Spring 2018

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Please consult ConnectCarolina (connectcarolina.unc.edu) for the most up-to-date information about FYS offerings and availability.

For more information about a specific instructor, please click on the instructor name, if highlighted.

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)
American Studies (AMST)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Art and Art History (ARTH/ARTS)
Asian Studies (ASIA)
Biology (BIOL)
Chemistry (CHEM)
Classics (CLAS)
Communication (COMM)
Computer Science (COMP)
Dramatic Art (DRAM)
Economics (ECON)
Education (EDUC)
English and Comparative Literature (ENGL)
Geological Sciences (GEOL)
German and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL/SLAV)
History (HIST)
Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST)
Information and Library Science (INLS)
Linguistics (LING)
Marine Sciences (MASC)
Mathematics (MATH)
Music (MUSC)
Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)
Political Science (POLI)
Psychology (PSYC)
Public Policy (PLCY)
Religious Studies (RELI)
Sociology (SOCI)
Women’s and Gender Studies (WGST)

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)

AAAD 50.001: Defining Blackness
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
SS, US
Candis Watts Smith

Professor Candis Watts Smith tends to ask research questions that blur disciplinary lines; many of the questions she poses can only be answered by considering bodies of literature, theoretical frameworks and methodological strategies found in Sociology, Political Science, Psychology and Public Policy. Her research interests focuses on American political behavior and Racial and Ethnic Politics. Here, she focuses on individuals’ and groups’ policy preferences, particularly around social policies that exacerbate or ameliorate disparities and inequality between groups.

Dr. Smith uses both qualitative and quantitative methods to answer research questions. This mixed-method approach is best illustrated in her first book Black Mosaic: The Politics of Black Pan-Ethnic Diversity (NYU Press, 2014). Her work also appears in journals like the Annual Review of Political Science, The Journal of Black Studies and Politics, Groups & Identities as well as in edited book volumes.

The boundaries of Blackness are constantly in flux, and pinning down an accurate definition of Blackness in the U.S., to be specific, is becoming an increasing complicated task due to changing social norms, immigration, emigration, the increasing number of immigrants from Africa and the Caribbean, the growing number of multi-racial persons and even increasing socioeconomic bifurcation among those traditionally categorized as Black. Who is included in the definition of Black is not only a matter of color and history but also of politics, culture and self-identification. Over the course of the semester, we will engage in the debates around Blackness. We will examine scholarly texts and government documents as well as film, novels and memoirs. Our goal is to attempt to define Blackness as well as to understand the mechanisms that influence the boundaries and definition of Blackness.

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AAAD 51.001: Masquerades of Blackness
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
VP, US
Charlene Regester

Charlene Regester is an Associate Professor in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies and Affiliate Faculty for the Global Cinema Minor. She received her BA, MA, Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is the author of African American Actresses: The Struggle for Visibility, 1900-1960 (which was nominated by the press to the NAACP Image Awards). She is the 2011 recipient of the Trailblazer Award Hayti Heritage Film Festival and 2007 Oscar Micheaux Book and Film Award from the Oscar Micheaux Film Festival, South Dakota. She has appeared on North Carolina Bookwatch with UNC-TV 2011; WUNC-FM Radio “The State of Things;” and Turner Movie Classics. Documentaries in which she has appeared include: Movies of Color: Black Southern Cinema (2003, Tom Thurman director), Beyond Tara: The Extraordinary Life of Hattie McDaniel (2001), Madison Davis Lacy director), and Birth of a Movement (2017, Bestor Cram and Susan Gray directors).

This seminar is designed to investigate how the concept of race has been represented in cinema historically, with a particular focus on representations of race when blackness is masqueraded. Its intent is to launch an investigative inquiry into how African Americans are represented on screen in various time periods, how we as spectators are manipulated by these cinematic constructions of race, and how race is marked or coded other than through visual representation. Students will view films that deal with “passing” from the various historical periods and will utilize theoretical concepts introduced in class to read these visual representations. Films selected for viewing include the pre-World War II Era, the Civil Rights Era, and the “Post-Racial” era. Students will be required to write three papers that reflect their ability to apply theoretical concepts to reading racialized representations on screen in these three historical periods to demonstrate their understanding of how racial masquerades have evolved over time and continue to persist in contemporary culture.

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AAAD 89.001: Globalization of Hip-Hop
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
SS, GL
Perry Hall

Dr. Perry Hall was involved in the early development of African American Studies with the National Council for Black Studies, chairing the committee that produced the first report on Black Studies core curriculum. His scholarship has explored issues of culture, identity and transformation, focusing especially on popular music as a medium of cultural production. His current book project, “Orality, Literacy, and Cultural Production: African Americans and Racial Modernity,” presents a fuller development of these issues in a study that respectively situates oral forms of black cultural expression (foregrounding popular music) and literate forms within the wider context of Western modernity.

This course will examine hip hop’s emergence in the US, and the proliferation of its practices and precepts to the far corners of the world through processes of cultural globalization, while focusing particularly on its manifestations on the African continent. In that context, the course will focus on ways that hip hop serves as a major conduit connecting African youth to global flows of information and sensibility, how it stimulates local, indigenous forms of musical expression and, particularly for young Africans, how hip hop functions as a medium for political discourse and activism. In this vein students will evaluate the role of hip hop in providing a space, a platform, and a voice to African youth for socialization, identity formation and community building in the current phase of cultural and economic globalization.

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American Studies (AMST)

AMST 89.001: Introduction to Digital Humanities
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
HS, CI, US
Seth Kotch

Seth Kotch is Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities in the Department of American Studies. He works on a range of projects related to the history and culture of the modern American South, oral sources, and social justice, including Media and the Movement, a National Endowment for the Humanities funded project about journalism after the civil rights movement; Mapping the Long Women’s Movement, an experiment with representing oral histories in space; and Back Ways, a look at the historic role of roads and pathways in rural communities.

This course uses interdisciplinary approaches and methods in combination with digital humanities tools to explore American identity through the lens of rural America. It combines seminar-style readings and discussions with collaborative, lab-based digital work on a project that illuminates the cultures, politics, and histories of the rural South.

Americans rely deeply on their rural environments, whether as wilderness sites for busy urbanites to unwind; as providers of the food we eat and export; as fodder for politicians’ image crafting and for truck commercials. The significance of rural spaces as symbols can obscure the fact that that people live, work, and die there, and thus they have been important sites of social and cultural change. This course seeks to shift our understanding of rural America from that of an evocative place that lives in the urban imagination to a real set of places that are changeable and changing, influential, and historic.

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Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 60H.001: Crisis & Resilience: Past and Future of Human Societies
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
HS, BN, CI
Patricia A. McAnany

Patricia A. McAnany is Kenan Eminent Professor of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. A Maya archaeologist, she serves as co-principal investigator of Proyecto Arqueológico Colaborativo del Oriente de Yucatán and as Executive Director of InHerit: Indigenous Heritage Passed to Present (www.in-herit.org). She is particularly interested in the intersection of ritual and economy and in the perspectives of descendant Maya peoples on cultural heritage. She is the author/co-editor of several books, most recently Maya Cultural Heritage: How Archaeologists and Indigenous Communities engage the Past; Textile Economies: Power & Value from the Local to the Transnational (2011) co-edited with Walter E. Little; Ancestral Maya Economies in Archaeological Perspective (2010); Questioning Collapse: Human Resilience, Ecological Vulnerability, and the Aftermath of Empire (2009) co-edited with Norman Yoffee; and Dimensions of Ritual Economy (2008) co-edited with E. Christian Wells. Her recent journal articles include “Casualties of Heritage Distancing: Children, Ch’ortí Indigeneity, and the Copán Archaeoscape” (co-authored with Shoshaunna Parks), Current Anthropology Vol. 53 (2011); and “Thinking About Stratigraphic Sequence in Social Terms” (co-authored with Ian Hodder), Archaeological Dialogues Vol. 16 (2009). She is the recipient of several research awards from the National Science Foundation and of fellowships from the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Institute for the Arts & Humanities (UNC, Chapel Hill), the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Radcliffe Center for Advanced Study at Harvard University. Currently, she works to provide rural communities in the Maya Region with opportunities to dialogue about cultural heritage.

This FYS encourages students to adopt a long view of human societies by examining responses to crises engendered by political, economic, and environmental factors over the longue durée. Perspectives on societal change—both apocalyptic and transformational—are critically examined in light of a suite of case studies that reach back to Mesopotamia (3rd millennium B.C.), Classic Maya and U.S. Pueblo dwellers of the first millennium A.D. and also include more recent case studies, such as the Rwandan genocide, nations such as Haiti that are alleged to be “failed” states, and the current global crisis of environmental sustainability. Students gain familiarity with evaluating archaeological, historical, and environmental information that is pertinent to social change. The aim of the seminar is to foster critical thinking and the ability to evaluate narratives (in both scholarly and popular media) about societal crises and human resilience.

Seminar research materials include books, journal articles, films, and student-run interviews. Class meetings generally consist of a short, introductory lecture followed by discussion headed by student discussion leaders who develop and circulate “talking points” before each class meeting based upon reading material for that day’s seminar. Additionally, each student selects a topic or a case study to research in depth, develops a short class presentation (about 10 minutes), and writes a final research paper.

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ANTH 89.034: Transforming Our Food Systems
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
SS, NA
Donald Nonini

Don Nonini is a sociocultural anthropologist who received his PhD in Anthropology from Stanford University; prior to graduate school, he worked as a restaurant cook for 1 1/2 years in San Francisco. Since he received his degree, his research and teaching specializations have been the Chinese diaspora of the Asia Pacific, the politics and political economy of urban life in the United States and in Southeast Asia, and social movements and social activism around food in the urban U.S.

This course employs an anthropological approach to the study of the human relationship to food, to contemporary food systems, and to the processes by which they are transformed. First, we consider how an anthropological (and especially ethnographic) approach to the study of food asks questions about food’ s connection to culture, to self, to home and family, to cultural heritage, to cities and to politics. Second, we explore how to study contemporary “food systems” using an anthropological approach. Third, we examine the challenges facing contemporary food systems such as hunger, the intensive use of energy and agro-industry, the abuse of food laborers, and GMO’s, toxins and wastes as products of agro-industrialism. Finally, we explore several social movements that seek to remedy such challenges.

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ANTH 89.047: Canine Cultures
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
SS, GL
Margaret Wiener

Margaret Wiener’s interest in dogs and their people was piqued when she met her first Balinese dog, Morris, whose humans picked up that exotic American name from TV. She was in Bali researching her first prize-winning book about kings and ideas of power. Wiener is currently finishing a book on the idea of magic, and the role it has played in establishing differences between “the West and the rest,” while beginning to work on relations between humans and other species. She currently lives with a dog and a cat.

What is a dog? A companion? A helper in activities as diverse as hunting, shepherding, de-mining, and policing? How did dogs evolve from wolves to become “man’s best friend?” How do the ways dogs know and sense the world differ from the ways humans do? How do dogs without homes relate to humans? This course answers such questions by investigating relations between humans and canines—mainly dogs; some foxes and wolves–across time and space. We will discover how movements of people, images, and goods spread around the world not only specific breeds but ideas about what dogs are good for and how dogs should be treated. Drawing on scholarly articles, news reports, films, statues, and field observations, we’ll explore how human value systems and politics have shaped dog lives and deaths—and in turn how dogs have shaped human lives.

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ANTH 89.062: Blackness and Racialization: A Multidimensional Approach
MWF, 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
HS, US
Charles Price

Charles Price is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Charles’s research, writing and activity focus on Black racial identity, Rastafari identity, life narrative genres, action research, community organizations and community organizing, people-centered community development, and social movements, with a geographic concentration on the United States and Jamaica. Charles authored the book Becoming Rasta: The Origins of Rastafari Identity in Jamaica (2009, New York University Press), co-authored the monograph Community Collaborations: Promoting Community Organizing (2009, Ford Foundation), and is under contract with NYU Press to write a sequel to Becoming Rasta, a book on collective identity formation and ethnogenesis among the Rastafari people of Jamaica. He is developing a historically grounded qualitative approach to explaining collective identity formation. Another project in development involves a collaboration with a faculty member to develop an action-oriented study of how Black men in North Carolina and Connecticut negotiate challenges and obstacles in their lives.

Blackness and Racialization is an introduction to the history, social construction, cultural production, and lived experience of race. The course focuses on Blackness in the United States and Jamaica (for comparison), though it necessarily addresses other race formations such as Whiteness and Brownness. The course approaches racialization from three angles: historical; social; and personal. It utilizes historical, theoretical, ethnographic, and popular culture productions to explain the effects, uses, durability, and pliability of racial formations.
Some questions that the course will address include:

  • What does the social construction of race mean in practice? How is race socially constructed?
  • How do racial categories and identities develop, persist, and change?
  • How does race work at various “levels,” such as the level of the individual, collectivity, and history?
  • What are the origins of various racial stereotypes?
  • Why do people have very different understandings of race, some embracing race, some rejecting race, and some claiming to not understand race at all?

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ANTH 89.087: Gender, Travel, and Tourism
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
SS, GL
Florence Babb

Florence Babb is a cultural anthropologist specializing in gender and sexuality as well as race and class in changing contexts in Latin America. She has taught previously at Colgate University, the University of Iowa, and the University of Florida – she is a newcomer to Carolina. Babb’s courses include such subject areas as the anthropology of gender and sexuality; Latin American cultural politics; travel and tourism; and the anthropology of love and globalization. Recently, she concluded a book project on postrevolutionary and postconflict tourism in Peru, Nicaragua, Mexico, and Cuba, drawing on her areas of research interest.

This first-year seminar considers how gender, global travel, and tourism come together in the contemporary world. We will examine gender differences (as well as differences of race, class, sexual orientation, national origin) in the experiences of travelers as well as of those who work in the service industries that accommodate travelers’ needs. We will also examine the gendered and racialized ways in which travel destinations are represented and marketed. Among the questions we will ask are the following: How are “exotic” locations portrayed as feminine? How are men and women treated differently as they participate in transnational currents of tourism? When and where are gender and sexual identities turned into commodities through tourism? How are power relations negotiated and what prospects are there for communities of women and men in the global South to actively construct the terms of their engagement with travelers from the global North?

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Art and Art History (ARTH/ARTS)

ARTH 53.001: Art and the Body
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
VP, NA
Katherine Guinness

Katherine Guinness is a theorist and historian of contemporary art. She received her Ph.D. in Art History and Visual Studies from the University of Manchester, and has previously taught at the University of Sydney and the University of New South Wales. Her research includes issues of bodily identity, selfie culture, and the aesthetic category of zaniness within video and performance art. She is currently completing a monograph on artist Rosemarie Trockel, entitled Rosemarie Trockel: Schizogenesis. Recently, she received the Lisa Visser Writer’s Award from arts magazine KAPSULA, and has an essay on Heath Franco in the forthcoming collection The National, a survey of contemporary Australian art.

This course will examine presentations and representations of the body in Western art and how such portrayals relate to their social, cultural, and political contexts. From classical Greek nudes to the crucified Christ to the mutilated victims of modern warfare, representations of the human form have always signified essential norms, ideals and aspirations—both personal and communal. This course will examine manifestations of “the body” in Western art. Focusing on depictions of the body in art as well as the use of the body as art, we will explore how such portrayals relate to broad social, cultural and political contexts. We will consider whether particular works of art reinforce or undermine traditional oppositions between normalcy and perversity, attraction and repulsion, nature and culture. Particular attention will be paid to art in which the body functions as a form of dissent, challenging conventions of gender, race or sexuality, with a focus on feminist artists and contemporary artwork.

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ARTH 55H.001: Art, Gender, and Power in Early Modern Europe
MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM
VP, NA
Tania String

Dr Tania String is an art historian specializing in the art of the Tudor period in England, and the Renaissance more broadly. She is the author of numerous books and articles on the portraits of Henry VIII. Before coming to UNC in 2010 she taught in England at the University of Bristol.

What did it mean to be a man or to be a woman in the Renaissance? This seminar will explore the ways in which constructions of gender are critical to understandings of the visual arts in the early modern period (c. 1400-1650). We will discuss and analyze a focused group of representations of men and women: portraits, mythological and biblical paintings and sculptures, and even turn our attention to the buildings these men and women inhabited. We will study the work of artists such as Michelangelo, Donatello, Titian, Holbein, and Rubens, amongst others, to find ways of understanding how masculinity and femininity were central concerns in early modern society and in the art produced in this period.

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ARTS 89.001: Visualizing Women’s Lives and Experiences
MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM
SS, US
Anna Bardone-Cone and Sabine Gruffat

Anna Bardone-Cone, PhD is the Principal Investigator of the studies conducted within the Bardone-Cone Lab. Dr. Bardone-Cone graduated from Williams College with a BA in Mathematics and French in 1991. She went on to receive her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2001, and completed her predoctoral clinical psychology internship at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. She joined the faculty at the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2001 as an Assistant Professor of Psychology and in 2009 joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she is currently a Professor. Her primary research interests lie in the sphere of eating disorders, disordered eating, and body image. She and her lab have several lines of research including: 1) defining eating disorder recovery and remission; 2) identifying and testing pathways to bulimic symptoms with particular interest in the role played by psychosocial variables (e.g., perfectionism, self-efficacy, social comparison, stress) and how these variables interact; and 3) examining cultural, familial, and media factors related to disordered eating and body image. Dr. Bardone-Cone is a member of the Eating Disorders Research Society and a Fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders, and has led an active program of eating disorder research since 1999. With her past and ongoing research studies, Dr. Bardone-Cone has sought to identify contributing factors to disordered eating and body image in order to better understand pathways to eating patterns and body image, including risk and resilience factors, and pathways to recovery. She was recently selected as a Working on Women in Science (WOWS) Scholar in the UNC College of Arts and Sciences for a two-year term, effective July 2017.

Sabine Gruffat is a digital media artist and award-winning filmmaker. Her creative work experimental video and animation, media-enhanced performance, participatory public art, and immersive installation.

Sabine’s films and videos have screened at festivals worldwide including the Image Forum Festival in Japan, The Ann Arbor Film Festival and Migrating Forms in New York. Her feature essay films I Have Always Been A Dreamer and Speculation Nation have screened internationally including at the Viennale, MoMA, Cinéma du Réel at the Centre Pompidou, and The Copenhagen International Documentary Film Festival.

She has also produced art for public spaces as well as interactive installations that have been shown at the Zolla Lieberman Gallery in Chicago, Art In General, Devotion Gallery, PS1 Contemporary Art Museum, and Hudson Franklin in New York.

This interdisciplinary course combines the knowledge and methodology of both psychology and media art disciplines. This course empowers students to develop the skills to analyze and critique how images of women inform psychological experiences, while also teaching students the skills to produce their own media (digital video, photography, interactive) relevant to women’s experiences. As we explore different themes relevant to women (e.g., gender socialization, body image, work/achievement, sex and romance, motherhood, aging, and mental health), this interdisciplinary approach will allow for a more meaningful exploration of women’s lives and experiences, and produce richer and more emotionally salient products and understanding. Students will engage in various hands-on projects, including developing a hypothesis-driven research proposal on a topic relevant to women and developing a website that disseminates key information regarding the chosen topic that is user-friendly, thought-provoking, and visually engaging.

Students may also register for this course under PSYC 89.001

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ARTS 89.002: Photographic Thinking and Practice
MW, 03:35 PM – 04:50 PM
VP
elin o'Hara slavick

elin o’Hara slavick received her MFA in Photography from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and her BA from Sarah Lawrence College. Slavick has exhibited her work internationally, and her work is held in many collections, including: The Library of Congress, Deutsche Bank, The National Library of France, The Art Institute of Chicago, and as a promised gift to the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC. Slavick is the author of two monographs – Bomb After Bomb: A Violent Cartography with a foreword by Howard Zinn, and After Hiroshima, with an essay by James Elkins. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Asia-Pacific Journal, Critical Asian Studies, Cultural Studies, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, and Actuphoto: Actualite Photographique, among other publications. She has received many grants, awards and fellowships.

This class is designed to introduce students to basic black and white darkroom practices, alternative processes (like cyanotypes) and a critical understanding of historical and contemporary photographic theory and production. The class is designed to help you think “photographically” and to make art through a conceptually photographic model or framework. While we are in the midst of / already passed a technological shift in photography – from “wet” processes that use negatives and tangible film to virtual and electronic processes, we will primarily be reading texts about, looking at artists who work with, and working within “old school” photography. The use of all technically possible and theoretically appropriate media is encouraged. We will have several group critiques and many slide/video/film presentations of and reading discussions about historical and contemporary photography and art.

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Asian Studies (ASIA)

ASIA 52.001: Food in Chinese Culture
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
LA, BN
Gang Yue

Dr. Gang Yue teaches a variety of courses on modern China and Tibet.

“You are what you eat,” but equally important is how you eat it. The rich tradition of Chinese food and the even richer tradition of writing about food offer great food for thought. This course uses the latest food writings to explore the major themes and topics related to food and the food culture of China as well as Chinese food in North America.

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ASIA 59.001: Media Masala: Popular Music, TV, and the Internet in Modern India and Pakistan
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
VP, BN
Afroz Taj

Afroz Taj has been teaching South Asian literature, culture, and language in the United States since 1983. In 1995 Afroz came to the University of North Carolina to establish a pioneering program of teaching Hindi-Urdu through live, interactive videoconferencing. He is the creator of the popular language learning websites “A Door Into Hindi” and “Darvazah: A Door Into Urdu.” Afroz’s research interests include Urdu poetry and poetics, South Asian theater, cinema and media. Afroz is the author of The Court of Indar and the Rebirth of North Indian Drama, Urdu Through Hindi, and The Tanhaiyan, Ankahi, and Ahsas Companion.

This seminar explores different types of broadcast and digital media, examining various cultural examples (e.g., music videos, television soap operas and reality shows, radio, and the Internet) and covering a variety of topics, including gender, sexuality, globalization, religion (personal and public), and activism. We will also discuss the ways traditional art forms (e.g., qawwali, ghazal, epic, classical dance) are transformed and given relevance in the modern South Asian media. An important theme of this course is how India and Pakistan, despite historical tensions, are linked by a common media culture that interprets and sometimes transcends geopolitical differences. This seminar will be particularly useful and fun for students who like to consider a variety of multimedia and textual sources in thinking about a provocative issue or question. Each student will design a short research project and make a presentation, and with a small group, produce a music video, giving the class an experiential perspective on the media in modern India and Pakistan. There are no prerequisites.

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ASIA 64.001: Arab World Photography
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
VP, BN
Nadia Yaqub

Nadia Yaqub’s research has treated Arab cultural texts ranging from medieval literature and contemporary oral poetry to modern prose fiction and visual culture. Most recently she has focused on Palestinian literature and visual culture. Her current work has focused on two distinct areas: 1. Palestinian cinema and 2. women and transgression in the Arab World. She is currently completing a study of Palestinian cinema of the 1970s titled Palestinian Cinema in the Days of Revolution. She is also coediting the volume Bad Girls of the Arab World with Dr. Rula Quawas from the University of Jordan.

Arab World Photography introduces students to the practice of photography in the Arab world. We will begin by studying photography of the Arab world by others: European travelers and missionaries, colonialists, ethnographers, journalists, etc. We will examine and discuss selected images, paying particular attention to the relationship that is created and/or represented in them. This viewing will be supplemented with background readings on the history and/or sociopolitical or cultural contexts in which the images are made. We will then turn our attention to indigenous photography in the Arab world. What types of images do people in the region make for themselves and to what purpose? In what ways are these images similar to or different from the photographs created about them by travelers and colonial administrators, foreign journalists, and academics? We will then consider photographs of war and violence and what effects that have on the world. The final segments of the class will be devoted to selected contemporary photographers from the Arab world and the complex ways in which their documentary and art images engage both with the history of Arab photography and the contemporary Arab world; the relationship between photography and moving images; and photography and the Arab Revolutions that began in January 2011.

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ASIA 69.001: Wars and Veterans: Iran, Iraq, and Afghanistan
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
LA, CI, GL
Claudia Yaghoobi

Claudia Yaghoobi is a Roshan Institute Assistant Professor in Persian Studies in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She teaches courses on Middle Eastern and Persian Literature. Yaghoobi’s recent publications include “Yusuf’s Queer Beauty in Persian Cultural Productions”, Comparatist (2016); “Socially Peripheral, Symbolically Central: Sima in Behrouz Afkhami’s Showkaran”, Journal of Asian Cinema (2016); “Subjectivity in ʿAṭṭār’s Shaykh San’an Story in The Conference of the Birds”, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture (2014); and “Sexual Trauma and Spiritual Experience: Rabiʿa al-ʿAdawiyya and Margery Kempe”, Persian Literary Studies Journal (2014). Her book, Subjectivity in ‘Attar, Persian Sufism, and European Mysticism, will be released in May 2017 by Purdue University Press.

In this course, we will explore the various ways that wars and conflicts, particularly Iran-Iraq, U.S.-Iraq, and U.S.-Afghanistan wars, have been portrayed in literature, film, and photography. We will attempt to deepen and enrich our understanding of war experienced by both veterans and civilians of each country. We will examine the impact of war on the human psyche in regards with violence. We will read books by American war veterans and Middle East authors contemplating the wars and their consequences. We will look at each writer’s perspective on war and their interpretation of it comparatively. In order to enhance our understanding of the phenomenon of war, we will also read supplementary articles on criticism of war and a few on psychology of war. There will be film screening on these wars which will give students the opportunity to examine these wars in a different medium than just literature. We will also look at war photography and analyze the perspectives of each photographer and the impact war has not only on people who are involved but on outside observers as well. All readings will be in English. The class will be conducted in the form of a combination of lectures, discussion, and experimentations.

Students may also register for this course under PWAD 69.001

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Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 53.001: Biotechnology: Genetically Modified Foods to the Sequence of the Human Genome
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
PL
Jill Dowen

Jill Dowen, PhD, is a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Integrative Program in Biological and Genome Sciences, and an Assistant Professor in the Biochemistry and Biophysics Department and the Biology Department at UNC-Chapel Hill. Dr. Dowen’s lab is investigating the function of DNA loops involving genes and their regulatory elements. Projects in her lab address how genome organization impacts the expression of genes in different cell types during development and how disruptions in these mechanisms lead to human diseases such as cancers and developmental syndromes.

A good life depends on access to adequate food and medical care. Advances in biotechnology have made possible both agriculture and medicine, and further advances may allow us to feed and keep healthy a burgeoning population in both developed and undeveloped countries. This seminar will examine the science behind a number of striking recent advances in biology, including animal cloning, genetic engineering of crop plants, development of new therapeutic drugs, development of embryonic stem cells, and deciphering of the complete human genome sequence. Students will debate how specific technological advances force us to confront new social and ethical choices, such as whether you want your own genome to be sequenced. We will also consider how new technologies are actually implemented, and we will visit an academic lab and a biotechnology company. The seminar should bring together the humanistic and technical impulses in students, and is open to students planning careers in scientific or humanities fields.

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Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 70.001: You Don’t Have to Be a Rocket Scientist
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
PL
Gary Glish

Professor Gary Glish is an analytical chemist. He cherishes that title because most people do not know what analytical chemistry is so he can do all kinds of different research and call it analytical chemistry. His general field of research is in mass spectrometry, a technique that also spans many different disciplines. His lab is involved in areas from development of new instrumentation to characterizing the chemical content of tobacco and e-cigarette aerosols and detecting leukemia peptide antigens. In his free time Prof. Glish plays basketball, soccer, tennis and bikes. He needs to keep active because he also likes to cook (and eat).

Science as presented in the mass media is often shallow and misleading. Critical evaluation of news reports and claims by politicians, although daunting for the non-scientist, is not difficult if a few basic principles are applied. The underlying theme of this seminar is the development of the basic tools for critically examining information from, or flaws in, news reports and popular science writing. Additional readings by and about scientists are designed to present scientists and science in a more intimate context. The assigned books may include: Cantor’s dilemma by Carl Djerassi; “Surely you’re joking, Mr. Feynman”: Adventures of a Curious Character by Richard P. Feynman; and Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: an Inquiry into Values by Robert Pirsig.

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Classics (CLAS)

CLAS 55H.001: Three Greek and Roman Epics
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
LA, NA, WB
James O'Hara

Professor James O’Hara received his A.B. in Classics from the College of the Holy Cross in 1981, and his Ph.D. in Classical Studies from the University of Michigan in 1986. From 1986 to 2001, he taught at Wesleyan University; since 2001 he has been the George. L. Paddison Professor of Latin at UNC, where he has also been department chair. His research and teaching interests are in Greek and Latin poetry, with special interests in Homer, Vergil, and the literature written during the reign of Rome’s first emperor, Augustus; other interests include Roman Civilization, Hellenistic poetry, didactic poetry, and satire.

The course will involve a close reading in English of Homer’s ILIAD and ODYSSEY and Vergil’s AENEID, and as a transition from Homer to Vergil, we will also read the tragedies of Sophocles from fifth-century Athens. It was epic and tragedy that formulated the bases of Graeco-Roman civilization and provided the models of heroism and human values for the Western Tradition—along with raising fundamental questions about the individual’s relationship to society. We will analyze, discuss, and write about these works both as individual pieces of literature in a historical context, and in terms of how they position themselves in the poetic tradition; after reading the ILIAD and ODYSSEY, we’ll see how heroic myth gets reworked by tragedy for democratic Athens, and then how Vergil combines Homer, tragedy and other traditions to make a new poem for his time. We will look at aspects of structure and technique, questions of overall interpretation and values, and the interplay of genre and historical setting. Requirements: discussion, short online readings in addition to the primary texts, several short papers during the term, and a 6-10-page term paper.

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CLAS 57H.001: Dead and Deadly Women: Greek Tragic Heroines from Aeschylus to Eliot
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
LA, NA
Sharon James

Professor Sharon James specializes in Roman comedy, Latin poetry, and women in ancient Greece and Rome. She has published many articles on these subjects, as well as a book on Roman love elegy (published in 2003); she is currently preparing a large-scale book on women in Greek and Roman New Comedy (the plays of Menander, Plautus, and Terence). She is also the co-editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Women in the Ancient World (published 2012). Professor James regularly teaches all these subjects at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Her lecture courses, CLAS/WMST 240/240H (Women in Ancient Greece) and CLAS/WMST 241/241H (Women in Ancient Rome) are cross-listed between Classics and Women’s Studies. In summer 2012 she co-directed an NEH Institute on the performance of Roman comedy. She has two very lively dogs who keep her busy at home. In 2013, she won the University’s William C. Friday/Class of 1986 Award for Excellence in Teaching.

In this course, we will study the great tragic heroines of ancient Greek drama, focusing on Clytemnestra, Medea, Alcestis, Phaedra, the Trojan Women, Antigone. We will also read a contemporary novel, by Fay Weldon, that engages many of these mythic women. We will studythe Greek tragedies intensively, along with their reception in later art, from paintings to poems, stage productions to sculptures, operas to ballets. Our questions will include: why does Greek tragedy focus so intensely on women? Are the playwrights misogynists or do they express some sympathy for women? What about these female characters grabbed the imaginations not only of ancient Greek playwrights but of later writers, painters, composers, not to mention readers? How are their stories relevant to the 21st century? Did the ancient Athenians know something we don’t?

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Communication (COMM)

COMM 53.001: Collective Leadership Models for Community Change
T, 3:30 PM – 6:30 PM
SS, EE
Patricia Parker

Patricia Parker (Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin) is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Communication Studies. She is the 2013 recipient of the Office of the Provost Engaged Scholarship Award for teaching and the founder and executive director of The Ella Baker Women’s Center for Leadership and Community Activism, a venture supported by a Kauffman Faculty Fellowship for social entrepreneurship. Her teaching, research and engaged scholarship explore questions at the intersections of race, gender, class and power in organization processes, with a primary focus on youth civic activism and girls’ and women’s transformational leadership. Her publications include a book on African American women’s executive leadership (Erlbaum, 2005) and several articles and book chapters on leadership and social change appearing in edited volumes and journals published internationally. She is currently working on a book project exploring youth civic activism and collective leadership within university-community partnerships.

In this seminar we explore the possibilities for collective leadership involving youth and adults in vulnerable communities. Course readings, guest speakers and class field trips will provide exemplars of collaborative leadership models that engage people across traditional divides of culture, race, economics and age. Students will work in teams to research, design and present a sustainable community-based change project focusing on three key strategies that engage youth as leaders and stakeholders in communities: youth media arts, youth organizing and youth participatory action research. Students will present their projects (orally and through multi-media documentation) in class and may be selected to present their work at the biennial leadership conference first convened in 2009 and organized by participants in the inaugural class of this seminar. Throughout the semester, each seminar participant will write a series of short essays reflecting on the collective leadership models and their own community engagement.

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COMM 63.001: The Creative Process in Performance
MW, 1:25 PM – 2:40 PM
VP, CI, US
Joseph Megel

Joseph Megel has spent the last 20 years focusing on the direction and development of new works, for theatre, film and video. Mr. Megel is a member of SSDC (Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers), Co-Artistic Director of StreetSigns Center for Literature and Performance in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and an Associate Artist for The Working Theatre in New York. He holds the M.F.A. degree from the Peter Stark Motion Picture Producing Program at the University of Southern California, a Master of Arts from the University of Cincinnati’s College Conservatory of Music and a B.S. in Speech from Northwestern University. He served for six years as Artistic Director of Playwrights Theatre of New Jersey, a new play development theatre, and continues to serve as Co-Executive Producer of Harland’s Creek Productions, producer of New York premieres of new plays, developmental producer of screenplays, readings and films.

Students in this seminar will attend and study the production process of multimedia, music, dance and theater performances in campus venues: The Memorial Hall Carolina Performing Arts Series, the Process Series of the Performance Studies program in the Department of Communication Studies, Playmakers, and others across campus. We will explore the ways that these performances engage us, communicating powerful ideas and emotions through their various media of expression. Students will research performance pieces, interview the performers, attend rehearsals and performances, and write essays that combine their own experiences of the performances with readings in performance studies. Students will also create their own performance pieces as they observe the relationship of preparation and practice to the spontaneity and surprise of performance.

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COMM 85.001: Think, Speak, Argue
MW, 1:25 PM – 2:40 PM
CI
Christian Lundberg

Christian Lundberg is an Associate Professor in Communication Studies, where he conducts research on the public sphere, rhetoric, and contemporary American religious discourse. He received his Ph.D. from Northwestern University’s program in Rhetoric and Public Culture, and currently teaches a class in globalization and communication. One of his passions is teaching people how to debate. He coached teams at three universities to national championships in intercollegiate debate and has taught debate classes at Northwestern, Emory University, and Georgia State, as well as teaching summer workshops on debate at Northwestern, Dartmouth, Miami University of Ohio, and the University of Kentucky.

This seminar helps students learn to think more critically, speak more persuasively, and argue more effectively by focusing on practical skill development in reasoning and debate. Students at Carolina learn to sharpen their thinking, speaking, and argument skills in the course of their normal classwork, but this happens more or less indirectly. This seminar will focus directly on improving each of these skills. Students will learn to think more critically by reflecting on the work of philosophers who deal with reasoning and informal logic, to speak with conviction and clarity through hands-on learning about the tradition of rhetoric, and to argue more effectively by debating the pressing issues of our day. The skills that we hone in on in this course will help students become more effective in the classroom, in their chosen vocation, and as citizens in an increasingly complex global public sphere.

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COMM 89.002: Beyoncé: Performance and Popular Culture
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
VP
Bryanne Young

Bryanne Young holds a Doctorate in Communication from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She specializes in performance studies, literary and cultural studies, and is interested in popular culture and performance in everyday life. She is a Canadian scholar whose research analyzes the politics of life and death with respect to race, sexuality, and gender.

The course will analyze the music and persona of Beyoncé as a critical medium to investigate popular music and celebrity culture. The course involves the analysis and creation of original performance and will serve as an introduction to critical race studies, feminist theory, and cultural analysis.

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Computer Science (COMP)

COMP 80H.001: Enabling Technology–Computers Helping People
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
US, EE
Gary Bishop

Gary Bishop is a professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research centers on the use of computers to help people with disabilities. Bishop won the Tanner Faculty Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching in 2003 and the Class of 1996 Excellence in Advising Award in 2005. He was one of the first six professors chosen to be a Faculty Engaged Scholar, named by the Carolina Center for Public Service and the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Public Service to conduct projects that connect faculty work and community needs. He also received the Kauffman Entrepreneurial Fellowship.

Nearly one in seven Americans has a significant disability; should they be exceptions? Through readings, guest lectures, videos, and projects we will explore the legal, moral, cultural, and technical issues and opportunities raised by this “minority you can join at any time”. Ideas originated in this class have been successfully used by people worldwide.

This is an approved Apples Service Learning course.

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Dramatic Art (DRAM)

DRAM 83.001: Spectacle in the Theatre
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
VP
David Navalinsky

David Navalinsky is the Director of Undergraduate Production in the Department of Dramatic Art. David has taught at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Mississippi. David’s recent design work includes scenery for The Uncanny Valley by Francesca Talenti. The Uncanny Valley featured a Robothespian™, which is exactly what it sounds like. He has also written a documentary theatre piece Priceless Gem: An Athlete Story, which tells the stories of UNC athletes. David has worked professionally at South Coast Repertory in Orange County California, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, The Illinois Shakespeare Festival, and the Karamu Performing Arts Theatre in Cleveland, OH. Some of David’s favorite projects were at the Dallas Children’s Theater where he made a dinosaur collapse and pirates walk the plank.

This seminar will explore the artists, art and technology involved in creating the world of the play. It is intended as an overview for students who want to learn about theatrical design. Students will create their own designs in the areas of scenery, costumes, and lighting for three plays throughout the semester. The plays will be placed outside of their traditional setting while still maintaining the story and themes. Students have placed Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a trailer park and a daycare center for example. Careful historical research, close reading and analysis, text and source material, and collaboration will be the focus of the student projects.

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DRAM 89.001: The Dramatic Character
TTH, 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM
VP
Janet Chambers

Professor Jan Chambers is resident designer for PlayMakers Repertory Company and faculty with the Department of Dramatic Art where she teaches set, costume and makeup design. This past fall she designed sets for PlayMakers productions of THE CAKE and A CHRISTMAS CAROL and is working on the new play LEAVING EDEN, by Mike Wiley, which will premiere on the Paul Green stage this coming April. Other recent work includes designs for the Guthrie Theatre in Minneapolis, the Folger Shakespeare Theatre in Washington D.C., the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and Archipelago Theatre/ Cine. You can see her work here http://www.unc.edu/~janc/JanChambersDesigner/.

The Dramatic Portrait explores the ways in which dramatic character is conceptualized, interpreted and physically manifested onstage.

How is a portrait more than a picture? How is a studio portrait different from one that is text based and evolves over time and in space? What are the various theatrical elements that are merged together to create dramatic character?

Methods of traditional and contemporary portraiture (painting, sculpture, photography, etc.) will be compared with the visual, aural, spatial, vocal and gestural elements of theatrical design and performance for developing dramatic portraits. Students will work individually and collaboratively to analyze, research, conceptualize and develop dramatic portraits from both given and devised texts. Class discussions will provide ongoing instructor and peer feedback which can be useful in revising work along the the way. Project portraits will be presented in gallery form to an invited audience at the end of the semester.

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Economics (ECON)

ECON 53.001: The Costs and Benefits of the Drug War
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
SS
Arthur Benavie

Arthur Benavie received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. He has been at UNC since 1967. His specialty is macroeconomic theory and policy. His book, Deficit Hysteria: A Common Sense Look at America’s Rush to Balance the Budget, was written for the general public. His most recent book is Social Security under the Gun. In his former life he was a concert violinist, and playing violin is now his main avocation.

The basic question examined in this seminar will be the costs and benefits of the U.S policy of drug prohibition. Does drug prohibition decrease drug abuse? Affect violence in our society? Aid terrorism? Diminish our civil liberties? Affect the public’s health? Corrupt public officials? Should drugs be decriminalized or legalized and if so, how? Should different illicit drugs be treated differently? What is the evidence in the United States and in other countries on decriminalization or legalization? Students will write a paper and present it in class, and prepare an interview with individuals who are on the frontline of the drug war, such as police or attorneys. As a seminar, classroom activity will consist of discussions and debates.

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ECON 57H.001: Engines of Innovation: the Entrepreneurial University in the 21st Century
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
SS, CI
Buck Goldstein

Buck Goldstein is the University Entrepreneur in Residence and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Economics. Prior to returning to the University, Goldstein co-founded Information America, an online information company which was publicly traded and subsequently acquired by the Thomson Corporation. Subsequently, he was a partner in Mellon Ventures, the venture capital arm of Mellon Bank. He is the author, with Holden Thorp, of Engines of Innovation–The Entrepreneurial University in the 21st Century.

This class will explore the current state of American higher education and attempt to apply basic principles of entrepreneurship and the lean start up methodology to the problems facing our colleges and universities. The class will involve readings on current issues in higher education and the study of key concepts in innovation and entrepreneurship. Class teams will then develop and test novel approaches to some of the most important problems in higher ed. Small grants will be available to facilitate this process. The class will also participate in a series of symposiums on higher education. Speakers at the symposiums will also meet with the class

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ECON 89.001: History of Financial Crisis, 1637-2013
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
HS, NA
John Komlos

John Komlos is Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Munich (Germany). He also taught at Harvard, Duke and in Austria and Switzerland. Born in Budapest, he became a refugee during the revolution of 1956, and grew up in Chicago where he received Ph.D.s in both history and economics from the University of Chicago where Nobel-Prize winning economist Robert Fogel induced him to study the effect of economic processes on human biology. Komlos devoted most of his academic career developing this research agenda, which culminated in his founding the journal “Economics and Human Biology” in 2003.

Would you like to find out about the financial crisis of 2008? This seminar will discuss the reasons why the crisis happened, examine critically how the government responded to the crisis, and why it has been difficult for the economy to regain its pre-crisis momentum. We will also discuss the similarities between the Meltdown and other historical financial crisis. Students will gain a broader understanding of the global economy in which we live and work. In addition, the historical perspective will enable students to gain a more thorough appreciation of the challenges that lie ahead for their generation. The aim of the seminar is not to concentrate on facts but rather to comprehend the big picture of economic processes in their social and political context in a very long-run perspective. Lots of discussion, lots of audio visual material will make this an exciting way to start your college career.

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Education (EDUC)

EDUC 65.001: School Daze: What’s School Got to do with Getting an Education?
T, 3:30 PM – 6:15 PM
Suzanne Allen Gulledge

Suzanne Allen Gulledge is a Clinical Professor of Teacher Education, Curriculum and Instruction, and International and Experiential Education. She was named a UNC-Chapel Hill University Engaged Scholar in 2009. International and global studies and community based service learning are among her teaching and research interests. With Ulteschi, Entrepreneurship Initiative and Center for International Studies grants she developed and continues to teach community based and study abroad courses. Through the Burch Honors Program she developed the first School of Education teacher education program study abroad semester. Gulledge is active on the Carolina campus in faculty governance and in interdisciplinary academic activities. She serves on the Carolina Faculty Council Executive Committee and boards of the Center for Faculty Excellence, Carolina Navigators of the Center for Global Education, APPLES Service Learning Program and Fixed Term Faculty Association. Teacher education and teacher professional development, in addition to social foundations, ethics, and social studies education, are Gulledge’s primary scholarly interests.

What does it mean to be an educated person? What function do schools serve? This seminar builds on the experiences of schooling that students bring to the university. It invites them to re-consider and de-construct what they know about education and schools as a result of those experiences. The seminar considers traditional schooling along with non-traditional and international approaches to educating youngsters. Included are provocative readings, discussions and invitations to brainstorm schooling as it relates to education. Students will be challenged to re-consider their experiences and notions about school and to examine alternatives. Students’ first-hand knowledge and experiences combined with a critical perspective will encourage innovative thinking about ways and places of learning with the aim of generating proposals for new or reformed schools and new forms of public education for the future.

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English (ENGL)

ENGL 69.001: Entrepreneurial on the Web
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
LA, CI
Daniel Anderson

Daniel Anderson has been teaching computer-assisted composition courses for 16 years. His work occupies the intersections of technology, teaching, and publication. He has developed award winning Web-based software for writing instruction and has published multiple books devoted to teaching and studying writing and literature. He has taught First Year Seminar courses at UNC–CH since the inception of the FYS program. He directs the Studio for Instructional Technology and English Studies at Carolina. His interests include teaching writing through the use of emerging communication media such as the World Wide Web and guiding students as they work together to investigate and create resources for studying literature.

In this class, we will look at the ways writing is evolving as it moves into digital spaces, with a particular focus on how to create an online presence to represent one’s identity and interests. We will learn aspects of Web development, how to participate in and develop a social media presence, and how to use multimedia to create messages. These contemporary tasks will be considered in light of historical concerns related to writing and communication. The class will also focus on creativity and the ways in which digital modes of communicating can open spaces for broader participation in the arts and creative expression.

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ENGL 71H.001: Doctors and Patients
MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM
LA
Jane F. Thrailkill

Jane F. Thrailkill swerved away from a career in health care and instead earned her Ph.D. in English and American Literature. Her interest in medicine has persisted, however: her first book studied the influence of medical ideas on American authors such as Mark Twain, Henry James, and Kate Chopin. She is Co-Director of HHIVE (Health & Humanities: Interdisciplinary Venue for Exploration). Her talk for TEDxUNC looks at the serious issue of hospital-based delirium and describes how literary study can give insight into medical problems. Dr. Thrailkill has been recognized for her commitment to undergraduate teaching by a number of university-wide teaching awards and a Bank of America Honors Distinguished Term Chair.

When the medical anthropologist Arthur Kleinman writes that “illness has meaning,” he reminds us that the human experience of being sick involves more than just an ailing body. In this course we will analyze a diverse collection of writers who have taken as their topic the human struggle to make sense of suffering and debility. The course is divided into five units that will allow us to explore not just the medical, but the personal, ethical, cultural, spiritual, and political facets of illness. Central texts may include Anne Fadiman’s /The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down/, Paul Kalanithi’s /When Breath Becomes Air/, and Alan Shapiro’s /Vigil/. We will also read shorter selections from an array of authors, such as Susan Sontag, Audre Lorde, Atul Gawande, Arthur Kleinman, and Eric Cassell. We will draw on the many talented writers and researchers in the area for a series of guest lectures.

May substitute for the ENGL 268H/gateway course requirement for the Medicine, Literature, and Culture minor.

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ENGL 85H.001: Economic Saints and Villains
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
LA, CI, WB
David Baker

David Baker is the Peter G. Phialas Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. He is interested in how early modern people experienced their marketplace, what they thought and felt about it, and in how literary works reflected that experience. He has written a book on this, and also one on issues of ethnic identity in Britain at this time. He teaches courses in Shakespeare and other dramatists, as well as the popular culture of early modern England. Recently, he has begun to explore the digital humanities and has several collaborative projects under way, including a web application dedicated to the literature and culture of early modern Ireland.

In 1593, the playwright, Christopher Marlowe, supposedly said that “he had as good a right to [make] coin as the Queen of England,” and that he was going to produce “French crowns, pistolets, and English shillings.” What did the writers of Renaissance England think about money and making money, and how did this influence their literary creativity? What did they say about the economy that was emerging around them, which today we call “capitalism”? And how did they carve out a place for themselves in that marketplace? In this course, we will go back to the origins of our own market-world. In the literature of the time, authors such as William Shakespeare, Thomas More, Ben Jonson, and Marlowe offered nuanced perspectives on inequality, globalism, and market ethics. They debated the nature of coins and credit, the role of women in the economy, and the dangers (and delights) of consumerism. We will read a variety of Renaissance works—Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice, More’s Utopia, Jonson’s Bartholomew Fair, Thomas Middleton and Thomas Dekker’s The Roaring Girl, as well as others—and compare them with examples of economic thought, commercial art, and literature from our own time. The goal will be to open a conversation between the past and the present.

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ENGL 89.001: Horror
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Tyler Curtain

Tyler Curtain is a theorist with the Department of English and Comparative Literature. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in theory, as well as courses in science fiction and fantasy. Professor Curtain is a member of the executive committee of the Discussion Group on Science Fiction and Utopian and Fantastic Literature of the Modern Language Association. He will be the group’s President in 2016-2017.

From its origins in Gothic and pre-Gothic literatures and arts, this course examines the complexities and pleasures of horror. Topics include psychology, aesthetics, politics, allegory, ideology, and ethics.

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Geological Sciences (GEOL)

GEOL 76.001: Energy Resources for a Hungry Planet
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
PL
José Rial

José Rial has a Ph.D. in Geophysics from Cal Tech and a MSc. in Geology from the University of Michigan. Rial’s expertise includes mathematical modeling of natural systems, seismic wave propagation and climatology. In recent years Rial’s academic interests include the role of science and scientific discovery on global environmental issues, such as global warming, climate change and policy.

The seminar first describes today’s fundamental sources of energy: oil, natural gas and coal, how and where to find them, and the latest statistics on how long the present reserves will last. We will then explore alternative energy resources and why it is so important for society to understand that fossil fuel reserves are finite, and will be depleted in 40 years (cheap oil) or in 200 years (coal). The course stimulates student participation through class debates (e.g., Can nuclear energy become a viable and safe substitute for coal?, Is the current US energy policy a threat to national security?).

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GEOL 77.001: Volcanoes and Civilization: An Uneasy Coexistence
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
PL
Allen Glazner

Allen Glazner’s research focuses on volcanoes, earthquakes and the processes that build the earth’s crust. In a typical year he spends several weeks doing field work with UNC students in the mountains and deserts of California. He was schooled at Pomona College and UCLA, began his teaching career at UNC in 1981 and has won two teaching awards. Geologic field trips have taken him to Argentina, Greece, Mexico, Italy, Switzerland, Alaska, Chile, Iceland, Scotland, France and Hawaii in recent years. He likes mountains, hiking, cycling, jazz and cool science stuff.

Volcanoes provide a breathable atmosphere, a habitable climate, and precious ores, but they have the potential to destroy civilization. This seminar will explore the uneasy coexistence of volcanoes and civilization.

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German and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL/SLAV)

GSLL 59.001: Moscow 1937: Dictatorships and Their Defenders
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
HS, GL
David Pike

David Pike received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1978 in German Studies with a minor in Russian and has taught at UNC–CH since 1980. He is the author of three books, The Politics of Culture in Soviet -Occupied Germany, 1945-1949 (1993), Lukács and Brecht (1985), and German Writers in Soviet Exile, 1933-1945 (1982). His research takes him regularly to Berlin and Moscow.

This seminar deals in the broadest possible context with two critical issues that dominated the 20th century: the rise of fascism out of the carnage of World War I and the Bolshevik revolution to which the war and Czarist Russia’s involvement in it helped contribute. As the semester unfolds, drawing on a variety of historical and documentary films, and literature (memoirs, novels), we will take a comparative look at singular personalities like Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler and examine the role played by such key figures in historical events of this magnitude. Towards the end of the semester, we will glance briefly at the situation created in Western and Eastern Europe by the defeat of fascism and contemplate the origins and evolution of the cold war. We will conclude the seminar with a consideration of the dissolution and democratization of Eastern European countries, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and, against the tragic background of the past, the general prognosis for democracy in the future.

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GSLL 67.001: Blackness in the European Imaginary, Europe in the Black Imaginary
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
GL, NA
Priscilla Layne

Priscilla Layne is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in African, African American, and Diaspora Studies. She is a native of Chicago and before moving to North Carolina, she received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2011. Her fields of research and teaching interests are 20th- and 21st-century literature, film, music, (post)subculture studies, multiculturalism, African Diaspora studies and gender studies. She is the author of several essays about German film, Turkish German literature, popular music and counterculture in Germany. In her free time she enjoys live music, traveling with her husband and son, and collecting punk records.

This seminar addresses how encounters between Europe and the African Diaspora changed notions of race, nation, identity and belonging in the 20th century. From the jazz age to the present, Blackness has posed both an allure as well as a danger for Europeans, especially those who view Black culture as challenging “old world” traditions. How does one explain Europeans’ fear and simultaneous love of Blackness? How have many Black intellectuals and artists responded to this puzzling binary? And what do discourses on and encounters with Blackness mean for Europe’s future? In the past ten years, interest in African Diaspora Studies and Black European culture has increased dramatically. This seminar will not only introduce students to these dynamic fields, but also introduce them to the study of the humanities by having them engage with theoretical and historical texts, learn literary and cultural analysis and conduct their own research. Class discussion will focus on a variety of media, ranging from essays, novels and poems to films and a musical. Through engaging with these texts, students will explore the construction of Blackness in various national and historical contexts including Germany, England, France, Russia, and Scandanavia.

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SLAV 86.001: Literature and Madness
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
LA
Radislav Lapushin

Radislav Lapushin, Associate Professor of Russian Literature, received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. His primary research interests are Chekhov; interrelationship between prose and poetry; and Russian literature on stage and screen. His recent book—“Dew on the Grass”: The Poetics of Inbetweenness in Chekhov—focuses on the poetic dimensions of Anton Chekhov’s prose and drama. He is the author of several volumes of poetry.

This seminar considers the relationship between literature and madness through the works of major Russian writers (Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Chekhov). We will examine how these artistic texts differently construct representations of madness. Students’ reading, writing, class discussions and presentations will be directed by a series of topics, such as the origin of madness, awareness or unawareness of madness, the theme of the mad artist, and madness as a literary device.

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History (HIST)

HIST 76.001: Understanding 1492
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
HS, WB
Kathryn Burns

Kathryn Burns first became interested in the colonial Andes while on a junior semester of study abroad. She has been returning to Peru ever since, especially to Lima and Cuzco. Her most recent book is about writing technologies and power in colonial Peru. She has been teaching Latin American history for over fifteen years, first at the University of Florida in Gainesville, and since 2000 in UNC’s History Department.

This seminar addresses one of the most challenging topics in American and Latin American history: how to understand what is often called simply “the conquest,” la conquista. For nineteenth-century historians writing in English and Spanish, it was a relatively clear-cut matter of epic battles and conquistadores. Spaniards won in a walkover; the “bronze race” suffered tragic defeat. Today, the conquest (or encounter, or invasion) no longer looks this way to historians. New sources, methods, and approaches have taken the field. Yet as our perspectives shift, our histories of la conquista still elicit strong feelings. Why? What’s at stake in the narration of this charged history? Whose versions of events tend to dominate? In this seminar, we will pay close attention to the sources for understanding the past, and to ways of narrating it. Students will explore the Wilson Library’s remarkable Flatow Collection of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century chronicles, and handle documents from the Manuscript Division’s holdings from colonial Popayán. Students will be expected to write frequent responses to our sources, participate in class discussions, and craft a final essay on a topic of particular interest.

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HIST 85H.001: What Concentration Camp Survivors Tell Us
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
HS, NA
Donald Reid

Donald Reid is an historian of modern Europe with a particular interest in how individuals and societies deal with traumatic pasts and in the place of history in novels and films. His research has ranged from the social worlds of Paris sewermen and French fascination with them to the way the Resistance has been remembered in France. His most recent publications are on radical politics in modern France and the detective novelist Didier Daeninckx as historian.

This course asks what (if anything) only survivors of concentration camps can tell us about the experience and, in turn, what we can learn by exploring the effects of this experience on survivors. This is a course about reading texts and viewing films in such a way that we can learn as much as we can from individuals expressing the inexpressible. Some things get lost in these tellings, but take on importance for this very reason. We are going to work to reveal this absent presence, examining what gets lost, why and how engaging with this can make us better historians of the camp experience and its effects.

We will analyze a number of texts and films about both the Soviet camps and the Nazi camps. We will devote particular attention to the works, written and filmed, of a survivor of Auschwitz, Primo Levi, and of a survivor of Buchenwald, Jorge Semprun. Dealing with the same events in their lives recounted differently over time, they offer insights into the nature of the experience and how the way it is recounted changes with individuals and in different historical situations. Levi’s creations and recreations of the experience of resistance, imprisonment, and liberation reveal the humane in a world predicated on its erasure. Semprun was a Communist whose engagement with novels about the Soviet camps transformed his understanding of who he was and what he had experienced.

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Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST)

IDST 89.001: Language We Live by: Language in Cognition, Learning, and Organization
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
PH
Kristin Bedell, Elliot Hauser, Min Tang, Marsha Collins

Note: This course will be taught by three Royster Fellows under the supervision of the Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education, Dr. Marsha Collins.

Kristin Bedell (Education) studies science education and citizen science. Her research focuses on the emergent learning processes of students in novel learning environments.

Elliott Hauser (Information and Library Science) studies organization, information systems, and the history and philosophy of information. His research focus is on the production of certainty in information systems.

Min Tang (Philosophy) studies philosophy of mind, language, and moral psychology. Her research focus is on how thinking in a non-native language affects the way people formulate and understand concepts and the way people make moral judgments.

Marsha S. Collins is Professor of Comparative Literature and Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education. Her research focuses on Early Modern Spanish Literature and Culture in the context of Early Modern Europe, Literature and the Visual Arts, and Idealizing Forms of Literature. She is the author of three books, most recently of “Imagining Arcadia in Renaissance Romance” (Routledge, 2016) and over thirty articles. She loves dogs, yoga, piano, travel, being at the ocean, and spending time with family and friends.”

What is the nature and structure of language? How do we acquire and learn a language? How does the way we use language affect our interactions with the world?

Throughout history, these questions have sparked debate and spurred reflection. This seminar continues that tradition through an interdisciplinary approach into language, focusing on its philosophical, linguistic, educational, and informational dimensions. We will study popular and scholarly articles alongside various kinds of media artifacts to engage with both historical and contemporary investigations of language. These investigations include language acquisition, language learning, behavioral patterns, cultural diversity, and the moral implications of language use. Students will have the opportunity to examine their personal language experiences in linguistically and culturally diverse settings. Through class discussions, writing assignments, group presentations, and student-designed creative projects, students will have an opportunity to hone the active inquiry, creative thinking, and communication skills necessary for future academic endeavors.

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IDST 89.002: From Laboratory to Layperson: Scientific Literacy and Communication
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
PL, CI
Casey Berger, Luis Maldonado, Eric Trexler, Marsha Collins

Note: This course will be taught by three Royster Fellows under the supervision of the Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education, Dr. Marsha Collins.

Casey Berger is a PhD student in the Drut group in the UNC Physics and Astronomy Department. She studies computational many-body quantum mechanics. Casey is a Department of Energy CSGF fellow and recipient of the William Neal Reynolds Fellowship from the UNC Royster Society of Fellows. Casey received a BA in Philosophy, a BS in Film Production, and a minor in Spanish from Boston University in 2010. Following her graduation, she spent two years working in the film industry in Hollywood before returning to academia to complete a BS in Physics at The Ohio State University in 2015. While at Ohio State Casey was co-chair of the Society of Women in Physics (SWiP) and a member of the Mortar Board National Senior Honorary.

Luis E. Maldonado is Royster Ph.D. student in the department of Nutrition. He received a Bachelors of Science in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Studies with a minor in Sociology from the University of Southern California, followed by a Master of Public Health in Chronic Disease Epidemiology from the Yale School of Public Health. His research focuses on dietary patterns, maternal and child health, and social and biological determinants of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease within Latino populations.

Eric Trexler completed his undergraduate degree in Exercise Science Education at The Ohio State University, followed by a Master of Arts Degree in Exercise and Sport Science (Exercise Physiology) at UNC Chapel Hill. Eric is currently a Royster Fellow at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he is completing a PhD in Human Movement Science under Dr. Abbie Smith-Ryan. As a strength and conditioning practitioner, Eric has worked with football, wrestling, and Special Olympics powerlifting athletes. Eric’s primary research interests are in evaluating how exercise and dietary supplement interventions influence body composition, metabolic function, and performance.

Marsha S. Collins is Professor of Comparative Literature and Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education. Her research focuses on Early Modern Spanish Literature and Culture in the context of Early Modern Europe, Literature and the Visual Arts, and Idealizing Forms of Literature. She is the author of three books, most recently of “Imagining Arcadia in Renaissance Romance” (Routledge, 2016) and over thirty articles. She loves dogs, yoga, piano, travel, being at the ocean, and spending time with family and friends.”

Scientific literacy is a critical cornerstone for growth and progress in economic, intellectual, and policy matters worldwide. Through this course, students will gain greater understanding of scientific literacy by exploring how science is done, communicated, and understood by the public. Science is a process that is applied in many forms. As such, the course takes an interdisciplinary approach integrating basic, observational, and applied sciences in an effort to not only show how these fields work together to make a positive impact in the world but also elucidate similar issues in science communication they all often face. Students will explore foundational concepts relating to logic, reasoning, communication, and critical evaluation of evidence, which will provide them with skills that apply to a variety of fields and concepts.

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Information and Library Science (INLS)

INLS 73.001: Smart Cities
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Arcot Rajasekar

Arcot Rajasekar is a Professor in the School of Library and Information Sciences, a Chief Scientist at the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) and co-Director of Data Intensive Cyber Environments (DICE) Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A leading proponent of policy-oriented large-scale data management, Rajasekar has several research projects funded by the NSF, NARA, NIH and other funding agencies. Rajasekar has a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Maryland at College Park and has more than 100 publications in the areas of data grids, digital library, persistent archives, logic programming and artificial intelligence. His latest projects include the Datanet Federation Consortium and the Data Bridge that is building a social network platform for scientific data.

A smart city is one where the needs of a populace meet the needs of environmental sustainability. The balance between the social and environmental issues is governed by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) that power a smart city infrastructure. In this course, we learn about the influence of urban networks, smart city urban planning, energy as a catalyst of sustainable development, smart city infrastructure, sustainable transportation, flow of information and communications, smart grids, digital infrastructure and the role of data and information technology. We will discuss criteria for measuring the smartness of a city, including quality of life, citizen governance, and discuss issues that go towards the making of a future smart city. Several case studies will be presented with guest lecturers invited to present on critical thinking and practices in smart city development.

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Linguistics (LING)

LING 50.001: Language in the U.S.A.
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
SS
Benjamin Frey

Benjamin Frey’s research interests center on sociolinguistics, with particular emphasis on language shift. His current project is a book manuscript on the process of shift as analyzed through the lens of economics, politics, religion, and race. The book notes the important roles of community agency and boundaries in insulating social networks, and compares the shift situations of several communities across the United States.

The motivation for Dr. Frey’s interest in language shift is primarily in language revitalization. If people can understand the processes that led to a shift away from endangered languages, they can also work with communities to promote their growth. As a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, the mission of language revitalization is close to his heart.

After joining the American Studies faculty in July of 2015, Dr. Frey has taught courses in Cherokee language and sociolinguistics. One of his particular interests in teaching is in inspiring students to see how classroom knowledge can apply to real world social situations. In his ‘America’s Threatened Languages’ course, he encourages students to consult census data to supplement historical knowledge about community development. This helps to form a picture of how shift situations unfold.

In 2013, he was the recipient of a Carolina Postdoctoral Fellowship for Faculty Diversity. During that time, he received an award for commitment to service from the Office of Postdoctoral Affairs.

The linguistic landscape of the United States in historical and contemporary perspective: American English dialects, language maintenance and shift among Native American and immigrant groups, language politics and policy.

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Marine Sciences (MASC)

MASC 57H.001: From “The Sound of Music” to “The Perfect Storm”
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
PL, QI
Alberto Scotti

Professor Alberto Scotti’s research focuses on problems of applied fluid dynamics which are environmentally and/or geophysically relevant. Presently, he is involved in several projects involving stratified flows interacting with topography, internal waves (linear and nonlinear) and boundary layer turbulence using a combination of theoretical and numerical tools.

We are constantly surrounded by phenomena that are wave-like in nature. We communicate over short distances with sound waves, while we use electromagnetic waves over long distances. We see waves when we stand at beach, and the weather we experience is controlled very often by wave-like features of the jet stream. In this seminar, we will develop the conceptual framework necessary to understand waves, starting from laboratory observations. The main goal is to expose the common traits of waves, and how they can be used to enhance our understanding and predict the outcome of a broad range of important physical phenomena.

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Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 51.001: Fish Gotta Swim, Birds Gotta Fly: The Mathematics and the Mechanics of Moving
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
QI
Roberto Camassa

Roberto Camassa is the Kenan Distinguished Professor in the Dept of Mathematics. His Ph.D. is from Cal Tech, and his research interests include nonlinear evolution equations, mathematical modeling, fluid mechanics and optics.

One focus of this seminar is to address the science of motion of vehicles and living organisms, in fluids such as air and water, using simple physical explanations supported with the relevant mathematical descriptions. Experimental demonstrations will be used to illustrate the concepts encountered in class, as well as to provide an insight into the art of fluid flow visualization. There are no prerequisites, and material from physics and mathematics will be introduced as needed. Understanding of the material will be reinforced with biweekly homework assignments and a final animation project. While this course is focused on the physics and mathematics, rather than computer programming, an introduction to elementary concepts of scientific computing will be part of the course.

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MATH 53.001: Symmetry and Tilings
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:40 PM
QI
Linda Green

Linda Green grew up in Durham, North Carolina and graduated from the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Chicago and her Ph.D. from Princeton University, specializing in in three-dimensional topology and geometry. Before coming to UNC, she worked in industry, using mathematical models of breast cancer to help guide health care policy. She also directed math enrichment programs for middle and high school students in the San Francisco Bay Area. She joined the UNC faculty as a lecturer in 2013. Her non-mathematical interests include soccer and hiking.

Repeating symmetry patterns and tilings are present all around us, from the brickwork on campus, to designs on tapestries and wallpaper, to paintings like those of M.C. Escher, to crystals including snowflakes and quartz. In this class, students will explore symmetry patterns, learn to identify and classify two-dimensional patterns, and use software to create their own tiling designs. Students will relate tiling patterns to their folded up counterparts, called orbifolds, and use mathematical ideas of curvature and cone points to determine which patterns are possible and which patterns can never be achieved. In addition to analyzing repeating patterns of tiles, students will examine non-periodic patterns, such as Penrose’s kite and dart tilings, and use mathematical ideas of self-similarity and limits to understand why these patterns can never exactly repeat. Course assignments will include mathematical investigations, design projects such as virtual and physical kaleidoscopes, quizzes, homework, and a final project. The final project will allow students to delve more deeply into a theoretical topic (e.g. hyperbolic tilings or crystallographic groups) or an application (e.g. quasicrystals or basket weave patterns). There are no prerequisites.

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MATH 58.001: Math, Art, and the Human Experience
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
QI
Mark McCombs

Mark McCombs received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics from UNC-Chapel Hill. He is A recent recipient of both a Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and a Students’ Undergraduate Teaching Award. He has also served as the mathematics department’s Director of Teacher Training, as well as an academic adviser in the College of Arts and Sciences. He authored the textbook (and companion website) used in Math 110 (college algebra) and supervises TAs who teach pre-calculus and calculus courses. He is especially committed to helping students discover more confidence in their own mathematical abilities. He enjoys writing, photography, film making, and UNC basketball.

This seminar is designed to engage students in an exploration of the relevance of mathematical ideas to fields typically perceived as “non-mathematical” (e.g., art, music, film, literature). Equally important will be an exploration of how these “non-mathematical” fields influence mathematical thought. Course activities and assignments have been designed to illuminate the fact that even the most complex mathematical concepts grow out of real people’s attempts to understand their world. By the end of the seminar, students should be able to

  • Identify and assess how mathematical ideas influence and are influenced by ideas expressed through art, music, literature, religion, etc
  • Compare and contrast different philosophies concerning the nature of mathematics
  • Articulate their own well-reasoned ideas concerning the nature of mathematics
  • Discuss the evolution of fundamental mathematical concepts in a historical as well as a cultural context
  • Discuss the work and lives of important mathematicians in relation to the “non-mathematical” work of their contemporaries
  • Identify and assess how their own understanding of mathematical ideas influences the way they interact with the world

Course assignments and activities will include weekly readings and short homework writing assignments (2–3 paragraphs), quizzes, and a portfolio of mathematical art (e.g., painting, origami, poetry, music). No prerequisite is required.

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Music (MUSC)

MUSC 56.001: Early-Modern Court Spectacle
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
HS, CI, WB
Megan K. Eagen

Megan K. Eagen earned her Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her doctoral dissertation explored intersections of music and religious identity in late-Renaissance Augsburg, Germany, through the lens of psalm motets. Eagen has been the recipient of numerous travel and research grants, particularly in support of this project, including a Research Award funded by UNC’s Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) and a full-year Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD) Fellowship.

Eagenhas presented her work at national and international conferences in the U.S., U.K., Canada, Austria, Belgium, Germany, Italy, and the Czech Republic, including the national gatherings of the American Musicological Society (Vancouver) and the Renaissance Society of America (Chicago), and the International Musicological Society Congress (Rome). Eagen’s current research continues to focus on late-Renaissance polyphony and has expanded to include polyphonic Lieder. Eagen’s scholastic interests also include music of the Second Viennese School, Celtic repertories, and rock music.

Eagen graduated magna cum laude with a B.M. in Music Composition and a B.S. in Physics and Astronomy from Iowa State University. She holds an M.A. in Humanities from the University of Chicago and an M.A. in Music from UNC. Following the completion of her Ph.D., she accepted a position at East Carolina University in Greenville, where she taught core courses in music history and theory (2016-2017). She is delighted to return to UNC as a Lecturer for the current academic year. Eagen plays piano, oboe, and Irish tin whistle and maintains a private piano studio. She enjoys running, hiking, and all forms of travel.

Music and spectacle in the late medieval, Renaissance, and baroque courts of Europe.

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MUSC 62.001: Vienna: City of Dreams
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
HS, CI
Stefan Litwin

Stefan Litwin has been Professor for Contemporary Music and Interpretation at the Hochschule für Musik Saar since 1992. He was also a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin from 2003 until 2005, where he presented numerous Lecture-Recitals and worked on a larger compositional project. During the season 2005/06, he was Distinguished Artist in Residence at Christ College, Cambridge University, UK. Since 2008, on faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Turn of the twentieth century Vienna was a crucible for much of modern life as we know it today. We will explore a wide gamut of music, art, architecture, literature, philosophy and political texts from this fascinating social period, including the eroticism pervading paintings of Klimt, Freud’s writings on the roots of human behavior in the subconscious, Karl Kraus’ critical social commentary in “Die Fackel”, as well as the roots of Zionism and the Nazi party in Austrian politics. Above all, we will listen to music of Brahms, Johann Strauss, Jr., Gustav Mahler, Richard Strauss, Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Class projects will include reports on various historical figures or composers, discussions of texts, and group listening to music.

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Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD)

PWAD 69.001: Wars and Veterans: Iran, Iraq, and Afghanistan
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
LA, CI, GL
Claudia Yaghoobi

Claudia Yaghoobi is a Roshan Institute Assistant Professor in Persian Studies in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She teaches courses on Middle Eastern and Persian Literature. Yaghoobi’s recent publications include “Yusuf’s Queer Beauty in Persian Cultural Productions”, Comparatist (2016); “Socially Peripheral, Symbolically Central: Sima in Behrouz Afkhami’s Showkaran”, Journal of Asian Cinema (2016); “Subjectivity in ʿAṭṭār’s Shaykh San’an Story in The Conference of the Birds”, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture (2014); and “Sexual Trauma and Spiritual Experience: Rabiʿa al-ʿAdawiyya and Margery Kempe”, Persian Literary Studies Journal (2014). Her book, Subjectivity in ‘Attar, Persian Sufism, and European Mysticism, will be released in May 2017 by Purdue University Press.

In this course, we will explore the various ways that wars and conflicts, particularly Iran-Iraq, U.S.-Iraq, and U.S.-Afghanistan wars, have been portrayed in literature, film, and photography. We will attempt to deepen and enrich our understanding of war experienced by both veterans and civilians of each country. We will examine the impact of war on the human psyche in regards with violence. We will read books by American war veterans and Middle East authors contemplating the wars and their consequences. We will look at each writer’s perspective on war and their interpretation of it comparatively. In order to enhance our understanding of the phenomenon of war, we will also read supplementary articles on criticism of war and a few on psychology of war. There will be film screening on these wars which will give students the opportunity to examine these wars in a different medium than just literature. We will also look at war photography and analyze the perspectives of each photographer and the impact war has not only on people who are involved but on outside observers as well. All readings will be in English. The class will be conducted in the form of a combination of lectures, discussion, and experimentations.

Students may also register for this course under ASIA 69.001

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Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 68H.001: Moral Life
MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM
PH
Douglas MacLean

Douglas MacLean’s current research focuses on practical ethics and issues in moral and political theory that are particularly relevant to practical concerns. Most of his recent writing examines how values do and ought to influence decisions, both personal decisions and government policies.

Modern (post-Enlightenment) moral philosophy is primarily concerned with analyzing or defining moral concepts. This includes basic or “thin” concepts like good, bad, right, wrong, and ought; and it includes “thick” concepts like kindness, cruelty, courage, cowardice, empathy, integrity, selfishness, and other concepts that characterize virtues and vices. Another aim of moral philosophy, which has been less pronounced in the post-enlightenment age but was the central moral question in the ancient world is: what is the proper or ideal life for a human being? This seminar will focus on the latter question, but it will draw heavily on modern philosophical works to help examine it.

We will begin with the ancient Greeks, especially Socrates, the first philosopher in the Western tradition to focus specifically on ethics. We will look briefly at the life and teaching of St. Augustine and then move to more modern and contemporary writing, looking at what modern moral theories tell us about the nature of a morally ideal life and what critics of these theories say about how human beings ought to live. Readings will be drawn primarily from philosophy but will also include literature. We will also watch and discuss several movies.

The class will be conducted as a seminar, and students will be expected to take the lead in discussing various topics. There will be no exams, but there will be at least five papers plus reports to the class. Students will also be required to come up with examples of morally good lives and explain and defend their choice of those examples.

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Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)

PHYS 53.001: Handcrafting in the Nanoworld: Building Models and Manipulating Molecules
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
PL
Michael R. Falvo

Michael R. Falvo is a Research Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. He received his BS in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1991, and his PhD in physics from UNC-CH in 1997. He is a former winner of the UNC Student Undergraduate Teaching Award presented annually to three professors by the undergraduate student body, and is a member of the UNC Academy of Distinguished Teaching Scholars. His current research focuses is on the physics of proteins and cells. He stretches, pokes and prods nanometer scale biological systems such as viruses, biopolymer strands, and individual protein molecules to test their mechanical properties. Falvo has a long-standing interest in science outreach and frequently presents workshops for the public and k-12 teachers. He has also co-authored two books on nanoscience for middle school science teachers.

he nanoworld is a strange and captivating place. It is a world of molecules vibrating trillions of times a second, quantum dots emitting rainbow colors, DNA encoding information in molecular bonds, and protein motors driving the complex machinery of the cell. At this scale, nature has unique rules and behaviors, some of which are amazing and unexpected. We are still uncovering these rules, and are only beginning to apply this new knowledge to technology. Can we build molecular machines that cure disease or clean up the environment? Can we make computers using single molecule transistors? How do viruses and other bio systems “assemble” themselves? In this seminar, we dive into the basic physics, chemistry and biology that describe the nanometer scale world. We will also try to distinguish the true promise of nanoscience from the hype. Students will engage in class discussions informed by their weekly reading of selected scientific literature. They will also participate in small group projects building physical models of nanoscale objects and phenomena, and perform calculations to gain a quantitative understanding of the physics underlying the nanoworld. No prerequisite is required for this course, but a spirit of adventure is.

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Political Science (POLI)

POLI 52.001: Friendship in Political Thought
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
PH, CI
Susan Bickford

Susan Bickford grew up in rural Ohio, did her undergraduate work at Bryn Mawr College, and received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Her research and teaching focus on feminist political theory, the impact of conflict and inequality on democratic politics, and ancient Greek political thought. She is the author of The Dissonance of Democracy: Listening, Conflict, and Citizenship. In 2013, she made it to the regional tryouts for Jeopardy, but Alex Trebek has not yet invited her to be on the show.

From Facebook friends to BFFs, friendship is a crucial part of our lives; friendship has also been a crucial concern in the history of political thought. In this class, we will investigate what relationships have been designated “friendship” in the past, and investigate why are they of such concern to political and ethical philosophers. What is the work that “friendship” does in the political and ethical thought of ancient thinkers like Plato, Aristotle, Cicero? How – and why – do Montaigne and Emerson write about it? Where do we find the most provocative and insightful contemporary writing about friendship? Above all: what is friendship’s relation to politics and to ethical life?

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POLI 54.001: The American Worker: Sociology, Politics, and History of Labor in the United States
MW, 10:10 AM – 11:25 AM
NA
Michele M. Hoyman

Michele M. Hoyman teaches in the Political Science Department and in the Master of Public Administration program. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Michigan. Professor Hoyman’s interests are in economic development, sustainable development, industrial labor relations, and public sector personnel. On a personal level, she is an avid UNC basketball fan and spends her spare time being walked in the park by her dog, Tilly. She is afflicted with an unrelenting sense of humor.

The face of the American worker is changing and the challenges American workers face are ever evolving. In the wake of recent events like the Occupy Wall Street protests, the public in general is becoming more aware of issues like income inequality, living wages, and the role of unions in the workplace. This seminar will explore the American worker from a legal, economic, and social justice perspective. Additionally, the legal framework Americans operate within in respect to labor law will be compared and contrasted with international standards and labor rights. The seminar will also feature an analysis of the American worker through classic film and fictional literature.

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POLI 66.001: The United States and the European Union: Partners or Rivals?
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
SS
Liesbet Hooghe

Liesbet Hooghe received her Ph.D. from the University of Leuven in Belgium in 1989. Before joining UNC in 2000, she taught at the University of Toronto (1994-2000) and held research fellowships at Cornell University, Oxford University (Nuffield), the European University Institute (Florence, Italy) and the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin ( Germany). Between 2004 and 2016, she was affiliated with the VU Amsterdam. Her principal areas of interest are comparative politics (Europe), identity, political parties, political elites, decentralization and international organization. She has written several books, including Cohesion Policy and European Integration (OUP, 1996); Multi-Level Governance in the European Union (Rowman & Littlefield, 2001—with Gary Marks); The European Commission and the Integration of Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2002), The Rise of Regional Authority (Routledge, 2010 – with Gary Marks and Arjan Schakel); the European Commission of the 21st Century (Oxford University Press, 2013; co-authored); Measuring Regional Authority (OUP, 2016; co-authored); and Community, Scale and Regional Governance: A Postfunctionalist Theory (OUP, 2016 – with Gary Marks).

This seminar introduces students to the European Union and its relations with the United States. In the first part, we become familiar with the European Union. Why is there a European Union? How does it operate, and how has it developed? What kind of polity is emerging at the European level, and how does it differ from federalism in the United States? Finally, how does Europe deal with its multiple crises? The second section compares American and European politics. How are elections and the practice of government different? How does welfare in the United States and the role of the state in the economy differ from that in Western Europe? Are Europeans from Venus and Americans from Mars, as a famous American scholar once argued, or is the reality more fine-grained? Students will participate in structured discussion, debate and role play. Each student will make at least one class presentation, and each will participate in an extensive role play on a current event relevant to transatlantic relations. There will also be plenty of opportunity for class discussion.

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POLI 67.001: Designing Democracy
MW, 4:00 PM – 5:15 PM
SS
Andrew Reynolds

Andrew Reynolds received his B.A.(Hons) from the University of East Anglia, a M.A. from the University of Cape Town and his Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego. His research and teaching focus on democratization, constitutional design and electoral politics. He is particularly interested in the presence and impact of minorities and marginalized communities. He has worked for the United Nations, the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (IDEA), the UK Department for International Development, the US State Department, the National Democratic Institute, the International Republican Institute, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and the International Foundation for Election Systems. He has also served as a consultant on issues of electoral and constitutional design for Afghanistan, Angola, Burma, Egypt, Fiji, Guyana, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles, Northern Ireland, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Yemen and Zimbabwe. He has received research awards from the U.S. Institute of Peace, the National Science Foundation, the US Agency for International Development and the Ford Foundation.

Among his books are: The Arab Spring: Pathways of Repression and Reform (Oxford, 2015) with Jason Brownlee and Tarek Masoud, Designing Democracy in a Dangerous World (Oxford, 2011), The Architecture of Democracy: Constitutional Design, Conflict Management, and Democracy (Oxford, 2002), Electoral Systems and Democratization in Southern Africa (Oxford, 1999), Election 99 South Africa: From Mandela to Mbeki (St. Martin’s, 1999) and Elections and Conflict Management in Africa (USIP, 1998), co-edited with T. Sisk. In 2012 he embarked on a multi-year research project to study the impact of LGBT national parliamentarians on public policy around the world. His forthcoming book is The Children of Harvey Milk (2016).

His articles have appeared in journals including American Political Science Review, World Politics, Democratization, Politics and Society, Middle East Law and Governance, Electoral Studies, Journal of Democracy, The Journal of Commonwealth and Comparative Politics and Political Science Quarterly. He has published opinion pieces in the New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Christian Science Monitor and San Diego Union Tribune. His work has been translated into French, Spanish, Arabic, Serbo-Croat, Albanian, Burmese and Portuguese.

This course will present political institutions as levers of conflict management in ethnically plural, post-conflict national states. To highlight the issues that lie behind constitutional design attention will be focused on a province that was in turmoil within an established democracy (Northern Ireland), a democratizing state (South Africa), a North African state in tumult (Egypt) and post war institutional design (Afghanistan). These states will be analyzed in terms of their paths toward democracy, the nature of their internal conflict and the types of political institutions they have (or are) adopting. Key to the class will be the student’s focus on their own case study of a democratizing state. The class will be briefed on the core ‘building block’ choices that go into a new constitution and the importance of rooting institutions in the distinct historical and socio-political characteristics of a nation. Through lectures, videos and discussions we shall investigate how nations can seek to transform violent conflict into democratic debate.

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POLI 70.001: The Politics of the European Union
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
SS
Gary Marks

Gary Marks is Burton Craige Professor of Political Science and Professor in the Chair for the study of multi-level governance at the Free University of Amsterdam. He served for twelve years as founding director of the UNC Center for European Studies and has served as Chair of the European Community Studies Association. Marks’ teaching and research interests lie in the field of comparative politics. His recent books include Multi-Level Governance and European Integration (with Liesbet Hooghe; Rowman & Littlefield, 2001), It Didn’t Happen Here: Why Socialism Failed in the United States (with Seymour Martin Lipset; Norton, 2000), Continuity and Change in Contemporary Capitalism (coedited with Herbert Kitschelt, Peter Lange, and John Stephens; CUP 1999) and European Integration and Political Conflict (co-edited with Marco Steenbergen, CUP 2004). He recently edited a special issue of Electoral Studies, “Comparing Measures Of Party Positioning: Expert, Manifesto, And Survey Data.”

This course is concerned with the European Union and the major debates that have shaped it. Why is there a European Union? How does it operate? How has it developed? Is multi-level governance emerging within and among national states? What are the major lines of disagreement among Europeans? How has the Euro-Crisis affected Europe. What is the future of the European Union? The class will consist of lectures, discussion, and debates, giving students the opportunity to discuss and debate the vital issues facing Europe.

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Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 68.001: Psychology of Emotion
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
SS
Kristen Lindquist

Dr. Kristen Lindquist is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and the director of the Carolina Affective Science Lab. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Boston College and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Harvard University Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative and the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging. Dr. Lindquist’s research uses social cognitive, psychophysiological and neuroscience methods to understand the nature of human emotion.

This seminar is designed especially for students interested in exploring the psychological and neuroscientific study of emotion. The seminar assumes students will have diverse backgrounds and there are no pre-requisites. Topics will include theoretical models of emotion process and structure, as well as discussions of psychological research bearing on questions such as “Can you read emotions in the faces of other people?” (emotional expressions), “How is emotion expressed in the body?” (autonomic physiology), “Where do emotions live in the brain?” (affective neuroscience), “Is emotion a source of wisdom or the enemy of rationality?” (emotion and reasoning), “Does emotion help or hurt your relationships with other people?” (emotion and social behavior), “Can you control your emotions or do they control you?” (emotion regulation), “Do emotions drive you crazy?” (emotion and psychopathology) and “Are women really the more emotional sex?” (gender and emotion). A range of perspectives in psychology will be explored, spanning social, cultural, developmental, clinical, cognitive and comparative psychology disciplines. Each week, a portion of the classes will be dedicated to discussions of research studies led by Dr. Lindquist. The rest of the classes will be less formal group-based discussions and demonstrations. Discussions will be used to explain or demonstrate especially important ideas, to discuss concepts covered in the assigned readings and to discuss the “real world” implications of class topics. Several discussion sessions will be dedicated to visits to Dr. Lindquist’s lab and the Biomedical Research Imaging Center, where students can experience research techniques and methods in a hands-on setting. Students will be evaluated based on exam performance, on a written research proposal, on an oral presentation of the research proposal and on participation in discussions.

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PSYC 89.001: Visualizing Women’s Lives and Experiences
MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM
SS, US
Anna Bardone-Cone and Sabine Gruffat

Anna Bardone-Cone, PhD is the Principal Investigator of the studies conducted within the Bardone-Cone Lab. Dr. Bardone-Cone graduated from Williams College with a BA in Mathematics and French in 1991. She went on to receive her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2001, and completed her predoctoral clinical psychology internship at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. She joined the faculty at the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2001 as an Assistant Professor of Psychology and in 2009 joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she is currently a Professor. Her primary research interests lie in the sphere of eating disorders, disordered eating, and body image. She and her lab have several lines of research including: 1) defining eating disorder recovery and remission; 2) identifying and testing pathways to bulimic symptoms with particular interest in the role played by psychosocial variables (e.g., perfectionism, self-efficacy, social comparison, stress) and how these variables interact; and 3) examining cultural, familial, and media factors related to disordered eating and body image. Dr. Bardone-Cone is a member of the Eating Disorders Research Society and a Fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders, and has led an active program of eating disorder research since 1999. With her past and ongoing research studies, Dr. Bardone-Cone has sought to identify contributing factors to disordered eating and body image in order to better understand pathways to eating patterns and body image, including risk and resilience factors, and pathways to recovery. She was recently selected as a Working on Women in Science (WOWS) Scholar in the UNC College of Arts and Sciences for a two-year term, effective July 2017.

Sabine Gruffat is a digital media artist and award-winning filmmaker. Her creative work experimental video and animation, media-enhanced performance, participatory public art, and immersive installation.

Sabine’s films and videos have screened at festivals worldwide including the Image Forum Festival in Japan, The Ann Arbor Film Festival and Migrating Forms in New York. Her feature essay films I Have Always Been A Dreamer and Speculation Nation have screened internationally including at the Viennale, MoMA, Cinéma du Réel at the Centre Pompidou, and The Copenhagen International Documentary Film Festival.

She has also produced art for public spaces as well as interactive installations that have been shown at the Zolla Lieberman Gallery in Chicago, Art In General, Devotion Gallery, PS1 Contemporary Art Museum, and Hudson Franklin in New York.

This interdisciplinary course combines the knowledge and methodology of both psychology and media art disciplines. This course empowers students to develop the skills to analyze and critique how images of women inform psychological experiences, while also teaching students the skills to produce their own media (digital video, photography, interactive) relevant to women’s experiences. As we explore different themes relevant to women (e.g., gender socialization, body image, work/achievement, sex and romance, motherhood, aging, and mental health), this interdisciplinary approach will allow for a more meaningful exploration of women’s lives and experiences, and produce richer and more emotionally salient products and understanding. Students will engage in various hands-on projects, including developing a hypothesis-driven research proposal on a topic relevant to women and developing a website that disseminates key information regarding the chosen topic that is user-friendly, thought-provoking, and visually engaging.

Students may also register for this course under ARTS 89.001

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PSYC 89H.001: Critical Thinking for Psychology and Beyond: How to use Your Brain
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
SS
Jonathan Abramowitz

Dr. Jonathan Abramowitz is Professor of Psychology and Director of the UNC Anxiety Clinic. His research focuses on developing and evaluating the effectiveness of treatments for anxiety disorders such as OCD, phobias, and panic attacks, and he has been given awards for his contributions to the field. As a psychological scientist, Dr. Abramowitz is passionate about standing up and de-bunking junk science, myths, and other false claims about psychological disorders and their treatment. He is also outspoken and takes a stand against unethical behavior on the part of mental health-related institutions and individuals.

Critical thinking is the ability (and willingness) to assess claims and make objective judgments on the basis of well-supported reasons. It is the ability to look for flaws in arguments and resist claims that have weak supporting evidence (or none at all). Critical thinking is not simply negative thinking; it fosters the ability to be creative and constructive, generate solutions, think of implications, and apply knowledge to a broad range of social and personal problems. Critical thinking skills are essential to success as a student, in your career, as a consumer of goods and services, and in many other areas of your life.

This course focuses on the development of critical thinking skills, especially as they relate to psychological science. The field of mental health is loaded with theories and interventions—some of them scientifically and logically valid, and others not. Critical thinking is a must if one is to successfully learn about how psychological knowledge is created, evaluated, and applied. In addition to learning basic skills of logic, students in this Honors First Year Seminar will learn about the logic of the scientific method and the common errors of human cognition that impede critical thinking. We will emphasize the application of critical thinking skills to psychological phenomena and claims about abnormal behavior and its treatment. Students will learn by discussing and writing effective arguments, analyzing the writings of others and evaluating their claims, exploring contemporary controversies within and beyond psychology, and interacting with members of the class regarding the weekly topics.

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Public Policy (PLCY)

PLCY 76.001: Global Health Policy
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
GL
Benjamin Mason Meier

Benjamin Mason Meier is an Associate Professor of Public Policy. Dr. Meier’s interdisciplinary research—at the intersection of global health, international law, and public policy—examines rights-based approaches to health. Working collaboratively across UNC’s Department of Public Policy and Gillings School of Global Public Health, Dr. Meier has written and presented extensively on the development, evolution, and application of human rights in global health. Dr. Meier received his Ph.D. in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, his J.D. and LL.M. in International and Comparative Law from Cornell Law School, and his B.A. in Biochemistry from Cornell University.

Global health policy impacts the health and well-being of individuals and peoples throughout the world. Many determinants of health operate at a global level, and many national policies, social practices, and individual health behaviors are structured by global forces. Concern for the spread of infectious diseases, increasing rates of chronic diseases and the effectiveness of health systems to provide quality care are among the daunting challenges to health policy makers.

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PLCY 80.001: Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Economic Growth
Innovative Places: RTP and Beyond
MW, 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM
Maryann Feldman

Maryann Feldman is Carolina’s S.K. Heninger Distinguished Professor of Public Policy, adjunct Professor of Finance at Kenan Flagler Business School and Research Fellow at the Kenan Institute for Private Enterprise. She has also taught at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Toronto. She attained her Ph.D. in Economics at Carnegie-Mellon University and is author of more than 80 academic articles, 2 books, and 9 edited volumes. Her work focuses on the spatial distribution of economic activity and understanding the factors that contribute to making certain places economically vibrant and creative. Her most recent work explores place-based economic processes that contribute to emerging industries, entrepreneurship and regional transformation. She is currently researching the industrial genesis of the Research Triangle Region.

This seminar provides an introduction to entrepreneurship and innovation with a focus on their geographic concentration in specific places. Using the Research Triangle region as our laboratory, this course will consider how regional economies are transformed through innovation and entrepreneurship. The course emphasizes entrepreneurs as part of a larger societal system that both determines what is possible and also changes in response to entrepreneurial actions. The role of public policy in providing incentives for entrepreneurship and innovation and setting social priorities is discussed. Wednesday sessions will be devoted to using data analytics to examine trends in innovation, entrepreneurship and places.

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PLCY 89.001: Ending Poverty
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
SS, BN
Sudhanshu Handa

Professor Sudhanshu Handa is a development economist specializing in human capital, poverty and social protection. He is one of the lead researchers on the Transfer Project (https://transfer.cpc.unc.edu/), a multi-country research initiative led by UNICEF to understand the impact of social protection programs in Africa on households and children. Prof. Handa has lived and worked in Jamaica, Mozambique, Kenya and Mexico. He is returning to UNC this fall after three years serving as the Head of Economic and Social Policy at UNICEF’s Office of Research. Dr. Handa received his PhD from University of Toronto and his BA from Johns Hopkins University.

Ending poverty is the underlying goal of almost all social policy initiatives, yet poverty remains a serious problem world-wide. In the United States alone about one-fifth of all children live in poverty, and in poorer developing nations over half the population typically live in poverty. Why is ending poverty such a seemingly elusive goal for social policy? Using Poor Economics as one of the core texts, we will address common debates and conceptions about poverty ranging from ’the poor are lazy and wasteful’ to ‘poor but efficient’. The seminar will review typical poverty alleviation initiatives, focusing primarily on low-income countries while also referring to the U.S. and European approaches to social protection. The seminar will compare a rights-based approach to poverty policy with an economic approach and use both approaches to discuss the appropriateness of specific programs. There is no pre requisite for this seminar.

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PLCY 89.002: Energy Poverty
MW, 10:10 AM – 11:25 AM
SS, GL
Pam Jagger

Pam Jagger is an applied political economist whose research focuses on the complex relationship between people and the environment. She leads the FUEL Lab at the Carolina Population Center. Her broad research focus is estimating the human welfare and environmental impacts of environment and development policies and projects. She has written extensively on poverty and environment linkages, forest governance, energy poverty, and evaluating the social impacts of forest-based climate mitigation strategies. She has led major field research projects in Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Rwanda, Uganda, and Zimbabwe.

Consider walking 45 minutes and paying 20 cents every time you charged your phone…. Access to affordable and clean energy, a key factor for sustainable development and poverty eradication, is one of the greatest challenges the world faces now and in the future. It is estimated that 3 billion people have no access to modern energy services, relying on wood, coal, or animal waste for cooking and heating, and one in five people lack access to electricity. The majority of people living in energy poverty are found in the developing world. This interdisciplinary seminar explores the grand challenge of energy poverty. We will explore the scope and complexity of the problem, strategies used by governments, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector to mitigate energy poverty, and how to develop and support environmentally sustainable solutions. We’ll examine several ongoing public policy experiments, and consider the potential to bring them to scale.

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Religious Studies (RELI)

RELI 70.001: Jesus in Scholarship and Film
W, 9:00 AM – 11:50 AM
SS
Bart Ehrman

Bart Ehrman is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies. He has taught at Carolina since 1988. He is author or editor of thirty books and is widely regarded as a leading expert on the New Testament and the history of the early Christian church. He is also a well-known teacher on campus, having won the Undergraduate Students Teaching Award, the Bowman and Gordon Gray Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and the John William Pope Center Spirit of Inquiry Teaching Award.

This seminar will examine how historians have reconstructed the life, teachings and death of the historical Jesus. We will look at the Gospels of the New Testament, as well as references to Jesus in other writings (Roman and Jewish sources, as well as Gospels that did not make it into the New Testament). In addition, we will explore how Jesus has been portrayed in modern film, including such Biblical “epics” as The Greatest Story Ever Told, such “period pieces” as Jesus Christ Superstar, such brilliant retellings as Jesus of Montreal and such controversial films as The Last Temptation of Christ and The Passion of the Christ. The ultimate goals of the seminar are to see what we can say about the historical man Jesus himself and how Jesus came to be portrayed in both ancient sources and modern imagination.

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RELI 88.001: Religion and Society in Historical Novels
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
LA, WB
Evyatar Marienberg

Dr. Evyatar Marienberg, an Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies, is a graduate of a Yeshiva in Israel, the Catholic Institute in Paris, and the School of Social Studies, also in Paris. Before coming to UNC he had the pleasure to teach or be a fellow in many institutions, among them Yeshiva University, McGill, Tel Aviv University, Notre Dame, the Jewish Theological Seminary, and Harvard. He is interested mostly in Judaism and Catholicism. Currently, he is working on his fourth book, which will be about traditional Jewish sex manuals.

We will read several books together in this seminar: Donna Woolfolk Cross, Pope Joan: A Novel ; A. B. Yehoshua, A Journey to the end of the Millennium ; Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose ; Glueckel of Hameln, My Life. Most of these books (but not all of them) can be described as “Historical Novels.” Having these books as a starting point, we will explore various aspects of religion and society in Europe and in the Middle East in the medieval and early modern period. Students will be requested to read a section from one of the books for each session, as well as related scholarly material, and to prepare presentations on their topic of choice (or on topics provided by the instructor) every other session. By using both literature and scholarship, we will reflect on religious concepts, social tensions, technological inventions, health issues, economic transformations, gender, political conflicts, and more, as hinted in these works.

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Sociology (SOCI)

SOCI 64.001: Equality of Educational Opportunity Then and Now
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
SS
Karolyn Tyson

Karolyn Tyson is Professor in the Department of Sociology. She earned her doctorate in sociology in 1999 from the University of California at Berkeley. Her main fields of interest are sociology of education, social psychology and social inequality. Dr. Tyson’s publications have examined the processes by which schools reproduce social inequality and how the schooling experience affects students’ attitudes toward school. Her overall program of research centers on understanding how cultural, structural and individual-level factors affect school achievement and contribute to unequal educational outcomes.

The 1954 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka case centered on one of the most significant and controversial issues in American public education: equality of educational opportunity. Now more than 60 years after this historic Supreme Court decision, this seminar will use a sociological lens to examine in depth the social conditions that precipitated the case, other relevant court decisions, the changing definitions of race and the educational landscape over the past 6 decades. Topics include de jure and de facto segregation, busing, between-school segregation, tracking and ability grouping, the black-white achievement gap and residential segregation. Students will read historical and contemporary accounts and research reports on the move and progress toward equality of educational opportunity, view films related to the topic, conduct original research exploring the schooling experiences of contemporary American youth and prepare an oral presentation and a research paper.

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SOCI 69.001: Human Societies and Genomics
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
SS
Guang Guo

Guang Guo is Dr. George and Alice Welsh Distinguished Professor in the Department of Sociology. He earned his doctorate in sociology at Princeton University and his undergraduate economics degree from the Tianjin Institute of Finance and Economics in China. In his work, he uses the tools in human genomics for understanding human societies. He examines how genes and social contexts interact to influence youth’s delinquency, what roles genomics play in human social networks, what roles genomics play in human marriages.

The seminar focuses on how advances in molecular genomics over the past decades benefit sociology and other social sciences. Topics include an introduction to traditional biometrics (inferring genetic influences using genetically related individuals without using molecular information); an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics; joint influences of social contexts and genetic heritage to human behaviors; history of human evolution and contemporary race/ethnicity; evolutionary psychology; sex, gender, and genomics; ethical, legal, and social issues in genetic studies (ELSI); genetic testing; and epigenetics – the potential links between genes and environment. To make the seminar accessible to students in social sciences, it does not have prerequisites, but familiarity with basic genetics or a social science field is helpful. The seminar does not focus on technical details of genomics, but on the main ideas. Students will be reading book chapters and mainly original articles published in contemporary scientific journals before classes, and presenting and discussing these articles in class. Students will write short summaries of the articles they read, present articles and lead discussion on these articles in class, take a midterm exam, and write a review essay.

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SOCI 71.001: The Pursuit of Happiness
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
SS
Arne Kalleberg

Dr. Arne Kalleberg is a Kenan Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and has Adjunct Professorships in the Kenan-Flagler Business School, the Department of Public Policy, and the Curriculum in Global Studies. He is also the Editor of Social Forces, an International Journal of Social Research.

Happiness remains a fundamental goal in most societies, despite being elusive for many people. In recent years, social scientists have become increasingly interested in the subject of happiness and its causes and consequences. Sociologists, economists, political scientists, geographers and psychologists have joined with philosophers in studying the nature of happiness and subjective well-being and its relationship to social life.

This course will examine the interplay between individual and social happiness by considering the nature and meaning of happiness in the contemporary United States as well as in other countries. We will seek to answer questions such as: What is happiness? Can we measure happiness, and if so, how? What is the relationship between biology and happiness? Between psychology and happiness? Does money buy happiness? Does happiness vary among diverse groups (racial, ethnic, religious, gender, age, and social class groups)? How does happiness differ among cultures and nations? What is (and should be) the role of happiness in formulating public policies? We will address these and other questions by: reading books and articles; class discussions and debates; viewing films; interviewing people; and collecting information using the Internet and other sources.

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SOCI 72.001: Race and Ethnicity in the United States
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
SS, US
Anthony Perez

Anthony Perez studies the measurement, meaning and implications of race/ethnicity in the United States and abroad. His research focuses on the interplay between formal and informal conceptualizations of race and ethnicity and de facto measures of race/ethnic populations used in the Census, social surveys and demographic data; causes of uncertainty in the reporting of race across generations and throughout the life course; and the consequences of racial uncertainty for research on inequality, race-attentive social policy and demographic projections of past and future diversity.

It is impossible to understand the structure of American society, or the lived experiences of its people, without understanding both the meaning and consequences of race and ethnicity. Yet, while examples of what race does are well known to students interested in questions of social justice and inequality, the question of what race is receives considerably less attention. Any student familiar with U.S. society can identify myriad, often striking examples of racial inequality—from highly disproportionate rates of poverty, unemployment and disease to racially disparate treatment at the hands of police, teachers and neighbors. But what, exactly, is “race?” The geographic origins of our ancestors? The social categories that others perceive from our appearance? The identities we claim based on a sense of belonging or attachment to a particular culture or community? Or can race be any and all of these things, depending on the context in which individuals perceive and react to one another? These are just some of pressing questions with which students will grapple in this seminar, as we delve into the meaning and measurement of race in society, how it changes over time and space and what it signals for the future of race/ethnic relations in the United States. In pursuit of these aims, we will incorporate a variety of instructional strategies and active learning techniques, including primary data collection and analysis, critical examination of race/ethnicity in popular culture (including music, literature, and film) and in-class group activities.

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Women’s and Gender Studies (WGST)

WGST 64.001: Plantation Lullabies: Literature by and about African American Women
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
LA, NA
Tanya Shields

Tanya Shields is an Associate Professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. Dr. Shields believes that teaching should engage students’ everyday lives by helping them make connections between the past and the present. Her research area is the Caribbean, specifically literature and its role in Caribbean belonging.

Have you ever had historical déjà vu? Were you ever struck by historical images in contemporary places? If not, you might be surprised to know how much of the past is hidden in plain sight. This seminar offers analytical strategies for understanding different ways that plantation culture was represented metaphorically in the 19th and 20th centuries with a view to understanding how it continues to manifest itself today with a particular emphasis on women’s experiences. We will explore the idea of the plantation as a physical place, an often-nostalgic idea, and a lasting economic system. We will journey through poetry, film, literature, and music to see how these echoes appear in various women’s texts from the US and the Caribbean. We will consider how our own identities inform our reactions to these texts and our broader environment. The final project for the seminar asks students to create their own plantation narratives—an engaging assignment that brings together history, storytelling, and analytic ability.

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