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African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)
American Studies (AMST)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Art and Art History(ARTH/ARTS)
Asian Studies (ASIA)
Chemistry (CHEM)
City and Regional Planning (PLAN)
Classics (CLAS)
Communication (COMM)
Computer Science (COMP)
Dramatic Art (DRAM)
Education (EDUC)
English and Comparative Literature (ENGL)
European Studies (EURO)
Geography (GEOG)
Geological Sciences (GEOL)
German and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)
History (HIST)
Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST)
Marine Sciences (MASC)
Mathematics (MATH)
Media and Journalism (MEJO)
Music (MUSC)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)
Political Science (POLI)
Psychology and Neuroscience (PSYC)
Public Policy (PLCY)
Religious Studies (RELI)
Romance Studies (ROML)
Social Medicine (SOCM)
Sociology (SOCI)

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)

AAAD 53.001: Experimentalism in Global Black Music and Performance Arts
VP, GL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
David Pier

Prof. David Pier is an ethnomusicologist who researches music in Africa and the United States. His book, Ugandan Music in the Marketing Era: The Branded Arena is a ethnographic study of the commercialization of folk music and dance heritage in Uganda. He is currently working on a book on a Ugandan guitar genre known as kadongo kamu. Having started out as a jazz pianist, he is keenly interested in both the processes and underlying ideas of musical experimentalism, especially in global Black historical contexts.

This course centers on artists who are known for their radically experimental approach to music-making and performance, pushing at established boundaries of genre, form, and affect, while taking inspiration from black identity, history, and culture. Geographically, this course is not limited to the United States, but also examines avant-garde artistry in Africa, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean. The focus is mainly on music, with excursions into avant-garde jazz, Brazilian tropicália, Jamaican dub, and electronic music. But we do additionally discuss experimental dance and theatre. The special challenges faced by black artists in establishing themselves in artistic fields marked as modernist, given the historical domination of discourses and institutions of modernism/modernity by whites, are explored. Students have the option to either write a traditional research paper on a topic of their choice, or create their own experimental artistic project.

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American Studies (AMST)

AMST 51.001: Navigating America
SS, CI, EE
MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM
Rachel A. Willis

Rachel A. Willis is a Professor of American Studies and Adjunct Professor of Economics at UNC. She has won numerous awards including the UNC Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, two Student Undergraduate Teaching Awards, and the Robert Sigmon Award for Service Learning. A three-time winner of the Chapman Award, she has been a Senior Fellow at the Global Research Institute and is a Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholar at the Carolina Center for Public Service. Her teaching methods incorporate innovative field study, collaborative assignments and experiential learning through events and programs outside of the classroom. A labor economist interested in global access to work, she has recently focused on the impact of climate change on port communities.

This seminar is designed to teach students how to navigate new intellectual terrain and process unfamiliar information from a variety of disciplinary perspectives with an emphasis on simulations, field study, reflections, and documentation. Each student will plan, implement, and document an individual short journey. This voyage of discovery on the campus or in the surrounding community will be chronicled with a documentary journal and presented to the class in a multi-media format that conveys the individual’s perspective, journey, and discoveries. Additionally, the class will collaboratively plan, implement, and document a common full day journey. This required field study will be a core aspect of the experiential education connection for the course.

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AMST 55H.001: Birth and Death in the United States (Honors)
PH, CI, US
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Timothy Marr

Timothy Marr is an Associate Professor in the Department of American Studies, where since 2000 he has taught courses on mating and marriage, cultural memory, and tobacco. His research interests include the life and works of Herman Melville and American approaches to Islam and Muslims.

This course explores birth and death as common human rites of passage impacted by changing American historical and cultural contexts. Since both are defining life events that remain beyond experiential recall, studying them in interdisciplinary ways opens powerful insights into how culture mediates the construction of bodies, social identities, and philosophical meanings. Readings and assignments are designed to examine changing anthropological rituals, medical procedures, scientific technologies, and ethical quandaries. We will also explore a variety of representations of birth and death in literary expression, film, and material culture as well as in hospitals, funeral homes, and cemeteries.

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AMST 59.001: American Indian Art in the 20th Century
VP, CI, US
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote

Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote is an Assistant Professor in the department of American Studies. She teaches courses on American Indian history, art and material culture. Her research interests include American Indian cultural and political history and expressive culture.

This course examines twentieth century American Indian art though secondary articles, books, and art itself. The class sharpens written and verbal communication though in-class discussion, informal, and formal assignments. Students will hone their visual critical thinking skills as well by examining and analyzing contemporary American Indian art and representations of Native people.

This course connects American Indian art to vital conversations in American Indian studies about topics such as colonialism, identity, gender, modernity, modernism, sovereignty, and representation. We will also address the following questions: How Native people and others have constructed and contested the idea of the American Indian art? How have Native artists engaged with modernism in their works? Additionally, we will examine how artists have engaged with and at times resisted the markets for their work and their influence on Native art. Over the course of the semester students will complete formal and informal writing and will produce at least ten pages of writing during the semester.

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Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 53H.037: Darwin’s Dangerous Idea (Honors)
SS
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Paul Leslie

Paul Leslie’s professional interests focus on human ecology, and he has pursued this primarily through research among nomadic peoples in East Africa. His most recent project entails studying (while nursing an aged Land Rover across the African savanna) human-environment interactions in northern Tanzania, especially how the changing land use and livelihood patterns of the Maasai people living there affect and are affected by wildlife and conservation efforts. When not teaching or practicing anthropology, he enjoys bicycling, motorcycling, woodworking, and jazz.

Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to one of the most profound revolutions in the history of thought, generating stunning insights but also some misunderstanding and tragic abuse. This seminar aims to provide a clear understanding of how natural selection works, and how it doesn’t. We will examine objections to the theory; how the environmental and health problems we face today reflect processes of natural selection; and recent attempts to understand why we get sick, how we respond to disease, why we get old, why we choose mates the way we do, and more. Class sessions will feature a mix of lecture and discussion of concepts and issues. Students will also engage in small group projects—cooperative explorations of problems raised in class or in the readings and/or designing mini research projects.

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ANTH 62.001: Indian Country Today
SS, US
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Valerie Lambert

Valerie Lambert is an associate professor and an enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation. She received her Ph.D. in Social Anthropology from Harvard University and has won awards for undergraduate teaching and for a book she wrote about her tribe. She has twice been elected president of the Association of Indigenous Anthropologists. Professor Lambert is married and the mother of two daughters, one of whom is a college student and the other, a high school student.

With the United States as our geographic focus, this seminar explores a range of 20th- and early-21st-century American Indian topics and current issues. We look at Indian casinos, tribal colleges, identity, gender, tribal courts, sports, and other topics. An exploration of the history of American Indians before and after the arrival of Europeans, a history with which we begin the seminar, provides essential background for looking at the present and recent past. This seminar will help students better understand the challenges facing American Indian communities both internally and externally and the creative solutions being forged to address these challenges. It will also help students further develop skills in reading, writing, critical analysis, and public speaking.

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ANTH 64.001: Public Archaeology in Bronzeville, Chicago’s Black Metropolis
HS, NA
MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM
Anna Sophia Agbe-Davies

Anna Sophia Agbe-Davies is an historical archaeologist whose excavations have explored the plantation societies of the colonial southeastern US and Caribbean, as well as towns and cities of the 19th and 20th century Midwest, with an emphasis on sites of the African diaspora. Her projects have included excavation and community collaboration at the sites of New Philadelphia, Illinois and the Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls on the south side of Chicago. Her research and teaching interests are strongly shaped by her own experiences as an undergraduate at the College of William and Mary and the time she spent working in museum settings before becoming a professor. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to that, she was a staff archaeologist for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s Department of Archaeological Research.

The term “African diaspora” usually refers to the consequences of the transatlantic slave trade, but there have been many diasporas of people of African descent. One major movement took place in the U.S. in the early 20th century when millions of people left small southern communities for large industrial northern cities. This seminar examines that phenomenon through the lens of a single site where migrants lived in the city of Chicago. The Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls was run by black women to provide social services for female migrants from 1926 through the 1960s. Research at this site combines elements of archaeology, anthropology and history to study their lives. Students, working in teams, will have the opportunity to contribute to the ongoing research effort via analysis of written records and artifacts. This multidisciplinary project will be of interest to students curious about 20th century history, African-American culture, museums and heritage, women’s and gender studies, migration and labor history.

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ANTH 65.086: Humans and Animals: Anthropological Perspectives – CANCELLED 4/24/2018
HS
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Ben Arbuckle

Ben Arbuckle is an Anthropologist with a specialty in Middle Eastern Archaeology. He runs the Zooarchaeology Laboratory in the Department of Anthropology and the Research Labs in Archaeology where he studies animal bones from archaeological sites. Professor Arbuckle uses these bones, which represent the trash from ancient meals, parties and sacrifices, in order to understand how our ancestors created a world whose technologies and social and political systems we have inherited. He is currently working on a National Geographic funded project exploring the origins of domestic horses and another trying to understand the origins of wool.

In this seminar we explore the complex relationships between people and animals in our own culture and in other cultures, now and also in the past. We will explore the origins and uses of domesticated animals, the role of dogs and cats in human societies, as companions, pets and food. We will also examine the symbolic uses of animals and talk about current issues including animal rights and the growing popularity of hunting.

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ANTH 89.034: Transforming Our Food Systems
SS, NA
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Don Nonini

Don Nonini is a sociocultural anthropologist who received his PhD in Anthropology from Stanford University. Before he went to graduate school, he worked as a restaurant cook for 1 1/2 years in San Francisco. Since he received his degree, his research and teaching specializations have been the Chinese diaspora in the Asia Pacific, the politics of urban life in the United States and in Southeast Asia, and social movements and social activism around food in the U.S.

In this course we employ an anthropological approach to the study of the human relationship to food, to contemporary food systems, and to the processes by which they are transformed. First, we consider how an anthropological approach to the study of food asks questions about food’ s connection to culture, self, home and family, cultural heritage, cities, and politics. Second, we explore the organization and power of today’s global food system.” Third, we examine the challenges facing contemporary food systems such as hunger, intensive use of energy in agro-industry and climate change, the abuse of food laborers, and GMOs, toxins and wastes as products of agro-industrialism. Finally, we explore alternatives to the global food system that seek to address these challenges.

As we study the global food economy, its challenges and alternatives, we develop students’ expressive and analytical skills in a multi-dimensional approach to studying food by different writing and oral presentation assignments. We go out into the “field” of kitchens, gardens, farmers markets, farms and food pantries. We explore the complete circuit of food from eating, raising, processing, and selling food and disposing of its wastes, and we collectively examine contemporary alternatives to the current food system.

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Art and Art History (ARTH/ARTS)

ARTH 52H.001: Celts–Druid Culture (Honors)
WB
TTH, 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM
Dorothy Hoogland Verkerk

Dorothy Hoogland Verkerk received her M.A. and Ph.D. from Rutgers University. Her area of specialization is in early medieval art, and her research interests include the interplay between images and texts in early medieval manuscripts, particularly the ways in which images interpret the meanings of texts through visual references to extra-textual elements such as popular sermons, liturgical rites, political necessities, and catechisms. Also, she is interested in the fluid and diverse iconography found in early Christian catacombs and sarcophagi, with rich references to death rituals. She has also explored Irish high crosses as potential sculptural responses to pilgrimage to Rome.

The Druids have intrigued the non-Celtic world since Julius Caesar. They have also enjoyed a revival in the 18th century and, more recently, in the 20th century. There are no original documents written by the ancient Druids themselves, only texts written by outsiders who often had a specific agenda to fulfill. The lack of verifiable information about the Druids allows for them to be romanticized at different times and for different reasons. They are virtually a tabula rasa on which can be written any narrative. Thus, the study of how Druids are portrayed give a great deal of information and insight into how they are depicted. The seminar will explore the question of whether we can define an iconography of Druidry. Is there a definable iconography? What are its origins or inspirations? How has it evolved?

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ARTH 61.001: African American Art of the Carolinas
VP, CI
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
John Bowles

John Bowles received his Ph.D. from UCLA in 2002 and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Program. He is an historian of African American art, who works from the assumption that art plays an important role in determining how we see ourselves as morally responsible individuals. In his research and teaching, he attempts to convey the urgency of art by addressing moral and political dilemmas we would often rather ignore. He has published articles and art criticism in various journals and has recently completed a book that examines the work of artist Adrian Piper. He is currently writing a book that explores how African American artists have engaged simultaneously with modernism, globalization and diaspora from the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s until today.

Focusing on the Carolinas, this seminar explores the many ways African Americans have used art to define themselves and their communities. We will ask how art has been used to maintain cultural traditions, shape American culture and build political solidarity from the era of colonialism and slavery to the present. We will study the cultivation of artistic practices from Africa; African American painters, sculptors and craftsmen who earned national reputations for the quality of their work; artists who re-imagined and redefined African American identity through art; and artists throughout the 20th century who represented the daily lives and hardships of rural and working-class blacks. Students will visit campus museums and archives and conduct original research using regional sources. Persistent questions throughout the semester will include, How does the art of African Americans in the Carolinas provoke us to question our own identities and roles within the region, and what is the contemporary role of art in shaping public discourse?

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ARTS 59.001: Time, A Doorway to Visual Expression
VP
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Jim Hirschfield

Jim Hirschfield has been teaching art at UNC since 1988. He began thinking about the experience of time when he traveled through the deserts of the southwest in his VW Microbus. He still enjoys traveling, only now he often travels as a part of his art projects. Jim has received a number of art commissions from cities across the country: From Anchorage, Alaska to Fort Lauderdale, Florida and from San Diego, California to Orono, Maine. He has also received numerous awards for his artwork, which he describes as the exploration of meditative and ethereal environments that expand our perceptions of time.

Visual artists, not unlike writers, communicate through complex structures of elements and principles (e.g., form, space, line, color, rhythm, balance, etc.). Analyzing any one of these components will help illustrate the nuances of visual language. This seminar will study and explore one of the lesser considered, but more intriguing, visual components: the element of Time. From subtle illusionary movement to clearly defined sequences of change, artists have manipulated the element of time to strengthen their work. This First Year Seminar will examine this enigmatic element of time through readings and class discussions of Alan Lightman’s Einstein’s Dreams and Leonard Shlain’s Art and Physics, as well as other selected essays. We will also look at films, listen to music and most importantly express our personal view through the art making process. As a first-year seminar, the course presumes no previous art experience and students may carry out their projects through a variety of mediums (e.g., drawing, photography, painting, video and/or sculpture). The projects will be evaluated through class critiques and discussions about the work. Ultimately, our intention will be to immerse ourselves in the subject and to create personal works of art motivated and inspired by our now enhanced understanding of time.

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ARTS 89.001: Studying the Landscape
VP
MW, 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM
Mario Marzan

Mario Marzan is an artist whose work includes drawing, painting, installation and sculpture. He grew up in Puerto Rico and now lives in North Carolina where he is an Associate Professor at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His work is about the constantly shifting, changing and evolving negotiation of landscapes in relation to individual identities and histories. Using scale models to relate to the characteristics of sculpture and architecture, his work addresses the spontaneous phenomena and transient moments that occur in nature as a way to talk about culture and assimilation. Mario teaches all level drawing courses as well as an immersive summer seminar on the intersections of art and nature.

Studying The Landscape is a special topics First Year Seminar that engages students in a territorial investigation of our relationship to the surrounding natural and built environments. From parks and gardens to backyards and forests, the seminar will explore the history and theory of art and nature by actively engaging with some of the critical issues facing our environments. Through creative explorations of place, the seminar bridges ecological concepts, the art of journaling and representation of the landscape— further exploring solutions to common ecological problems through a variety of artful field research methods, field trips and different artistic media; including drawing, model-making, collage and photography.

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Asian Studies (ASIA)

ASIA 65.001: Philosophy on Bamboo: Rethinking Early Chinese Thought
PH, WB
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Uffe Bergeton

Uffe Bergeton is a historian of early China with a focus on pre-Qin (i.e. pre-221 BCE) culture, history and thought. Originally from Denmark, he has lived and studied in France, Taiwan and China. His research projects include early Chinese theories of epistemology and the politics of reclusion, as well as comparisons between pre-Qin China and ancient Greece.

Over the last few decades a large number of bamboo manuscripts of hitherto unknown texts dating to the 4th to the 1st centuries BCE have been excavated from various sites in China. This wealth of new material has led many scholars to rethink longstanding assumptions about early Chinese thought. In order to enable students to engage directly with the recently discovered texts and cutting-edge research on them, this course will briefly introduce students to the received classics of the pre-Qin period, such as the Analects, the Mozi, the Mencius, the Xunzi, the Daodejing, the Zhuangzi and the Hanfeizi. Rather than merely providing an introduction to these traditional texts, we will study how recently discovered texts challenge traditional readings of pre-Qin works and lead us to question traditional classifications of pre-Qin works into “schools of thought” or isms such as Confucianism, Legalism, Daoism, etc.

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ASIA 89.001: Transnational Korea: Literature, Film, Popular Culture
LA, BN
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Jonathan Kief

Jonathan Kief is a scholar of modern Korean literature and culture whose research focuses on interactions between words and images in postcolonial North and South Korea. He is also interested in the Korean diaspora, the history of Korean translation practices, and the history of radio and television in Cold War-era East Asia. In his teaching, he combines literature, film, and popular culture to help students explore both the contemporary globalization of Korean culture and the robust history of transnational exchanges that it builds upon. Before moving to North Carolina, he lived in Korea, Japan, and many different parts of the U.S.

Taking the recent Korean Wave phenomenon as its point of departure, this course introduces students to the history of transnational imaginations in modern and contemporary Korean culture. Drawing upon literature, film, television, and secondary scholarship, we will explore how a diverse array of Korean cultural producers have used narratives of cross-border travel, migration, and exchange to rethink Korea’s place in the world and refashion Korean identity. In each section of the course, we will consider a different domain or dimension of border-crossing activity: education; labor; migration and diaspora; North-South interactions; war and military; cosmopolitan imaginings and the making of “global Korea.” In so doing, we will learn to think critically about the relationship between works from colonial Korea, postcolonial North Korea, postcolonial South Korea, and the Korean diaspora, and we will also gain a more nuanced understanding of popular culture’s place within its broader social and historical contexts.

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Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 73.001: From Atomic Bombs to Cancer Treatments: The Broad Scope of Nuclear Chemistry
PL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Todd Austell

Todd Austell received his BS in Chemistry in 1987 and his PhD in Chemistry in 1996, both at UNC. He spent one year working in the pharmaceutical industry prior to graduate school and another year as an Assistant Professor at the United States Air Force Academy prior to returning to his current position. As an undergraduate, he participated in the Department of Energy and American Chemistry Society’s Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry. Topical studies in nuclear chemistry have been a hobby of his since that time. His graduate research involved separation science, and he is currently involved in both curriculum development within the chemistry department and in a long-term study of how middle school and secondary math education/preparation affects student performances in college general chemistry. His hobbies include hiking, camping, disc golf and gardening as well as following all UNC athletics.

Nuclear chemistry is a field that touches the lives of everyone perhaps every day of their lives. This seminar will approach the topic of nuclear chemistry on the level of an introductory chemistry class with no prerequisite. Atomic structure, nuclear fission and nuclear fusion processes will be studied to provide the background necessary to understand their applications. Nuclear weapons and nuclear power will be covered in detail with discussion of topics relevant both for today’s society and for the future. Other topics including household applications, nuclear medicine, radiation safety and the problematic issue of radioactive waste storage will be discussed. The seminar will include guest lecturers from the various fields of nuclear chemistry, selected reading assignments, topical student-led discussions, possible facility trips/tours and a final project presentation on a relevant topic.

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City and Regional Planning (PLAN)

PLAN 89.001: How Rhetoric Shapes Public Policy
SS, CI, US
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Jordynn Jack and Mai Nguyen

Dr. Jordynn Jack is Professor of English and Comparative Literature. She received her MA and PhD in English at the Pennsylvania State University. Her research involves interdisciplinary study of how people use language persuasively in a range of fields, from academic disciplines such as neuroscience and health care to public discussions over the environment, public policies, and social issues. Her most recent book, Autism and Gender (2014), examines how public debates about autism and its causes draw upon popular ideas about sex and gender. She is also co-director of the HHIVE Lab, an interdisciplinary center where undergraduate students work with faculty on engaged health humanities research projects.

Dr. Mai Thi Nguyen is an Associate Professor in the City & Regional Planning Department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her Master’s in Sociology at the Pennsylvania State University and PhD in Urban Planning at the University of California, Irvine. She is an expert in housing policy, community economic development, immigration and urban growth phenomena. She also teaches courses in the Housing and Community Development specialization with the focus of teaching about practices and policies that create transformative community change. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

The places we live in matter deeply. Those places are not only shaped by bricks and mortar, though, but by the rhetoric used to craft public policy about who is allowed to use places and what activities occur within them. Studying the period post-WWII (1945), this course will examine how policy issues are framed persuasively for different stakeholders and audiences. We will employ rhetorical analysis to identify the “frames”—key terms and concepts, or topoi, as rhetoric scholars would put it—that shape how issues of public policy are conveyed to different audiences. Topics of study will include poverty and welfare policy, housing issues such as eviction and residential segregation, and the neighborhood as a site for social justice.

Researchers in the humanities and the social sciences tend to study public policy from different perspectives. In this class, we will examine public policy from the perspective of two disciplines: rhetoric and city and regional planning. Rhetoric scholars focus on the persuasive language techniques stakeholders use to frame discussions of public policy, while planning researchers use methods such as interviews, case studies, and site visits to understand policy changes and how they affect individuals. By combining these methods, students in this course will develop a deeper understanding of public policy, examine how persuasive language shapes those policies, and learn how to craft effective messages to enact change in their own communities.

Students may also register for this course under ENGL 89.001.

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Classics (CLAS)

CLAS 67.001: Helen of Troy: from Homer to Hollywood
LA, WB
MWF, 12:20 PM – 1:10 PM
Patricia Rosenmeyer

Prof. Patricia Rosenmeyer has degrees in Classics from Harvard (B.A.), Cambridge (M.A.), and Princeton (Ph.D.). She taught at Michigan, Yale, and Wisconsin, before accepting the Paddison Chair of Classics at UNC-Chapel Hill in fall 2017. Prof. Rosenmeyer pursues a range of scholarly interests in ancient Greek literature, and has published four books and one edited volume. She has received fellowships from ACLS, NEH, the Mellon Foundation, and the Loeb Library. Her current research focuses on Homer, Sappho, reception studies, and translation strategies in early 20th-century Europe. She is eager to share her fascination with Helen of Troy with interested students.

Helen of Troy is said to have been the most beautiful woman in the world, yet we have no evidence of what she really looked like. This missing piece has worked in her favor, as authors and artists have tried to “fill in the blank” ever since. For over two millennia, her story has inspired countless creative responses, from Homer’s Iliad to Hollywood’s Troy. Helen makes us think about issues that still resonate today: how do we define beauty? what is worth fighting for? how far should one go for love? In this course, we will study the story of Helen in multiple retellings, asking questions about the value of beauty, the risks of desire, and the consequences for society when individuals place love above all else. Students will read ancient and modern sources, analyze and debate them, and write about the issues. The course requires no prior knowledge of the material.

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CLAS 73H.001: Life in Ancient Pompeii (Honors)
HS, BN, WB
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Hérica Valladares

Hérica Valladares is an art historian who specializes in the study of imperial Rome and ancient Campania. She has traveled extensively and conducted research in Italy, Turkey and North Africa. Professor Valladares is the author of numerous articles on Roman wall painting. She is currently working on a book on the representation of love scenes in Roman art and literature.

Ancient Pompeii, the city whose life was snuffed out by a volcanic eruption almost 2000 years ago, has captured the imagination of multitudes since its rediscovery in the late 18th century. In this seminar we will explore the history and archaeology of this ancient city with the goal of better understanding daily life in the early Roman empire. How did ancient Pompeians spend their days? What were their houses like? Who ran the city and how were they elected? How did Pompeians cope with the various challenges of city life, such as sanitation and traffic jams? The course proceeds topically, moving from an exploration of the city’s public spaces to an analysis of more private domains—Pompeian houses, gardens and tombs. Although the city’s material remains will be the primary focus of our study, we will also consider evidence from literature, epigraphy and 18th and 19th-century publications. The impact of the rediscovery of Pompeii in the 18th century on the development of archaeology as a discipline will be one of our final topics of discussion. We will also consider the reception of Pompeii in contemporary popular culture.

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Communication (COMM)

COMM 62.001: African American Literature and Performance
VP
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Renée Alexander Craft

Renée Alexander Craft is an associate professor with a joint appointment in the Department of Communication and Curriculum in Global Studies. Her research and teaching focus on Black Diaspora literature and culture. More specifically, Alexander Craft investigates the ways Black Diaspora communities have and continue to use imagination as a tool for liberation. For the past seventeen years, her research and creative projects have centered on an Afro-Latin community located on the Caribbean coast of Panama who call themselves and their carnival performance tradition “Congo.” She has completed three projects that reflect this focus: an ethnographic monograph titled When the Devil Knocks: The Congo Tradition and the Politics of Blackness in 20th Century Panama, a digital humanities project titled Digital Portobelo: Art + Scholarship + Cultural Preservation (digitalportobelo.org), and a novel based in large part on her field research titled She Looks Like Us.

What if Black pirates raided European slave ships to liberate enslaved Africans? What if African Americans could time travel? What if the most powerful being the world has ever seen were a Black female vampire or telepath? Those “what if’s” fit within a genre called Black speculative fiction. Focused on speculative fiction, fantasy, and science fiction written by Black Diaspora authors, this semester challenges students to think critically and creatively about modern structures of race and racism. Using historical and theoretical readings to guide us, we travel to the worlds these authors create, seek to understand the workings of race there, and return to our contemporary contexts to reflect and critique what we have witnessed. How do understandings of race and racism in these worlds help us engage with structures of race and racism in ours? What racial logics motivate the main characters and the sociopolitical movements of which they are apart? What is the relationship between Blackness there and Blackness here?

“Performance” will serve as a process–oriented, participatory, and experiential way to interpret, analyze, and re-present course materials. This includes collaborative in-class workshop performances as well as short, rehearsed solo and ensemble performances. Performance, then, will function as part of our repertoire of engagement alongside readings, screenings, critical discussions, journal assignments, and analytical papers.

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COMM 63.001: The Creative Process in Performance
VP, CI, US
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Joseph Megel

Joseph Megel has spent the last 20 years focusing on the direction and development of new works, for theatre, film and video. Mr. Megel is a member of SSDC (Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers), Co-Artistic Director of StreetSigns Center for Literature and Performance in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and an Associate Artist for The Working Theatre in New York. He holds the M.F.A. degree from the Peter Stark Motion Picture Producing Program at the University of Southern California, a Master of Arts from the University of Cincinnati’s College Conservatory of Music and a B.S. in Speech from Northwestern University. He served for six years as Artistic Director of Playwrights Theatre of New Jersey, a new play development theatre, and continues to serve as Co-Executive Producer of Harland’s Creek Productions, producer of New York premieres of new plays, developmental producer of screenplays, readings and films.

Students in this seminar will attend and study the production process of multimedia, music, dance and theater performances in campus venues: The Memorial Hall Carolina Performing Arts Series, the Process Series of the Performance Studies program in the Department of Communication Studies, Playmakers, and others across campus. We will explore the ways that these performances engage us, communicating powerful ideas and emotions through their various media of expression. Students will research performance pieces, interview the performers, attend rehearsals and performances, and write essays that combine their own experiences of the performances with readings in performance studies. Students will also create their own performance pieces as they observe the relationship of preparation and practice to the spontaneity and surprise of performance.

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COMM 73.001: Understanding Place through Rhetoric
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Carole Blair

Carole Blair’s research focuses on the rhetorical and cultural significance of U.S. commemorative places and artworks. She teaches related courses on visual and material rhetorics, rhetoric and emory, and rhetorics of place, as well as on contemporary rhetorical theory and criticism. Her current research focuses on contemporary rhetorical theory and criticism, attending especially to rhetoric’s crucial role in understanding visual and material phenomena. In particular, she studies the rhetorics of commemorative places and artworks of the twentieth-century U.S.

This seminar explores how we come to understand what places are and how they are meaningful. We will look at places “rhetorically”: how they were designed to persuade those who inhabit them, how we actually experience them, and how we make sense of them in our individual lives.

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COMM 82.001: Food Politics from an Organizational Communication Perspective
SS, CI, EE
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Sarah Dempsey

Sarah Dempsey is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication. Her research focuses on critical theories of work and professional life and the politics of voice, representation, and accountability in social change efforts. Her most recent research examines cultural discourses about work and labor in the context of the food industry. She is currently engaged in a book length project drawing on archival research, critical analysis of popular discourses and corporate practices, and interviews with contemporary food service workers, organizers, and living wage and fair wage advocates and business owners.

The globalization of food systems is both a hotly contested subject and a central part of contemporary life. This course provides an applied introduction to key debates by adopting a critical organizational communication lens on our globalized food system. Drawing on readings, popular media texts, discussions, and experiential activities, we will explore food system labor practices, the role of multinational companies and global commodity chains, the status of hunger and food deserts, the role of food marketing and consumption practices, and the growth of local and sustainable movements devoted to food justice. Throughout, we investigate how our global food system is shaped by different types of organizations operating within particular locales, such as North Carolina, USA.

This is an APPLES-designated service-learning course that requires service hours. In addition to experiential field activities and visits, our course is organized around group-based engaged research projects. Your success will depend upon your ability to work independently and practice collective leadership. This project will increase your research and writing skills, sharpen your leadership and collaborative skills, and provide you with applied insight into the themes of the course

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COMM 88.001: Technologies of Popular Culture
CI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Michael Palm

Michael Palm’s teaching interests include media history and cultural studies of technology. His research focuses on technologies introduced into people’s everyday lives, and their role in the emergence and interplay between new forms of work, commerce and consumption. His book Technologies of Consumer Labor (Routledge, 2017) is a history of self-service technology, spanning from the telephone dial to the ATM. His current book project combines labor ethnography, cultural history and critical political economy to explore the contemporary revival of vinyl records.

This seminar takes an historical approach to the relationship between popular culture and technological change, focusing on how artists and other workers in the film, TV and especially music industries have incorporated new technology into the production, distribution and consumption of popular cultural products and experiences. From vinyl records to CDs to mp3s, we will track pivotal format ‘upgrades’ and analyze their aesthetic, economic, legal and political ramifications. Controversies such as sampling and piracy will be debated in class, and influential companies including Apple and Amazon will be subject to our collective research. Students’ own expertise and investments in pop culture will inform discussions and, ideally, research projects culminating in individual terms papers and group presentations.

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COMM 89.001: Make a Zine! Do-It-Yourself Writing, Publishing, and Distribution
LA
MW, 5:45 PM – 7:00 PM
Bill Brown

Bill Brown is a writer and filmmaker living in North Carolina where he is an Associate Professor of Media Production in the Department of Communication. He received a BA from Harvard University and an MFA from the California Institute of the Arts.

Brown’s films have screened at venues around the world, including the Rotterdam Film Festival, the London Film Festival, the Sundance Film Festival, and Lincoln Center.

Brown is the co-founder of The Zine Machine: Durham Printed Matter Festival, now entering its third year. His travel zine, Dream Whip, is published by Microcosm Publishing.
Zines (pronounced “zeens”) are self-published labors of love. Though they take a multitude of forms (hand-written pamphlets, comic books, collages), tackle all manner of topics (from romance to rock n’ roll, graffiti to global politics), and explore a variety of genres (self-help, sci-fi, teen lit, punk rock, poetry), they all share a passion for uncompromising creative expression. In a world of virtual media, zines are things you can hold in your hands and that circulate in the world.

This is a hands-on seminar. You will be introduced to the history, culture, and politics of zines; you will be visited by local zine makers and participate in zine-making workshops; and you will conceive and create your own zine, and organize a zine festival to share the zines you make.

This seminar is a perfect fit for budding writers, poets, cartoonists, and anyone with an interest in personal, creative expression.

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COMM 89.002: Arts @ Carolina: Critical Making and the Creative Campus – ADDED 6/4/2018
VP
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Tony Perucci

Tony Perucci is an award-winning theatre director and performance scholar. He is a founding member of The Performance Collective and has created and performed in original performance work in Berlin, Brazil, New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and North Carolina. He is the author of the book Paul Robeson and the Cold War Performance Complex: Race, Madness and Activism and numerous book chapters and articles in academic journals. Dr. Perucci is currently finishing his second book, On the Horizontal: Mary Overlie and the Viewpoints on the ground-breaking theatre and dance artist Mary Overlie. He is at work on another research project, Reality Frictions: Ruptural Performance and Impossible Theatre, which investigates politically-engaged art that troubles the line between fact and fiction. Dr. Perucci received his Ph.D. in Performance Studies from New York University, Tisch School of the Arts, his MA in Communication Studies from UNC-CH and his BS from Northwestern University.

This course introduces students to artistic practice as a “way of knowing.” We will “map” the UNC-CH campus using the abundance of arts events as our coordinates for navigating the space. We will also come to inscribe ourselves into that “map” through the creation of visual and/or performing arts projects in various locations across campus. Approaching the arts as a forum for critical engagement, students will attend theatre, music and dance performances, visual arts exhibitions, as well as the Hanes Visiting Artist Lecture Series, master classes by visiting artists, and post-show discussions. Students will also be guided in the creation of public space art projects that draw upon those events as well as ideas, concepts and texts that emerge in their first classes at UNC. How does the practice of engaged art-making function as a “way of knowing” that compliments and expands the understanding of those materials? How do the different artistic forms encountered “think” differently about questions, issues and problems from, say, a traditional academic setting, laboratory, corporate boardroom, break-room at work, or even the family dinner table? How do different artistic media confront artists with differing problems or questions to address in their work? How do these differences affect how we experience and make sense of the art we watch, hear, touch and create?

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COMM 89.004: Environmental Communication and the Media – ADDED 8/6/2018
Gen Eds: SS, GL
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
David Monje

Dr. David Monje’s research and teaching interests are in the environment, art, aesthetics and politics. He has travelled widely pursuing these interests and brings a broad perspective to the class. His interdisciplinary approach to teaching is informed by his education: he has BFA in painting, a BA in Linguistics, an MA in Communication and Society, and Ph.D. in Cultural Studies and Communication.

This seminar introduces first year students to the ways in which climate science, ecology and environmental science and climate change intersect with and are represented in politics, cultural artifacts, and the media. From television news, newspapers, and radio to social media such as Facebook and Twitter, climate change is a political, social, and cultural phenomenon. Climate change and global warming are also potentially consequential natural phenomena that scientists study, write about, and theorize about.

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Computer Science (COMP)

COMP 60H.001: Robotics with LEGO® (Honors)
QI
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Henry Fuchs

Henry Fuchs is the Federico Gil Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Fuchs is a co-director, with Nadia Thalmann of NTU Singapore and Markus Gross of ETH Zurich, of the NTU-ETH-UNC “BeingThere” International Research Centre for Tele-Presence and Tele-Collaboration. In 1975 he received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Utah. He has been active in computer graphics since the 1970s, with rendering algorithms (BSP Trees), hardware (Pixel-Planes and PixelFlow), virtual environments, tele-immersion systems and medical applications. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of the ACM, recipient of the 1992 ACM-SIGGRAPH Achievement Award and recipient of the IEEE VGTC 2013 Virtual Reality Career Award.

This seminar explores the process of design and the nature of computers by designing, building, and programming LEGO® robots. Competitions to evaluate various robots are generally held at the middle and/or at the end of the semester. Previous programming experience is not required. Assignments will typically take one to two weeks, each building on previously constructed robot and making one that will perform a more complex task. Early robots will follow black race course routes or run through mazes constructed on the floor of the robotics laboratory. Later “robots” will play simple games with human users. Others robots will play simple soccer games, remotely controlled by human handlers. Most assignments will include a written report, as well as a demonstration of a working robot and a listing of its computer program

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COMP 89H.093: Gerrymandering (Honors)
QI
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Diane Pozefsky

Diane Pozefsky received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from UNC and spent twenty-five years at IBM, where she was named an IBM Fellow. She has worked in technologies from networking and mobile computing to software engineering; she especially enjoyed working at the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics. She is heavily involved in encouraging students to consider careers in science and engineering. Her family includes her husband, a daughter who is an environmental specialist for the federal government, and one remaining geriatric cat. One of her passions is travel; she has visited every continent and Madagascar and is now working her way through the national parks.

The course will explore has become a political flashpoint in recent years. Defined as the manipulation of district boundaries to benefit a political party or demographic, there are pending court cases in numerous states, including North Carolina. One of the problems is in defining whether gerrymandering has occurred and there are a number of different technological approaches to defining it. The holy grail, however, is to find a way to prevent it. We will explore the problems introduced by gerrymandering and explore the technologies proposed to identify and prevent it. We will use real political maps to do these evaluations and will propose new approaches that we think should be explored.

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Dramatic Art (DRAM)

DRAM 79.001: The Heart of the Play: Fundamentals of Acting, Playwriting, and Collaboration
VP, CI
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Mark Perry

Mark Perry teaches playwriting, play analysis and dramaturgy and serves as a resident dramaturg with PlayMakers Repertory Company. His plays A New Dress for Mona and The Will of Bernard Boynton have been produced by UNC’s Department of Dramatic Art, and both scripts are available from Drama Circle. Mark is a graduate of the University of Iowa’s Playwrights Workshop and a former recipient of the North Carolina Arts Council’s Literature Fellowship for playwriting.

The goal of this seminar is to get you doing theatre, to spark your creativity and to connect you with the deeper lessons of this dynamic art form. You will act. You will write. You will work with others. It will not always be easy, but if you are willing to stretch yourself, you should have a great time. Each lesson is organized around a principle or virtue inherent in the practice of the art. Participants study a quotation or two that relate to that principle and then engage in drama exercises that spring from that principle. By the end of the course, you will have gained skills to make you comfortable to write, stage and perform your own 10 minute plays. Not just for those interested in pursuing theatre, this seminar will give you a more holistic understanding of essential principles in the practice of your life.

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DRAM 80.001: Psychology of Clothes: Motivations for Dressing Up and Dressing Down
VP, CI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Bobbi Owen

Bobbi Owen is the Michael R. McVaugh Distinguished Professor of Dramatic Art. Her courses include costume design and costume history, based in Western and non-Western traditions. She writes about theatrical designers with books including Costume Design on Broadway and Broadway Design Roster, the catalog for the United States entry in the 2007 Prague Quadrennial, Design USA (with Jody Blake) and The Designs of Willa Kim. Her most recent book, The Designs of William Ivey Long, about the much honored costume designer of Broadway musicals including Hairspray, Chicago, The Producers and Crazy for You was published in March 2018

Her research interests focus on traditional dress around the world – much of which is rapidly disappearing. NowesArk is an electronic study collection that contains information about traditional garments and accessories in the Department of Dramatic Art. It is a companion website to Costar, an online archive of vintage clothing, mainly from the 19th and 20th century. Both collections, at http://costumes.unc.edu/costar/homes/Cloaks.jsp, are a valuable means to study the materials, construction, provenance, and patterns used for historic clothing.

This seminar is focused on developing the vocabulary so students can articulate their own motivations for dress and then apply the ideas they have discovered to the ways in which both individuality and group attitudes are expressed through clothing. The semester begins with the familiar – observation and analysis of clothing forms on UNC’s campus – and moves into less familiar aspects of dress. Small groups will present their findings to the class with an emphasis placed on not only what the subjects are wearing, but why. Throughout the semester the class will meet “on location” wherever clothing is worn throughout the community. In the classroom, students will discuss readings from to create shared terminology. They will also discover common (and occasionally uncommon) motivations for dress, not only in our own culture, but also in others in the world today.

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DRAM 81H.001: Staging America: The American Drama (Honors)
VP, CI, NA
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Gregory Kable

Gregory Kable is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Dramatic Art, where he teaches dramatic literature, theatre history, and performance courses and serves as an Associate Dramaturg for PlayMakers Repertory Company. He also teaches seminars on Modern British Crama and American Musicals for the Honors program. He has directed dozens of productions at UNC and throughout the local community, and is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama.

This seminar examines our national drama from its colonial origins to the present. Participants read plays and criticism, screen videos, engage in critical writing, and consider performance as related means of exploring the visions and revisions constituting American dramatic history. We will approach American drama as both a literary and commercial art form, and look to its history to provide a context for current American theater practice. Readings are chosen for their intrinsic merit and historical importance, but also for their treatment of key issues and events in American life. Our focus throughout will be on the forces that shaped the American drama as well as, in turn, that drama’s ability to shed light on the national experience.

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DRAM 83.001: Spectacle in the Theatre
VP
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
David Navalinsky

David Navalinsky is the Director of Undergraduate Production in the Department of Dramatic Art. David has taught at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Mississippi. David’s recent design work includes scenery for The Uncanny Valley by Francesca Talenti. The Uncanny Valley featured a Robothespian™, which is exactly what it sounds like. He has also written a documentary theatre piece Priceless Gem: An Athlete Story, which tells the stories of UNC athletes. David has worked professionally at South Coast Repertory in Orange County California, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, The Illinois Shakespeare Festival, and the Karamu Performing Arts Theatre in Cleveland, OH. Some of David’s favorite projects were at the Dallas Children’s Theater where he made a dinosaur collapse and pirates walk the plank.

This seminar will explore the artists, art and technology involved in creating the world of the play. It is intended as an overview for students who want to learn about theatrical design. Students will create their own designs in the areas of scenery, costumes, and lighting for three plays throughout the semester. The plays will be placed outside of their traditional setting while still maintaining the story and themes. Students have placed Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a trailer park and a daycare center for example. Careful historical research, close reading and analysis, text and source material, and collaboration will be the focus of the student projects.

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DRAM 87H.001: Style: A Mode of Expression (Honors)
VP, CI, NA
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
McKay Coble

McKay Coble teaches design, both scenic and costume for the theatre and the history of material culture. She fell in love with the power of choice as far as visuals are concerned early in her career as a Carolina student and have never turned back. She is a professor in the Department of Dramatic Art and is a resident designer for PlayMakers Repertory Company. Dr. Coble uses the many and varied artistic venues on campus as co-instructors and the class will be visiting them during the course of the semester. Students will likely join her on a design journey as she created the scenery for a production for PRC. Students will have the opportunity to see the process and product.

This seminar studies the elements of design in their pure form and in context, surveys a history of period styles and theatre, and identifies their causes.

Consider Oscar Wilde’s statement from The Decay of Living 1889:

“Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life. This results not merely from Life’s imitative instincts, but from the fact that the self conscious aim of Life is to find expression, and that Art offers it certain beautiful forms through which it may realize that energy…”

Do you agree or disagree? Art and design have frequently shown the inner life of humankind throughout history better than political, intellectual or social history. While a period’s style is seldom defined by the everyday choices of everyday people and is most often recorded in the works of artists, writers and intellectuals we must recognize the “times” as a major motivator for all stylistic choices. Even minor arts reflect major events.

We will study the elements of design as they exist in their pure form; a “tool box” of elements available to artists and practice the principles to which design is bound. We will survey a history of period styles, period theatre and identify their causes. We will explore one period’s style as a foundation for the next and dispel the Star Trek premise that future styles will only reflect the future.

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Education (EDUC)

EDUC 65.001: School Daze: What’s School Got to do with Getting an Education?
T, 3:30 PM – 6:15 PM
Suzanne Gulledge

Suzanne Gulledge is a Professor of Education with specializations in Curriculum and Instruction, Ethics and Education and International and Experiential Teaching and Learning. She was named a UNC-Chapel Hill University Engaged Scholar in 2009 and has numerous teaching awards and honors. International and global studies and community based service learning are among her teaching and research interests. She developed and continues to lead educator initiatives and study abroad courses. Those have been in South Africa, Tanzania, Scotland, Northern Ireland and China. Gulledge is the director of the Academic Leadership Program in the Institute for the Arts and Humanities. Active on the Carolina campus in faculty governance and in interdisciplinary academic activities, she directs a Carolina Seminar, has been elected to the Carolina Faculty Council Executive Committee, Chancellor’s Advisory Committee, Faculty Assembly and University Government Committee. She has been Chair of the Faculty and a Division Coordinator and Program Chair in the School of Education. She has served on advisory boards for the Center for Faculty Excellence, Carolina Navigators of the Center for Global Education, APPLES Service Learning Program, the Ackland Museum and Carolina Performing Arts – Arts at the Core. Teacher education and teacher professional development, in addition to social foundations, ethics, and social studies education, are Gulledge’s primary scholarly interests.

What does it mean to be an educated person? What function do schools serve? This seminar builds on the experiences of schooling that students bring to the university. In an innovative update to the pedagogy of this popular First Year Seminar, it will now feature design thinking and use of “makerspaces” as a way for students to “actualize” their ideas and learning about how schooling can be updated and revised to better meet the aims of “real” education in the Twenty-first Century and beyond. The seminar includes readings, speakers and experiences as stimuli for them to engineer new paradigms, approaches, structures and tools for education of the future. Students are challenged to re-consider and de-construct what they know about education and schools as a result of those experiences and then re-conceptualize, redesign and create their new vision for schooling as educative in new ways. The seminar considers traditional schooling along with non-traditional and international approaches to educating youngsters. There are no pre-requisites for this class. Students’ first-hand knowledge and experiences combined with a critical perspective will encourage innovative thinking about ways and places of learning with the aim of generating proposals for new or reformed schools and new forms of public education for the future through collaboration, making and design thinking.

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English and Comparative Literature (ENGL)

ENGL 53.001: Slavery and Freedom in African American Literature and Film
LA, US
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
William L. Andrews

William L. Andrews teaches courses on African American literature, American autobiography studies and Southern literature. Since the mid-1980s he has done a considerable amount of editing of African American and Southern literature and criticism. Professor Andrews is the series editor of North American Slave Narratives, Beginnings to 1920, a complete digitized library of autobiographies and biographies of North American slaves and ex-slaves.

The purpose of this seminar is to explore the African American slave narrative tradition from its 19th-century origins in autobiography to its present manifestations in prize-winning fiction and film. The most famous 19th-century slave narrative, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845) was an international best seller. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), the amazing but utterly truthful story of Harriet Jacobs’s slave experience in Edenton, North Carolina, is extensively read and taught in college and university classrooms around the world. In the 20th century, many important African American autobiographies and novels—Washington’s Up From Slavery (1901), Wright’s Black Boy (1945), Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952), Haley’s The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1965) and Morrison’s Beloved (1987) —are products, formally and thematically, of the ongoing slave narrative tradition. The slave narrative has also given rise to a number of notable films, from major studio releases like Spielberg’s Amistad (1997) to TV-films like Charles Burnett’s Nightjohn (1996). The 1977 television series based on Haley’s Roots enabled the slave narrative tradition to have a profound impact on late 20th-century American culture. Slave narratives have also had strong influence on popular films such as Blade Runner (1982), The Handmaid’s Tale (1990), Django Unchained (2013) and 12 Years a Slave (2013). Because of the widespread incidence of human trafficking and other forms of involuntary servitude in the world today, slavery remains a major human rights issue.

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ENGL 55H.01: Reading and Writing Women’s Lives (Honors)
LA, CI, EE
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Jane Danielewicz

Although she is an English professor, Jane Danielewicz is curious about almost all fields, from plant biology and architecture, to American history and literature. She can’t help but live the life of the mind and is a passionate reader, writer, and teacher. At UC Berkeley, her graduate education focused on linguistics and literacy, writing and rhetoric. Professor Danielewicz’s work at UNC continues in this vein. She investigates the nature of written language, the teaching of writing, and forms of creative non-fiction. Her special interest is in life-writing, particularly the study of contemporary American memoir. She is proud to have been named the Richard Grant Hiskey Distinguished Professor in Research and Undergraduate Teaching. She has twice received the J. Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award and has a particular affinity for working with first-year students. She enjoys creating assignments that tempt students to push the envelope and try something new, especially to conduct research in their fields. An associate professor in the department of English and Comparative Literature, she also directs the Writing in the Disciplines Program. Professor Danielewicz has recently published a book, Contemporary American Memoir in Action (2017), which discusses how memoirs are not simply interesting narratives but are actions that solve social problems or produce new ways of understanding the world.

How do our lives become stories? This simple question provokes writers to produce autobiographies or memoirs or biographies. This honors seminar narrows the scope, focusing on contemporary stories that involve personal and lived experience by and about women. Not only will we be reading autobiographical stories and theories that describe women’s experience, but we will also try producing creative nonfiction ourselves. What stories will students—as women or as men—tell about their lives? Students will be challenged to investigate questions of self and identity by composing (using traditional written or new media formats) four genres of life writing during the course: autobiography, autoethnography, biography, and personal essay. Students will learn the research methods involved in life writing. The seminar will be conducted daily as a workshop to promote interactive, experiential learning. Students will be organized into working groups to facilitate community building. Published authors will visit the class. Students will publish their work through public readings and on-line venues.

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ENGL 70.001: Courtly Love, Then and Now
LA, NA
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
David Baker

David Baker is the Peter G. Phialas Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. He is interested in how early modern people experienced their marketplace, what they thought and felt about it, and in how literary works reflected that experience. He has written a book on this, and also one on issues of ethnic identity in Britain at this time. He teaches courses in Shakespeare and other dramatists, as well as the popular culture of early modern England. Recently, he has begun to explore the digital humanities and has several collaborative projects under way, including a web application dedicated to the literature and culture of early modern Ireland.

How have ideas about courtship changed between the twelfth-century Rules of Love penned by Andrew the Chaplain and today’s men’s and women’s magazines, or1995’s The Rules: Time-Tested Secrets for Capturing the Heart of Mr. Right? Just what was “courtly love”? And how has it influenced our own views of romance? Our readings will include literature that defined this influential concept, from The Art of Love by the Latin writer Ovid; to medieval Arthurian romances and troubadour lyrics; to Renaissance sonnets and Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. We will trace the influence of these traditions in works by nineteenth-century writers such as Tennyson and Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and in contemporary films, cartoons, and advertisements. In the process we will be exploring the history of Western thought about gender relations, and the political and economic implications of our ideas about beauty, sex, and love.

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ENGL 85H.001: Economic Saints and Villains (Honors)
LA, CI, WB
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Ritchie Kendall

Assistant Dean for Honors Carolina and Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Ritchie Kendall joined the UNC faculty in 1980. He holds a BA in English from Yale University (1973) and an MA and PhD in English from Harvard University (1980). His specialty is in English Renaissance drama with an emphasis on the socio-economic dimensions of early modern theater. He has taught Honors courses in Shakespeare, Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, comedy and social class, epic and drama, and early modern ideas of entrepreneurship. He has also served several times as Faculty Director for the Honors Semester in London.

The rise of new economic activities–whether the birth of international banking, trading in future commodities, or the marketing of junk bonds–bring with them both excitement and trepidation. Literature about how people, both ordinary and extraordinary, go about the business of getting and spending is one way that a culture comes to terms with emergent and potentially revolutionary economic formations. This course will explore how early modern England from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries imagined new economic orders through plays and novels. We will examine how Renaissance plays by Marlowe, Shakespeare, Dekker, and Heywood present economic scoundrels such as Barabas and Shylock as well as heroic entrepreneurs such as Simon Eyre and Thomas Gresham. In the eighteenth century we will sample the work of Daniel Defoe who crafted a guide for early tradesmen but also produced subversive novels with dubious heroines who use sex and business acumen to acquire and lose great fortunes. From the nineteenth century, we will read two works, a little known melodrama, “The Game of Speculation,” as well as the iconic “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens. Both stories speculate on the compatibility of economic and spiritual success. We will conclude with a modern epilogue: three satiric films from the era of Reagan economics including Oliver Stone’s “Wall Street,” Mike Nichols’ “Working Girl,” and Jon Landis’ “Trading Places.” Our objective throughout will be to analyze how literary art, itself a form of economic activity, simultaneously demonizes and celebrates the “miracle of the marketplace” and those financial pioneers that perform its magic.

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ENGL 89.001: How Rhetoric Shapes Public Policy
SS, CI, US
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Jordynn Jack and Mai Nguyen

Dr. Jordynn Jack is Professor of English and Comparative Literature. She received her MA and PhD in English at the Pennsylvania State University. Her research involves interdisciplinary study of how people use language persuasively in a range of fields, from academic disciplines such as neuroscience and health care to public discussions over the environment, public policies, and social issues. Her most recent book, Autism and Gender (2014), examines how public debates about autism and its causes draw upon popular ideas about sex and gender. She is also co-director of the HHIVE Lab, an interdisciplinary center where undergraduate students work with faculty on engaged health humanities research projects.

Dr. Mai Thi Nguyen is an Associate Professor in the City & Regional Planning Department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her Master’s in Sociology at the Pennsylvania State University and PhD in Urban Planning at the University of California, Irvine. She is an expert in housing policy, community economic development, immigration and urban growth phenomena. She also teaches courses in the Housing and Community Development specialization with the focus of teaching about practices and policies that create transformative community change. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

The places we live in matter deeply. Those places are not only shaped by bricks and mortar, though, but by the rhetoric used to craft public policy about who is allowed to use places and what activities occur within them. Studying the period post-WWII (1945), this course will examine how policy issues are framed persuasively for different stakeholders and audiences. We will employ rhetorical analysis to identify the “frames”—key terms and concepts, or topoi, as rhetoric scholars would put it—that shape how issues of public policy are conveyed to different audiences. Topics of study will include poverty and welfare policy, housing issues such as eviction and residential segregation, and the neighborhood as a site for social justice.

Researchers in the humanities and the social sciences tend to study public policy from different perspectives. In this class, we will examine public policy from the perspective of two disciplines: rhetoric and city and regional planning. Rhetoric scholars focus on the persuasive language techniques stakeholders use to frame discussions of public policy, while planning researchers use methods such as interviews, case studies, and site visits to understand policy changes and how they affect individuals. By combining these methods, students in this course will develop a deeper understanding of public policy, examine how persuasive language shapes those policies, and learn how to craft effective messages to enact change in their own communities.

Students may also register for this course under PLAN 89.001.

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ENGL 89.002: W. B. Yeats and Irish Independence
John L. Townsend III FYS in English
LA, NA, CI
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
John McGowan

John McGowan is the John W. and Anna H. Hanes Distinguished Professor of English. He has won multiple teaching awards including the Sitterson Award for Excellence in Freshmen Teaching. He is the author of six books about British literature and the theory and practice of democracy. Recently, he has been interested in how the First World War is the source of many of today’s political and social problems, ranging from the Middle East crisis to Brexit. The story of Ireland’s violent escape from the British Empire during the years between 1900 and 1925 is fascinating in itself, but also forms the context for the great Irish writers–Yeats, Synge, O’Casey, and Joyce–of that time.

William Butler Yeats is widely considered the greatest poet writing in English during the 20th century. But Yeats was also deeply involved in the political struggles for Irish independence, struggles that lasted for over 25 years and were the source of three separate bloody conflicts. This course will read Yeats’s poems and plays in the context of his political activities and of the wider Irish scene. Students will research the history of the fight for Irish independence, the contributions Yeats made to the development of Irish nationalism, and the intricacies of Yeats’s poetry and plays. Our work will encompass history, literary criticism, and theater studies.

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ENGL 89.003: Environmental Literature and Narrative
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
LA
Heidi Kim

Heidi Kim is an Associate Professor of English and adjunct in the Department of Asian Studies. Her research-focused teaching has resulted in public events featuring students and has been featured in print. She is the author of Invisible Subjects (Oxford University Press, 2016) on the postwar careers of William Faulkner, Ralph Ellison, and John Steinbeck, and she has also published and spoken widely on the Japanese American incarceration. More recently, she has commenced collaborative research on climate change impact and environmental justice, including an NSF-funded project in west Africa on food security and social networks. She received the Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award in 2014.

In this course, we will study environmental literature from around the globe, contrasting fiction with non-fiction. How do these narratives convey the beauty, ferocity, and vulnerability of the environment and the relationship between environment and humanity? Our readings will take us from historical events such as the Dust Bowl to the present-day North Carolina coast to speculative fiction set in China, in works by famous writers such as John Steinbeck side by side with emerging modern voices. Students will be challenged not only to interpret these readings but to create their own essays or fiction, based on research on the topic of their choice. Discussions will be highlighted this semester by a special visit from award-winning poet Aimee Nezhukumatathil.

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ENGL 89.004: Blake 2.0: William Blake in Popular Culture
John L. Townsend III FYS in English
LA, NA
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Joseph Viscomi

Joseph Viscomi, the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of English Literature, directs and co-edits the William Blake Archive. His special interests are British Romantic literature, art and printmaking. He has co-edited 9 illuminated works for The William Blake Trust and over 90 electronic editions for the Blake Archive. He is the author of Prints by Blake and his Followers, Blake and the Idea of the Book and numerous essays on Blake’s illuminated printing, color printing and reception. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Rockefeller Foundation, Getty Foundation and National Humanities Center.

William Blake, the visionary poet, artist and printmaker of the British Romantic period, has had enormous influence on modern art and popular culture. His illuminated poetry integrated word and image anticipating graphic novels and influencing many modern musicians, poets, writers (including Pullman, His Dark Materials Trilogy, Bono, Patti Smith and Jim Morrison). Using the Blake Archive, a hypertext of Blake’s poetry and art, we will study key Blake works as well as the digital medium that enables us to study these works in new ways. We will also explore the Web for performances and adaptations of the works we study and for works by musicians, painters, poets, writers, actors, playwrights, performers, dancers and film and video makers who were or are inspired or influenced by Blake. Students will share their discoveries with the class and produce critical or creative responses to a work by Blake or by an influenced artist.

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European Studies (EURO)

EURO 89.001: Europe and the U.S. in a Changing World
SS, GL
TTH, 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM
Liesbet Hooghe

Liesbet Hooghe is the W.R. Kenan Professor of Political Science at UNC-Chapel Hill and Robert Schuman Fellow at the European University Institute, Florence. Her research interests are in political behavior (elites, political parties, public opinion), multilevel governance and decentralization, European integration, international organization. In 2017 she received the Daniel Elazar Distinguished Scholar Award for Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations of the APSA. Hooghe’s recent co-authored books include The European Commission in the 21st Century (OUP, 2013); Measuring Regional Authority (OUP, 2016); Community, Scale and Regional Governance (OUP, 2016); and Measuring International Authority (OUP, 2017). Homepage: http://hooghe.web.unc.edu

This course introduces students to European society and the European Union, and the respects in which European politics differs from American politics. The first section of the course engages Europe and the European Union. Why is there a European Union? How does it operate? How has it developed? What difference has it made in the lives of Europeans? What kind of polity is emerging at the European level? How is European integration contested? Is European integration the beginning of the end of the national state in Western Europe, or will states constrain the loss of sovereignty? The second section of the course compares American with European politics. How are elections and the practice of government different? How do welfare and health care in the United States differ from Western Europe? To what extent do conceptions and practice in foreign policy differ between Europe and the USA? Are Europeans from Venus and Americans from Mars, as a famous American scholar once argued, or is the reality more fine-grained?

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Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 50.001: Mountain Environments
PL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Diego Riveros-Iregui

Dr. Riveros-Iregui received a Ph.D. in Ecology and Environmental Sciences from Montana State University (2008), a M.S. in Geology from the University of Minnesota (2004), and a B.S. in Geology from the National University of Colombia (1999). His research interests include watershed science, forest and soil processes, ecosystem ecology, and landscape biophysical responses to environmental change. His field studies include highly impacted sites of the Andes Mountains of Colombia and the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador. He publishes in journals such as Global Change Biology, Water Resources Research, and Geophysical Research Letters. He is an avid runner and can be followed on Twitter @carbonshed.

This seminar focuses on understanding the physical geography of mountain environments and the processes that have created them, shaped them, and sustained them. There are several reasons for studying the environments of mountains: (a) they reveal integrative earth systems processes that can be readily observed and understood; (b) the processes are not oversimplified, but have spatial complexity at scales that can be methodically analyzed; and (c) mountains often reveal the intricate dynamics of coupled human-natural systems. We will explore mountain environments by concentrating on processes that shape the landscape, patterns that are apparent because of those active processes, and how the concept of scale (both through space and time) define the patterns that we observe when go on a hike or when we drive across the country. We will draw examples from different environments, including the Appalachian Mountains, the Rocky Mountains, and the Andes.

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GEOG 64.001: Vietnam
HS, BN
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
Christian C. Lentz

When Christian C. Lentz was growing up in a small Rhode Island town, he wanted to experience places just over the horizon, if not the other side of the earth. So in college he learned Indonesian and studied abroad there before turning towards Vietnamese and Vietnam. With a Masters in Environmental Science and a PhD in Development Sociology, he fit nicely into the Department of Geography at UNC. He continues to work in Southeast Asia and is interested in how everyday folk—farmers, soldiers, and traders—negotiate a social world created, in part, by their own thoughts, relations, and actions. His research looks at Vietnam during war and revolution, when ordinary people changed their world and, in many ways, turned it upside down.

What do we think of when we think of Vietnam? For many, Vietnam was and remains a war that haunts veterans, families, and politicians. But to think only of the “Vietnam War” overlooks a country and its story. In fact, many Vietnamese wonder why Americans are so preoccupied with the “American War”!

We will explore modern Vietnam in order to situate the American War in a broader spatial and historical context. Landscapes range from forests, over mountains, through fields, and downstream to river deltas. Vietnamese move from village to city, meander through cafes and rice paddies, cross oceans and land again. Our journey begins with royal unification and collapse, winds through colonialism and nationalist struggles, pauses in the Cold War, and ends with ongoing reforms. This seminar aims to introduce a fascinating place rich in history and to animate a geographic imagination students can take anywhere. Through forays to the university library and media center, we learn how to locate and appreciate fact and fiction, primary and secondary sources, text and picture, film and map. Through reading and writing exercises as well as film screenings and class discussions, students encounter new points of view, engage scholarly debates, and develop informed perspectives.

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Geological Sciences (GEOL)

GEOL 72H.001: Field Geology of Eastern California (Honors)
PL, EE
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Drew Coleman

Drew Coleman’s research focuses on understanding how the Earth works by determining the rates of processes (mountain building, extinction, volcanism, etc.) that occurred in the past. To accomplish this he and his students date rocks. His teaching is inquiry based and he is most happy when he is teaching “hands on” in the field or lab.

This seminar will be designed around a one-week field trip to eastern California, where students will study geologic features including active volcanoes, earthquake-producing faults, evidence for recent glaciations and extreme climate change, and how locals deal with living on active geologic features. Before the field trip (which will take place the week of Fall Break and be based at the White Mountain Research Station, Bishop, California), the class will meet twice a week to go over basic geologic principles and to work on field topics for which student groups will be responsible. During the trip students will work on specific projects (e.g., making a geologic map of a small area; mapping, measuring, and describing an active fault; observing and recording glacial features on a hike), and collect samples for an original, small group, research project. After the field trip students will complete laboratory analysis of samples and present the results of their research to the Department. Grading will be based on the research, group work presented on the trip, and on a variety of small projects during the trip (notebook descriptions, mapping projects, etc.). Students will be required to pay some of the costs (estimated about $900). This course will require missing three days of classes.

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GEOL 79.001: Coasts in Crisis – CANCELLED 7/19/2018
PL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Laura Moore

Laura Moore’s research focuses on large-scale geological and modern evolution of coastal environments with an emphasis on understanding the impacts of climate change on modern coastal systems. In her study of coastal systems she uses a combination of field techniques and computer modeling approaches. She appreciates that her research allows her to spend time at the coast, which is one of her favorite places to be.

Rising sea level and severe storms continue to cause coastal erosion yet coastal areas are more populated than ever. In light of this, what is the future of the American beach and beaches worldwide? In this seminar we will investigate the evolution and function of coastal environments over geologic time. We will also consider the recent effects of development and engineering solutions on coastal environments. We will then examine the factors that have led to existing coastal management strategies and the tensions between coastal development and the desire to preserve natural coastal environments. A mixture of readings, lecture, hands-on activities, lively class discussions, and role play exercises will provide a variety of means for interacting with course material.

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German and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)

GSLL 50.001: Literary Fantasy and Historical Reality – CANCELLED 6/13/2018
LA, CI, NA
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Tin Wegel

Tin Wegel is a Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures. Her academic interests lie in drama and theater performances, as well as foreign language pedagogy. Since 2003, she has staged a great number of plays in both German and English with students at various colleges and universities. In Fall 2017, she staged “Standing on Ceremony: The Gay Marriage Plays” with her First-Year Seminar students. Her latest performance in German was Frank Wedekind’s 1891 play “Frühlings Erwachen. Eine Kindertragödie” (“Spring Awakening. A Children’s Tragedy”) with students in a German senior seminar.

This seminar focuses on images of fantastical worlds in art and literature and the historical realities in which these fantasies are rooted. In life, as well as in in our imagination, we often see what we believe to be real. And yet, our beliefs about truth and reality are heavily influenced by what we allow ourselves to see and believe in. In order to make sense of what is real, as opposed to what feels real, we will examine a broad spectrum of artistic takes on the fantastical and the real from European and American sources. Additionally, you will be working on a project that engages with the topics of the course and that will be both academic and creative in nature. Longer literary texts include Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis (ISBN: 978-0393347098), Tony Kushner’s Angels in America (ISBN: 978-1559363846), and Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad (ISBN: 978-0345804327).

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GSLL 69.001: Laughing and Crying at the Movies: Film and Experience – CANCELLED 4/17/2018
VP
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Inga Pollmann

Inga Pollmann is Assistant Professor in Film Studies in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures and is also part of the Cinema and Media Studies program in English and Comparative Literature. Her research focuses on the history of film theory, intersections of film, science and philosophy, and the place of the moving image within aesthetic theory. As a consequence, her interests span across a variety of genres, styles, and periods, such as 1920s German cinema, melodrama, global new wave cinemas, and contemporary art cinema. She has written essays on Russian montage cinema, German abstract cinema, the interrelation of German biology and film theory in the 1920s, the question of mood and coldness in film, French film theory and evolution, and contemporary German cinema. Her latest book project entitled Cinematic Vitalism: Film Theory and the Question of Life engages with the role of conceptions of life and vitality in German and French aesthetic theory, philosophy, and theory of biology for film theory and practice from the 1910s-60s.

In this seminar, we will consider a puzzling question: Why is it that we cry at the movies? And why do we willingly, and lustfully, expose ourselves to such an experience? How do films make us laugh or recoil in horror, and what is the difference between experiencing this in a movie theater or at home? Crying, laughing or screaming are just a few of the possible responses a movie can elicit from its audience. We will focus on various film genres, including melodrama, horror and comedy, to venture a few preliminary answers. Additionally, we will make excursions into other genres and their emotional responses to think further about the physical and psychological aspects of film spectatorship. Over the course of this seminar, students will learn the basics of film analysis and gain an overview over the history of international film production, and they will also consider various definitions of, and approaches to, emotion, affect, and the body. Questions that will guide our investigation include: What is an emotion? What formal elements of a film can we identify that guide emotional response? What distinguishes crying from laughing and other emotional utterances? How do we account for the social role of laughing and crying in the movie theater, its communicative and contagious aspects? What is the role of gender in emotional response? What do emotional responses to film tell us about the medium film?

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GSLL 75.001: The Book of Books: Literature and the Bible
LA, NA
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Aleksandra Prica

Aleksandra Prica studied German Literature and Theology at the University of Zürich in Switzerland and at the Humboldt University in Berlin. She received her Ph.D. degree in Medieval German Literature at the University of Zürich in 2010. Before spending two years on a postdoctoral grant at the Department of Germanic Studies at the University of Chicago she was a Senior Research Associate (Oberassistentin) of Medieval German Studies in the Department of Germanic Studies at the University of Zürich. She joined the faculty of UNC in January 2016.

Dr. Prica’s academic interest focuses on literature of the Middle Ages and contemporary adaptations of the medieval world in literature, art and film.

The Bible is the single most influential book in all of Western civilization. It is the top bestseller of all time and the most translated work in history. No other text has been read, discussed and interpreted as often and no other book had a comparable impact on the arts. Knowing the Bible is therefore the condition that helps us understand substantial aspects of what is at stake in literary, visual and musical traditions. In this class we will familiarize ourselves with the stories, poems, letters, historical documents, songs, witness accounts and philosophical treatises that the Bible contains, and we will examine how works of art have preserved or transformed this biblical material. While our focus will lie on literature, we will also visit the museum, go to a music performance and watch movies. In written assignments and oral presentations, you will have the chance to interpret and work creatively with and through the biblical and literary texts.

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GSLL 80.001: Not Just Dogs: Animals in Russian Literature
LA, BN
MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM
Radislav Lapushin

Radislav Lapushin, Associate Professor of Russian Literature, received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. His primary research interests are Chekhov; interrelationship between prose and poetry; and Russian literature on stage and screen. His well-received book, Dew on the Grass: The Poetics of Inbetweenness in Chekhov, focuses on the poetic dimensions of Anton Chekhov’s prose and drama. An author of several volumes of Russian poetry, his most recent collection, Dog Poetry (Boston, 2016), dovetails nicely with the topic of this seminar.

This seminar explores the “question of the animal” in the works of major Russian writers (Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Turgenev, Chekhov) and introduces students to the main theoretical texts on the animal/human relationship (Nietzsche, Levinas, Derrida, Irigaray). Among the topics to be discussed are the animal as the other, animal and human natures, dominance and submission, ethics of the human/animal relations, and the theme of “talking” animals.

The course’s main goals are:

  • To follow the representation of the animal in Russian literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries;
  • To examine the worlds of major Russian writers;
  • To learn the methods of analyzing literature;
  • To learn the methods of critical writing.

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History (HIST)

HIST 50.001: Time and the Medieval Cosmos
HS
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Chris Clemens and Brett Edward Whalen

Dr. Chris Clemens is the Jaroslav Folda Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Senior Associate Dean of Natural Sciences. He studies stellar remnants and the debris from old planetary systems around them. Dr. Clemens is also a faculty member of the Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies.

Brett Edward Whalen (associate professor, History) received his PhD from Stanford in 2005 and has been at Carolina ever since. He teaches classes on the medieval church, the crusades, and the apocalypse. As a child, he spent cold, clear winter nights in Vermont looking through his telescope at celestial bodies.

Time and the Medieval Cosmos will introduce first-year students to the basic motions of the solar system as viewed from the Earth and the mechanical and mathematical models used to reproduce them. The course will also immerse students in the world of medieval and early modern education, theology, and natural philosophy, challenging them to understand the historical conditions that shaped views of the cosmos in the premodern world. Last but not least, the class will raise broader questions about the relationship between faith and reason, along with the role of institutional authorities in determining the boundaries of “acceptable” knowledge.

Students may also register for this course under PHYS 50.001.

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HIST 89.001: Screen Nazis: The Representation of National Socialism in the Cinema
John L. Townsend III FYS in History
HS, GL
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Tobias Hof

Tobias Hof joined UNC Chapel Hill in 2014 as the DAAD Visiting Professor. His research centers on modern European History with a special interest in the history of 19th and 20th century Germany and Italy, international relations, security and Fascism. After finishing a biography on Galeazzo Ciano, Benito Mussolini’s son in law, his next research project is focusing on the international food aid to Ethiopia during the famines in the 1970s and 1980s. He is also editing a book on post-war cinema in Germany, Italy and Japan.

In this seminar we will examine the portrayal and representation of German National Socialism, the “Nazis” and the crimes they committed in war and postwar visual culture. We will track the transformation of the “Nazi” in the cultural imagination of Europe, America, and Asia as a way to understand not only the public culture of remembrance but, also the historical, political and ideological context in which the films were made. The selection of films that we will watch includes movies from the United States, Germany, Italy, France, Great Britain, the Soviet Union and Japan. This wide range of films from different countries will allow us to avoid a discussion limited by national boundaries and will enable us to further grasp the role of the cinema in contextualizing major historical events in the 20th century.

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HIST 89.002: Rebuilding the American South: Work and Identity in Modern History – ADDED 5/14/2018
HS, US
MW, 1:25 PM – 2:40pm
Erik Gellman

Dr. Erik Gellman is Associate Professor of History at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. He’s the author of Death Blow to Jim Crow: The National Negro Congress and the Rise of Militant Civil Rights (UNC Press, 2012) and The Gospel of the Working Class: Labor’s Southern Prophets in New Deal America (IL Press, 2011, coauthor Jarod Roll). He’s co-directed NEH and Terra Foundation programs on the Black Chicago Renaissance. Thanks to an NEH Public Scholar fellowship, he’s in the process of writing his next book, Troublemakers: Chicago Freedom Struggles through the Lens of Art Shay (University of Chicago Press). From 2006-2018, he taught at Roosevelt University in Chicago.

“Class” has been the subject of more mystification, misunderstanding, and ill-informed political disagreement than perhaps any other social category. Especially in the American South, the notion of fundamental class differences may seem antithetical to the aspirations, or even claims, for a class-less society. Yet differences in occupation, income, wealth, the habits of everyday life, and definitions of the “good life” clearly remain. This course examines how class experiences and debates over the meaning of work have shaped the postbellum Southern United States. Technological innovation, the emergence of a consumer economy, and the evolution of popular culture all have made and remade class identities and influenced ideas about the South as a region as well as the racial, gender, and sexual identities of its people. Students in this course will develop new perspectives on the South in American history. They will also cultivate skills (oral and written), using history as a way of learning to analyze the past and inform the present.

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Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST)

IDST 89.001: Happiness: Mind, Body, Society
SS
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
Joanna Lawson, Khoa Le Nguyen, Yioula Sigounas, Banu Gökarıksel

Note: This course will be taught by three Royster Fellows under the supervision of the Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education, Dr. Banu Gökarıksel.

Joanna Lawson is a graduate student studying philosophy. She is interested in discovering the fundamental nature of reality, including the nature of time and the metaphysical structure of the self. She has a master’s degree from the University of Oxford in Philosophical Theology, where she studied under Brian Leftow. She has given talks in both the US and the UK, including, “Luminosity and Epistemicism: Are We Luminous?”, “Time and Tense in a Four Category Ontology: A Kantian Solution”, and “Felt Passage: The Anticipatory and Retrospective Nature of Present Experience”. She wants to learn (through experience, if possible) what true happiness is.

Khoa Le Nguyen is a Psychology Ph.D. student researching socioemotional processes and wellbeing. He graduated summa cum laude from the College of Wooster with a degree in Psychology, then conducted research at the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania, before attending graduate school at Chapel Hill. He is studying how activities to increase positive emotions such as meditation influence wellbeing and biological aging, and how emotional and biological processes (e.g. inflammation) reciprocally impact each other. He also has an interest in teaching and applying positive psychology to help individuals thrive both inside and outside the academic context.

Yioula Sigounas is a graduate student studying anthropology. She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University with a degree in literature before returning home to North Carolina and attending medical school at UNC-Chapel Hill. After completing medical school and training as a surgeon, she realized that she is much more interested in the “why” of medicine than the “what.” As a medical anthropologist, Yioula researches how people discover, create, and obtain material and social resources as ways to address physical disability. She keeps finding happiness and happy people in the most unexpected circumstances and places.

Banu Gökarıksel is an Associate Professor of Geography and the Royster Distinguished Professor at The Graduate School at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She has a joint appointment in the Curriculum of Global Studies and adjunct appointment in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies at Duke University. She served as the co-editor of the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies (2014-2018). Professor Gökarıksel received her PhD in Geography from the University of Washington, Seattle and MA in Sociology/Anthropology from Bogaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey. She was awarded the 2017 Chapman Family University Teaching Award and the 2018 American Association of Geographers Enhancing Diversity Award. She is the co-director of Duke Middle East in Europe summer program,

Professor Gökarıksel’s research examines bodies, intimacy, and everyday spaces as key sites of politics and geopolitics. Her work addresses geography of religion and feminist political and cultural geographies and engages feminist and social theory to analyze embodied and lived experiences of religion and secularism, the production of social difference, and the formation of subjects, borders, and territory. She has been conducting multi-method fieldwork research that focuses on the politics of everyday life and questions of religion, secularism, and pluralism in Turkey since 1996. Professor Gökarıksel is interested in similar questions about religious, racial, and gender/sexual diversity, shared spaces, and social justice in the US and in Europe (specifically Germany) as well.

Happiness: Mind, Body, Society is an interdisciplinary first-year seminar that will introduce students to the study of positive emotions and well-being from the perspectives of anthropology, philosophy, and positive psychology. In anthropology, students will learn how sensory perceptions differ among individuals and populations, how happiness reflects societal arrangements, and how emotions can produce transformative individual and collective actions. In philosophy, students will examine how philosophers over the course of history have understood the concept of human flourishing, explore the moral and ethical dimensions of happiness, and ask themselves the difficult question, “Why be happy?” In psychology, students will learn a quantitative approach to positive psychology research. By exploring the evidence-based answers to “Why be happy?”, students will identify factors that make happy individuals and societies, and will explore how to become happier themselves. This course will use theoretical, ethnographic, scientific and historical texts, films, lectures, and small group discussions to engage with different ways of understanding happiness.

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Marine Sciences (MASC)

MASC 52.001: Living with Our Oceans and Atmosphere
PL
MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM
Wei Mei

Wei Mei is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Marine Sciences at UNC Chapel Hill. He holds a Ph.D. in Earth System Science from the University of California at Irvine, and a Master of Science in Meteorology and a Bachelor of Science in Atmospheric Sciences from Nanjing University (China). Dr. Mei is the instructor of “Environmental Systems Modeling” (MASC/ENEC/GEOL 415) and “Living with Our Oceans and Atmosphere” (MASC 52) at UNC. He was a guest lecturer for several undergraduate and graduate courses on atmosphere, oceans and climate prior to coming to UNC. Dr. Mei’s current research interests lie in extreme weather and climate events (including hurricanes and atmospheric rivers) and their effects on coastal hazards (e.g., storm surge, flooding, and high winds). His work has contributed to the recognition of the effect of ocean temperature on hurricane intensity and to the understanding of the link between hurricanes and climate.

This seminar will introduce students to the nature of the Earth’s oceans and atmosphere, and describe the processes that lead to our weather patterns and global climate. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the oceans and atmosphere affect human population, how oceanic and atmospheric changes are linked to increasing human activity, and how these changes can affect you. Basic principles and modern theories of changing climate, severe weather events, oceanic hazards, and interactions between the oceans and the atmosphere will be studied. Examples of presently active research being conducted at UNC and at other institutions will be used to highlight how the above topics are investigated scientifically. Readings will be taken from introductory textbooks on meteorology, oceanography and environmental sciences; and modern articles in periodicals such as Scientific American, Nature, American Scientist, National Geographic, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, and Weatherwise. Various websites, including those within the UNC Department of Marine Sciences, will be used. Classroom presentations, seminars, and group discussions and debates will be utilized.

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MASC 55.001: Change in the Coastal Ocean
PL
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Christopher S. Martens

Christopher S. Martens earned his Ph.D. in Chemical Oceanography from Florida State University in 1972, then moved to Yale to complete two years of postdoctoral study before joining the faculty at UNC in 1974. His current research focuses on how biological processes affect the chemistry of seawater, sources of greenhouse gases, changing coral reef ecosystems, and the carbon cycle in deep sea environments including the northern Gulf of Mexico area impacted by the Deepwater Horizon disaster. He publishes widely and has twice been co-recipient of the Geochemical Society’s Best Paper award in Organic Geochemistry. He is an experienced SCUBA diver and underwater videographer. He has received a “Favorite Faculty” award for recognized excellence in undergraduate teaching.

This seminar provides students with opportunities to explore recent changes in marine and terrestrial environments caused by the interactions of fascinating oceanographic processes. Class presentations and discussions focus on the work of active marine scientists who combine their traditional disciplinary research with knowledge and skills from other fields as needed to understand new environmental challenges. This cross-cutting scientific approach prepares class members to recognize important connections between traditional disciplines to discover interdisciplinary research areas that they might wish to further explore during their undergraduate careers at Carolina. In preparation for discussions, laboratory demonstrations, and occasional visits to field sites, we read a series of recently published, non-technical research papers. We use information from those papers plus current research at Carolina to investigate how biological, geological, physical, and geochemical processes interact to influence coastal, open-ocean, and tropical environments. Students will participate in “video- and photo-trips” during classes, laboratory demonstrations using state-of-the art instrumentation in our laboratories, and “hands on” mini-experiments designed to emphasize the importance of the scientific question rather than just the technology involved. Please note that this seminar has no prerequisites.

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MASC 59.001: Extreme Microorganisms: Pushing the Limits of Life on Earth and Beyond
PL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Andreas Teske

Andreas Teske is a biochemist by training, but became fascinated by the microbial world of the oceans and focused his Ph.D. research on the ecology and diversity of marine bacteria that catalyze the sulfur cycle. After completing his Ph.D. at Bremen University and the Max-Planck-Institute for Marine Microbiology in Germany in 1995, he spent his postdoc years at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and stayed on as Assistant Scientist. Andreas Teske joined the UNC Marine Sciences faculty in 2002. His research interests include the microbiology of the deep marine subsurface, and microbial ecosystems of petroleum seeps and hydrothermal vents. In search of novel extreme marine microorganisms, he and his students are participating in a wide range of research cruises.

We will expand our horizons in biology by learning about some of the most extreme microorganisms on the planet – microorganisms that thrive without oxygen in deep marine sediments and in the Earth’s crust, under high temperatures in boiling hot springs or in superheated deep-sea water under high pressure, and under chemical stress factors (high sulfide and heavy metal concentrations) that were once thought to be incompatible with life. Numerous extremophilic (extreme-loving) microorganisms of different metabolic types have been isolated in the laboratory as pure cultures; others have been observed in Nature but have so far resisted cultivation. Extremophiles provide opportunities to study the unusual and strange biochemistry that allows them to thrive in their unique habitats; they are also valuable model systems for potential life on other planets. We will get to know the unusual habitats where extremophiles are found, for example hot springs and volcanic areas on land (Yellowstone) and in the ocean (hydrothermal vents), and we will explore the earliest history of extremophiles as some of the most ancient microorganisms on Earth.

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Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 51H.001: Fish Gotta Swim, Birds Gotta Fly: The Mathematics and the Mechanics of Moving (Honors)
QI
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PMR
Roberto Camassa

Roberto Camassa is the Kenan Distinguished Professor in the Department of Mathematics. His Ph.D. is from Cal Tech, and his research interests include nonlinear evolution equations, mathematical modeling, fluid mechanics and optics.

The scientific method is arguably the single most important achievement of the modern era. Together with its technological implications, in the last four centuries it has shaped the world both physically and culturally, and continues to do so, like no other element in the history of mankind. The overall aim of the course is to learn the basic elements of the method through a combination of simple physical experiments (mostly at the \thought” level), rigorous mathematical training and elementary mathematical modeling. The focus will be on mechanics, which can arguably be considered the “birthplace” of the method. In particular, the mechanics of fluids will provide the main emphasis, both for its implications in any aspect of life on Earth and for its challenges to the physical intuition.

You should be ready to work with a non-standard class format, where concepts are developed through class discussions in which everybody is expected to join and share observations, insights as well as critiques. No question offered in earnest is too naive or irrelevant, and students are expected to share their doubts as well as their knowledge to achieve the outcome of understanding a certain issue. In-depth class discussion, \open ended” homework assignments with problems and essays, hands-on in-class, in-lab and in-silico (computational) experiments will be the basis for evaluation and final grade assignment.

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MATH 62H.001: Combinatorics (Honors)
QI
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
Ivan Cherednik

Professor Ivan Cherednik is Austin H. Carr Distinguished Professor of Mathematics. Trained at the Steklov Mathematics Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences and at Moscow State University, his areas of specialization are Representation Theory, Combinatorics, Number Theory, Harmonic Analysis, and Mathematical Physics. Cherednik’s particular affection for Combinatorics is well known: he proved the celebrated Constant term conjecture in Combinatorics.

A leading expert in Modern Combinatorics wants to share his vision of the subject with the students. The seminar is a perfect background for future specialists in mathematics, physics, computer science, biology, economics, for those who are curious what statistical physics is about, what is cryptography, and how stock market works, and for everyone who likes mathematics.

The course will be organized around the following topics:

  1. Puzzles: dimer covering, magic squares, 36 officers
  2. Combinations: from coin tossing to dice and poker
  3. Fibonacci numbers: rabbits, population growth, etc.
  4. Arithmetic: designs, cyphers, intro to finite fields
  5. Catalan numbers: from playing roulette to stock market

The students will learn about the history of Combinatorics, its connections with the theory of numbers, its fundamental role in the natural sciences and various applications.
It is an advanced research course; all students are expected to participate in projects under the supervision of I.Ch. and the Graduate Research Consultant (the GRC Program). This seminar is partially supported by Honors Carolina.

The grades will be based on the exam, bi-weekly home assignments and the participation in the projects. The course requires focus and effort, but, generally, the students are quite satisfied with the progress they make (and their grades too).
From the Course Evaluation: “A difficult but wholly worthwhile course: I feel more competent for having taken it”, “I would recommend this FYS to others ONLY if they have a VERY strong affinity for and ability in Algebra (I thought I did, but I was wrong)”.

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Media and Journalism (MEJO)

MEJO 89.001: Polarized Politics, Fake News and How Post-Millennials Can Face the Future
CI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Ferrel Guillory

Ferrel Guillory is a professor of the practice of journalism at the UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communication. He founded the Program on Public Life (formerly the Program on Southern Politics, Media and Public Life) in 1997 to build bridges between the academic resources at UNC-Chapel Hill and the governmental, journalism and civic leaders of North Carolina and the South. Guillory is a co-founder of EducationNC, a nonprofit news and policy organization, and he is a senior fellow at MDC, a Southern think tank.

This course offers first year students an opportunity to explore American public life through the lens of professional journalism. Students will read explanatory journalism, examine what makes information credible or not. By engaging in group discussions and writing their own analyses, they will deepen their understanding of how government and politics play out in states and communities in today’s often-fractious United States. In addition to learning more about journalism and democracy, the course seeks to instill in students a sense of idealism and engaged citizenship.

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Music (MUSC)

MUSC 51.001: The Interplay of Music and Physics
PL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Laurie McNeil and Brent Wissick

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her Ph.D. in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. Her seminar grows out of her life as a choral singer (and, earlier, a violinist and recorder player). When not singing with the Choral Society of Durham, she can be found in her laboratory using lasers to study the properties of materials.

Brent Wissick (Professor of Music) specializes in cello, viola da gamba and chamber music. He has a particular interest in performance practices of the 16th-18th centuries and is Past President of the Viola da Gamba Society of America. He has recorded numerous CDs with American Bach Soloists and other important groups; and has given concerts and lectures throughout North America, Europe, Asia and Australia.

This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects.

Students may also register for this course under PHYS 51.001.

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MUSC 64.001: What is a Work of Art? Listening to Music – ADDED 6/14/2018
VP, CI, NA
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Mark Evan Bonds

Mark Evan Bonds is the Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor of Music at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he has taught since 1992. He has published and lectured widely on music since 1750 but enjoys learning about music of all periods and all kinds from around the world. He is the author of two college-level textbooks and has a particular interest in the history of how people have listened to music from the Enlightenment to the present.

If the Mona Lisa is in the Louvre, where is Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony? Where is The Star-Spangled Banner? Amazing Grace? In a composer’s manuscript? One of many published editions? In a recording? In a live performance? Which performance? Music is the most malleable of the arts and by far the hardest to pin down: a single work can exist in almost countless versions. This seminar will explore the many ways in which music can be transmitted—through performances, print, and recordings—by focusing on a handful of works from Bach to Beyoncé. Throughout the semester students will present their research findings on assigned works and on works of their own choosing that illustrate the problematic notion of authenticity in music. We will give special attention to developing listening skills that can be applied to music of all times and places.

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MUSC 89.001: Arts, Activism, Africa
VP, BN
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Chérie Rivers Ndaliko

Chérie Rivers Ndaliko is an interdisciplinary scholar, activist, and the Executive Director of the Yole!Africa cultural center (www.yoleafrica.org) located in Goma, Democratic Republic of the Congo. The focus of her research is art and social justice in African warzones. With data gathered through empirical research, ethnography, and community based participatory methods, she advocates for a paradigm shift in the application of arts activism within humanitarian and charitable aid in Africa. She is author of Necessary Noise: Music, Film, and Charitable Imperialism (Oxford, 2016), which won the 2017 Alan Merriam Prize, and co-editor of The Art of Emergency: Aesthetics and Aid in African Crises (forthcoming with Oxford). Her analyses of contemporary sociopolitical artworks draw from the fields of African studies, ethnomusicology, film/media studies, and cultural theory. She holds a B.M. in film scoring from the Berklee College of Music (2005), an A.M. from Harvard University in Ethnomusicology (2008), and a Ph.D. from Harvard University in African Studies (2012), where she was a pioneer of the University’s Social Engagement Initiative.

In the face of social and political unrest art is often viewed as a potential vehicle of change, whether as a catalyst of social justice, a source of healing, or a unifying force. But is arts activism effective? If so, what makes it so? If not, what hinders its efficacy? Drawing on historic and contemporary case studies from the African continent, this First Year Seminar introduces students to the intellectual, historical, practical, and creative aspects of addressing sociopolitical issues through art and creativity. We will explore the precedents, strategies, and shortcomings of arts initiatives, learn about pioneering movements and individuals, and also have the opportunity to participate in a project of arts activism in the east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Through all aspects of this course—from the analytical to the creative—students will engage in active learning, not only critiquing existing models, but also crafting new approaches that engage digital and social technologies.

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Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 60H.001: Plato’s Symposium and Its Influence on Western Art and Literature (Honors)
PH
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
James Lesher

James Lesher has written four books and more than seventy articles on aspects of ancient Greek philosophy. He is especially interested in the group of early thinkers known as ‘the Presocratics’ (e.g. Pythagoras, Heraclitus, and Parmenides), and much of his research has focused on Presocratic accounts of the sources, nature, and limits of human knowledge.

The goal of this course is to gain a detailed understanding of Plato’s philosophical and literary masterpiece, The Symposium, and its influence on later artists and writers. The first part of the course will be devoted to gaining a detailed understanding of the Symposium. In the second part of the course we will explore critical responses to Plato’s ‘theory of love’. In the third part of the course we will explore connections between Plato’s Symposium and Plotinus’ Enneads, Ficino’s De Amore, Castiglione’s The Courtier, Botticelli’s “Primavera” and “Birth of Venus,” the poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Thomas Mann’s Death in Venice, Jonathan Miller’s “The Drinking Party,” and Trask’s and Mitchell’s “Hedwig and the Angry Inch.”

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PHIL 89.001: Politics, Philosophy, and Economics
PH, CI
TTH, 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM
Dan Shahar

Dan Shahar is a Research Assistant Professor in the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program. Before arriving at UNC, Dan completed his PhD in philosophy at the University of Arizona, where he was a graduate fellow of the Center for the Philosophy of Freedom. Dan’s research focuses on the implications of environmental challenges for liberal democracies and their members. He is currently co-editing a new edition of the popular textbook, Environmental Ethics: What Really Matters, What Really Works, with David Schmidtz.

It is easy to take modern civilization for granted, but it is an incredible achievement. Virtually all of us are wealthier, healthier, safer, and better-educated than our ancestors. And we can expect our children to be even better-off still. How has this been possible? How can our societies continue to improve? This seminar will draw on powerful insights and techniques from the fields of philosophy, politics, and economics to seek answers to these questions. Students will examine how property rights, markets, and political action combine to create flourishing civilizations. They will grapple with thorny issues like environmental degradation, distributive justice, and economic exploitation. And they will gain valuable analytical tools from rational choice theory, utility theory, game theory, and public choice economics—as well as critical communication and independent study skills that will serve them throughout their college careers.

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Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)

PHYS 50.001: Time and the Medieval Cosmos
HS
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Chris Clemens and Brett Edward Whalen

Dr. Chris Clemens is the Jaroslav Folda Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Senior Associate Dean of Natural Sciences. He studies stellar remnants and the debris from old planetary systems around them. Dr. Clemens is also a faculty member of the Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies.

Brett Edward Whalen (associate professor, History) received his PhD from Stanford in 2005 and has been at Carolina ever since. He teaches classes on the medieval church, the crusades, and the apocalypse. As a child, he spent cold, clear winter nights in Vermont looking through his telescope at celestial bodies.

Time and the Medieval Cosmos will introduce first-year students to the basic motions of the solar system as viewed from the Earth and the mechanical and mathematical models used to reproduce them. The course will also immerse students in the world of medieval and early modern education, theology, and natural philosophy, challenging them to understand the historical conditions that shaped views of the cosmos in the premodern world. Last but not least, the class will raise broader questions about the relationship between faith and reason, along with the role of institutional authorities in determining the boundaries of “acceptable” knowledge.

Students may also register for this course under HIST 50.001.

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PHYS 51.001: The Interplay of Music and Physics
PL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Laurie McNeil and Brent Wissick

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her Ph.D. in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. Her seminar grows out of her life as a choral singer (and, earlier, a violinist and recorder player). When not singing with the Choral Society of Durham, she can be found in her laboratory using lasers to study the properties of materials.

Brent Wissick (Professor of Music) specializes in cello, viola da gamba and chamber music. He has a particular interest in performance practices of the 16th-18th centuries and is Past President of the Viola da Gamba Society of America. He has recorded numerous CDs with American Bach Soloists and other important groups; and has given concerts and lectures throughout North America, Europe, Asia and Australia.

This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects.

Students may also register for this course under MUSC 51.001.

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PHYS 89.001: Introduction to Mechatronics
PX, QI
Lecture: MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM (please note the lecture has a corresponding lab meeting once per week; see below for available lab times)
Lab: M, 1:25 PM – 3:25 PM or M, 3:35 PM – 5:35 PM
Stefan Jeglinski

In a previous 30-year career, Stefan Jeglinski designed and built instrumentation, learned to program from scratch, and performed R&D for large and small companies. For five years he was a actual rocket scientist, so when he says “this ain’t rocket science,” he knows what he’s talking about! He broke away from rockets to complete his PhD in experimental solid state physics at the University of Utah, and then returned to industry where he spent over 15 years in all aspects of product development for electron microscopy, before landing at UNC in 2010 to share everything he’s learned. In addition to his love of teaching physics, he brings a lifetime of real-world experience and stories about building, making, and engineering across disciplines.

Mechatronics is a multidisciplinary synergy of STEM fields, such as physics, engineering, electronics, and computer science. All students, regardless of their educational goals, will achieve critical introductory skills in numerical reasoning and analysis, model-building and prototyping, computer programming and electronics, and will demonstrate proficiency and knowledge about topics that increasingly impact society. The course focuses on four areas: Numeracy and Proportional Reasoning, Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing, Computer Technology (Programming and Electronics), and Current Events and Policy (aka, shall we welcome our new mechatronic overlords). The course goals are to prepare students for academic success at UNC, help science students be more capable scientists, and to help ALL students be stronger and better-informed citizens of the world.

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Political Science (POLI)

POLI 50.001: Movies and Politics
SS, CI
MW, 9:05 AM – 11:30 AM
Pamela Conover

Pamela Conover, Burton Craige Professor of Political Science, was educated at Emory University and received her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota. Professor Conover teaches courses dealing with political psychology, and social movements and political protest. In the past, Professor Conover’s research has concerned the nature of political thinking and the politics of identity and citizenship. She also coauthored the book Feminism and the New Right. Her current research is focused on partisan polarization and rivalry, and gender bias in the national news media. In her spare time, she enjoys cycling and being walked by her two golden retrievers, Izzy and Henry.

In this seminar, we will consider the interplay between films and politics—filmmakers and citizens. We will discuss what movies “mean,” and the intent of filmmakers, but our major focus will be on the contribution of films to political life and what we can learn from films about our political system as well as ourselves as citizens. Towards this end, we will watch both fictitious and documentary films. One theme will be to evaluate whether political films provide accurate understandings of reality. Another theme will be to explore the changing influence of documentary filmmakers in shaping the political role of films in our society. A third theme will be to consider how political life is shaped by diversity—race, class, gender, sexuality and religion—and the extent to which that diversity is represented in films. A final theme will be to examine how our self-understandings as citizens are shaped by the experience of watching films. Among the topics covered will be propaganda, industry and governmental censorship, campaigning, political ambition, interest groups and corruption, congress and the presidency, the judicial system, foreign affairs and contemporary wars. In addition to watching films and reading about them, students will engage in seminar discussions, wiki writing and online discussions. Grades will be based on several writing projects, class and forum discussions, and a final exam.

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POLI 54.001: The American Worker: Sociology, Politics, and History of Labor in the United States
NA
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Michele M. Hoyman

Michele M. Hoyman teaches in the Political Science Department and in the Master of Public Administration program. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Michigan. Professor Hoyman’s interests are in economic development, industrial labor relations, and public sector personnel. On a personal level, she is an avid UNC basketball fan and helps the team win by wearing her magic beanie. She is afflicted with an unrelenting sense of humor.

The face of the American worker is changing and the challenges American workers face are ever evolving. Both the media and public in general is becoming more aware of issues like income inequality, living wages, and the role of unions in the workplace. This seminar will explore the American worker from a legal, economic, and social justice perspective. Additionally, the legal framework Americans operate within (in respect to labor law) will be compared with international standards on labor rights. The seminar will also feature an analysis of the American worker through some classic film and fictional literature.

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POLI 57.001: Democratic Governance in Contemporary Latin America
SS, BN
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Jonathan Hartlyn

Jonathan Hartlyn is the Kenneth J. Reckford Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He grew up in Latin America, in Cuba, Mexico and Peru. He received his B.A. from Clark University, and a M.Phil. and Ph.D. from Yale University. His research and teaching interests focus on the comparative politics of Latin America, especially with relation to questions of democratization, political institutions, and state-society relations. He spent several months in Argentina in fall 2017 advancing on his current research on democratic governance in the region. He also has on-going research on constitutional change in Latin America and on the dynamics of executive approval.

He has authored or co-authored dozens of articles and chapters on democratic transitions, gender and politics, migration and political parties, public opinion and institutional trust, and elections and electoral governance, among other topics, in multiple journals and edited volumes. His books include: The Politics of Coalition Rule in Colombia; The Struggle for Democratic Politics in the Dominican Republic; and the co-authored Latin America in the Twenty First Century: Toward a New Socio-Political Matrix. His publications have been translated into Spanish, Portuguese, German and Persian.

With a wave of democratization that began in 1978 and peaked in the mid-1990s, Latin America is experiencing the most prolonged and extensive period of democratic politics in its history. For most countries in the region, state power is accessed through reasonably competitive, fair, and clean elections, in contrast to past patterns of authoritarian rule, though with exceptions and setbacks. In spite of this democratic shift, in many countries in the region the exercise of state power reflects historical continuities or new examples of corruption, clientelism and other abuses of state resources. This complicates the ability of governments to provide citizen security, economic development and social inclusion.

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POLI 67.001: Designing Democracy
SS
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Andrew Reynolds

Andrew Reynolds received his B.A.(Hons) from the University of East Anglia, a M.A. from the University of Cape Town and his Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego. His research and teaching focus on democratization, constitutional design and electoral politics. He is particularly interested in the presence and impact of minorities and marginalized communities. He has worked for the United Nations, the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (IDEA), the UK Department for International Development, the US State Department, the National Democratic Institute, the International Republican Institute, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and the International Foundation for Election Systems. He has also served as a consultant on issues of electoral and constitutional design for Afghanistan, Angola, Burma, Egypt, Fiji, Guyana, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles, Northern Ireland, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Yemen and Zimbabwe. He has received research awards from the U.S. Institute of Peace, the National Science Foundation, the US Agency for International Development and the Ford Foundation.

Among his books are: The Arab Spring: Pathways of Repression and Reform (Oxford, 2015) with Jason Brownlee and Tarek Masoud, Designing Democracy in a Dangerous World (Oxford, 2011), The Architecture of Democracy: Constitutional Design, Conflict Management, and Democracy (Oxford, 2002), Electoral Systems and Democratization in Southern Africa (Oxford, 1999), Election 99 South Africa: From Mandela to Mbeki (St. Martin’s, 1999) and Elections and Conflict Management in Africa (USIP, 1998), co-edited with T. Sisk. In 2012 he embarked on a multi-year research project to study the impact of LGBT national parliamentarians on public policy around the world. His forthcoming book is The Children of Harvey Milk (2016).

His articles have appeared in journals including American Political Science Review, World Politics, Democratization, Politics and Society, Middle East Law and Governance, Electoral Studies, Journal of Democracy, The Journal of Commonwealth and Comparative Politics, and Political Science Quarterly. He has published opinion pieces in the New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Christian Science Monitor, and San Diego Union Tribune. His work has been translated into French, Spanish, Arabic, Serbo-Croat, Albanian, Burmese and Portuguese.

This course will present political institutions as levers of conflict management in ethnically plural, post-conflict national states. To highlight the issues that lie behind constitutional design attention will be focused on a province that was in turmoil within an established democracy (Northern Ireland), a democratizing state (South Africa), a North African state in tumult (Egypt) and post war institutional design (Afghanistan). These states will be analyzed in terms of their paths toward democracy, the nature of their internal conflict and the types of political institutions they have (or are) adopting. Key to the class will be the student’s focus on their own case study of a democratizing state. The class will be briefed on the core ‘building block’ choices that go into a new constitution and the importance of rooting institutions in the distinct historical and socio-political characteristics of a nation. Through lectures, videos and discussions we shall investigate how nations can seek to transform violent conflict into democratic debate.

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POLI 75.001: Thinking about Law
PH
TTH, 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM
Charles Szypszak

Charles Szypszak is Albert Coates Distinguished Professor of Public Law and Government. He has been with the School of Government since 2005. Prior to that, he was an attorney and director of a general practice firm in New Hampshire. He provides legal counsel to state, national and international institutions, organizations and public officials and teaches Law for Public Administration in the graduate program in public administration. He has taught and worked on law reforms in Poland and Russia. He is the recipient of the University’s J. Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award and the School of Government’s Coates Distinguished Professorship for Teaching Excellence.

Are you interested in being a lawyer or public official? Do you know what it means to “think like a lawyer?” Have you considered why people mostly honor the law? Where do you find “the law?” How do judges decide difficult cases? This seminar will explore the notion of a rule of law, formal and customary law, legal analysis, judicial interpretation and the realities of the adversarial system and law practice. We will consider what makes law seem legitimate and how to assess whether it promotes liberty and justice. This seminar will challenge students to be reflective and critical about their own perspectives and to explore personal responsibility for promoting a rule of law. Students will be engaged in analytical thinking and expression through required participation in teacher-led dialogues based on assigned readings and with research and writing assignments. Reading materials include selections from court cases and other sources that provide an introduction to the notion of a rule of law, the sources of law that govern us and protect our individual rights, the nature of legal analysis, the different methods of judicial interpretation, and the realities of law practice and the adversarial system.

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POLI 89.001: Revolution! New York City in 1775 and Paris in 1791 ADDED 5/23/2018
MW, 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM
HS
Matthew Weidenfeld

Dr. Matthew Weidenfeld joined the department of Political Science in the Fall of 2018. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and his B.A. From New College of Florida. Prior to coming to High Point, he has held appointments at Southwestern University, Washington State University in Pullman, and Elon University.

He has a wide range of teaching interests and experience in the history of political theory. Recently, his courses have featured role-immersive, Reacting to the Past Simulations. These consist of elaborate games, set in the past, in which students are assigned roles informed by classic texts in the history of ideas. Class sessions are run entirely by students; though he advises and guides students throughout. The simulations seek to draw students into the past, promote engagement with big ideas, and improve intellectual and academic skills.

Dr. Weidenfeld’s research and scholarship focus on two areas: the teaching and learning of political theory and the political theory of judgment. His research has been published in several journals, including Political Research Quarterly, The Journal of Political Science Education, Contemporary Political Theory, and The European Journal of Political Theory.

Democracy, it seems, has become the only defensible political system throughout much of the world. What seems like a simple concept (i.e. democracy) and a simple goal (i.e. promoting democracy both in the United States and abroad) become complicated when we ask ourselves a few, simple questions: What is democracy? Is it a set of institutions? A way of life? How does rule by the people protect the rights of minorities? What are democracies to do with intolerant or undemocratic minorities? Is democracy the best system of government?

For us, many of these questions received their first answers at two dramatic moments in history: The American Revolution and The French Revolution. This course is designed to throw students into New York City in 1775 and Paris in 1791 by recreating and engaging with the ideas and arguments of these times. The course will rely on the Reacting to the Past pedagogy. ¿Reacting to the Past¿ (RTTP) consists of elaborate games, set in the past, in which students are assigned roles informed by classic texts in the history of ideas. Class sessions are run entirely by students; instructors advise and guide students and grade their oral and written work. It seeks to draw students into the past, promote engagement with big ideas, and improve intellectual and academic skills. The course will be extremely hard work, but should also be intellectually engaging and, to put it simply, a good deal of fun.

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Psychology and Neuroscience (PSYC)

PSYC 54.001: Families and Children
SS
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Shauna Cooper

Dr. Shauna Cooper studies the cultural and contextual factors that contribute to positive youth development, with a specific focus on African American adolescents and families. Visit her online: African American Youth Development Research Laboratory.

In this First Year Seminar we will consider family as a context for children’s development. Contemporary families are highly diverse, and topics covered in class reflect this diversity. We will examine characteristics of traditional, divorced and step families, single parents, gay and lesbian parents, and immigrant families. In addition to taking two examinations, students will interview a family member and write a five-page paper based on that interview. Each student will also give a class presentation on a family-related topic.

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PSYC 61.001: Drug Addiction: Fact and Fiction
PL, CI
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Kathryn (Kate) Reissner

Kathryn (Kate) Reissner received her PhD from the University of California, where she performed research on the neurobiology of learning and memory. Dr. Reissner went on to perform postdoctoral research at the Medical University of South Carolina, where she studied the role of glutamate transport in the development of cocaine addiction. She joined the Department of Psychology at UNC-CH as an Assistant Professor in 2013. Research in the Reissner lab is focused on the long lasting changes in the brain’s reward circuitry induced by cocaine abuse which mediate enduring vulnerability to relapse, with emphasis on neuron-astrocyte interactions.

Illicit and legal drugs make the user feel good but also promote the development of dependence and long-lasting changes in brain physiology. In this biological psychology seminar, we will take a multi-disciplinary approach to learn about the neurobiology of drug addiction with a focus on the following questions: How do we define addiction? What are the beneficial and harmful psychological effects of abused drugs? What has scientific research revealed about the neurobiology of the “brain on drugs”? Do most users become addicts? How is drug addiction treated? We will tackle these and other questions through classroom discussions/debates, lectures, movies, reading and writing assignments, and an optional tour of a residential substance abuse recovery program. In this communication intensive seminar, critical analysis of information about the neurobiology of addiction will be used to separate fact from fiction.

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PSYC 62.001: Positive Psychology: The Science of Optimal Human Functioning
SS, CI
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Barbara Fredrickson

Barbara Fredrickson is Kenan Distinguished Professor of Teaching and Director of the Social Psychology Doctoral Program in the Department of Psychology. She is also author of Positivity (Crown, 2009). She received her Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1990. Her research centers on emotions, especially positive emotions. Among other topics, she explores the conditions that promote human flourishing and optimal well-being. Her research and teaching have received multiple awards and international recognition.

What does it mean for humans to flourish, or function at their very best? Positive psychology is a new movement that tackles this age-old question scientifically. One basic premise of positive psychology is that human flourishing—a life rich in purpose, relationships, and enjoyment—will not result simply by curing pathology and eliminating behavioral and emotional problems. Rather, flourishing requires building and capitalizing on human strengths and capacities. Another basic premise is that human flourishing involves unlocking or building potential resources, capabilities and capacities at multiple levels—in people, and also within groups and systems. Students will explore these issues through class discussions, experiential assignments, writing assignments, guest lectures, as well as by collecting data on their own lives.

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PSYC 68.001: Psychology of Emotion
SS
MWF, 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Kristen Lindquist

Dr. Kristen Lindquist is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and the director of the Carolina Affective Science Lab. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Boston College and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Harvard University Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative and the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging. Dr. Lindquist’s research uses social cognitive, psychophysiological and neuroscience methods to understand the nature of human emotion.

This seminar is designed especially for students interested in exploring the psychological and neuroscientific study of emotion. The seminar assumes students will have diverse backgrounds and there are no pre-requisites. Topics will include theoretical models of emotion process and structure, as well as discussions of psychological research bearing on questions such as “Can you read emotions in the faces of other people?” (emotional expressions), “How is emotion expressed in the body?” (autonomic physiology), “Where do emotions live in the brain?” (affective neuroscience), “Is emotion a source of wisdom or the enemy of rationality?” (emotion and reasoning), “Does emotion help or hurt your relationships with other people?” (emotion and social behavior), “Can you control your emotions or do they control you?” (emotion regulation), “Do emotions drive you crazy?” (emotion and psychopathology) and “Are women really the more emotional sex?” (gender and emotion). A range of perspectives in psychology will be explored, spanning social, cultural, developmental, clinical, cognitive and comparative psychology disciplines. Each week, a portion of the classes will be dedicated to discussions of research studies led by Dr. Lindquist. The rest of the classes will be less formal group-based discussions and demonstrations. Discussions will be used to explain or demonstrate especially important ideas, to discuss concepts covered in the assigned readings and to discuss the “real world” implications of class topics. Several discussion sessions will be dedicated to visits to Dr. Lindquist’s lab and the Biomedical Research Imaging Center, where students can experience research techniques and methods in a hands-on setting. Students will be evaluated based on exam performance, on a written research proposal, on an oral presentation of the research proposal and on participation in discussions.

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Public Policy (PLCY)

PLCY 51.001: The Global Environment in the 21st Century
GL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Elizabeth Sasser

Elizabeth Sasser is a public policy practitioner with extensive experience in federal and state government. Prior to joining UNC Public Policy as a Lecturer, Elizabeth served as policy advisor at the U.S. Department of Energy during the first term of the Obama Administration. She worked with Administration leadership on strategies to advance the nation’s interests on environmental and energy issues, focusing primarily on bilateral relations with China. Prior to her time in the Administration, she was a policy advisor to two North Carolina governors on energy and education issues. She has a B.A. and an M.P.P. from Duke University and studied at Peking University in Beijing, China, where she developed a fluency in Mandarin.

Many serious environmental threats are global in scope. Just think of the way we produce and consume energy; how waste produced in one corner of the world travels by air, sea and land to pollute another corner; and how ecosystems that transcend national boundaries are impacted by human behavior. Who is responsible for governing these global environmental challenges? This seminar explores linkages among nations, global environmental institutions and the environmental problems they cause and seek to rectify. We will examine how global environmental policy is made, with specific attention to the roles of institutions and nations. Topics include the evolution of environmental policy in the United States; China impact on the global environment; global environmental institutions such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change; risks to the environment through pollution of land and sea by waste; and global energy and environmental implications of shale gas and fracking. No prerequisites are necessary.

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PLCY 55.001: Higher Education, the College Experience, and Public Policy – CANCELLED 5/4/2018
SS
MW, 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM
Anna Krome-Lukens

Anna Krome-Lukens is a Teaching Assisant Professor and Director of Experiential Education in Public Policy. She completed her PhD in U.S. History at UNC-Chapel Hill, with research focused on the history of social welfare and public health policies. She developed her interest in pressing issues in higher education while she was in graduate school, through involvement in UNC’s graduate branch of student government, work in Undergraduate Retention, and service on several university-wide committees. As a member of the faculty, she continues to be involved in (and fascinated by) policy-making within the university.

Higher education is undergoing rapid transformations that may dramatically change the undergraduate college experience. In this course, you will examine urgent questions facing American colleges and universities. For example, why is the cost of college rising and what implications does this shift have for who attends and graduates from college? How well is higher education preparing students for jobs of the future? How has new technology reshaped the college experience, both academically and socially? How should universities respond to student needs and desires? What role should athletics play in higher education? We’ll explore these and other topics through class discussion, position papers, oral presentations and debates, and interactions with UNC faculty and staff. By introducing you to the history, institutions, and culture of higher education, this course also will help you transition into and make the most of your college experience.

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PLCY 76H.001: Global Health Policy (Honors)
GL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Benjamin Mason Meier

Benjamin Mason Meier is an Associate Professor of Public Policy. Dr. Meier’s interdisciplinary research—at the intersection of global health, international law, and public policy—examines rights-based approaches to health. Working collaboratively across UNC’s Department of Public Policy and Gillings School of Global Public Health, Dr. Meier has written and presented extensively on the development, evolution, and application of human rights in global health. Dr. Meier received his Ph.D. in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, his J.D. and LL.M. in International and Comparative Law from Cornell Law School, and his B.A. in Biochemistry from Cornell University.

Global health policy impacts the health and well-being of individuals and peoples throughout the world. Many determinants of health operate at a global level, and many national policies, social practices, and individual health behaviors are structured by global forces. Concern for the spread of infectious diseases, increasing rates of chronic diseases and the effectiveness of health systems to provide quality care are among the daunting challenges to health policy makers.

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PLCY 85.001: Reforming America’s Schools
SS, NA
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Douglas Lauen

Dr. Douglas Lauen’s work seeks to understand the effects of educational policies, school types, and school contextual factors on student outcomes. I focus on areas that policymakers can control and that have high relevance to current educational policy debates. To date my academic research covers four areas: 1) classroom poverty composition, 2) educational accountability, 3) performance incentives, and 4) school choice. Sociological and economic theory and policy relevance guide my work, which employs rigorous quantitative research designs. My work often examines the heterogeneity of effects across socially, economically, and educationally disadvantaged student subgroups because reducing educational inequality depends on whether policies and settings have differential effects on disadvantaged and minority students.

This seminar will examine the role of schools and other institutions play in determining life chances, which educational interventions work well for economically and academically disadvantaged students, and what to do when institutions cease to work well. Students will learn how to analyze complex educational public policy problems while exploring questions of effectiveness, inequality, resource management, and politics.

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PLCY 89.001: Creating Social Value
SS
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Melissa Carrier

Melissa Carrier has spent her career doing work that she loves. Her 20+ year career has centered on identifying and realizing opportunities for organizations of all types to adapt and grow through innovation and entrepreneurship. After many years in industry, she joined the University of Maryland where she founded the Center for Social Value Creation to teach, research and model market-based solutions that co-create economic, social and environmental value. Empowering students to discover their “inner-entrepreneurial mindset” to change the world is one of her greatest passions. Her other passions include yoga, running, and raising three active boys with her best friend.

If you are looking for a hands-on approach to changing the world around you but never knew where to start, this course is for you. Designed to immerse students in the process of designing innovative solutions for social change, this course is a highly interactive, experiential, and dynamic one. We will look at the social entrepreneurs, innovators, and visionaries who are creating new methods of solving society’s problems. We contrast traditional methods of activism with a new approach that combines the pragmatic style of social entrepreneurship and the collaborative engagement of transformative action. Specifically, today’s cutting edge movements tend to be more collective, less adversarial, more locally specific and more solutions-oriented than previous ones.

This course will look at the history and theory of social change, practice the skills and strategies of effective change agents and give students the tools to create a blueprint for their ideas for social transformation. Students will explore models in business, nonprofit and policy that address food insecurity, health and well-being, arts, education, environmental sustainability, social justice and more.

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Religious Studies (RELI)

RELI 63.001: The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls
HS, WB
MW, 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM
Jodi Magness

Jodi Magness is the Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism. Before coming to UNC–Chapel Hill in 2002, she taught at Tufts University for ten years. Professor Magness received her B.A. in Archaeology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and her Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from the University of Pennsylvania. She has participated on numerous excavations in Israel and Greece, and currently directs excavations at Huqoq in Israel. Professor Magness’ publications include a book entitled The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls (2002).

The Dead Sea Scrolls have been described as the most important archaeological discovery of the 20th century. The first scrolls were discovered in 1947, in a cave near the site of Qumran by the Dead Sea. Eventually the remains of over 900 scrolls were found in 11 caves around Qumran. The scrolls date to the time of Jesus and include the earliest preserved copies of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). They were deposited in the caves by members of a Jewish sect called the Essenes who lived at Qumran. In this seminar, students explore the meaning and significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls – and learn about broader issues such as how canons of sacred scripture developed among Jews and Christians – through classroom discussions, thought papers, and creative assignments.

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RELI 73H.001: From Dragons to Pokemon: Animals in Japanese Myth, Folklore, and Religion (Honors)
LA, BN, CI
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Barbara Ambros

Barbara Ambros
Field of specialization: Religions of Asia Research interests: Religions in early modern through contemporary Japan; gender studies; critical animal studies; place and space; and pilgrimage.
Fun fact: she holds a third-degree black belt in Shotokan karate and serves as the faculty advisor for the UNC Shotokan Club.

This seminar examines the cultural construction of animals in Japanese myth, folklore, and religion. We will discuss various kinds of animals: those that occur in the natural world, those that are found in myths and folklore, and those that have appeared in popular media such as animation. We will explore how images of various animals were culturally constructed as tricksters, gods, monsters, or anthropomorphic companions; how animals were ritualized as divine, demonic, or sentient beings in Buddhism, Shinto, and folk religion; and how animals could serve as metaphors that embodied collective ideals or anxieties. Most of our readings will focus on primary and secondary texts from the Japanese tradition (in English), but we will also read theoretical texts on human-animal relationships and historical studies on animals in the larger Asian context. We will also view and analyze several Japanese films, both anime and documentaries, that deal with animals and environmental issues.

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RELI 75.001: Sacrifice and Surrender
PH, BN
T, 3:30 PM – 6:20 PM
Todd Ramón Ochoa

Todd Ramón Ochoa writes about African-inspired communities in Cuba. His first book, Society of the Dead (University of California, 2010), is an ethnography of a Cuban-Kongo society of affliction, and its healing-harming practices at the turn of the 21st century. In that book he describe the materiality of the dead in Cuban-Kongo life, and ask readers to consider the concrete, creative, and collective efforts required to shape fate. Society of the Dead is an engagement with anthropology’s rendering of sorcery, and an exploration of sensation, transformation, and redemption in the African Diaspora.

His second book is about an African-inspired community in rural central Cuba. This book describes the healing feasts, called bembés, which focus and intensify life in a small town. It is an engagement with questions of materiality, cultural recombination, and excess, in Cuban religious life.

Dr. Ochoa’s writing and teaching are inflected by social theory and contemporary philosophy, and by a commitment to writing as a critical and creative scholarly practice. His articles are more theoretical than his books, and his teaching is oriented to helping students grasp social theory as a resource for scholarly creativity in the study of religion.

This course will consider the questions of debt, loss, and surrender as we explore the problem of sacrifice. Readings will address the associated problems of violence, transgression, and animality.

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RELI 89H.001: Researching Religion in Women’s Lives (Honors)
SS, GL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Lauren Leve and Lisa Pearce

Lauren Leve received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology before joining the Department of Religious Studies at Carolina. Now an associate professor, her research uses the lens of religion to explore changing forms of culture and political life in contemporary Asia, especially Nepal. She has been living and working in Nepal since she was an undergraduate—sometimes for a few weeks at a time, sometimes for a few years. Her research has also brought her to Thailand, Sri Lanka, India, and Singapore. She has written on topics that include Buddhism, globalization, international development (especially women’s empowerment), human rights, and secularism. Her recent book is titled The Buddhist Art of Living in Nepal: Ethical Practice and Religious Reform. She is currently working on two projects: one on Buddhist mindfulness meditation and one on gender and the rise of Christianity in Nepal.

Lisa Pearce, a Professor of Sociology and Faculty Fellow at the Carolina Population Center, is a sociologist of family, religion, and the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Her research is based in Kenya, Nepal, and the United States. She has written two books, A Faith of Their Own: Stability and Change in the Religiosity of American’s Adolescents (with Melinda Lundquist Denton) and Mixed Method Data Collection Strategies (with William G. Axinn). Professor Pearce enjoys working with students to collect different kinds of data, moving back and forth between open-ended exploration and the systematic testing of ideas that emerge. She has been on the faculty at Carolina for 16 years.

How do religious beliefs and practices shape gender identities, values, and expectations in different religious cultures? How are these understandings reflected, contested, and/or creatively transformed by women within religious traditions, and at different times? How do we know what we think we know? This course examines the relations between women and religion across different traditions and in diverse global contexts, asking how religious modes of authority and ethical being-in-the-world shape women’s aspirations for self-actualization and position them in relation to both opportunities and constraints. The course also asks, how can we know and measure these relations? Arguments about women and religion are based on evidence that reflect different sets of assumptions and are collected in different ways. Throughout the semester, we’ll explore key methods for data collection and analysis in the Humanities and Social Sciences through a series of hands-on research assignments, culminating in a final research project. Practical experience generating and interpreting diverse types of data will reveal the ways that scientific and humanistic modes of inquiry can work together to pose and answer key questions about women, gender, and human social life.

Students may also register for this course under SOCI 89H.001.

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Romance Studies (ROML)

ROML 58.001: Mexican Women Across Borders and Genres – ADDED 4/23/2018
LA
MWF, 9:05 AM -9:55 AM
Oswaldo Estrada

Oswaldo Estrada focuses primarily on the literatures of Mexico and Peru. He studies the aesthetic effect of rewriting history, gender formation and transgression, and the construction of identities in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

This course explores various narratives by which Mexican women expect and are expected to live. Participants read poems, letters, stories, chronicles, and short novels by Mexican women of the twentieth century whose writing transgresses several genres and challenges traditional notions of gender and marginality. Taking into account the negative impact that religion, colonialism, nationalism and modernization have had on the representation of Mexican women, the course addresses, among other themes and topics, the role of memory and discourse; the inevitable formation of otherness; identity construction; gender ambiguities; moral subversions and inversions; textual experimentation and performance; and the long-lasting effects of gender violence and its portrayal as a psychological trauma. We will read in English or in English translation works by Elena Poniatowska, Rosario Castellanos, Sandra Cisneros, Cristina Rivera Garza, and Ana Clavel, among others.

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Social Medicine (SOCM)

SOCM 89.001: Use, Misuse, and Addiction to Opioids in the 21st Century
SS
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Catherine Sanford

Catherine (Kay) Sanford, MSPH is a nationally recognized drug overdose prevention advocate and activist. She served as NC’s Injury Epidemiologist in the Division of Public Health, identifying in 2002 the state’s epidemic of fatal drug overdoses, primarily due to the misuse of prescription pain medication, and more recently, the abuse of heroin and fentanyl. For 15 years she has lead and served on multiple overdose prevention task forces to design and evaluate overdose prevention and intervention strategies, design and collect more accurate overdose data, pass public health overdose prevention legislation and teach harm reduction to physicians, patients, law enforcement, criminal justice officers and inmates.

The medical and societal consequences of opioid use have reached epidemic proportions in the United States. Opioid overdose is now the leading cause of accidental death in the country, and the demographics and characteristics of the epidemic are constantly evolving. The purpose of this first-year student seminar is to understand the culture and physiological effects of beneficial and non-beneficial opioid use that includes pain management, overdose prevention, opioid use disorder, opioid overdose, diversion, legal consequences, harm reduction and treatment. Activities will include pre-class reading; lectures from technical experts; group discussions; written summaries of class material; in-class debates on controversial issues, such as legalizing opioids or abstinence-only vs. medical assisted treatment; experiments on the effects of opioids on the behavior of laboratory rats; and development and presentation of an effective evidence-based opioid misuse and abuse prevention program.

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Sociology (SOCI)

SOCI 57H.001: Rationalization and the Changing Nature of Social Life in 21st-Century America (Honors)
SS
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Howard E. Aldrich

Howard E. Aldrich is Kenan Professor of Sociology. He has won numerous awards for his teaching and mentoring: Favorite Professor Award from the senior class at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; graduate students’ Award for Best Teaching, Department of Sociology, several times; and the J Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award from the University of Carolina Chapel Hill. His two sons and his daughters-in-law graduated from Carolina. His main research interests are entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial team formation, gender and entrepreneurship, and evolutionary theory. He writes a regular column, “Speaking from Experience,” for The National Teaching and Learning Forum. He fly fishes year-round in the mountains of Western North Carolina and Eastern Tennessee and wherever else his travels may take him. Photos of his catches may be seen on his homepage.

Today, fast food restaurants have become a model for everyday life. Some scholars have even talked about the “McDonaldization” of the nation and the world. By that, scholars mean a drive toward greater efficiency, predictability, calculability, and control by non-human technologies in modern organizations. This drive has shaped many features of American life, including health care, law, and education. Such forces have even affected personal relationships. Sociologists have a term for this process: “rationalization.” In this course, we will explore that social process through a process called “active learning”: field trips, making things in a makerspace, presentations by visitors, videos, classroom simulations, and other activities. You will be assessed based on your monthly contributions to blog posts, class participation, four short (two page) papers, a major research project culminating in a term paper (15-20 pages), and a group presentation.

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SOCI 58.001: Globalization, Work, and Inequality
SS, GL
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Ted Mouw

Ted Mouw is a sociologist who studies social demography, labor markets and inequality. He received his Ph.D. (in sociology) and M.A. (in economics) in 1999 from Michigan. He is currently working on a project on globalization and low-wage labor markets. There are three components to this project: 1) Longitudinal evidence on “dead end jobs” and working poverty in the U.S., 2) immigration and the labor market for Mexican migrants and 3) industrialization and labor conditions in Mexico and Indonesia. He has also researched the use of job contacts to find work and racial friendship segregation in schools. After college he lived in Indonesia for two years, where he taught English, studied Indonesian and Javanese, and climbed volcanoes.

This seminar, which presents a comparative and multidisciplinary perspective on how globalization affects labor markets and inequality, will consist of two parts. First, we will discuss basic sociological and economic models of work and globalization and then students will apply these models to three case studies: 1) “sweatshops” and the question of international labor standards, 2) industrialization and development in China and Indonesia and 3) immigration and economic integration between the U.S. and Mexico. Students will prepare research papers on one of the three case studies. Course readings will be supplemented by the teacher’s current research on two questions: 1) What are conditions actually like for workers in Nike plants in Indonesia? (Interviews and a photo-narrative) and 2) How does the labor market work for undocumented Mexican workers? (Interviews from Carrboro, NC, part of Mouw’s personal research project.)

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SOCI 64.001: Equality of Educational Opportunity Then and Now
SS
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Karolyn Tyson

Karolyn Tyson is Professor in the Department of Sociology. She earned her doctorate in sociology in 1999 from the University of California at Berkeley. Her main fields of interest are sociology of education, social psychology and social inequality. Dr. Tyson’s publications have examined the processes by which schools reproduce social inequality and how the schooling experience affects students’ attitudes toward school. Her overall program of research centers on understanding how cultural, structural and individual-level factors affect school achievement and contribute to unequal educational outcomes.

The 1954 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka case centered on one of the most significant and controversial issues in American public education: equality of educational opportunity. Now more than 60 years after this historic Supreme Court decision, this seminar will use a sociological lens to examine in depth the social conditions that precipitated the case, other relevant court decisions, the changing definitions of race and the educational landscape over the past 6 decades. Topics include de jure and de facto segregation, busing, between-school segregation, tracking and ability grouping, the black-white achievement gap and residential segregation. Students will read historical and contemporary accounts and research reports on the move and progress toward equality of educational opportunity, view films related to the topic, conduct original research exploring young adults’ educational experiences, perspectives on equality of educational opportunity, and hopes for their future children. Students will prepare an oral presentation and a research paper.

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SOCI 66.001: Citizenship and Society in the United States
SS, NA
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Andrew Perrin

Andrew Perrin is a cultural sociologist who specializes in American democracy, citizenship, and public opinion. He received his Ph.D. in sociology in 2001 from the University of California, Berkeley. He has conducted research on, among other topics, letters to the editor; the importance of, and contests over, time in American politics; human rights in the U.S.; and just what we mean when we talk about “public opinion.” He is currently working on research on the relationship between college education and democratic citizenship.

Popular unrest. The resurgence of authoritarian styles and practices in politics. Democratic collapse. Political tumult around the globe in recent decades has put elites, and others, on edge as young democracies have collapsed and longer standing ones appear to be stumbling. In the United States, basic stability and democratic expansion have been accompanied by increasing citizen distrust of institutions, growing social divisions, and contestation over basic citizenship rights. Acute observers have long seen the U.S. as a harbinger of the promise and peril of modern democracies. What is the fate of democracy in the U.S.? What does that portend, if anything, for other democracies, or for the general principle of popular sovereignty—the idea that the people govern themselves? We investigate these and related questions by actively consulting political theory and empirical research in the social sciences. Our investigation will include class-time collaboration with a similar course being taught by a political scientist at Williams College. A highly recommended, but optional, study trip to Washington, DC, in November will allow both classes to meet and discuss elections and popular sovereignty with practitioners and elected officials. (NOTE: Students may be asked to pay part of the cost of the Washington trip, approximately $400, and may need to miss two days of classes.)

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SOCI 89H.001: Researching Religion in Women’s Lives (Honors)
SS, GL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Lauren Leve and Lisa Pearce

Lauren Leve received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology before joining the Department of Religious Studies at Carolina. Now an associate professor, her research uses the lens of religion to explore changing forms of culture and political life in contemporary Asia, especially Nepal. She has been living and working in Nepal since she was an undergraduate—sometimes for a few weeks at a time, sometimes for a few years. Her research has also brought her to Thailand, Sri Lanka, India, and Singapore. She has written on topics that include Buddhism, globalization, international development (especially women’s empowerment), human rights, and secularism. Her recent book is titled The Buddhist Art of Living in Nepal: Ethical Practice and Religious Reform. She is currently working on two projects: one on Buddhist mindfulness meditation and one on gender and the rise of Christianity in Nepal.

Lisa Pearce, a Professor of Sociology and Faculty Fellow at the Carolina Population Center, is a sociologist of family, religion, and the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Her research is based in Kenya, Nepal, and the United States. She has written two books, A Faith of Their Own: Stability and Change in the Religiosity of American’s Adolescents (with Melinda Lundquist Denton) and Mixed Method Data Collection Strategies (with William G. Axinn). Professor Pearce enjoys working with students to collect different kinds of data, moving back and forth between open-ended exploration and the systematic testing of ideas that emerge. She has been on the faculty at Carolina for 16 years.

How do religious beliefs and practices shape gender identities, values, and expectations in different religious cultures? How are these understandings reflected, contested, and/or creatively transformed by women within religious traditions, and at different times? How do we know what we think we know? This course examines the relations between women and religion across different traditions and in diverse global contexts, asking how religious modes of authority and ethical being-in-the-world shape women’s aspirations for self-actualization and position them in relation to both opportunities and constraints. The course also asks, how can we know and measure these relations? Arguments about women and religion are based on evidence that reflect different sets of assumptions and are collected in different ways. Throughout the semester, we’ll explore key methods for data collection and analysis in the Humanities and Social Sciences through a series of hands-on research assignments, culminating in a final research project. Practical experience generating and interpreting diverse types of data will reveal the ways that scientific and humanistic modes of inquiry can work together to pose and answer key questions about women, gender, and human social life.

Students may also register for this course under RELI 89H.001.

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