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African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)
American Studies (AMST)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Asian Studies (ASIA)
Biology (BIOL)
Chemistry (CHEM)
Classics (CLAS)
Communication (COMM)
Computer Science (COMP)
Dramatic Art (DRAM)
Economics (ECON)
English and Comparative Literature (CMPL/ENGL)
Geography (GEOG)
Geological Sciences (GEOL)
German and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)
History (HIST)
Information and Library Science (INLS)
Institute for the Study of the Americas (LTAM)
Marine Sciences (MASC)
Mathematics (MATH)
Music (MUSC)
Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)
Political Science (POLI)
Psychology and Neuroscience (PSYC)
Public Policy (PLCY)
Religious Studies (RELI)
Romance Studies (ROML)
School of Education (EDUC)
Sociology (SOCI)
Other Opportunities

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)

AAAD 50.001: Defining Blackness
Gen Eds: SS, US
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Candis Watts Smith

Professor Candis Watts Smith tends to ask research questions that blur disciplinary lines; many of the questions she poses can only be answered by considering bodies of literature, theoretical frameworks and methodological strategies found in Sociology, Political Science, Psychology and Public Policy. Her research interests focuses on American political behavior and Racial and Ethnic Politics. Here, she focuses on individuals’ and groups’ policy preferences, particularly around social policies that exacerbate or ameliorate disparities and inequality between groups.

Dr. Smith uses both qualitative and quantitative methods to answer research questions. This mixed-method approach is best illustrated in her first book Black Mosaic: The Politics of Black Pan-Ethnic Diversity (NYU Press, 2014). Her work also appears in journals like the Annual Review of Political Science, The Journal of Black Studies and Politics, Groups & Identities as well as in edited book volumes.

The boundaries of Blackness are constantly in flux, and pinning down an accurate definition of Blackness in the U.S., to be specific, is becoming an increasing complicated task due to changing social norms, immigration, emigration, the increasing number of immigrants from Africa and the Caribbean, the growing number of multi-racial persons and even increasing socioeconomic bifurcation among those traditionally categorized as Black. Who is included in the definition of Black is not only a matter of color and history but also of politics, culture and self-identification. Over the course of the semester, we will engage in the debates around Blackness. We will examine scholarly texts and government documents as well as film, novels and memoirs. Our goal is to attempt to define Blackness as well as to understand the mechanisms that influence the boundaries and definition of Blackness.

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AAAD 51.001: Masquerades of Blackness
Gen Eds: VP, US
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Charlene Regester

Charlene Regester is an Associate Professor in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies and Affiliate Faculty for the Global Cinema Minor. She received her BA, MA, Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is the author of African American Actresses: The Struggle for Visibility, 1900-1960 (which was nominated by the press to the NAACP Image Awards). She is the 2011 recipient of the Trailblazer Award Hayti Heritage Film Festival and 2007 Oscar Micheaux Book and Film Award from the Oscar Micheaux Film Festival, South Dakota. She has appeared on North Carolina Bookwatch with UNC-TV 2011; WUNC-FM Radio “The State of Things;” and Turner Movie Classics. Documentaries in which she has appeared include: Movies of Color: Black Southern Cinema (2003, Tom Thurman director), Beyond Tara: The Extraordinary Life of Hattie McDaniel (2001), Madison Davis Lacy director), and Birth of a Movement (2017, Bestor Cram and Susan Gray directors).

This seminar is designed to investigate how the concept of race has been represented in cinema historically, with a particular focus on representations of race when blackness is masqueraded. Its intent is to launch an investigative inquiry into how African Americans are represented on screen in various time periods, how we as spectators are manipulated by these cinematic constructions of race, and how race is marked or coded other than through visual representation. Students will view films that deal with “passing” from the various historical periods and will utilize theoretical concepts introduced in class to read these visual representations. Films selected for viewing include the pre-World War II Era, the Civil Rights Era, and the “Post-Racial” era. Students will be required to write three papers that reflect their ability to apply theoretical concepts to reading racialized representations on screen in these three historical periods to demonstrate their understanding of how racial masquerades have evolved over time and continue to persist in contemporary culture.

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AAAD 54.001: African Migrations, Boundaries, Displacements, and Belonging
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTh, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Michael Lambert

Michael Lambert is an Associate Professor of African Studies and Anthropology. His research has principally been in francophone West Africa with a focus on issues related to migration. He has lived for over five years in Senegal and the neighboring nation of Mauritania, where he served as a Peace Corps volunteer, and he has travelled extensively throughout the continent. His first book, Longing for Exile: Migration and the Making of a Translocal Community in Senegal (West Africa) (Heinemann, 2002), explores the cultural and social history of urban migration in a Senegalese community. His most recent book (co-authored), Up from These Hills: Memories of Cherokee Boyhood (Nebraska [Bison Books], 2011), explores American Indian experience in the mid-20th century.

Boundary making, migration, and population displacement have been significant dimensions of the contemporary African experience. How has boundary making, broadly defined (inclusive of national borders, rural-urban distinctions, and ethnic and racial groupings, for example), shaped contemporary Africa? What types of and through what processes were boundaries were created? How did the African people respond to these processes? What population displacements unfolded in the context of this boundary making? And how did the people of Africa make sense of and understand boundary making, migration, and displacement? These are some of the questions we will be examining in this interactive and discussion oriented class. We will build our examination of these issues around six novels written by African authors. These novels will provide insight into the ways by which boundaries, migration, and displacement impacted the everyday lives of the African people.

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American Studies (AMST)

AMST 53H.001: The Family and Social Change in America (Honors)
Gen Eds: HS, CI, NA
TTh, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Robert C. Allen

Robert C. Allen is the James Logan Godfrey Distinguished Professor of American Studies. He has served as Director of the UNC Digital Innovation Lab 2011-16); Co-Principal Investigator for the Mellon-Foundation-funded Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative (2012-14); and Director of the University Honors Program (1997-99). He is Faculty Co-Lead for the Community History Workshop. His work in the emerging field of digital humanities has earned him the American Historical Association’s Rosenzweig Prize for Innovation in Digital History, and the C. Felix Harvey Award to Advance Institutional Priorities at UNC. He has published widely in the fields of American cultural and media history (8 books, more than 40 book chapters and articles). In 2011 he received the Tanner Faculty Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

Inspired by successful television program, “Who Do You Think You Are?” and the popularity of such online genealogical resources as Ancestry.com and Family Search, millions of people are taking advantage of billions of digitized public records and publications (census enumerations, city directories, newspapers, military records, etc.) to become online historical detectives. Some are also becoming 21st century family “kinkeepers”: combining digital resources with local archival resources (including the Southern Historical Collection and North Carolina Collection at UNC and State Archives in Raleigh), family memorabilia from “the bottom drawer of grandma’s dresser” and recordings of family stories to create multimedia family archives, which can be shared with far-flung extended family members and passed down to future generations. This course unfolds the process and materials of genealogical research to larger historical issues and contexts; explores how family history can personalize and localize social, cultural, political, and economic history; and asks how the question “Who do you think you are?” can become the basis for examining “Who do we think we are?” as a diverse national culture. Participants will research and document the history of (at least!) the last four generations of their biological/cultural families; gather (and preserve) family history materials from living family members; and explore the complexities of family history in relation to gender, race, and ethnicity. In addition to learning more about your own and your family’s history, we will use the tools and resources that have revolutionized genealogy and family history to ask new questions about the social and cultural history of “ordinary” people in North Carolina over the past 150 years. In the process, participants will also gain valuable experience in using digital technologies to gather and represent historical data; using public records and other primary documents; conducting oral history interviews; and constructing historical narratives. This course benefits from and is designed as an introduction to the work of the Community Histories Workshop (http://communityhistories.org), a unit devoted to public digital history and humanities.

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AMST 89.001: Methods of Detection
Gen Eds: SS, EE-field work
MWF, 01:25 PM – 02:15 PM
Marsha Penner and Michelle Robinson

Marsha Penner is a Teaching Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience. She is devoted to teaching undergraduate students about the brain, and has experience utilizing neuroscience-themed escape rooms as a teaching device.

Michelle Robinson is an Associate Professor in the Department of American Studies. Her book Dreams for Dead Bodies: Blackness, Labor, and the Corpus of American Detective Fiction (U Michigan 2016) studies the origins of the literary devices we associate with detective fiction.

Not only do paperbacks like Gone Girl and television mega-franchises like Law & Order invite their audiences to perform extraordinary feats of detection, they also communicate information about the cognitive processes that make mystery solving possible. Both literary theorists and behavioral neuroscientists have developed models that explain the ways detection–the accumulation and logical assembly of clues and evidence to solve mysteries—takes place. Our course merges neuroscience and literary studies by exploring how the brain permits puzzle solving while we study how detection fictions take advantage of and represent this cognitive work. Students will learn the fundamentals of behavioral neuroscience and engage as active readers of puzzle mysteries who can deconstruct the pieces of the fictional puzzle. Students will integrate neuroscience and detective fiction by building an original “Escape Room”. These “Escape Rooms” will engage local audiences in puzzle solving and teach non-specialists core concepts about behavioral neuroscience.

Students may also register for this course under PSYC 89.001.

Other Opportunities in American Studies

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Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 54.001: The Indians’ New Worlds: Southeastern Histories from 1200 to 1800
Gen Eds: HS, US, WB
TTh, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
C. Margaret Scarry

Margaret Scarry’s fascination with Native American cultures began in high school, when she participated in an archaeological field school on Summer Island, Michigan. She pursued her interest through undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of Michigan, where she earned her Ph.D. in 1986. Though her first archaeological experience was in the Midwest, she soon shifted her interest to the Southeast, where she investigates Native American foodways—the activities and ideas by which people acquire, distribute, prepare, present, consume, and think about food. Much of her research has focused on the Moundville chiefdom, which flourished in Alabama from about A.D. 1100 to 1500. After a number of years in Florida and Kentucky, Scarry joined the anthropology faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill in 1995. Among other things, she teaches courses on archaeology, food and culture, and archaeobotany.

By AD 1200, most Southeastern Indians were farmers who lived in societies ruled by hereditary chiefs. After 1500, encounters between Indians and Europeans changed the lives of all concerned, but the changes took place in, and were shaped by, existing cultures. This seminar uses reading, discussion, and lecture to examine the lives of Southern Indians and to understand how encounters and interaction with European explorers and colonists changed the worlds in which the Indians lived. Students will learn how archaeologists and historians work, both separately and together, to study the past of Native societies. Students will study and analyze archaeological artifacts, Spanish accounts of Southeastern Indians, and other primary materials in class. These activities, along with various role-playing exercises, will directly involve the students in the study of Native people in the period between 1200 and 1800. Grades will be based on class participation, two short papers, participation in a group project, and a final paper related to the group project.

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ANTH 67.0001: Blackness and Racialization: A Multidimensional Approach – ADDED 12/3/2018
MWF, 12:20 PM – 01:10 PM
HS, US
Charles Price

Charles Price is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Charles’s research, writing and activity focus on Black racial identity, Rastafari identity, life narrative genres, action research, community organizations and community organizing, people-centered community development, and social movements, with a geographic concentration on the United States and Jamaica. Charles authored the book Becoming Rasta: The Origins of Rastafari Identity in Jamaica (2009, New York University Press), co-authored the monograph Community Collaborations: Promoting Community Organizing (2009, Ford Foundation), and is under contract with NYU Press to write a sequel to Becoming Rasta, a book on collective identity formation and ethnogenesis among the Rastafari people of Jamaica. He is developing a historically grounded qualitative approach to explaining collective identity formation. Another project in development involves a collaboration with a faculty member to develop an action-oriented study of how Black men in North Carolina and Connecticut negotiate challenges and obstacles in their lives.

Blackness and Racialization is an introduction to the history, social construction, cultural production, and lived experience of race. The course focuses on Blackness in the United States and Jamaica (for comparison), though it necessarily addresses other race formations such as Whiteness and Brownness. The course approaches racialization from three angles: historical; social; and personal. It utilizes historical, theoretical, ethnographic, and popular culture productions to explain the effects, uses, durability, and pliability of racial formations.
Some questions that the course will address include:

  • What does the social construction of race mean in practice? How is race socially constructed?
  • How do racial categories and identities develop, persist, and change?
  • How does race work at various “levels,” such as the level of the individual, collectivity, and history?
  • What are the origins of various racial stereotypes?
  • Why do people have very different understandings of race, some embracing race, some rejecting race, and some claiming to not understand race at all?

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ANTH 89.056: Race and Small Town America
Gen Eds: SS, US
MWF, 12:20 PM – 01:10 PM
Karla Slocum

Karla Slocum is also Associate Professor of Anthropology. Slocum specializes in studies of place identities, black-identified communities and history, and rural engagements with global economic change in the Caribbean and the United States. She is the author of Free Trade and Freedom: Neoliberalism, Place and Nation in the Caribbean (University of Michigan Press, 2006). Her second book, The Appeal of a Black Place: Lured by History, Space and Race in American Black Towns , is under contract with the University of North Carolina Press. The book examines the contemporary attraction of historic, rural black towns in the Western U.S. amid their simultaneous status as economically fragile and socially remote communities.

Race is a prominent feature of American life and the U.S. is made up of more small towns than large cities. What, then, does race mean for small town American life? The goal of this course is for students to understand how race shapes the ways that people live their lives in U.S. small and rural towns? We will address such questions as: How do a rural identity and a racial identity intersect? How do different racial groups experience rural life? How is race significant for small town experiences in the areas of: economies and work; education; culture and identity; health and environment; and community history and heritage? To explore these questions, we will focus on ethnographic studies of specific rural communities.

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ANTH 89.084: Forced Out and Fenced In: New Ethnographies of Latino Immigration – CANCELLED 11/30/2018
Gen Eds: SS, US
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Angela Stuesse

Dr. Angela Stuesse is a cultural anthropologist of Latino and Latin America who studies immigration, race, labor, social movements, and activist research. Her new book, Scratching Out a Living, explores how Latino migration has transformed the U.S. South. Other recent work focuses on the policing, detention, and deportation of Latino communities and on undocumented young people’s access to higher education. She believes in the transformative potential of education, fostering horizontal relationships of shared learning, and creating opportunities for students to problem-solve real world issues. www.AngelaStuesse.com

Undocumented immigration receives considerable media attention in the United States today. But what does it actually mean to be undocumented? How does illegality shape the lived realities of migrants themselves? Through in-depth engagement with five new ethnographies on the topic, this course examines the social, political, and legal challenges faced by undocumented Latino immigrants and their families. Through the lens of legal anthropology, which seeks to understand the relationship between law/policy, social relations, and inequality, students will explore the hazards of unauthorized crossing at the U.S.-Mexico border, processes of and obstacles to legalization, economic and health effects of workplace exploitation, coming-of-age challenges of undocumented youth, and consequences of detention and deportation. The authors of each ethnography will be invited to join us via Skype for an informal Q&A conversation.

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ANTH 89.087: Race | Sex | Latin America
Gen Eds: SS, BN, CI
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Florence Babb

Florence Babb is a professor of Anthropology and Latin American Studies who has long carried out research and teaching on race, gender, sexuality, and other forms of social difference and inequality in Latin America. She is part of her department’s Concentration on Race, Difference, and Power, and she recently published her fourth book, entitled Women’s Place in the Andes: Engaging Decolonial Feminist Anthropology. She enjoys providing her students with challenging material that they can discuss and debate in class. Her seminars are lively and give students the chance to help lead class discussion.

What can we learn by considering past and present differences of race, gender, and sexuality in Latin America and the Caribbean? What might this tell us about such a diverse region of the Americas, and even perhaps about our own forms of difference and inequality in North America? How might this exploration expand and transform our knowledge about this part of the world? This first-year seminar considers how race, gender, and sexuality come together in precolonial, postcolonial, and contemporary Latin America. We will explore histories of indigenous, Afrodescendant, and mestizo peoples and how racial and sexual difference have persisted or changed over time. To learn about the current context in the region, we will draw from selected case studies from rural to urban settings, from Andean to tropical and coastal settings, from heteronormative to LGBTQ populations, and from conservative politics to social movements that are calling for expanded rights to political inclusion.

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Asian Studies (ASIA)

ASIA 61.001: India through the Lens of Master Filmmakers
Gen Eds: VP, BN, CI
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM,
Class will also meet M, 04:40 PM – 07:40 PM
Pamela Lothspeich

Pamela Lothspeich teaches courses on Indian literature and film, the Hindu epics, and South Asian culture generally. Her research focuses on modern adaptations of the Mahabharata and Ramayana in literature and theater. Her first book, Epic Nation: Reimagining the Mahabharata in the Age of Empire (OUP: 2009), discusses how Indian writers in the colonial period often retold stories from the Mahabharata in ways that allegorically expressed patriotism and contested British rule. She is currently completing a second book on a modern Hindi epic known as “The Radheshyam Ramayana” and a popular style of theater called “Ramlila” which enacts the story of the Ramayana in an annual festival.

In this course, students will experience films by some of the most acclaimed directors working in various languages and regions of India, as well as the Indian diaspora. The cinematic journey in this course will introduce students to important themes in South Asian culture and history over the past 200 years. It will also introduce students to some of the formal elements of filmmaking to help them better “read” the text of film, and appreciate the craft and aesthetics of filmmaking. There will be weekly film screenings and related readings on Indian cinema, culture, and film theory. For the Communication-Intensive component of this course, students will receive feedback on a piece of their writing and be asked to revise and resubmit it. They will also be given opportunities to speak on assigned topics in class.

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ASIA 64.001: Arab World Photography
Gen Eds: VP, BN
TTh, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Nadia Yaqub

Nadia Yaqub’s research has treated Arab cultural texts ranging from medieval literature and contemporary oral poetry to modern prose fiction and visual culture. Most recently she has focused on Palestinian literature and visual culture. Her current work has focused on two distinct areas: 1. Palestinian cinema and 2. women and transgression in the Arab World. She is currently completing a study of Palestinian cinema of the 1970s titled Palestinian Cinema in the Days of Revolution. She is also coediting the volume Bad Girls of the Arab World with Dr. Rula Quawas from the University of Jordan.

Arab World Photography introduces students to the practice of photography in the Arab world. We will begin by studying photography of the Arab world by others: European travelers and missionaries, colonialists, ethnographers, journalists, etc. We will examine and discuss selected images, paying particular attention to the relationship that is created and/or represented in them. This viewing will be supplemented with background readings on the history and/or sociopolitical or cultural contexts in which the images are made. We will then turn our attention to indigenous photography in the Arab world. What types of images do people in the region make for themselves and to what purpose? In what ways are these images similar to or different from the photographs created about them by travelers and colonial administrators, foreign journalists, and academics? We will then consider photographs of war and violence and what effects that have on the world. The final segments of the class will be devoted to selected contemporary photographers from the Arab world and the complex ways in which their documentary and art images engage both with the history of Arab photography and the contemporary Arab world; the relationship between photography and moving images; and photography and the Arab Revolutions that began in January 2011.

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ASIA 69.001: Wars and Veterans: Iran, Iraq, and Afghanistan
Gen Eds: LA, CI, GL
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Claudia Yaghoobi

Claudia Yaghoobi is a Roshan Institute Assistant Professor in Persian Studies in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She teaches courses on Middle Eastern and Persian Literature. Yaghoobi’s recent publications include “Yusuf’s Queer Beauty in Persian Cultural Productions”, Comparatist (2016); “Socially Peripheral, Symbolically Central: Sima in Behrouz Afkhami’s Showkaran”, Journal of Asian Cinema (2016); “Subjectivity in ʿAṭṭār’s Shaykh San’an Story in The Conference of the Birds”, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture (2014); and “Sexual Trauma and Spiritual Experience: Rabiʿa al-ʿAdawiyya and Margery Kempe”, Persian Literary Studies Journal (2014). Her book, Subjectivity in ‘Attar, Persian Sufism, and European Mysticism, will be released in May 2017 by Purdue University Press.

In this course, we will explore the various ways that wars and conflicts, particularly Iran-Iraq, U.S.-Iraq, and U.S.-Afghanistan wars, have been portrayed in literature, film, and photography. We will attempt to deepen and enrich our understanding of war experienced by both veterans and civilians of each country. We will examine the impact of war on the human psyche in regards with violence. We will read books by American war veterans and Middle East authors contemplating the wars and their consequences. We will look at each writer’s perspective on war and their interpretation of it comparatively. In order to enhance our understanding of the phenomenon of war, we will also read supplementary articles on criticism of war and a few on psychology of war. There will be film screening on these wars which will give students the opportunity to examine these wars in a different medium than just literature. We will also look at war photography and analyze the perspectives of each photographer and the impact war has not only on people who are involved but on outside observers as well. All readings will be in English. The class will be conducted in the form of a combination of lectures, discussion, and experimentations.

Students may also register for this course under PWAD 69.001.

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ASIA 89.001: Transnational Korea: Literature, Film, Popular Culture
Gen Eds: LA, BN
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Jonathan Kief

Jonathan Kief is a scholar of modern Korean literature and culture whose research focuses on interactions between words and images in postcolonial North and South Korea. He is also interested in the Korean diaspora, the history of Korean translation practices, and the history of radio and television in Cold War-era East Asia. In his teaching, he combines literature, film, and popular culture to help students explore both the contemporary globalization of Korean culture and the robust history of transnational exchanges that it builds upon. Before moving to North Carolina, he lived in Korea, Japan, and many different parts of the U.S.

Taking the recent Korean Wave phenomenon as its point of departure, this course introduces students to the history of transnational imaginations in modern and contemporary Korean culture. Drawing upon literature, film, television, and secondary scholarship, we will explore how a diverse array of Korean cultural producers have used narratives of cross-border travel, migration, and exchange to rethink Korea’s place in the world and refashion Korean identity. In each section of the course, we will consider a different domain or dimension of border-crossing activity: education; labor; migration and diaspora; North-South interactions; war and military; cosmopolitan imaginings and the making of “global Korea.” In so doing, we will learn to think critically about the relationship between works from colonial Korea, postcolonial North Korea, postcolonial South Korea, and the Korean diaspora, and we will also gain a more nuanced understanding of popular culture’s place within its broader social and historical contexts.

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Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 53.001: Biotechnology: Genetically Modified Foods to the Sequence of the Human Genome
Gen Eds: PL
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Jill Dowen

Jill Dowen, PhD, is a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Integrative Program in Biological and Genome Sciences, and an Assistant Professor in the Biochemistry and Biophysics Department and the Biology Department at UNC-Chapel Hill. Dr. Dowen’s lab is investigating the function of DNA loops involving genes and their regulatory elements. Projects in her lab address how genome organization impacts the expression of genes in different cell types during development and how disruptions in these mechanisms lead to human diseases such as cancers and developmental syndromes.

A good life depends on access to adequate food and medical care. Advances in biotechnology have made possible both agriculture and medicine, and further advances may allow us to feed and keep healthy a burgeoning population in both developed and undeveloped countries. This seminar will examine the science behind a number of striking recent advances in biology, including animal cloning, genetic engineering of crop plants, development of new therapeutic drugs, development of embryonic stem cells, and deciphering of the complete human genome sequence. Students will debate how specific technological advances force us to confront new social and ethical choices, such as whether you want your own genome to be sequenced. We will also consider how new technologies are actually implemented, and we will visit an academic lab and a biotechnology company. The seminar should bring together the humanistic and technical impulses in students, and is open to students planning careers in scientific or humanities fields.

Other Opportunities in Biology

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Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 70.001: You Don’t Have to Be a Rocket Scientist – CANCELLED 11/30/2018
Gen Eds: PL
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Todd Austell

Todd Austell received his BS in Chemistry in 1987 and his PhD in Chemistry in 1996, both at UNC. He spent one year working in the pharmaceutical industry prior to graduate school and another year as an Assistant Professor at the United States Air Force Academy prior to returning to his current position. As an undergraduate, he participated in the Department of Energy and American Chemistry Society’s Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry. Topical studies in nuclear chemistry have been a hobby of his since that time. His graduate research involved separation science, and he is currently involved in both curriculum development within the chemistry department and in a long-term study of how middle school and secondary math education/preparation affects student performances in college general chemistry. His hobbies include hiking, camping, disc golf and gardening as well as following all UNC athletics.

Nuclear chemistry is a field that touches the lives of everyone perhaps every day of their lives. This seminar will approach the topic of nuclear chemistry on the level of an introductory chemistry class with no prerequisite. Atomic structure, nuclear fission and nuclear fusion processes will be studied to provide the background necessary to understand their applications. Nuclear weapons and nuclear power will be covered in detail with discussion of topics relevant both for today’s society and for the future. Other topics including household applications, nuclear medicine, radiation safety and the problematic issue of radioactive waste storage will be discussed. The seminar will include guest lecturers from the various fields of nuclear chemistry, selected reading assignments, topical student-led discussions, possible facility trips/tours and a final project presentation on a relevant topic.

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Classics (CLAS)

CLAS 51H.001: Greek Drama from Page to Stage (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, CI, WB
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Al Duncan

Al Duncan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics. He holds a B.A. in English and Classical Languages & Literature from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in Classics and the Humanities from Stanford University. Having previously taught in Classics and Comparative Literature at the University at Utah, he joined the Carolina faculty in 2015 and offers a variety of courses on ancient Greek language and literature and ancient Mediterranean culture. Professor Duncan’s research focuses on theatrical production, aesthetics, and genre. He is currently preparing a book on ugliness in Greek drama, as well as several chapters and articles on the material and cognitive aspects of ancient theater.

Taking a participatory approach to ancient Greek drama, this course pairs readings of three Athenian playwrights (Aeschylus, Euripides, and Aristophanes) with performance-oriented activities, readings, and writings. At its most traditional, this course surveys the much-discussed and much-theorized historio-cultural context of “classical” Athens, with particular focus on the political, religious, and aesthetic forces that gave rise to humankind’s first recorded theater.

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CLAS 61H.001: Writing the Past (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, CI, WB
MWF, 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM
Emily Baragwanath

Emily Baragwanath studied at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, before taking up a Rhodes Scholarship to the University of Oxford, U.K. where she gained her doctorate in Classics. She has since held research fellowships at Christ Church, Oxford, at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington D.C., and in Heidelberg. Her main area of scholarly interest is the literary techniques employed by Greek historians in their construction of historical narratives. Her first book, Motivation and Narrative in Herodotus, winner of Oxford’s Conington Prize and the CAMWS Award for Outstanding Publication 2010, explores the representation of human motivation in Herodotus’ Histories. She is now examining the representation of women in the historian and philosopher Xenophon.

The intersection of history-writing, cinema and fiction will be our focus as we engage with the greatest Greek historians—Herodotus, Thucydides, Polybius—against the backdrop of modern renditions of the past and of war in cinema (including Peter Weir’s Gallipoli, Wolfgang Petersen’s Troy and Zack Snyder’s 300), documentaries (including Tolga Ornek’s Gallipoli), news footage and short stories. We will examine the strategies of each ancient writer in confronting challenges that remain pressing for directors, journalists, and historians today. These include difficulties of conflicting perspectives, biased evidence, and the limitations of memory, as well as broader questions about the nature of historical representation. The aim is for students to engage in critical and informed analysis of the strategies of our three ancient historians in ‘writing the past’, and to draw appropriate comparisons with the challenges that confront modern counterparts. The course will center on in-class group discussion and debate focused on questions arising from the week’s reading or viewing assignments. Students will write two short essays and a longer paper arising from their course project.

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CLAS 89.001: Ancient Magic and Religion
Gen Eds: LA, WB
MWF, 12:20 PM – 01:10 PM
Suzanne Lye

Suzanne Lye received her A.B. from Harvard University, where she studied organic chemistry and the history of antibiotics. After receiving her Ph.D. in Classics from the University of California, Los Angeles, she was awarded a Postdoctoral Fellowship at Dartmouth College. At present, she is working on a book-length project about conceptions of the afterlife in ancient Greek Underworld narratives from Homer to Lucian. She has also participated in several digital humanities initiatives through Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies, including the Homer Multitext Project. She has published on ancient epic, ancient religion and magic, ancient representations of gender and ethnicity, modern pedagogy, and Classical reception.

Bindings and curses, love charms and healing potions, amulets and talismans – from simple spells to complex group rituals, ancient societies made use of both magic and religion to try to influence the world around them. In this course, we shall examine the roles of magic and religion in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, paying special attention to their local contexts and to the myths and actual techniques ancient practitioners used to serve their clientele.

In this class, we examine descriptions of religious and magical practices in the multicultural contexts of ancient Greece and Rome. Our sources include literary accounts, legal documents, and material objects, such as inscriptions, amulets, tablets, magical images, and papyri.

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Communication (COMM)

COMM 61.001: The Politics of Performance – CANCELLED 11/14/2018
Gen Eds: VP
TTh, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Bryanne Young

Bryanne Young holds a Doctorate in Communication from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She specializes in performance studies, literary and cultural studies, and is interested in popular culture and performance in everyday life. She is a Canadian scholar whose research analyzes the politics of life and death with respect to race, sexuality, and gender.

This seminar explores performance as a practice of political engagement. In an era when politicians are increasingly judged by their success as performers and the makers of spectacles, how can we engage with politics as a force for substantial and positive change? When confronted with the rise of “post-truth politics,” how do social movements and individuals speak “truth to power”? In this seminar, we will examine the creative processes with artists and arts collectives who create work for social change. We will investigate the artistic practices of activists and social movements in local, national and global contexts, such as the Black Power movement, ACT-UP, anti-sexual assault protests on college campuses, Occupy Wall Street, Black Lives Matter as well as both pro- and anti-refugee activism in Europe. A key concern throughout the semester will be performances that blur the boundary between the “actual” and “fictional,” where it is at times unclear to audiences whether they are witnessing (or participating in) a staged event or a “real” one. The course will also feature class visits by international artists who engage politics through their work, including the Dutch actor group, Wunderbaum. The course is organized around an arts-based pedagogy, where students will explore collaborative practices through performance-based projects.

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COMM 83.001: Networked Societies
Gen Eds: SS
TTh, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Alice Marwick

Alice Marwick (PhD, New York University) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication and Faculty Affiliate at the Center for Media Law and Policy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Faculty Advisor to the Media Manipulation Initiative at the Data & Society Research Institute. She researches the social, political, and cultural implications of popular social media technologies. In 2017, she co-authored Media Manipulation and Disinformation Online, a flagship report examining far-right online subcultures and their use of social media to spread misinformation, for which she was named one of 2017’s Global Thinkers by Foreign Policy magazine. Her research has been featured in The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Today Show, NPR, and CNN, among other venues. She is the author of Status Update: Celebrity, Publicity and Branding in the Social Media Age (Yale 2013), which draws from ethnographic fieldwork in the San Francisco tech scene to examine how people seek social status through attention and visibility online and co-editor of The Sage Handbook of Social Media (Sage 2017). Her current book project examines how the networked nature of online privacy disproportionately impacts marginalized individuals in terms of gender, race, and socio-economic status.

The “network” is the 21st century’s most popular metaphor, used to describe relationships, economies, technological infrastructures, and politics. In this class, we will delve into the relationship between networked digital technologies (social media, video games, server farms, gig economy apps like Uber and Care.com, cryptocurrency, online retailers, political campaign apps, etc.) and the ways we think about ourselves, our communities, our jobs, money, our careers, and our environment. In this seminar, we will delve deeply into some of these technologies and processes, with the goal of providing participants with a set of critical and theoretical tools to interpret the complexity of everyday life. We will do a lot of reading, try out a variety of new networked technologies, and debate their ramifications in class, culminating in a series of essays on technology and society. This class is a great fit for sci-fi nerds, Black Mirror fans, social media gurus, gamers, tech enthusiasts, or anyone who likes thinking deeply about the impacts of technology locally and globally.

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COMM 85.001: Think, Speak, Argue – CANCELLED 11/09/2018
Gen Eds: CI
MW, 01:25 PM – 02:40 PM
Christian Lundberg

Christian Lundberg is an Associate Professor in Communication Studies, where he conducts research on the public sphere, rhetoric, and contemporary American religious discourse. He received his Ph.D. from Northwestern University’s program in Rhetoric and Public Culture, and currently teaches a class in globalization and communication. One of his passions is teaching people how to debate. He coached teams at three universities to national championships in intercollegiate debate and has taught debate classes at Northwestern, Emory University, and Georgia State, as well as teaching summer workshops on debate at Northwestern, Dartmouth, Miami University of Ohio, and the University of Kentucky.

This seminar helps students learn to think more critically, speak more persuasively, and argue more effectively by focusing on practical skill development in reasoning and debate. Students at Carolina learn to sharpen their thinking, speaking, and argument skills in the course of their normal classwork, but this happens more or less indirectly. This seminar will focus directly on improving each of these skills. Students will learn to think more critically by reflecting on the work of philosophers who deal with reasoning and informal logic, to speak with conviction and clarity through hands-on learning about the tradition of rhetoric, and to argue more effectively by debating the pressing issues of our day. The skills that we hone in on in this course will help students become more effective in the classroom, in their chosen vocation, and as citizens in an increasingly complex global public sphere.

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COMM 89.001: Extremism and Visual Persuasion
Gen Eds: CI, GL
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Corinne Dauber

Dr. Cori E. Dauber (@coridauber) is Professor of Communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she is also a Research Fellow at the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS.) She is co-editor of Visual Propaganda and Extremism in the Online Environment, (US Army War College Press, 2014) and the author of You Tube War: Fighting in a World of Cameras in Every Cell Phone, Photoshop on Every Computer, (US Army War College Press, 2010.) She has been the Visiting Research Professor at the Strategic Studies Institute of the US Army War College. Her research focus is the communication strategies of terrorist groups, with a particular focus on their use of visual imagery. Her work has been published in venues such as Military Review, Small Wars Journal, and Jihadology.net, and she has presented her research to the Council on Foreign Relations, the John F. Kennedy School for Special Warfare, the Foreign Policy Research Institute, and the Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies of the National Defense University among others. Dr. Dauber holds a PhD and BS from Northwestern University, and an MA from Chapel Hill, all in Communication Studies.

Extremist groups use materials that are particularly dependent on the visual: videos, memes, even old school posters. This class will examine the way these materials work to persuade by, first, looking at the power of the visual image itself. How do visuals work in any context? What makes one visual effective, while another falls flat, one memorable, while another is forgettable? Then we will look at the way visuals are harnessed by extremist groups in any number of contexts, whether those materials were effective or not, and attempt to determine why those campaigns succeeded or failed.

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COMM 89.002: Mediating the US-Mexico Border
Gen Eds: VP, US
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
China Medel

Dr. Medel’s research and teaching interests include U.S.-Mexico border studies, Chicana/o and Latina/o literature and art, visual media studies, performance, and social movements. She received her Ph.D. from the Graduate Program in Literature at Duke University and her dissertation was titled “Border Images and Imaginaries: Spectral Aesthetics and Visual Medias of Americanity at the U.S.-Mexico Border.” As postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Communication at UNC Carolina, Dr. Medel is at work on a book project, “Spectral Aesthetics: Media and Movement(s) at the U.S.-Mexico Border.” The book expands the scope of her dissertation to put art and filmmaking practices into dialog with the experiments and thinking emerging from on the ground activist projects in immigration justice in order to understand the crucial role of these different types of praxis in imagining and shaping new forms of political life. She has taught courses in film and media studies and border studies. In addition to her research and teaching Dr. Medel is an active SONG member working on two local anti-criminalization campaigns.

The US-Mexico border is a contentious site in public culture, media, and the lives of the people who daily navigate it. A remote site for many, understanding the border takes place largely through the images that mediate it. This course is an investigation into cultural mediations of the US-Mexico border through film, photography, music, performance, and digital media. Critically examining these mediations we will seek to ground the images and ideas they convey by putting them into conversation with ethnography, investigative journalism, and historical narrative. The border, as image, idea, and concrete reality, produces a set of visualizing relationships that influence how we see and understand migration, the nation, labor, race, gender and other structuring paradigms. Focusing on the visual culture, film, art, and activism of the US-Mexico border we will think about the ways in which art and media produce, or resist, dominant ways of seeing that take place at the border.

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COMM 89.004: Environmental Communication and the Media
Gen Eds: SS, GL
MW, 01:25 PM – 02:40 PM
David Monje

Dr. David Monje’s research and teaching interests are in the environment, art, aesthetics and politics. He has travelled widely pursuing these interests and brings a broad perspective to the class. His interdisciplinary approach to teaching is informed by his education: he has BFA in painting, a BA in Linguistics, an MA in Communication and Society, and Ph.D. in Cultural Studies and Communication.

This seminar introduces first year students to the ways in which climate science, ecology and environmental science and climate change intersect with and are represented in politics, cultural artifacts, and the media. From television news, newspapers, and radio to social media such as Facebook and Twitter, climate change is a political, social, and cultural phenomenon. Climate change and global warming are also potentially consequential natural phenomena that scientists study, write about, and theorize about.

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Computer Science (COMP)

COMP 65H.001: Folding, from Paper to Proteins (Honors)
Gen Eds: PL
TTh, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Jack Snoeyink

Professor Jack Snoeyink (Ph.D. Stanford, 1990) works on computational geometry, which is a branch of the theory of computer science that designs and analyzes algorithms and data structures for problems best stated in geometry form. His main application areas are in terrain modeling in geographic information systems, molecular structure validation and improvement in biochemistry, as well as computational topology, computer graphics, and information visualization. A UNC professor since 2000, he spent 2015-2017 in the swamp, as a program director at the US National Science Foundation, and is glad to be back to his office full of puzzles.

Folding gives shape to paper, creating works of craft and art. Folding gives shape to proteins, which enable life. This is a class about shape and structure, explored through origami, mathematics, robotics, and molecular biology, and the many puzzle-like questions that we find in these areas. In addition to folding origami models and exploring the function of proteins, we will look at how to describe shapes and structures, how to design them, and how to think about the limits of design.

In addition to learning some skills and factoids that you can use to impress your friends (e.g., new paper airplanes, what to do with metro tickets, folding and cutting in the BEAM makerspace, and fascinating molecular machines), the underlying aim is to study the languages used to describe shape and changes to shape in origami, robotics, and molecular biology, and to introduce students to how to tackle research questions, ranging from toy mathematical puzzles to what is arguably the most important puzzle in science today: “How does the sequence of amino acids coded by a gene reliably fold into the three-dimensional structure to be a functioning protein?”

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Dramatic Art (DRAM)

DRAM 83.001: Spectacle in the Theatre
Gen Eds: VP
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
David Navalinsky

David Navalinsky is the Director of Undergraduate Production in the Department of Dramatic Art. David has taught at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Mississippi. David’s recent design work includes scenery for The Uncanny Valley by Francesca Talenti. The Uncanny Valley featured a Robothespian™, which is exactly what it sounds like. He has also written a documentary theatre piece Priceless Gem: An Athlete Story, which tells the stories of UNC athletes. David has worked professionally at South Coast Repertory in Orange County California, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, The Illinois Shakespeare Festival, and the Karamu Performing Arts Theatre in Cleveland, OH. Some of David’s favorite projects were at the Dallas Children’s Theater where he made a dinosaur collapse and pirates walk the plank.

This seminar will explore the artists, art and technology involved in creating the world of the play. It is intended as an overview for students who want to learn about theatrical design. Students will create their own designs in the areas of scenery, costumes, and lighting for three plays throughout the semester. The plays will be placed outside of their traditional setting while still maintaining the story and themes. Students have placed Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a trailer park and a daycare center for example. Careful historical research, close reading and analysis, text and source material, and collaboration will be the focus of the student projects.

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DRAM 87H.001: Style: A Mode of Expression (Honors)
Gen Eds: VP, CI, NA
MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM
McKay Coble

McKay Coble teaches design, both scenic and costume for the theatre and the history of material culture. She fell in love with the power of choice as far as visuals are concerned early in her career as a Carolina student and have never turned back. She is a professor in the Department of Dramatic Art and is a resident designer for PlayMakers Repertory Company. Dr. Coble uses the many and varied artistic venues on campus as co-instructors and the class will be visiting them during the course of the semester. Students will likely join her on a design journey as she created the scenery for a production for PRC. Students will have the opportunity to see the process and product.

This seminar studies the elements of design in their pure form and in context, surveys a history of period styles and theatre, and identifies their causes.

Consider Oscar Wilde’s statement from The Decay of Living 1889:

“Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life. This results not merely from Life’s imitative instincts, but from the fact that the self conscious aim of Life is to find expression, and that Art offers it certain beautiful forms through which it may realize that energy…”

Do you agree or disagree? Art and design have frequently shown the inner life of humankind throughout history better than political, intellectual or social history. While a period’s style is seldom defined by the everyday choices of everyday people and is most often recorded in the works of artists, writers and intellectuals we must recognize the “times” as a major motivator for all stylistic choices. Even minor arts reflect major events.

We will study the elements of design as they exist in their pure form; a “tool box” of elements available to artists and practice the principles to which design is bound. We will survey a history of period styles, period theatre and identify their causes. We will explore one period’s style as a foundation for the next and dispel the Star Trek premise that future styles will only reflect the future.

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Economics (ECON)

ECON 53.001: The Costs and Benefits of the Drug War
Gen Eds: SS
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Arthur Benavie

Arthur Benavie received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. He has been at UNC since 1967. His specialty is macroeconomic theory and policy. His book, Deficit Hysteria: A Common Sense Look at America’s Rush to Balance the Budget, was written for the general public. His most recent book is Social Security under the Gun. In his former life he was a concert violinist, and playing violin is now his main avocation.

The basic question examined in this seminar will be the costs and benefits of the U.S policy of drug prohibition. Does drug prohibition decrease drug abuse? Affect violence in our society? Aid terrorism? Diminish our civil liberties? Affect the public’s health? Corrupt public officials? Should drugs be decriminalized or legalized and if so, how? Should different illicit drugs be treated differently? What is the evidence in the United States and in other countries on decriminalization or legalization? Students will write a paper and present it in class, and prepare an interview with individuals who are on the frontline of the drug war, such as police or attorneys. As a seminar, classroom activity will consist of discussions and debates.

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ECON 57H.001: Engines of Innovation: the Entrepreneurial University in the 21st Century (Honors)
Gen Eds: SS, CI
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Buck Goldstein

Buck Goldstein is the University Entrepreneur in Residence and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Economics. Prior to returning to the University, Goldstein co-founded Information America, an online information company which was publicly traded and subsequently acquired by the Thomson Corporation. Subsequently, he was a partner in Mellon Ventures, the venture capital arm of Mellon Bank. He is the author, with Holden Thorp, of Engines of Innovation–The Entrepreneurial University in the 21st Century.

This class will explore the current state of American higher education and attempt to apply basic principles of entrepreneurship and the lean start up methodology to the problems facing our colleges and universities. The class will involve readings on current issues in higher education and the study of key concepts in innovation and entrepreneurship. Class teams will then develop and test novel approaches to some of the most important problems in higher ed. Small grants will be available to facilitate this process. The class will also participate in a series of symposiums on higher education. Speakers at the symposiums will also meet with the class.

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ECON 58.001: History of Financial Crisis, 1637-2013
Gen Eds: HS, NA
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
John Komlos

John Komlos is Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Munich (Germany). He also taught at Harvard, Duke and in Austria and Switzerland. Born in Budapest, he became a refugee during the revolution of 1956, and grew up in Chicago where he received Ph.D.s in both history and economics from the University of Chicago where Nobel-Prize winning economist Robert Fogel induced him to study the effect of economic processes on human biology. Komlos devoted most of his academic career developing this research agenda, which culminated in his founding the journal “Economics and Human Biology” in 2003.

Would you like to find out about the financial crisis of 2008? This seminar will discuss the reasons why the crisis happened, examine critically how the government responded to the crisis, and why it has been difficult for the economy to regain its pre-crisis momentum. We will also discuss the similarities between the Meltdown and other historical financial crisis. Students will gain a broader understanding of the global economy in which we live and work. In addition, the historical perspective will enable students to gain a more thorough appreciation of the challenges that lie ahead for their generation. The aim of the seminar is not to concentrate on facts but rather to comprehend the big picture of economic processes in their social and political context in a very long-run perspective. Lots of discussion, lots of audio visual material will make this an exciting way to start your college career.

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English and Comparative Literature (CMPL/ENGL)

CMPL 89.001: Curiosity and the Birth of the Imagination
Gen Eds: LA, WB
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Marsha Collins

Marsha S. Collins is Professor of Comparative Literature and Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education. Her research focuses on Early Modern Spanish Literature and Culture in the context of Early Modern Europe, Literature and the Visual Arts, and Idealizing Forms of Literature. She is the author of three books, most recently of “Imagining Arcadia in Renaissance Romance” (Routledge, 2016) and over thirty articles. She loves dogs, yoga, piano, travel, being at the ocean, and spending time with family and friends.
Today we tend to see curiosity and imagination as two peas in a very positive pod. Yet, although they have often been linked together, neither curiosity nor the imagination has always been viewed in such a favorable light. Pandora’s curiosity supposedly unleashed all ills and calamities upon the world. In the sixteenth century, Michel de Montaigne famously called the imagination a “runaway horse” and asserted that the imagination brings fevers and death to those who give it a free hand and encourage it. How did we get from Pandora’s calamitous curiosity and Montaigne’s death-dealing imagination to Epcot Center’s gleeful celebration of curiosity and the imagination? In this course, we will seek answers to this question by looking back in time to the thought and literature of classical antiquity and Early Modern Europe–to writings by Plato, Lucian, Cervantes, Shakespeare, and others.

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ENGL 52H.001: Computers and English Studies (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, CI
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Daniel Anderson

Daniel Anderson is currently wrapping up a book project—Screen Rhetoric and the Material World. He is also working steadily at developing a number of online sites geared toward making the social Web a composition space. The PIT Journal is one such site. It provides a space for undergraduate research while using technology to shift patterns of peer review and scholarly production. The best way to find out more about Daniel Anderson is to explore some of his other sites:
http://iamdananderson.net/professing/
http://thoughtpress.org/daniel/

In this class, you will learn about the ways that digital technologies are changing the study of language and literature. The main goals, however, are to become producers rather than consumers of digital materials. You will develop multiple projects with the aim of generating new knowledge about literary texts. You will also develop your skills in collaboration and multimedia composing. And you will explore your own imagination, taking risks and experimenting with what it means to develop and study creative works in the twenty-first century.

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ENGL 63.001: Banned Books – CANCELLED 11/13/2018
Gen Eds: LA, US
MW, 03:35 PM – 04:50 PM
Laura Halperin

Laura Halperin is an Assistant Professor of Latina/o Literature in the Department of English and Comparative Literature, and she is affiliated with the Department of American Studies and the Curriculum in Global Studies. She received her B.A. in Comparative Literature from Brown University and M.A. and Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She has experience teaching elementary school, junior high school, college, and graduate students. She currently is writing a book about representations of psychological, physical, and geopolitical harm in contemporary Latina literature. Her next book project will examine experiences Latinas/os have with the educational system in this country.

In this seminar, we will read Latina/o texts that have been banned in the United States; we will examine the rhetoric surrounding such censorship attempts; and we will focus on the relationship between the banning of the books and the constructions of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality within the works. We will pay close attention to the themes and language within the targeted books. Indeed, the bulk of the course will consist of literary analysis. Given that some of the most commonly cited reasons for censorship attempts revolve around concerns about “excessive” or “inappropriate” portrayals of violence, sexuality, or the occult, the course will be structured around these particular polemics. In the course, we will look to the contexts surrounding the censorship of the Latina/o texts that we will read and discuss. Considering that Latinas/os now comprise the largest minority population in this country, we will ask what the relationship might be between the attempts to remove Latina/o texts from grade school libraries and classrooms and the shifting demographics in the places where these books have been removed. Students will be evaluated based on a combination of written and oral work.

The seminar will be organized as a discussion course in which active participation will be key. The class will have large group and small group discussions and debates. Students will write essays during the semester, and, at the end of the semester, they will have the option of writing a research paper or putting together a creative project.

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ENGL 74.001: Epic/Anti-Epic in Western Literature
Gen Eds: LA, NA, WB
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Jessica Wolfe

Jessica Wolfe, a native New Yorker, was educated at Bryn Mawr, Cambridge, and Stanford, and she has been teaching at UNC since 1998. She is a literary and intellectual historian of early modern England and Europe with strong research interests in the history of biology and of the life sciences — the beginnings of modern geology, animal locomotion, magnetism (she’s even published on flea circuses in the Renaissance). She is an avid traveler and has taken recent trips to Armenia, Morocco, and France.

In this course, students will study epic and anti-epic strains in Western literature, reading key texts in the epic tradition from Homer and Virgil through the 20th century in light of various challenges to that tradition and tensions within it.

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ENGL 86.001: The Cities of Modernism
Gen Eds: LA, CI
MWF, 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM
Rebecka Rutledge Fisher

Rebecka Rutledge Fisher, associate professor of English and comparative literature and past director of the Program in Comparative Literature, has won a number of awards in student mentoring, and was, in spring 2017, named one of the “Carolina Women We Admire.” Her special interests are in the philosophy of literature as well as the critical philosophy of race, two subjects that are at the heart of her research and publications. She is the author of Habitations of the Veil: Metaphor and the Poetics of Black Being in African American Literature, has published an edition of Olaudah Equiano’s 18th century autobiography, and co-edited the volume Retrieving the Human: Reading Paul Gilroy, which was selected as recommended reading by the American Library Association’s Choice magazine. Her interest in the varied intersections of philosophy and literature encourages a synergy between academic work and personal worldview: she is especially drawn to beautiful works that delve into personal ethics, intellectual evolution, and inter-existence. She is currently writing a book (forthcoming from the University of South Carolina Press) on the Pulitzer Prize winning poet Natasha Trethewey, who served as Poet Laureate of the U.S. from 2012-2014.

The Cities of Modernism is a cross-cultural, inter-medial, and meta-critical exploration of the human condition in imagery of the “Great City” in modernist works of literature, art, and film. Numerous novels and poems of the early twentieth century, and even some appearing during the last decades of the nineteenth century, reflect the ways in which turn-of-the-century cities generated states of shock, exhilaration, alienation, anonymity, confusion, or thrill. Our work this semester will lead us to discover not only the origins of such sentiments as they are expressed through various works of art, but also the origins of – and theories behind –twentieth-century Western modernism itself.

In order to accomplish our goals, our source materials will be varied and diverse. Novels, poetry, and essays read will include texts – many in translation – by Arthur Rimbaud (French), Andrei Bely (Russian), W.E.B. Du Bois (African American), T.S. Eliot (British/Anglo-American), Jean Toomer (African American), and Virginia Woolf (British) and Aimé Césaire (Afro-French/Caribbean). Discussions of paintings by German expressionists and artists of the Harlem Renaissance, as well as screenings of films such as “Metropolis” by Fritz Lang and “Modern Times” by Charlie Chaplin will aid us in further developing a “visual literacy” with regard to modernism. Discussions will also draw upon contemporary theoretical essays by Walter Benjamin, W.E.B. Du Bois, Sigmund Freud, Georg Simmel, and Oswald Spengler. And, of course, since this period in history is also referred to as “The Jazz Age,” jazz music will serve as the “soundtrack” of our studies.

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ENGL 89.001: Contemporary Social Problems in Short Stories, the Social Sciences and the Press
Gen Eds: LA, CI
TTh, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Luc Bovens and Hilary Lithgow

Professor Luc Bovens is a core member of the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program. He works across a broad range of topics and issues spanning rationality, epistemology, morality and political philosophy.

Hilary Lithgow is interested in the value that literature can have for people in their everyday lives, and what literature might be able to show us about our lives that we might not otherwise be able to see. Hilary’s graduate work focused on Victorian and early twentieth century British literature, and on what a writer’s style tells us about his or her values and commitments. In doing that work, she got especially interested in the literature of war and the ways in which war experience shapes the writings of everyday soldiers from World War I to the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan; this semester’s first year seminar grows directly out of that interest. She holds two BA’s in English, one from Haverford College and the other from Oxford University, and a PhD in English from Stanford; her teaching has been recognized by multiple awards, including most recently the Joseph Flora Award here at UNC.

We will read works of short fiction from around the globe that address a range of social and political problems. The course addresses these issues from three angles. We will touch on topics that are prominent in the news today such as opiate addiction, arranged marriage, trafficking, bullying, social exclusion, charitable giving, implicit bias, and basic income. First, we read a short story that addresses the social or political issue. Second, we choose a recent and prominent study in the social sciences that addresses the issue. And third, we investigate how the issue is being reported in the press. Our goal will be to explore the different ways in which literature, social science and journalism construct issues of broad social and political relevance, the opportunities and limits of these constructions and what might be gained by using all three (rather than only one) to understand and respond to these issues.

Students may also register for this course under PHIL 89.001.

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ENGL 89.002: Dreaming America: The Federal Theatre Project
Gen Eds: VP, US
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Leslie Frost

Leslie Frost is the author of Dreaming America: Popular Front Ideals and Aesthetics in Children’s Plays of the Federal Theatre Project. Columbus: The Ohio State UP, 2013. Her academic work centers on visual and performing arts and American literature since 1900. She is currently working on a project centered on U.S. Post Office murals (one of which is in the Chapel Hill post office) of the New Deal. She teaches classes on drama and American literature; in 2017 she adapted Sinclair Lewis’s it Can’t Happen Here for a staged reading at Historic Playmakers Theatre that she cast and produced.

From 1935-1939, America had a national theater. Born of the Great Depression, the Federal Theatre Project (FTP) was a Works Projects Administration (WPA) program to put unemployed people back to work. With almost one-third of the nation unemployed, the FTP provided jobs to the out of work and cheap or free entertainment to a people struggling with the hardships of the economic depression.

In this class we will study plays of the Federal Theatre Project that immerse us in traditional and new American theatrical forms. We will visit regional theatre productions and archival materials held in the Southern Historical Collection at Wilson Library that detail Playmakers’ founder Frederick Koch’s work as Southern Regional Director of Federal Theatre. We will also study American culture in the 1930s to investigate the relationship between theatrical art, culture, and politics, connections powerfully displayed by federal theatre’s vested interest in America’s working and middle classes, social justice issues, modernist aesthetics, and contextualized by its stormy relationship with the government committees that would investigate its politics and, ultimately, cause its demise.

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ENGL 89.003: Scottish Gaelic Folksong and Vernacular Verse in the North American Diaspora – CANCELLED 12/3/2018
Gen Eds: US, CI
MWF, 08:00 AM – 08:50 AM
Tiber Falzett

Dr. Falzett has conducted over a decade of fieldwork with Scottish Gaelic speakers in Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada and the Outer Hebrides and West Highlands of Scotland. A fluent Scottish Gaelic speaker as well as a singer and bagpiper, Dr. Falzett has presented and performed from hearthsides and villages halls to national broadcast media in both Scotland and Canada. As an active folklorist and musician, he especially values opportunities to share the Scottish Gaelic language and its music with others and the power that both language and music hold in breaking down barriers and bringing people together.

In this seminar, we will delve into the treasure trove of Scottish Gaelic song tradition and vernacular verse transmitted and composed in the North American Diaspora, from the earliest surviving examples of verse made in Revolutionary eighteenth-century North Carolina to the living Scottish Gaelic song tradition in Cape Breton Island, Canada. Scottish Gaelic texts will be engaged in English translation and students will be encouraged to participate fully from discussing a text’s imagery to singing its choruses. Rooted in over four-centuries of oral tradition, these compositions give voice to a dynamic yet, to the outside observer, subaltern tradition of song-making carried across the Atlantic by emigrants and exiles from the eighteenth century onward. This large corpus of material that offers vivid insights into the experiences of Scottish Gaels in what are today the United States of America and Canada remains largely underexplored within the academy. This is in-spite of the fact that it offers some of the earliest examples of poetic expression among minoritized immigrant groups in the continent. Key concepts to be explored will include oral and literary frameworks of representation, the function, performance and transmission of song and verse in the social world, and the methods of documentation and collection of oral texts that by the mid-twentieth century became increasingly endangered with rapid attrition of the Gaelic language as the vital force in expressing everyday experience. At its heart, this verse was composed to be sung and shared at the communal level, representing a poetic lifeblood that gives voice to Scottish Gaelic experience over generations in which the lines between composer, performer, and audience were often blurred. For this reason, the texts examined will be placed in the functional contexts of their oral performance by engaging archival recordings made in the twentieth century. Attention will also be given to the popularization of these rooted songs now performed globally from commercial recordings that top the record charts to soundtracks for feature-length films. Ultimately, this unique body of knowledge represents an unparalleled literary inheritance that has been both highly valued and devotedly maintained in the collective memory of Scottish Gaelic-speaking communities on both sides of the Atlantic.

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Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 50.001: Mountain Environments
Gen Eds: PL
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Diego Riveros-Iregui

Dr. Riveros-Iregui received a Ph.D. in Ecology and Environmental Sciences from Montana State University (2008), a M.S. in Geology from the University of Minnesota (2004), and a B.S. in Geology from the National University of Colombia (1999). His research interests include watershed science, forest and soil processes, ecosystem ecology, and landscape biophysical responses to environmental change. His field studies include highly impacted sites of the Andes Mountains of Colombia and the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador. He publishes in journals such as Global Change Biology, Water Resources Research, and Geophysical Research Letters. He is an avid runner and can be followed on Twitter @carbonshed.

This seminar focuses on understanding the physical geography of mountain environments and the processes that have created them, shaped them, and sustained them. There are several reasons for studying the environments of mountains: (a) they reveal integrative earth systems processes that can be readily observed and understood; (b) the processes are not oversimplified, but have spatial complexity at scales that can be methodically analyzed; and (c) mountains often reveal the intricate dynamics of coupled human-natural systems. We will explore mountain environments by concentrating on processes that shape the landscape, patterns that are apparent because of those active processes, and how the concept of scale (both through space and time) define the patterns that we observe when go on a hike or when we drive across the country. We will draw examples from different environments, including the Appalachian Mountains, the Rocky Mountains, and the Andes.

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GEOG 56.001: Local Places in a Globalizing World
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTh, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Altha Cravey

Altha Cravey became a geographer because she loves to travel and see new things. Her research focuses on globalization, labor, and gender issues in contemporary Mexico. She is beginning to publish on globalization in the US South as well. Cravey was born and raised in Illinois and Indiana and worked as a construction electrician for eleven years before finishing her undergraduate education. Her dissertation at the University of Iowa was supported by a four-year Iowa Fellowship and was published as Women and Work in Mexico’s Maquiladoras (Rowman and Littlefield, 1998). Cravey loves to bicycle around campus and Chapel Hill.

Globalization is a word we hear every day, but what does it mean for us in local places? Specifically, what can an understanding of globalization tell us about Carolina and nearby places? This seminar weaves together perspectives on globalization with hands-on exploration of Carolina and its place in today’s global “knowledge economy,” and the University’s founding in relation to the globalizing forces of that day. Our focus will shift back and forth between the global and the local, even to the microscale of our campus. We will learn through a variety of experiences and approaches, including fieldwork, old documents, and some introductory GIS (geographic information systems) exercises in addition to readings, class discussion, and group work. By the end of the seminar, students will not only have an understanding of globalization and the very real connections between the global and the local, but also a unique perspective on our university.

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Geological Sciences (GEOL)

GEOL 76.001: Energy Resources for a Hungry Planet
Gen Eds: PL
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
José Rial

José Rial has a Ph.D. in Geophysics from Cal Tech and a MSc. in Geology from the University of Michigan. Rial’s expertise includes mathematical modeling of natural systems, seismic wave propagation and climatology. In recent years Rial’s academic interests include the role of science and scientific discovery on global environmental issues, such as global warming, climate change and policy.

The seminar first describes today’s fundamental sources of energy: oil, natural gas and coal, how and where to find them, and the latest statistics on how long the present reserves will last. We will then explore alternative energy resources and why it is so important for society to understand that fossil fuel reserves are finite, and will be depleted in 40 years (cheap oil) or in 200 years (coal). The course stimulates student participation through class debates (e.g., Can nuclear energy become a viable and safe substitute for coal?, Is the current US energy policy a threat to national security?).

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German and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)

GSLL 51.001: Stalin and Hitler: Historical Issues in Cultural and Other Perspectives
Gen Eds: HS, GL
TTh, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
David Pike

David Pike received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1978 in German Studies with a minor in Russian and has taught at UNC–CH since 1980. He is the author of three books, The Politics of Culture in Soviet -Occupied Germany, 1945-1949 (1993), Lukács and Brecht (1985), and German Writers in Soviet Exile, 1933-1945 (1982). His research takes him regularly to Berlin and Moscow.

This course deals with critical issues, in the broadest possible context, that dominated the twentieth century: the rise of fascism out of the carnage of World War One and the Bolshevik revolution to which the war and Czarist Russia’s involvement in it helped contribute. As the semester unfolds, drawing on a variety of historical and documentary films, and literature (memoirs, novels), we will take a comparative look at singular personalities like Lenin, Stalin and Hitler and examine the role played by such key figures in historical events of this magnitude. More towards the end of the semester, we glance briefly at the situation created in Western and Eastern Europe by the defeat of fascism and contemplate the origins and evolution of the cold war. We conclude with a consideration of the dissolution and democratization of Eastern European countries, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and, against the tragic background of the past, the recent reemergence of conflict between Russia and the “West.”

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GSLL 55.001: Fantasies of Rome: Gladiators, Senators, Soothsayers, and Caesars
Gen Eds: HS, CI, WB
MWF, 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM
Clayton Koelb

Clayton Koelb is Guy B. Johnson Distinguished Professor of German and Professor of English and Comparative Literature. Before coming to Carolina he was Professor of German and Comparative Literature at the University of Chicago, and he has been visiting Professor at Purdue, Minnesota, and Princeton. He has published many books on literary history and literary theory, including two that are especially relevant to this course: The Incredulous Reader, which deals with the issue of why we like stories we might not believe; and Legendary Figures, which examines the depiction of ancient history in modern novels.

Introduces students to study of humanities by examining how the idea of Rome evolved through poetry, history, philosophy, opera, even forgery into a concept that has long outlasted the Romans. Previously offered as GERM 55.

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History (HIST)

HIST 53.001: Traveling to European Cities: American Writers/Cultural Identities, 1830-1930
Gen Eds: HS, NA
TTh, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Lloyd Kramer

Lloyd Kramer’s interests focus on Modern European History with an emphasis on nineteenth-century France and French-American cultural relations. He is particularly interested in historical processes that shape personal and collective identities, including the experiences of cross-cultural exchange and the emergence of modern nationalism. Other research and teaching interests deal with the roles of intellectuals in modern societies and the theoretical foundations of historical knowledge. His teaching stresses the pleasures of reading, discussing and writing about influential books in various eras of European and world history.

This seminar examines two key themes in modern cultural and intellectual history: the importance of travel in the lives and cultural identities of American writers and the important role of European cities in the evolution of modern American cultural identities. We shall focus on a historical era in which American writers were especially drawn to Europe as an alternative to the social and cultural life in the United States; and we’ll discuss how the encounter with Europe influenced these writers as they defined their national identities as well as their views of politics, social relations, gender identities, literature, art and Western cultural traditions. The seminar is based on the assumption that travel has become one of the most influential personal experiences in modern times. In short, we shall explore the connection between travel, writing and personal identities. This is a class for people who like to read about personal experiences and are intrigued by foreign travel. The assigned texts include works by women and men such as Margaret Fuller, Mark Twain, Henry James, Edith Wharton, Gertrude Stein and Ernest Hemingway; and the cities we’ll discuss include Paris, London, Rome, Venice and Athens.

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HIST 72H.001: Women’s Voices: 20th-Century European History in Female Memory (Honors)
Gen Eds: HS, CI, NA
M, 03:35 PM – 06:05 PM
Karen Hagemann

Karen Hagemann is the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of History and Adjunct Professor of the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense. She published widely in Modern German, European and Transatlantic history combing political, social, cultural and military history with women’s and gender history. Her most recent monograph is Revisiting Prussia’s Wars against Napoleon: History, Culture, and Memory (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Currently she is finishing as the general editor the work on the Oxford Handbook on Gender, War and the Western World since 1600. (http://history.unc.edu/people/faculty/karen-hagemann/) and (https://hagemann.web.unc.edu/)

The seminar examines twentieth century European history through the lens of women’s autobiographical writings. It explores women’s voices from different generational, social and national backgrounds, who all tried to make a difference in society and politics: Emmeline Pankhurst (1958-1928), a leader of the militant British suffragette movement; Alice Salomon (1872-1948), a liberal Jewish-German social reformer and activist of the German middle class women’s movement; Vera Brittain (1893-1970), a British volunteer nurse during World War I, who became after the war a peace activist and writer; Toni Sender (1888-1964), a German-Jewish socialist and one of the first female parliamentarians in Weimar Germany, who like Salomon after the Nazi’s takeover in 1933 had to flee Germany; Genevieve De Gaulle-Anthonioz (1920-2002), a French resistance fighter during World War II and a survivor of the women’s concentration camp Ravensbrück; and Ruth Klüger (1931-), an Austrian-Jewish student who survived Auschwitz and became a professor in the U.S. The overarching theme of the seminar is the struggle of women for equal economic, social and political rights. We will explore what effects social and political changes, revolutions and wars as well as the Holocaust had on this struggle and the lives of women in Europe more general. Through intensive discussions of the reading in class, group work and the opportunity to do research on the female autobiography of their own choice, the seminar offers students a unique approach to twentieth century European history.

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HIST 76.001: Understanding 1492
Gen Eds: HS, WB
TTh, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Kathryn Burns

Kathryn Burns first became interested in the colonial Andes while on a junior semester of study abroad. She has been returning to Peru ever since, especially to Lima and Cuzco. Her most recent book is about writing technologies and power in colonial Peru. She has been teaching Latin American history for over fifteen years, first at the University of Florida in Gainesville, and since 2000 in UNC’s History Department.

This seminar addresses one of the most challenging topics in American and Latin American history: how to understand what is often called simply “the conquest,” la conquista. For nineteenth-century historians writing in English and Spanish, it was a relatively clear-cut matter of epic battles and conquistadores. Spaniards won in a walkover; the “bronze race” suffered tragic defeat. Today, the conquest (or encounter, or invasion) no longer looks this way to historians. New sources, methods, and approaches have taken the field. Yet as our perspectives shift, our histories of la conquista still elicit strong feelings. Why? What’s at stake in the narration of this charged history? Whose versions of events tend to dominate? In this seminar, we will pay close attention to the sources for understanding the past, and to ways of narrating it. Students will explore the Wilson Library’s remarkable Flatow Collection of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century chronicles, and handle documents from the Manuscript Division’s holdings from colonial Popayán. Students will be expected to write frequent responses to our sources, participate in class discussions, and craft a final essay on a topic of particular interest.

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Information and Library Science (INLS)

INLS 73.001: Smart Cities
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Arcot Rajasekar

Arcot Rajasekar is a Professor in the School of Library and Information Sciences, a Chief Scientist at the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) and co-Director of Data Intensive Cyber Environments (DICE) Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A leading proponent of policy-oriented large-scale data management, Rajasekar has several research projects funded by the NSF, NARA, NIH and other funding agencies. Rajasekar has a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Maryland at College Park and has more than 100 publications in the areas of data grids, digital library, persistent archives, logic programming and artificial intelligence. His latest projects include the Datanet Federation Consortium and the Data Bridge that is building a social network platform for scientific data.

A smart city is one where the needs of a populace meet the needs of environmental sustainability. The balance between the social and environmental issues is governed by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) that power a smart city infrastructure. In this course, we learn about the influence of urban networks, smart city urban planning, energy as a catalyst of sustainable development, smart city infrastructure, sustainable transportation, flow of information and communications, smart grids, digital infrastructure and the role of data and information technology. We will discuss criteria for measuring the smartness of a city, including quality of life, citizen governance, and discuss issues that go towards the making of a future smart city. Several case studies will be presented with guest lecturers invited to present on critical thinking and practices in smart city development.

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Institute for the Study of the Americas (LTAM)

LTAM 89.001: The United States and Cuba
Gen Eds: HS, GL
T, 03:30 PM – 06:15 PM
Louis Pérez

Louis Pérez – Principal teaching fields include twentieth-century Latin America, the Caribbean, and Cuba. Recent publications include: Cuba and the United States: Ties of Singular Intimacy, 1770s-1980s (3rd ed., Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2003); Cuba: Between Reform and Revolution (5th ed., New York: Oxford University Press, 2014); On Becoming Cuban: Identity, Nationality and Culture (2nd ed., Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2007); Cuba in the American Imagination: Metaphor and the Imperial Ethos (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008): The Structure of Cuban History: Meaning and Purpose of the Past (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013). Pérez has served on a number of journal editorial boards, including: Inter-American Economic Affairs, Latin American Research Review, The Americas, and the American Historical Review. He is presently the series editor of “Envisioning Cuba” at the University of North Carolina Press.

LTAM 89 will examine the multiple-faceted and often conflict-ridden relationship between the United States and Cuba. Each country entered the imagination of the other at decisive moments during nineteenth-century national formation. Cuba developed into an object of U.S. obsession, as the United States expanded onto the Gulf of Mexico during the early decades of the 19th century, whereupon American political leaders contemplated the incorporation of Cuba into the U.S. national system a matter of national interest. Cuba, on the other hand, contemplated a different destiny, one based on national sovereignty and self-determination, sentiments that sustained the Cuban pursuit of independence through the second half of the 19th century. These have developed into the principal undercurrents of U.S.-Cuba relations: U.S. resolve to possess Cuba and the Cuban determination to resist possession.

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Marine Sciences (MASC)

MASC 51.001: Global Warming: Science, Social Impacts, Solutions
Gen Eds: PL, QI
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Marc Alperin

Dr. Alperin’s work involves the use of stable isotopes as natural tracers of sedimentary processes. He is particularly interested in carbon cycling in coastal sediments and its role in the global carbon budget. Recent projects have included studies of the biogeochemistry of organic compounds dissolved in sediment pore waters, the fate of organic matter deposited on the seafloor, anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments, and the effects of dissolved organic nitrogen and carbon in atmospheric precipitation on coastal ecosystems. Dr. Alperin also co-leads the CHAOS Biogeochemistry Laboratories.

Students will examine evidence that human activity has caused global warming, investigate scientists’ ability to predict climate change, and discuss the political and social dimensions of global climate change.

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MASC 53.001: The Ends of the Earth: Polar Oceanography and Exploration
Gen Eds: PL
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Carol Arnosti

Carol Arnosti grew up in Wisconsin, where she developed an early appreciation for snow and ice. As an undergraduate at Lawrence University, she majored in chemistry, studied history, and played intercollegiate basketball. After completing a Ph.D. in oceanography at M.I.T. and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, she went to the Max-Planck Institute in Bremen, Germany, where she rapidly became involved in a new project investigating microbial life at low temperatures. Continued involvement in this project since moving to Chapel Hill in 1995 has led to repeated research work in the Arctic as well as a trip to Antarctica, and a permanent case of ‘Polar Fever’.

What explains the ‘pull of the Poles’? What motivated early explorers to undergo great hardships to investigate the Arctic and Antarctic, and what did they discover about these regions? What have we discovered in the intervening decades, and what do we still not understand about polar regions? Why do the Arctic and Antarctic play such a critical role in global climate? This seminar will combine scientific and historical perspectives to investigate the ‘ends of the earth’, the Arctic and Antarctica. We will begin by surveying the geography and oceanography of these regions, and then step back into the past and follow in the footsteps of some of the early polar explorers by reading their own accounts of their explorations. Modern accounts will help us compare and contrast these early explorations. The seminar will also include readings and discussions about current questions and problems of the polar regions, in particular human impacts and potential effects of global warming. Class discussions, short writing assignments, a term paper, and group presentations will be used to hone critical thinking and communication skills, and to help develop both scientific and historical understanding of these unique regions of the earth.

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Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 60.001: Simulated Life
Gen Eds: QI
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Laura A. Miller

Laura A. Miller (PhD, NYU) is Associate Professor of Mathematics and Biology. Using her training in both mathematics and biology, she applies mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamics to better understand how organisms interact with their environments. Her current research interests include topics such as the aerodynamics of insect flight, the group behavior of pulsing corals, the fluid dynamics of jellyfish swimming, and the mechanical properties of trees that allow them to withstand hurricane force winds. Outside of the lab, Miller enjoys horseback riding, rowing, and scuba diving.

The focus of this semester’s Simulated Life seminar will be on organisms living within moving fluids. The natural world is replete with examples of animals and plants whose shape influences flow to their benefit. For example, the shape of a maple seed generates lift to allow for farther dispersal. The structure of a pinecone helps it to filter pollen from the air. A falcon’s form during a dive reduces drag and allows it to reach greater speeds.

We will mathematically describe the shape of organisms using 3D computer aided design (CAD). We will use the 3D objects in numerical simulations of flow around an organism. We will also 3D print these objects and place them inside flow tanks for comparison to simulation.

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Create 3D models of organs and organisms.
  • Run numerical simulations on a remote cluster.
  • Explain how the flow around an organism can be important to feeding, nutrient exchange, dispersal, and survivability.
  • Visualize flows experimentally and using numerically generated data.

The goals of this course are not specifically to:

  • Provide an introduction to numerical analysis.
  • Learn the detailed mathematics behind computer-aided design.
  • Teach students how to code.

Other Opportunities in Mathematics

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Music (MUSC)

MUSC 65.001: Music and Culture: Understanding the World through Music
Gen Eds: VP, NA
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Anne MacNeil

Before joining the faculty at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where she holds appointments in the Department of Music and the Department of English and Comparative Literatures, Professor Anne MacNeil taught at Northwestern University and the University of Texas at Austin. Her areas of specialization include Renaissance music, music and spectacle, commedia dell’arte, opera, performance studies, historiography, and digital humanities. Her current research encompasses digital humanities, the use of boats, barges, and waterways as venues for musical and theatrical performance in and around Renaissance Mantua; early-modern laments; operatic settings of tales of the Trojan Wars; and the intersections of music, ceremony, and biography in the lives of Isabella d’Este, Margherita Farnese, and Eleonora de’ Medici. Professor MacNeil is Co-Director of the international consortium IDEA: Isabella d’Este Archive (https://isabelladeste.web.unc.edu), an interdisciplinary digital humanities environment for studies relating to Isabella d’Este (1474-1539).

This seminar focuses on the variety of performances presented by Carolina Performing Arts at Memorial Hall. Through attendance at performances and through research on the performing artists and the works being performed, students explore questions such as, How does music reflect culture? How does the culture shape the art form?

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Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD)

PWAD 69.001: Wars and Veterans: Iran, Iraq, and Afghanistan
Gen Eds: LA, CI, GL
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Claudia Yaghoobi

Claudia Yaghoobi is a Roshan Institute Assistant Professor in Persian Studies in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She teaches courses on Middle Eastern and Persian Literature. Yaghoobi’s recent publications include “Yusuf’s Queer Beauty in Persian Cultural Productions”, Comparatist (2016); “Socially Peripheral, Symbolically Central: Sima in Behrouz Afkhami’s Showkaran”, Journal of Asian Cinema (2016); “Subjectivity in ʿAṭṭār’s Shaykh San’an Story in The Conference of the Birds”, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture (2014); and “Sexual Trauma and Spiritual Experience: Rabiʿa al-ʿAdawiyya and Margery Kempe”, Persian Literary Studies Journal (2014). Her book, Subjectivity in ‘Attar, Persian Sufism, and European Mysticism, will be released in May 2017 by Purdue University Press.

In this course, we will explore the various ways that wars and conflicts, particularly Iran-Iraq, U.S.-Iraq, and U.S.-Afghanistan wars, have been portrayed in literature, film, and photography. We will attempt to deepen and enrich our understanding of war experienced by both veterans and civilians of each country. We will examine the impact of war on the human psyche in regards with violence. We will read books by American war veterans and Middle East authors contemplating the wars and their consequences. We will look at each writer’s perspective on war and their interpretation of it comparatively. In order to enhance our understanding of the phenomenon of war, we will also read supplementary articles on criticism of war and a few on psychology of war. There will be film screening on these wars which will give students the opportunity to examine these wars in a different medium than just literature. We will also look at war photography and analyze the perspectives of each photographer and the impact war has not only on people who are involved but on outside observers as well. All readings will be in English. The class will be conducted in the form of a combination of lectures, discussion, and experimentations.

Students may also register for this course under ASIA 69.001.

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Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 89.001: Contemporary Social Problems in Short Stories, the Social Sciences and the Press
Gen Eds: LA, CI
TTh, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Luc Bovens and Hilary Lithgow

Professor Luc Bovens is a core member of the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program. He works across a broad range of topics and issues spanning rationality, epistemology, morality and political philosophy.

Hilary Lithgow is interested in the value that literature can have for people in their everyday lives, and what literature might be able to show us about our lives that we might not otherwise be able to see. Hilary’s graduate work focused on Victorian and early twentieth century British literature, and on what a writer’s style tells us about his or her values and commitments. In doing that work, she got especially interested in the literature of war and the ways in which war experience shapes the writings of everyday soldiers from World War I to the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan; this semester’s first year seminar grows directly out of that interest. She holds two BA’s in English, one from Haverford College and the other from Oxford University, and a PhD in English from Stanford; her teaching has been recognized by multiple awards, including most recently the Joseph Flora Award here at UNC.

We will read works of short fiction from around the globe that address a range of social and political problems. The course addresses these issues from three angles. We will touch on topics that are prominent in the news today such as opiate addiction, arranged marriage, trafficking, bullying, social exclusion, charitable giving, implicit bias, and basic income. First, we read a short story that addresses the social or political issue. Second, we choose a recent and prominent study in the social sciences that addresses the issue. And third, we investigate how the issue is being reported in the press. Our goal will be to explore the different ways in which literature, social science and journalism construct issues of broad social and political relevance, the opportunities and limits of these constructions and what might be gained by using all three (rather than only one) to understand and respond to these issues.

Students may also register for this course under ENGL 89.001.

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PHIL 89.002: Philosophy With Children
Gen Eds: PH, EE-service learning
TTh, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Steven Swartzer

Steven Swartzer is a Teaching Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Outreach Director for the Parr Center for Ethics. Prof. Swartzer’s research focuses on the philosophy of punishment, with an emphasis on philosophical and ethical questions raised by racial injustice and mass incarceration in the US. Prof. Swartzer is also excited about working to promote philosophy in the community (especially with children and teens); he holds a key leadership role in the National High School Ethics Bowl program, and serves on the American Philosophical Association’s Committee on Pre-College Instruction in Philosophy.

This experiential education course provides a unique perspective on philosophical inquiry. Participants will examine the philosophy of childhood and participate in off-campus philosophy sessions with local youth about a range of topics, with an emphasis on ethics and values. We will use children’s literature, play, and other activities to generate guided conversations about important values—perhaps, including friendship, respect, fairness, gratitude, and justice. We will also discuss big and interesting questions, such as: What makes us who we are? and How can we know that we are not in a dream, right now? By helping local youth learn how to engage in philosophical exploration, participants will take an active role in their own philosophical learning, thereby deepening their own understanding of philosophical issues, and gaining insights into the extent to which young people are capable of philosophical reflection and moral reasoning.

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Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)

PHYS 53.001: Handcrafting in the Nanoworld: Building Models and Manipulating Molecules
Gen Eds: PL
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Michael R. Falvo

Michael R. Falvo is a Research Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. He received his BS in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1991, and his PhD in physics from UNC-CH in 1997. He is a former winner of the UNC Student Undergraduate Teaching Award presented annually to three professors by the undergraduate student body, and is a member of the UNC Academy of Distinguished Teaching Scholars. His current research focuses is on the physics of proteins and cells. He stretches, pokes and prods nanometer scale biological systems such as viruses, biopolymer strands, and individual protein molecules to test their mechanical properties. Falvo has a long-standing interest in science outreach and frequently presents workshops for the public and k-12 teachers. He has also co-authored two books on nanoscience for middle school science teachers.

The nanoworld is a strange and captivating place. It is a world of molecules vibrating trillions of times a second, quantum dots emitting rainbow colors, DNA encoding information in molecular bonds, and protein motors driving the complex machinery of the cell. At this scale, nature has unique rules and behaviors, some of which are amazing and unexpected. We are still uncovering these rules, and are only beginning to apply this new knowledge to technology. Can we build molecular machines that cure disease or clean up the environment? Can we make computers using single molecule transistors? How do viruses and other bio systems “assemble” themselves? In this seminar, we dive into the basic physics, chemistry and biology that describe the nanometer scale world. We will also try to distinguish the true promise of nanoscience from the hype. Students will engage in class discussions informed by their weekly reading of selected scientific literature. They will also participate in small group projects building physical models of nanoscale objects and phenomena, and perform calculations to gain a quantitative understanding of the physics underlying the nanoworld. No prerequisite is required for this course, but a spirit of adventure is.

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Political Science (POLI)

POLI 66.001: The United States and the European Union: Partners or Rivals?
Gen Eds: SS
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Gary Marks

Gary Marks is Burton Craige Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and Robert Schuman Fellow at the European University Institute, Florence. Marks founded and directed the Center for European Studies in Chapel Hill. His research is chiefly in the fields of European and comparative politics, measurement, international organization, and multilevel governance. In 2010 he was awarded a Humboldt Research Prize and he was the recipient of a $4 million research grant from the European Research Council. In 2017 he received the Daniel Elazar Distinguished Federalism Scholar Award of the APSA. Marks’ recent publications include A Postfunctionalist theory of Governance: Measuring Regional Authority (Oxford University Press 2016); Community, Scale and Regional Governance (OUP 2016); and Measuring International Authority (OUP 2017).

This course explores basic issues in the politics and political conflict in the European Union and the United States. In part one we inquire into some basic features of political development. Why did Britain and Germany follow different paths to democracy? How do democratic institutions work differently across liberal democracies? What does Left/Right mean, and how has this changed over time? Why did socialism fail in the United States?

In part two we focus on the European Union and the United States. Why was the European Union created, how does it work, and how can one make sense of its evolution? Both the EU and the US are highly decentralized polities. Both have a strong separation of powers in the center. How is lawmaking in the EU and the US similar? How is it different?

In recent years, both the US and the EU have been riven by cultural issues, including immigration and trade. How has this affected domestic politics and policy? In the light of this, what are the causes and consequences of Brexit and the Euro-crisis?

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Psychology and Neuroscience (PSYC)

PSYC 89.001: Methods of Detection
Gen Eds: SS, EE-field work
MWF, 01:25 PM – 02:15 PM
Marsha Penner and Michelle Robinson

Marsha Penner is a Teaching Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience. She is devoted to teaching undergraduate students about the brain, and has experience utilizing neuroscience-themed escape rooms as a teaching device.

Michelle Robinson is an Associate Professor in the Department of American Studies. Her book Dreams for Dead Bodies: Blackness, Labor, and the Corpus of American Detective Fiction (U Michigan 2016) studies the origins of the literary devices we associate with detective fiction.

Not only do paperbacks like Gone Girl and television mega-franchises like Law & Order invite their audiences to perform extraordinary feats of detection, they also communicate information about the cognitive processes that make mystery solving possible. Both literary theorists and behavioral neuroscientists have developed models that explain the ways detection–the accumulation and logical assembly of clues and evidence to solve mysteries—takes place. Our course merges neuroscience and literary studies by exploring how the brain permits puzzle solving while we study how detection fictions take advantage of and represent this cognitive work. Students will learn the fundamentals of behavioral neuroscience and engage as active readers of puzzle mysteries who can deconstruct the pieces of the fictional puzzle. Students will integrate neuroscience and detective fiction by building an original “Escape Room”. These “Escape Rooms” will engage local audiences in puzzle solving and teach non-specialists core concepts about behavioral neuroscience.

Students may also register for this course under AMST 89.001.

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PSYC 89.002: Talking about Numbers: Communicating Research Results to Others
Gen Eds: PL, QI
MW, 10:10 AM – 11:25 AM
Viji Sathy

Viji Sathy is an award-winning Teaching Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill teaching the very classes she credits for charting her own professional career in Quantitative Psychology: statistics and research methods. Professor Sathy is also the Program Evaluator of the of the Chancellor’s Science Scholars a program aimed at increasing representation of underrepresented students in STEM PhDs. She is engaged in numerous activities on campus using data-driven techniques to promote student success. She leads faculty development workshops around the country on active learning as well as inclusified classrooms in an effort to broaden participation in the sciences. She was born in India but grew up in a small town in NC and is a proud recipient of public education (K-PhD) in NC, with three degrees from UNC-Chapel Hill.

How do you persuade others with numbers? What general principles should you think about when sharing data with others? What are the common biases and fallacies that we have in understanding numbers and statistics? How do you figure out if you should trust results from research studies reported in the media? This seminar introduces students to the many ways that data are reported to the public in our everyday lives-through advertising and media as well as scientific journal articles. Students in this course will create models in the BeAM spaces on campus that will help make abstract topics about numbers more concrete. Students will learn practical skills that will be useful in subsequent classes at Carolina and after graduation (e.g., in graduate school, in work, as a consumer, as a citizen).

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PSYC 89H.001: Critical Thinking for Psychology and Beyond: How to use Your Brain (Honors)
Gen Eds: SS
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Jonathan Abramowitz

Dr. Abramowitz studies psychological processes and cognitive-behavioral treatment of anxiety disorders, especially obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and health-related anxiety.

Critical thinking is the ability (and willingness) to assess claims and make objective judgments on the basis of well-supported reasons. It is the ability to look for flaws in arguments and resist claims that have weak supporting evidence (or none at all). Critical thinking is not simply negative thinking; it fosters the ability to be creative and constructive, generate solutions, think of implications, and apply knowledge to a broad range of social and personal problems. Critical thinking skills are essential to success as a student, in your career, as a consumer of goods and services, and in many other areas of your life.

This course focuses on the development of critical thinking skills, especially as they relate to psychological science. The field of mental health is loaded with theories and interventions—some of them scientifically and logically valid, and others not. Critical thinking is a must if one is to successfully learn about how psychological knowledge is created, evaluated, and applied. In addition to learning basic skills of logic, students in this Honors First Year Seminar will learn about the logic of the scientific method and the common errors of human cognition that impede critical thinking. We will emphasize the application of critical thinking skills to psychological phenomena and claims about abnormal behavior and its treatment. Students will learn by discussing and writing effective arguments, analyzing the writings of others and evaluating their claims, exploring contemporary controversies within and beyond psychology, and interacting with members of the class regarding the weekly topics.

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Public Policy (PLCY)

PLCY 54.001: U.S. Immigration
Gen Eds: SS, US
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Joaquín Rubalcaba

Joaquín Alfredo-Angel Rubalcaba is an assistant professor in the Department of Public Policy at UNC Chapel Hill. Dr. Rubalcaba received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of New Mexico and is an alumnus of the RWJF doctoral fellows program. His areas of interests broadly include health and labor economics. Specifically, he has explored the health and labor market outcomes among underrepresented and disadvantaged communities, while developing new empirical techniques to investigate the economic mechanisms and public policies driving these outcomes.

Currently, Dr. Rubalcaba’s research addresses the role of public policy in the overall socioeconomic wellbeing of immigrant communities. In this line of research, he investigates how policies such as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and the Real ID Act have impacted labor supply behavior and health insurance coverage. In another line of research, Dr. Rubalcaba is exploring new empirical techniques to estimate economic values. This particular research has demonstrated an empirically tractable method to assign economic value to health conditions, such as diabetes, ultimately increasing the economic tools used to inform policy decisions.

This seminar provides students with an opportunity to discuss current topics in United States immigration. Students will explore theories of migration, acculturation and assimilation, and the ways in which policies influence the well-being of immigrants.

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PLCY 80.001: Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Economic Growth
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Maryann Feldman

Maryann Feldman is Carolina’s S.K. Heninger Distinguished Professor of Public Policy, adjunct Professor of Finance at Kenan Flagler Business School and Research Fellow at the Kenan Institute for Private Enterprise. She has also taught at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Toronto. She attained her Ph.D. in Economics at Carnegie-Mellon University and is author of more than 80 academic articles, 2 books, and 9 edited volumes. Her work focuses on the spatial distribution of economic activity and understanding the factors that contribute to making certain places economically vibrant and creative. Her most recent work explores place-based economic processes that contribute to emerging industries, entrepreneurship and regional transformation. She is currently researching the industrial genesis of the Research Triangle Region.

This seminar provides an introduction to entrepreneurship and innovation with a focus on their geographic concentration in specific places. Using the Research Triangle region as our laboratory, this course will consider how regional economies are transformed through innovation and entrepreneurship. The course emphasizes entrepreneurs as part of a larger societal system that both determines what is possible and also changes in response to entrepreneurial actions. The role of public policy in providing incentives for entrepreneurship and innovation and setting social priorities is discussed. Wednesday sessions will be devoted to using data analytics to examine trends in innovation, entrepreneurship and places.

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PLCY 89.001: America’s Labor Market
Gen Eds: SS
MW, 01:25 PM – 02:40 PM
Jeremy Moulton

Dr. Moulton received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California, Davis and works in the fields of public and labor economics. His research primarily utilizes public policy shocks as “natural experiments” to investigate labor market outcomes, retirement decision-making, the intergenerational transmission of wealth and education, and the real estate market. Jeremy has published papers that investigate the extent to which people leave the labor force when they lose eligibility for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), whether people can marry a more educated spouse if they increase their own education using variation in education caused by the World War II G.I. Bill, whether lower healthcare costs caused by Medicare Part-D pushed people to enter self-employment, the long-run impact of entering the labor market during the Great Depression, and the impact of property tax exemptions on real estate prices using a ballot initiative in Virginia.

The course will familiarize students with the major public policies and movements affecting the American labor market. Students will learn how each of the following impacts the labor market: education, the minimum wage, Social Security, pensions, unions, unemployment insurance, welfare (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, TANF), income taxes (including the Earned Income Tax Credit, EITC), self-employment, immigration, automation, and the gig economy. The course uses news articles, policy summaries, podcasts, and academic journal articles to help students learn the many theoretical and political viewpoints associated with each topic.

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Religious Studies (RELI)

RELI 80.001: Religion and Writing in the Ancient World
Gen Eds: HS, WB
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Joseph Lam

Joseph Lam is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies. He received his Ph.D. (with Honors) from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. His research focuses on ancient Near Eastern religious texts and practices, with an emphasis on the diverse written traditions of the Levant (Syria-Palestine) in 2nd and 1st millennia BCE, including the Hebrew Bible. At Carolina, he has taught courses on Classical Hebrew language, Hebrew Bible, ancient Near Eastern culture, and the place of metaphor in religious language.

Few technological innovations have more profoundly shaped the course of human civilization than the invention of writing. This course explores the role of writing in the development of ancient religious traditions, covering the wide chronological period from the beginnings of writing in Mesopotamia and Egypt (approximately 3200 BCE) to the advent of Islam. We will begin by considering the nature of writing both as a technology and as a symbolic system, giving attention to insights coming out of modern linguistic research. Then we will examine a series of case studies of the relationship between religion and writing drawn from the ancient world (especially the ancient Near East), in order to illustrate the diversity and complexity of these interactions between technology and society. Specific topics to be addressed include: religion and the early alphabet, magical and mystical uses of writing, religion and literacy, scribal culture, and the development of “scriptural” texts such as the Bible and the Qur’an.

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Romance Studies (ROML)

ROML 89.001: Forging Alliances: Religion, War and Cultural Transference on the Camino de Santiago
Gen Eds: HS, WB
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Hélène de Fays

Dr. Hélène de Fays is a Senior Lecturer in the Romance Studies Department. She has earned undergraduate degrees in Finances and International Relations, as well as an MA and Ph.D. in Hispanic Literature. Her educational and professional backgrounds, as well as her personal multidisciplinary interests, have guided her research and teaching. Dr. de Fays has taught a number of successful cultures courses and has published articles on the concepts of utopia and dystopia in Spanish American Science Fiction and ecofeminism in Central American narrative. She has also co-authored a web-based textbook on the cultural history of the Hispanic world.

This course explores the role the Camino de Santiago (the Way of St. James) played in the construction of a distinctive Spanish identity in the medieval period of Europe. We will approach this issue from a variety of perspectives. From the religious point of view, we will discuss the transformation of the man into a legend and eventually a myth, as well as the growth of the pilgrimage to Santiago. From the political and economic perspectives, we will examine the role of the Camino in the strengthening of the first Christian Kingdoms in the North of Spain, the creation of the first Spanish knight orders and their fight against Islam. We will also discuss the cultural transference that took place along the Camino by analyzing the art, architecture, music and literature that developed in the cities and villages along the pilgrimage routes.

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ROML 89.002: La Mode: Fashion in French Culture
Gen Eds: VP, NA
MW, 01:25 PM – 02:40 PM
Ellen Welch

Ellen Welch is an Associate Professor in the French & Francophone Studies program where she teaches on French cultural history, literature, and theater and performance. A specialist of Ancien Régime France, she has written books on the history of exoticism in French literature and on the role of the performing arts (especially ballet) in early modern diplomacy. She holds a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and a BA from Brown University, where working on an honors thesis sparked the passion for research that she now enjoys sharing with UNC undergrads.

French culture and fashion have been synonymous since the age of Louis XIV. This is not only because Paris traditionally occupied the center of the global fashion industry. It’s also because fashion has a respected place in French culture. This seminar investigates what fashion has meant to French-speaking writers, artists, and philosophers through the centuries. We will explore key episodes in the history of French fashion from the emergence of the idea of fashion in the seventeenth century, to Marie-Antoinette’s role as fashion icon, to the birth of haute couture in the 20th century, to the contemporary “street style” phenomenon and debates about fashion’s impact on the environment and global economy. Along the way, we’ll discover how French thinkers have interpreted the allure and significance of fashion from the perspectives of sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, and gender studies. In short, we will consider what it means to take fashion seriously.

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School of Education (EDUC)

EDUC 65.001: School Daze: What’s School Got to do with Getting an Education?
T, 03:30 PM – 06:15 PM
Suzanne Gulledge

Suzanne Gulledge is a Professor of Education with specializations in Curriculum and Instruction, Ethics and Education and International and Experiential Teaching and Learning. She was named a UNC-Chapel Hill University Engaged Scholar in 2009 and has numerous teaching awards and honors. International and global studies and community based service learning are among her teaching and research interests. She developed and continues to lead educator initiatives and study abroad courses. Those have been in South Africa, Tanzania, Scotland, Northern Ireland and China. Gulledge is the director of the Academic Leadership Program in the Institute for the Arts and Humanities. Active on the Carolina campus in faculty governance and in interdisciplinary academic activities, she directs a Carolina Seminar, has been elected to the Carolina Faculty Council Executive Committee, Chancellor’s Advisory Committee, Faculty Assembly and University Government Committee. She has been Chair of the Faculty and a Division Coordinator and Program Chair in the School of Education. She has served on advisory boards for the Center for Faculty Excellence, Carolina Navigators of the Center for Global Education, APPLES Service Learning Program, the Ackland Museum and Carolina Performing Arts – Arts at the Core. Teacher education and teacher professional development, in addition to social foundations, ethics, and social studies education, are Gulledge’s primary scholarly interests.

What does it mean to be an educated person? What function do schools serve? This seminar builds on the experiences of schooling that students bring to the university. In an innovative update to the pedagogy of this popular First Year Seminar, it will now feature design thinking and use of “makerspaces” as a way for students to “actualize” their ideas and learning about how schooling can be updated and revised to better meet the aims of “real” education in the Twenty-first Century and beyond. The seminar includes readings, speakers and experiences as stimuli for them to engineer new paradigms, approaches, structures and tools for education of the future. Students are challenged to re-consider and de-construct what they know about education and schools as a result of those experiences and then re-conceptualize, redesign and create their new vision for schooling as educative in new ways. The seminar considers traditional schooling along with non-traditional and international approaches to educating youngsters. There are no pre-requisites for this class. Students’ first-hand knowledge and experiences combined with a critical perspective will encourage innovative thinking about ways and places of learning with the aim of generating proposals for new or reformed schools and new forms of public education for the future through collaboration, making and design thinking.

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Sociology (SOCI)

SOCI 71.001: The Pursuit of Happiness
Gen Eds: SS
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Arne Kalleberg

Dr. Arne Kalleberg is a Kenan Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and has Adjunct Professorships in the Kenan-Flagler Business School, the Department of Public Policy, and the Curriculum in Global Studies. He is also the Editor of Social Forces, an International Journal of Social Research.

Happiness remains a fundamental goal in most societies, despite being elusive for many people. In recent years, social scientists have become increasingly interested in the subject of happiness and its causes and consequences. Sociologists, economists, political scientists, geographers and psychologists have joined with philosophers in studying the nature of happiness and subjective well-being and its relationship to social life.

This course will examine the interplay between individual and social happiness by considering the nature and meaning of happiness in the contemporary United States as well as in other countries. We will seek to answer questions such as: What is happiness? Can we measure happiness, and if so, how? What is the relationship between biology and happiness? Between psychology and happiness? Does money buy happiness? Does happiness vary among diverse groups (racial, ethnic, religious, gender, age, and social class groups)? How does happiness differ among cultures and nations? What is (and should be) the role of happiness in formulating public policies? We will address these and other questions by: reading books and articles; class discussions and debates; viewing films; interviewing people; and collecting information using the Internet and other sources.

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Other Opportunities

First Year Launch Courses

AMST 202.001: Historical Approaches to American Studies
Gen Eds: HS, NA
TTh, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Seth Kotch

Seth Kotch is an Assistant Professor in the Department of American Studies. He studies histories of crime and punishment in the American South, and directs A Red Record, a digital project that contextualizes and situates lynchings in the former Confederacy. Following completion of his first book, a history of the Death Penalty in North Carolina, he is laying the groundwork for a history of drunk driving in America. He is a Chapel Hill native (go Heels) and a graduate of Chapel Hill High School (go Tigers). He breaks ankles playing basketball (his own ankles, now he can’t play any more).

Why does history matter? It’s not an easy question to answer, and to be honest, it probably doesn’t matter to most people. But one important reason history is useful, at least, is because it helps us understand, if not avoid repeating, the present. Studying history reveals how small decisions become major forces, how humans and governments have wrestled with personal and political needs, how power ebbs and flows. In this course we will explore histories of the present, unpacking the historical context behind present-day issues, controversies, and events so as to understand them more deeply and impress our grandparents. You, the students, will choose which subjects we explore. For each of five units, I will assemble a group of readings that includes some basic contextual and historic matter; some original sources, such as manuscripts or newspaper coverage; some interpretive material created by historians; and some cultural material, such as art or television. These sources will help us explore core questions and concepts we will refine over the course of each unit. By the end of the course, we will have a sense of the historic resonances of issues and events that are important to you.

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BIOL 190.001: Scientific Thinking in Biology (The Creativity of Science)
Gen Eds: PL
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Elizabeth Shank

Elizabeth Shank is interested in understanding how microbes interact in complex communities. It turns out that all microbes, but particularly soil bacteria, secrete an amazing array of small chemical compounds. Humans often use these compounds as drugs (e.g. >70% of antibiotics used clinically are produced by soil bacteria), but there is growing evidence that many ‘antibiotics’ can also act as cell-cell communication signals. Dr. Shank’s lab uses genetics, microscopy, chemical imaging, and next-generation sequencing to explore these interactions in microbial communities and uses biological thinking to develop new ways to discover novel bioactive compounds. Her primary role in the lab is now as an idea generator, experimental advisor, collaboration initiator, professional mentor, and grant-writer.

This course provides an introduction to the dynamic, creative, and open-ended process that is the scientific method. It is not a lecture-style class. Instead, we will be using an approach termed CREATE (Consider, Read, Elucidate the hypotheses, Analyze the data, Think of the next Experiment). Through the methodical analysis of news reports and scientific articles, CREATE encourages students to discuss and debate data and their interpretation, generate and evaluate hypotheses, and design experiments to test their hypotheses. This approach directly emphasizes the creativity and open-ended nature of scientific research as well as exposing students to the diversity of people who undertake research careers. We will discuss current biological topics relevant to society, such as antibiotic resistance and discovery, the human microbiome, or how microbes impact our environment. No previous experience reading scientific literature is required, but a curiosity about biology, the scientific process, research and discovery, or communication of technical ideas is recommended.

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MATH 190.001: Introduction to Research in Network Data Science
Gen Eds: QR, CI, EE-Mentored Research
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Peter Mucha

Peter Mucha is a Professor of Mathematics and Applied Physical Sciences. He grew up in Minnesota, moving east to attend Cornell University where he majored in Engineering Physics. After an M.Phil. in Physics at Cambridge, he continued his studies at Princeton with an M.A. and Ph.D. in Applied and Computational Mathematics. He moved to Chapel Hill following positions at MIT and Georgia Tech. His research includes a variety of topics in network science, including developments in community detection, network representations of data, and modeling dynamics on and of networks. His group activities are fundamentally interdisciplinary, with collaborations on varied topics across the mathematical, physical, life, and social sciences.

We live in a connected world, where the confluence of the different connections – social, political, financial, informational, technological, biological, behavioral, epidemiological – affects virtually every aspect of our lives. The study of networks provides a language for describing these connections and for describing the resulting impacts. Most people are familiar with the concept of a network in terms of hyperlinked web pages or online social networks. Online networks are of particular interest, but networks are also useful for representing and studying a wider variety of connected systems. With “nodes” representing actors of interest and “edges” connecting the nodes representing relationships, the concept of a network can be flexibly used across many applications.

Introduction to Research in Network Data Science (IRNDS) is a research-intensive experience designed to rapidly engage students in hands-on data science activities through direct interaction with real-world data about networks and network representations of data. In addition to providing a direct connection to active data science research, IRNDS will involve students actively developing a public data science portfolio in GitHub that demonstrates their course experience.

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