choice economics—as well as critical communication and independent study skills that will serve them throughout their college careers.

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PHIL 89.003: Philosophy, Politics, and Economics
PH, CI
TTH, 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM
Dan Shahar

Dan Shahar is a Research Assistant Professor in the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program. Before arriving at UNC, Dan completed his PhD in philosophy at the University of Arizona, where he was a graduate fellow of the Center for the Philosophy of Freedom. Dan’s research focuses on the implications of environmental challenges for liberal democracies and their members. He is currently co-editing a new edition of the popular textbook, Environmental Ethics: What Really Matters, What Really Works, with David Schmidtz.

It is easy to take modern civilization for granted, but it is an incredible achievement. Virtually all of us are wealthier, healthier, safer, and better-educated than our ancestors. And we can expect our children to be even better-off still. How has this been possible? How can our societies continue to improve? This seminar will draw on powerful insights and techniques from the fields of philosophy, politics, and economics to seek answers to these questions. Students will examine how property rights, markets, and political action combine to create flourishing civilizations. They will grapple with thorny issues like environmental degradation, distributive justice, and economic exploitation. And they will gain valuable analytical tools from rational choice theory, utility theory, game theory, and public choice economics—as well as critical communication and independent study skills that will serve them throughout their college careers.

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Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)

PHYS 51.001: The Interplay of Music and Physics
PL
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Laurie McNeil, Brent Wissick

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her Ph.D. in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. Her seminar grows out of her life as a choral singer (and, earlier, a violinist and recorder player). When not singing with the Choral Society of Durham, she can be found in her laboratory using lasers to study the properties of materials.

Brent Wissick (Professor of Music) specializes in cello, viola da gamba and chamber music. He has a particular interest in performance practices of the 16th-18th centuries and is Past President of the Viola da Gamba Society of America. He has recorded numerous CDs with American Bach Soloists and other important groups; and has given concerts and lectures throughout North America, Europe, Asia and Australia.

This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects.

Students may also register for this course under MUSC 51.001.

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PHYS 52.052: Making the Right Connections
MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM
Lab: M, 01:25 PM – 03:25 PM or M, 03:35 PM – 05:35 PM
Hugon J.Karwowski

Hugon J.Karwowski, who is a native of Poland, is a physicist and a teacher. His research is in applied nuclear physics, neutrino physics and astrophysics. Most of his experimental work is performed using accelerators at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. His other interests are politics, world history and grade inflation. He is a winner of numerous teaching awards and has served as a mentor of students on all levels.

This seminar will investigate the multiple roles that computers perform in scientific investigations. We will discuss and test in practice how the connections are made between measuring devices and computers. We will investigate how the collected data are evaluated and how the decisions based on the experimental results are made. We will also discuss the role of the computer simulations in scientific research and the societal consequences of recent technological advances. In the lab students will learn digital electronics, programming and gain working knowledge of data acquisition techniques with primary focus on flow of data from and to scientific instruments. We will visit a number of research labs on and off campus and talk to young researchers about their work. This seminar will be of particular interest for prospective science majors, but there are no prerequisites.

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PHYS 54.001: Physics of Movies
PL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Christian Iliadis

Christian Iliadis is a Greek who was born and raised in Germany. He obtained his diploma in physics from the University of Muenster/Germany and then moved to Notre Dame where he received his Ph.D. He spent three years in Vancouver, working in Canada’s largest nuclear physics laboratory. Since 1996, he has been Professor of Physics and Astronomy at UNC–CH, teaching a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses. His research specialty is nuclear astrophysics, which is the science of how stars generate energy and produce the elements in the Universe via nuclear fusion reactions. He also wrote a recently published textbook on this subject. His favorite hobby is soccer (or football, as it is called in the rest of the world).

In this seminar, we will analyze physics concepts by watching scenes from popular movies. The overall goal is to disentangle the complicated interplay of physics ideas in real-life situations and thereby to improve significantly our problem-solving skills. Emphasis is placed on group work rather than on traditional teaching. We will be addressing questions such as: Which scenes from movies are unphysical and which are realistic? How are physicists portrayed in movies? How does physics research influence society? Ultimately, we will gain a more fundamental understanding for physical concepts and how these concepts shape our world view. No prerequisite is required.

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Political Science (POLI)

POLI 50.001: Movies and Politics
SS, CI
MW, 09:05 AM – 11:25 AM
Pamela Conover

Pamela Conover, Burton Craige Professor of Political Science, was educated at Emory University and received her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota. Professor Conover teaches courses dealing with political psychology, and social movements and political protest. In the past, Professor Conover’s research has concerned the nature of political thinking and the politics of identity and citizenship. She also coauthored the book Feminism and the New Right. Her current research is focused on partisan polarization and rivalry, and gender bias in the national news media. In her spare time, she enjoys cycling and being walked by her two golden retrievers, Izzy and Henry.

In this seminar, we will consider the interplay between films and politics—filmmakers and citizens. We will discuss what movies “mean,” and the intent of filmmakers, but our major focus will be on the contribution of films to political life and what we can learn from films about our political system as well as ourselves as citizens. Towards this end, we will watch both fictitious and documentary films. One theme will be to evaluate whether political films provide accurate understandings of reality. Another theme will be to explore the changing influence of documentary filmmakers in shaping the political role of films in our society. A third theme will be to consider how political life is shaped by diversity—race, class, gender, sexuality and religion—and the extent to which that diversity is represented in films. A final theme will be to examine how our self-understandings as citizens are shaped by the experience of watching films. Among the topics covered will be propaganda, industry and governmental censorship, campaigning, political ambition, interest groups and corruption, congress and the presidency, the judicial system, foreign affairs and contemporary wars. In addition to watching films and reading about them, students will engage in seminar discussions, wiki writing and online discussions. Grades will be based on several writing projects, class and forum discussions, and a final exam.

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POLI 56.001: American Political Autobiography
PH, NA, US
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Mike Lienesch

Mike Lienesch is a Professor in the Department of Political Science who came to Carolina from the University of California Berkeley, where he received his Ph.D. In several books and many articles and essays, he has written about American political thinking from the eighteenth century to today, concentrating on the role of religion in politics. His most recent book is In the Beginning: Fundamentalism, the Scopes Trial, and the Making of the Antievolution Movement. In recognition of his teaching, he has won UNC’s Tanner Award, a Favorite Faculty Award, and been a Bowman and Gordon Gray Professor.

How do we think about ourselves as Americans, and how do our identities influence our ideas about politics? In this seminar, we will try to answer these questions by reading and discussing autobiographies written by a diverse collection of writers from the eighteenth century to today. Among them are Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Jane Addams, Malcolm X, Wilma Mankiller, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Richard Rodriquez. In addition to reading and reflecting on these and other sources, and discussing them in a variety of structured learning situations, we will also plan and write our own political autobiographies. By the end of the term, students should not only be thinking more critically about the personal and public aspects of what it means to be an American, but also should have a clearer conception of themselves as political people.

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POLI 71H.001: Politics of Race, Ethnicity, Language, Religion, and Gender
SS, US
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Andrea Benjamin

Andrea Benjamin earned her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 2010. Her research interests include Race and Politics, Elections and Voting behavior, and Public Opinion. Her first book, Racial Coalition Building in Local Elections: Elite Cues and Cross-Ethnic Voting, explores the potential for Black and Latino Coalitions, is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. Professor Benjamin teaches courses on Race and Politics, Public Opinion, Identity, and Urban Politics. Courses will culminate in small group projects that may include political ads, policy recommendations, or government project evaluations. Professor Benjamin is originally from Northern California and completed her undergraduate degree at the University of California, Davis.

In many parts of the world, race, ethnicity, language, religion and gender are explicitly linked to politics. In the United States, we tend to link these identities to politics through political parties. In this seminar, we will explore the concepts of race, ethnicity, language, religion, and gender in a comparative context in order to gain a better understanding of their application in the United States. From there we will consider the relationship between race, ethnicity, language, religion, gender and politics, from the perspective of citizens, candidates, policies, and institutions. We will use scholarly texts as the foundation for the course, but we will couple those with newspaper articles and narratives to gain a first-hand perspective as needed.

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POLI 75.001: Thinking about Law
PH
TTH, 08:00 AM – 09:15 AM
Charles Szypszak

Charles Szypszak has been with the School of Government since 2005. Prior to that, he was an attorney and director of a general practice firm in New Hampshire. He provides legal counsel to state, national and international institutions, organizations and public officials and teaches Law for Public Administration in the graduate program in public administration. He has taught and worked on law reforms in Poland and Russia. He is the recipient of the University’s J. Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award and the School of Government’s Coates Distinguished Professorship for Teaching Excellence.

Are you interested in being a lawyer or public official? Do you know what it means to “think like a lawyer?” Have you considered why people mostly honor the law? Where do you find “the law?” How do judges decide difficult cases? This seminar will explore the notion of a rule of law, formal and customary law, legal analysis, judicial interpretation and the realities of the adversarial system and law practice. We will consider what makes law seem legitimate and how to assess whether it promotes liberty and justice. This seminar will challenge students to be reflective and critical about their own perspectives and to explore personal responsibility for promoting a rule of law. Students will be engaged in analytical thinking and expression through readings, classroom discussions and research and writing assignments. Reading materials will include selections from court cases and other sources that provide an introduction to the notion of a rule of law, the sources of law that govern us and protect our individual rights, the nature of legal analysis, the different methods of judicial interpretation and the realities of law practice and the adversarial system.

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Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 54.001: Families and Children
SS
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Shauna Cooper

Dr. Shauna Cooper studies the cultural and contextual factors that contribute to positive youth development, with a specific focus on African American adolescents and families. Visit her online: African American Youth Development Research Laboratory.

In this First Year Seminar we will consider family as a context for children’s development. Contemporary families are highly diverse, and topics covered in class reflect this diversity. We will examine characteristics of traditional, divorced and step families, single parents, gay and lesbian parents, and immigrant families. In addition to taking two examinations, students will interview a family member and write a five-page paper based on that interview. Each student will also give a class presentation on a family-related topic.

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PSYC 58H.001: The Psychology of Mental States and Language Use – CANCELLED 8/7/2017
SS
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Jennifer Arnold

Dr. Jennifer Arnold is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. She studies the ways that our minds handle the jobs of speaking and understanding. How do speakers choose words and produce them? How do listeners pick out the speaker’s meaning? Her research is guided by questions about how people represent the thoughts, intentions, and mental activities of other people, and how this information influences specific linguistic processes.

As adults we constantly make judgments about other people’s beliefs, desires, goals, knowledge, and intentions from evidence like eye gaze and inferences from their words and actions. These judgments together can be called mindreading, or theory of mind (where “theory” refers to the theory someone might hold about another’s mental state, not a scientific theory). This information is known to guide some aspects of language use — for example, you wouldn’t ask someone to hand you “that book” if they don’t know it exists. But sometimes you might ignore what someone else does or does not know – for instance asking someone for “the red book” when that person is sitting in front of two red books. This course examines how children, adults, and individuals with autism infer other people’s mental states, and how they use it to guide decisions during speaking and understanding. A major focus of this course is on research methods, and how to investigate questions of mental state and language processing empirically. The course culminates in students conducting an original research project and reporting it in both spoken and written formats.

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PSYC 62.001: Positive Psychology: The Science of Optimal Human Functioning
SS, CI
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Barbara Fredrickson

Barbara Fredrickson is Kenan Distinguished Professor of Teaching and Director of the Social Psychology Doctoral Program in the Department of Psychology. She is also author of Positivity (Crown, 2009). She received her Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1990. Her research centers on emotions, especially positive emotions. Among other topics, she explores the conditions that promote human flourishing and optimal well-being. Her research and teaching have received multiple awards and international recognition.

What does it mean for humans to flourish, or function at their very best? Positive psychology is a new movement that tackles this age-old question scientifically. One basic premise of positive psychology is that human flourishing—a life rich in purpose, relationships, and enjoyment—will not result simply by curing pathology and eliminating behavioral and emotional problems. Rather, flourishing requires building and capitalizing on human strengths and capacities. Another basic premise is that human flourishing involves unlocking or building potential resources, capabilities and capacities at multiple levels—in people, and also within groups and systems. Students will explore these issues through class discussions, experiential assignments, writing assignments, guest lectures, as well as by collecting data on their own lives.

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PSYC 67.001: The Senses of Animals
PL
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Mark Hollins

Mark Hollins is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and Director of the Somatosensory Research Lab. Students in the Lab work with Dr. Hollins to examine the ways in which both sensory and cognitive factors influence perception. Their current work focuses on pain perception, since chronic pain is a major public health problem affecting one in three people and yet is not fully understood.

This seminar deals with the senses of animals. Many animal senses are related to our own, but are either more or less highly developed than ours. For example, falcons have sharper vision than we do, whereas moles are nearly blind. However, some animals possess sensory abilities that we lack entirely, such as the ability of sea turtles to perceive magnetic fields or the ability of bees to perceive the polarization of light. Taking the human senses as a point of reference, we will examine both categories of animal senses, talking about how they work and how they help animals survive. The seminar is also intended to increase students’ understanding of the scientific method and to help them develop their ability to communicate scientific ideas effectively in speech and writing. Grades will be based primarily on a team project, a research proposal and a poster presentation, a report on a scientific article, and two exams (but no final).

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PSYC 68.001: Psychology of Emotion
SS
MWF, 01:25 PM – 02:15 PM
Kristen Lindquist

Dr. Kristen Lindquist is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and the director of the Carolina Affective Science Lab. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Boston College and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Harvard University Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative and the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging. Dr. Lindquist’s research uses social cognitive, psychophysiological and neuroscience methods to understand the nature of human emotion.

This seminar is designed especially for students interested in exploring the psychological and neuroscientific study of emotion. The seminar assumes students will have diverse backgrounds and there are no pre-requisites. Topics will include theoretical models of emotion process and structure, as well as discussions of psychological research bearing on questions such as “Can you read emotions in the faces of other people?” (emotional expressions), “How is emotion expressed in the body?” (autonomic physiology), “Where do emotions live in the brain?” (affective neuroscience), “Is emotion a source of wisdom or the enemy of rationality?” (emotion and reasoning), “Does emotion help or hurt your relationships with other people?” (emotion and social behavior), “Can you control your emotions or do they control you?” (emotion regulation), “Do emotions drive you crazy?” (emotion and psychopathology) and “Are women really the more emotional sex?” (gender and emotion). A range of perspectives in psychology will be explored, spanning social, cultural, developmental, clinical, cognitive and comparative psychology disciplines. Each week, a portion of the classes will be dedicated to discussions of research studies led by Dr. Lindquist. The rest of the classes will be less formal group-based discussions and demonstrations. Discussions will be used to explain or demonstrate especially important ideas, to discuss concepts covered in the assigned readings and to discuss the “real world” implications of class topics. Several discussion sessions will be dedicated to visits to Dr. Lindquist’s lab and the Biomedical Research Imaging Center, where students can experience research techniques and methods in a hands-on setting. Students will be evaluated based on exam performance, on a written research proposal, on an oral presentation of the research proposal and on participation in discussions.

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PSYC 71.001: Plasticity and the Brain
PL
TTH, 11:00 PM – 12:15 PM
Joe Hopfinger

Dr. Joe Hopfinger is a cognitive neuroscientist with over 15 years of experience teaching and running his lab at UNC. His lab utilizes a variety of methods to investigate the neural mechanisms of attention, using “brainwave” recordings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to peer into the living human brain as it performs its amazing cognitive functions. Dr. Hopfinger has recently expanded his research into the domain of “neural plasticity,” and he is studying the neural effects of online-cognitive training, as well as transcranial neural stimulation. He is excited to offer this new course on this cutting-edge, and somewhat controversial, topic.

This course will introduce you to the recent research and debate regarding neural plasticity and the ability of the healthy adult brain to change. Exciting new research suggests that the ability of the adult brain to change goes well beyond simply acquiring new knowledge and memories. Incredible accounts of brain damaged patients recovering cognitive, perceptual and motor functions have opened new areas of research into the ability of the adult brain to change, and a host of new businesses have arisen purporting to be able to trigger, and maintain, desired changes in the brain. Goals of this course include gaining knowledge of a new area of research in the psychological and neural sciences, developing skills in going beyond general-audience books and media coverage to critically evaluate research sources (scientific journal articles) and presenting your own well-researched ideas in written and oral formats.

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Public Policy (PLCY)

PLCY 51.001: The Global Environment in the 21st Century
GL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Elizabeth Sasser

Elizabeth Sasser is a public policy practitioner with extensive experience in federal and state government. Prior to joining UNC Public Policy as a Lecturer, Elizabeth served as policy advisor at the U.S. Department of Energy during the first term of the Obama Administration. She worked with Administration leadership on strategies to advance the nation’s interests on environmental and energy issues, focusing primarily on bilateral relations with China. Prior to her time in the Administration, she was a policy advisor to two North Carolina governors on energy and education issues. She has a B.A. and an M.P.P. from Duke University and studied at Peking University in Beijing, China, where she developed a fluency in Mandarin.

Many serious environmental threats are global in scope. Just think of the way we produce and consume energy; how waste produced in one corner of the world travels by air, sea and land to pollute another corner; and how ecosystems that transcend national boundaries are impacted by human behavior. Who is responsible for governing these global environmental challenges? This seminar explores linkages among nations, global environmental institutions and the environmental problems they cause and seek to rectify. We will examine how global environmental policy is made, with specific attention to the roles of institutions and nations. Topics include the evolution of environmental policy in the United States; China and India’s impact on the global environment; global environmental institutions such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change; risks to the environment through pollution of land and sea by waste; and global energy and environmental implications of shale gas and fracking. No prerequisites are necessary.

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PLCY 55.001: Higher Education, the College Experience, and Public Policy
SS
MW, 02:30 PM – 03:45 PM
Anna Krome-Lukens

Anna Krome-Lukens completed her PhD in U.S. History at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her historical research focuses on the history of social welfare and public health policies. She developed her interest in pressing issues in higher education while in graduate school, through involvement in UNC’s graduate branch of student government, work in Undergraduate Retention, an appointment as the graduate representative to Faculty Council and service on several university-wide committees, including the University Copyright Committee and the Administrative Board of the Library.

Higher education is undergoing rapid transformations that may dramatically change the undergraduate college experience. In this course, students will examine urgent questions facing American colleges and universities. For example, why is the cost of college rising and what implications does this shift have for who attends and graduates from college? How well is higher education preparing students for jobs of the future? How has new technology reshaped the college experience, both academically and socially? How should universities respond to student needs and desires? What role should athletics play in higher education? Students will explore these and other topics through class discussion, position papers, oral presentations and interactions with UNC faculty and staff.

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PLCY 71.001: Justice and Inequality
PH
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Douglas MacKay

Douglas MacKay holds a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Toronto. Prior to joining the Department of Public Policy on July 1, 2013, he completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. MacKay’s research and teaching interests concern questions at the intersection of justice and public policy. He is currently working on projects concerning the justice of economic inequality – both domestic and global; the ethics of immigration policy; priority setting in health care; the ethics of international clinical research; and justice in the division of responsibilities within federal systems of government.

The value of equality is a foundational principle of the United States of America. The Declaration of Independence proclaims that “all men are created equal” and possess unalienable rights to “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” The Constitution of the United States requires that no State “deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” Additionally, equality has been the goal of a number of influential political movements, including the Civil Rights movement, the Feminist movement, Occupy Wall Street and the LGBT movement. Yet despite this prominence of the value of equality, the U.S. is becoming a more unequal society in a number of domains, particularly, with respect to the distribution of income, political influence and social mobility. This course investigates the value of equality and asks which forms of inequality are unjust and ought to be remedied. We will focus on a variety of different spheres of U.S. social, political and economic life, including the distribution of income and opportunities, marriage, health outcomes, education, voting and political influence, and employment. We will also ask whether equality is a value that applies beyond U.S. borders, particularly with respect to global disparities in income and wealth, and climate change. The course will feature a combination of lectures and class discussion. Significant instructional time will also be dedicated to developing students’ critical thinking, reading and writing skills.

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PLCY 85.001: Reforming America’s Schools
SS, NA
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
JB Buxton

JB Buxton has worked in a variety of roles in government and the nonprofit sector focused on public education, including North Carolina’s deputy state superintendent, senior education advisor to N.C. Gov. Mike Easley; a White House Fellow working with the Domestic Policy Council under President Clinton; director of policy and research for the Public School Forum of N.C. and coordinator of special programs for the NC Teaching Fellows Program. He began his career as a high school English teacher and coach in Massachusetts. Buxton currently runs the Education Innovations Group, a consulting practice focused on PreK-12 and postsecondary public education. Buxton works with state departments of education, national foundations and state, regional and national organizations focused on dramatic improvements in public education. Buxton received his bachelor’s degree in English from UNC-Chapel Hill and his master’s in public affairs from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University.

This course focuses on the policy and politics of education reform in America. Who are the major institutional and political actors engaged in education reform? Who are the major influencers? How do they interact to make and implement public policy? What are the major issues and debates in contemporary American public education? Participants in the seminar will develop an understanding of who is involved and how policy is developed at the local, state and federal levels, and delve into current issues and debates on subjects like standards, testing and accountability, school choice, teacher preparation and compensation, and innovative school models. The seminar will include interactions with current policy and political actors from North Carolina and around the nation.

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PLCY 89.001: Creating Social Value
SS
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Melissa Carrier

Melissa Carrier has spent her career doing work that she loves. Her 20+ year career has centered on identifying and realizing opportunities for organizations of all types to adapt and grow through innovation and entrepreneurship. After many years in industry, she joined the University of Maryland where she founded the Center for Social Value Creation to teach, research and model market-based solutions that co-create economic, social and environmental value. Empowering students to discover their “inner-entrepreneurial mindset” to change the world is one of her greatest passions. Her other passions include yoga, running, and raising three active boys with her best friend.

If you are looking for a hands-on approach to changing the world around you but never knew where to start, this course is for you. Designed to immerse students in the process of designing innovative solutions for social change, this course is a highly interactive, experiential, and dynamic one. We will look at the social entrepreneurs, innovators, and visionaries who are creating new methods of solving society’s problems. We contrast traditional methods of activism with a new approach that combines the pragmatic style of social entrepreneurship and the collaborative engagement of transformative action. Specifically, today’s cutting edge movements tend to be more collective, less adversarial, more locally specific and more solutions-oriented than previous ones.

This course will look at the history and theory of social change, practice the skills and strategies of effective change agents and give students the tools to create a blueprint for their ideas for social transformation. Students will explore models in business, nonprofit and policy that address food insecurity, health and well-being, arts, education, environmental sustainability, social justice and more.

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Religious Studies (RELI)

RELI 73H.001: From Dragons to Pokemon: Animals in Japanese Myth, Folklore, and Religion
LA, BN, CI
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Barbara Ambros

Barbara Ambros

Field of specialization: Religions of Asia Research interests: Religions in early modern through contemporary Japan; gender studies; critical animal studies; place and space; and pilgrimage.

Fun fact: she holds a third-degree black belt in Shotokan karate and serves as the faculty advisor for the UNC Shotokan Club.

This seminar examines the cultural construction of animals in Japanese myth, folklore, and religion. We will discuss various kinds of animals: those that occur in the natural world, those that are found in myths and folklore, and those that have appeared in popular media such as animation. We will explore how images of various animals were culturally constructed as tricksters, gods, monsters, or anthropomorphic companions; how animals were ritualized as divine, demonic, or sentient beings in Buddhism, Shinto, and folk religion; and how animals could serve as metaphors that embodied collective ideals or anxieties. Most of our readings will focus on primary and secondary texts from the Japanese tradition (in English), but we will also read theoretical texts on human-animal relationships and historical studies on animals in the larger Asian context. We will also view and analyze several Japanese films, both anime and documentaries, that deal with animals and environmental issues.

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RELI 89H.002: Researching Religion in Women’s Lives
SS, GL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Lauren Leve and Lisa Pearce

Lauren Leve received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology. Now an associate professor of Religious Studies, she has been living and working in Nepal since 1990; sometimes for a few weeks at a time, sometimes for a few years. Her research has also brought her to Thailand, Sri Lanka, India, and Singapore. She has written on topics that include Buddhism, globalization, women’s empowerment, theories of rural revolution, human rights, and suffering. Her recent book is titled “The Buddhist Art of Living in Nepal: Ethical Practice and Religious Reform.” She is currently working on a project on gender, health, politics, and the rise of Christianity in Nepal. Professor Leve is grateful to the monks, nuns, householders, newly-literate women, NGO staff, Maoists, Christians and others who have opened their lives to her and taught her to (try to) see through their eyes. She reports that it’s a little disorienting at first, but that once you learn to learn from others’ perspectives, there’s no better way to live in the world!

Professor Lisa Pearce, an Associate Professor of Sociology and Faculty Fellow at the Carolina Population Center, is a sociologist of family, religion, and the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Her research is based in Kenya, Nepal, and the United States. She has written two books, A Faith of Their Own: Stability and Change in the Religiosity of American’s Adolescents (with Melinda Lundquist Denton) and Mixed Method Data Collection Strategies (with William G. Axinn). Professor Pearce enjoys working with students to collect different kinds of data, moving back and forth between open-ended exploration and the systematic testing of ideas that emerge. She has been on the faculty at Carolina for 15 years and counting.

How do religious beliefs and practices shape gender identities, values, and expectations in different religious cultures? How are these understandings reflected, contested, and/or creatively transformed by women within religious traditions, and at different times? How do we know what we think we know? This course examines the relations between women and religion across different traditions and in diverse global contexts, asking how religious modes of authority and ethical being-in-the-world shape women’s aspirations for self-actualization and position them in relation to both opportunities and constraints. The course also asks, how can we know and measure these relations? Arguments about women and religion are based on evidence that reflect different sets of assumptions and are collected in different ways. Throughout the semester, we’ll explore key methods for data collection and analysis in the Humanities and Social Sciences through a series of hands-on research assignments, culminating in a final research project. Practical experience generating and interpreting diverse types of data will reveal the ways that scientific and humanistic modes of inquiry can work together to pose and answer key questions about women, gender, and human social life.

Students may also register for this course under SOCI 89H.002.

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Romance Studies (ROML)

ROML 55H.001: Writing with an Accent: Latin@ Literature and Culture
LA
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Rosa Perelmuter

Dr. Rosa Perelmuter is Professor of Spanish and Director of the Moore Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program. She has held several fellowships, including two Pogue Foundation Research Leaves and a National Endowment for the Humanities summer grant. Her first book, Noche intelectual, a study of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz’s Primero sueño, was published by the Universidad Autónoma de México Press in 1982, and her second, Los límites de la femineidad en Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz: Estrategias retóricas y recepción literaria, was published in Madrid/Frankfurt by Iberoamericana/Vervuert in 2004. Since then, she has continued to think and write about Sor Juana and other writers of Colonial Spanish America, and is currently at work on two projects: a book-length study of the description of nature in epic poems written in Spanish America in the 16th and 17th centuries and a history of the Cuban Jewish Community between 1920 and 1960.

In this seminar we will study the literary production of Hispanic/Latin@/LatinX writers living in the U.S. Using a variety of materials (essays, documentaries, films, music) and English-language texts (novels, short stories, plays, poetry) we will examine works by Chicano, Puerto Rican, Nuyorican, Dominican, and Cuban-American writers. Topics to be discussed include: Latino, Latin@, LatinX, Hispanic?; What’s in a Name?; Negotiating the Barrio; The politics of Bilingualism; The search for Home in Migrant, Rural, and Urban Environments; The Many Faces of Machismo; Religion and Spirituality in Latino Communities; Forms of Prejudice and Discrimination; Music as a Cultural Bridge. All readings will be in English, though knowledge of Spanish is desirable.

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ROML 89.002: Forging Alliances: Religion, War and Cultural Transference on the Camino de Santiago
HS, WB
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Hélène de Fays

Dr. Hélène de Fays is a Senior Lecturer in the Romance Studies Department. She has earned undergraduate degrees in Finances and International Relations, as well as an MA and Ph.D. in Hispanic Literature. Her educational and professional backgrounds, as well as her personal multidisciplinary interests, have guided her research and teaching. Dr. de Fays has taught a number of successful cultures courses and has published articles on the concepts of utopia and dystopia in Spanish American Science Fiction and ecofeminism in Central American narrative. She has also co-authored a web-based textbook on the cultural history of the Hispanic world.

This course explores the role the Camino de Santiago (the Way of St. James) played in the construction of a distinctive Spanish identity in the medieval period of Europe. We will approach this issue from a variety of perspectives. From the religious point of view, we will discuss the transformation of the man into a legend and eventually a myth, as well as the growth of the pilgrimage to Santiago. From the political and economic perspectives, we will examine the role of the Camino in the strengthening of the first Christian Kingdoms in the North of Spain, the creation of the first Spanish knight orders and their fight against Islam. We will also discuss the cultural transference that took place along the Camino by analyzing the art, architecture, music and literature that developed in the cities and villages along the pilgrimage routes.

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Sociology (SOCI)

SOCI 64.001: Equality of Educational Opportunity Then and Now
SS
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Karolyn Tyson

Karolyn Tyson is Professor in the Department of Sociology. She earned her doctorate in sociology in 1999 from the University of California at Berkeley. Her main fields of interest are sociology of education, social psychology and social inequality. Dr. Tyson’s publications have examined the processes by which schools reproduce social inequality and how the schooling experience affects students’ attitudes toward school. Her overall program of research centers on understanding how cultural, structural and individual-level factors affect school achievement and contribute to unequal educational outcomes.

The 1954 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka case centered on one of the most significant and controversial issues in American public education: equality of educational opportunity. Now more than 60 years after this historic Supreme Court decision, this seminar will use a sociological lens to examine in depth the social conditions that precipitated the case, other relevant court decisions, the changing definitions of race and the educational landscape over the past 6 decades. Topics include de jure and de facto segregation, busing, between-school segregation, tracking and ability grouping, the black-white achievement gap and residential segregation. Students will read historical and contemporary accounts and research reports on the move and progress toward equality of educational opportunity, view films related to the topic, conduct original research exploring the schooling experiences of contemporary American youth and prepare an oral presentation and a research paper.

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SOCI 72.001: Race and Ethnicity in the United States
SS, US
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Anthony Perez

Anthony Perez studies the measurement, meaning and implications of race/ethnicity in the United States and abroad. His research focuses on the interplay between formal and informal conceptualizations of race and ethnicity and de facto measures of race/ethnic populations used in the Census, social surveys and demographic data; causes of uncertainty in the reporting of race across generations and throughout the life course; and the consequences of racial uncertainty for research on inequality, race-attentive social policy and demographic projections of past and future diversity.

It is impossible to understand the structure of American society, or the lived experiences of its people, without understanding both the meaning and consequences of race and ethnicity. Yet, while examples of what race does are well known to students interested in questions of social justice and inequality, the question of what race is receives considerably less attention. Any student familiar with U.S. society can identify myriad, often striking examples of racial inequality—from highly disproportionate rates of poverty, unemployment and disease to racially disparate treatment at the hands of police, teachers and neighbors. But what, exactly, is “race?” The geographic origins of our ancestors? The social categories that others perceive from our appearance? The identities we claim based on a sense of belonging or attachment to a particular culture or community? Or can race be any and all of these things, depending on the context in which individuals perceive and react to one another? These are just some of pressing questions with which students will grapple in this seminar, as we delve into the meaning and measurement of race in society, how it changes over time and space and what it signals for the future of race/ethnic relations in the United States. In pursuit of these aims, we will incorporate a variety of instructional strategies and active learning techniques, including primary data collection and analysis, critical examination of race/ethnicity in popular culture (including music, literature, and film) and in-class group activities.

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SOCI 89H.001: Rationalization and the Changing Nature of Social Life in 21st Century America
SS
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Howard E. Aldrich

Howard E. Aldrich is Kenan Professor of Sociology. He has won numerous awards for his teaching and mentoring: Favorite Professor Award from the senior class at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; graduate students’ Award for Best Teaching, Department of Sociology, several times; and the J Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award from the University of Carolina Chapel Hill. In 2000, he won the Global Entrepreneurship Researcher of the Year Award from the Swedish Foundation of Small Business Research. His main research interests are entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial team formation, gender and entrepreneurship, and evolutionary theory. He writes a regular column, “Speaking from Experience,” for The National Teaching and Learning Forum. He fly fishes year-round in the mountains of Western North Carolina and Eastern Tennessee and wherever else his travels may take him. Photos of his catches may be seen on his homepage.

Today, fast food restaurants have become a model for everyday life. Some scholars have even talked about the “McDonaldization” of the nation and the world. By that, scholars mean a drive toward greater efficiency, predictability, calculability, and control by non-human technologies in modern organizations. This drive has shaped many features of American life, including health care, law, and education. Such forces have even affected personal relationships. Sociologists have a term for this process: “rationalization.” In this course, we will explore that social process through a process called “active learning”: field trips, work in a makerspace, presentations by visitors, videos, role-playing, classroom simulations, and other activities. You will be assessed based on your contributions to blog posts, five short (two pages) papers, a term project, and a group presentation.

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SOCI 89H.002: Researching Religion in Women’s Lives
SS, GL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Lauren Leve and Lisa Pearce

Lauren Leve received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology. Now an associate professor of Religious Studies, she has been living and working in Nepal since 1990; sometimes for a few weeks at a time, sometimes for a few years. Her research has also brought her to Thailand, Sri Lanka, India, and Singapore. She has written on topics that include Buddhism, globalization, women’s empowerment, theories of rural revolution, human rights, and suffering. Her recent book is titled “The Buddhist Art of Living in Nepal: Ethical Practice and Religious Reform.” She is currently working on a project on gender, health, politics, and the rise of Christianity in Nepal. Professor Leve is grateful to the monks, nuns, householders, newly-literate women, NGO staff, Maoists, Christians and others who have opened their lives to her and taught her to (try to) see through their eyes. She reports that it’s a little disorienting at first, but that once you learn to learn from others’ perspectives, there’s no better way to live in the world!

Professor Lisa Pearce, an Associate Professor of Sociology and Faculty Fellow at the Carolina Population Center, is a sociologist of family, religion, and the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Her research is based in Kenya, Nepal, and the United States. She has written two books, A Faith of Their Own: Stability and Change in the Religiosity of American’s Adolescents (with Melinda Lundquist Denton) and Mixed Method Data Collection Strategies (with William G. Axinn). Professor Pearce enjoys working with students to collect different kinds of data, moving back and forth between open-ended exploration and the systematic testing of ideas that emerge. She has been on the faculty at Carolina for 15 years and counting.

How do religious beliefs and practices shape gender identities, values, and expectations in different religious cultures? How are these understandings reflected, contested, and/or creatively transformed by women within religious traditions, and at different times? How do we know what we think we know? This course examines the relations between women and religion across different traditions and in diverse global contexts, asking how religious modes of authority and ethical being-in-the-world shape women’s aspirations for self-actualization and position them in relation to both opportunities and constraints. The course also asks, how can we know and measure these relations? Arguments about women and religion are based on evidence that reflect different sets of assumptions and are collected in different ways. Throughout the semester, we’ll explore key methods for data collection and analysis in the Humanities and Social Sciences through a series of hands-on research assignments, culminating in a final research project. Practical experience generating and interpreting diverse types of data will reveal the ways that scientific and humanistic modes of inquiry can work together to pose and answer key questions about women, gender, and human social life.

Students may also register for this course under RELI 89H.002.

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Statistics and Operations Research (STOR)

STOR 64.001: A Random Walk down Wall Street
QI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Chuanshu Ji

Chuanshu Ji joined the Department of Statistics and Operations Research after getting his Ph.D. in 1988 from Columbia University. Ji’s research involves using statistics to quantify uncertainty and randomness in various problems in natural and social science. One example is to understand patterns of stock markets and predict their behaviors, where it becomes useful to present financial data graphically and run related computer simulation. He also teaches statistics and probability courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

The ups and downs of many stocks, bonds, and mutual funds in the past few years have made a significant impact on our society. Accordingly, a good understanding of financial markets becomes a necessary part of our education. This seminar is intended to provide students with a multimedia platform on which they can learn some basic concepts in finance and economics, useful tools for collecting and summarizing financial data, and simple probability models for quantification of the market uncertainty. Students will actively participate in the seminar’s organization. A number of small projects will be assigned to students, supervised by the instructor. The projects include data analysis using Excel, experimentation of simple investment strategies and portfolios through “virtual trading,” discussions on the performance of those portfolios and related probability calculation. Students will present what they conduct in the assigned projects. Grades will be based on students’ performance in their homework, projects, and presentations.

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Women’s and Gender Studies (WGST)

WGST 68.001: Assumed Identities: Performance in Photography
VP
T, 03:30 PM – 06:30 PM
Susan Harbage Page

Susan Harbage Page is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. Harbage Page is a visual artist with a background in photography and lens-based work that explores immigration, race, and gender. Her most recent work is an archeological look at the U.S. – Mexico Border through photography and site-specific art interventions.

Have you ever made a “selfie” and posted it on the internet? What image of yourself were you trying to reinforce? This seminar uses photography and its aspects of role-playing, performance, and documentation to understand the construction of identity and the changing roles that we take on in society. We will look at historical and contemporary photographers who use assumed identities to create their own realities and challenge society’s stereotypes. Through a series of photographic self-portraits and performative experiences we will query our own identities and how they have been constructed. No specific camera equipment required. You may use any camera you have access to including smart phones for this seminar.

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