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Please consult ConnectCarolina (connectcarolina.unc.edu) for the most up-to-date information about FYS offerings and availability.

For more information about a specific instructor, please click on the instructor name, if highlighted.

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)
American Studies (AMST)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Art and Art History (ARTH)
Asian Studies (ASIA)
City and Regional Planning (PLAN)
Classics (CLAS)
Communication (COMM)
Computer Science (COMP)
Dramatic Art (DRAM)
Economics (ECON)
Education (EDUC)
English and Comparative Literature (ENGL)
Geography (GEOG)
Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)
History (HIST)
Information and Library Science (INLS)
Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST)
Latin American Studies (LTAM)
Marine Sciences (MASC)
Mathematics (MATH)
Music (MUSC)
Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)
Political Science (POLI)
Psychology and Neuroscience (NSCI/PYSC)
Public Policy (PLCY)
Religious Studies (RELI)
Romance Studies (ROML)
Sociology (SOCI)
Women’s and Gender Studies (WGST)
Other Opportunities (First Year Launch)

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)

AAAD 51.001: Masquerades of Blackness
Gen Eds: VP, US
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Charlene Regester

Charlene Regester is an Associate Professor in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies and Affiliate Faculty for the Global Cinema Minor. She received her BA, MA, Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is the author of African American Actresses: The Struggle for Visibility, 1900-1960 (which was nominated by the press to the NAACP Image Awards). She is the 2011 recipient of the Trailblazer Award Hayti Heritage Film Festival and 2007 Oscar Micheaux Book and Film Award from the Oscar Micheaux Film Festival, South Dakota. She has appeared on North Carolina Bookwatch with UNC-TV 2011; WUNC-FM Radio “The State of Things;” and Turner Movie Classics. Documentaries in which she has appeared include: Movies of Color: Black Southern Cinema (2003, Tom Thurman director), Beyond Tara: The Extraordinary Life of Hattie McDaniel (2001), Madison Davis Lacy director), and Birth of a Movement (2017, Bestor Cram and Susan Gray directors).

This seminar is designed to investigate how the concept of race has been represented in cinema historically, with a particular focus on representations of race when blackness is masqueraded. Its intent is to launch an investigative inquiry into how African Americans are represented on screen in various time periods, how we as spectators are manipulated by these cinematic constructions of race, and how race is marked or coded other than through visual representation. Students will view films that deal with “passing” from the various historical periods and will utilize theoretical concepts introduced in class to read these visual representations. Films selected for viewing include the pre-World War II Era, the Civil Rights Era, and the “Post-Racial” era. Students will be required to write three papers that reflect their ability to apply theoretical concepts to reading racialized representations on screen in these three historical periods to demonstrate their understanding of how racial masquerades have evolved over time and continue to persist in contemporary culture.

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American Studies (AMST)

AMST 51.001: Navigating America
Gen Eds: SS, CI, EE-Field Work
MW, 12:20 PM – 01:35 PM
Rachel A. Willis

Rachel A. Willis is a Professor of American Studies and Adjunct Professor of Economics at UNC. She has won numerous awards including the UNC Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, two Student Undergraduate Teaching Awards, and the Robert Sigmon Award for Service Learning. A three-time winner of the Chapman Award, she has been a Senior Fellow at the Global Research Institute and is a Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholar at the Carolina Center for Public Service. Her teaching methods incorporate innovative field study, collaborative assignments and experiential learning through events and programs outside of the classroom. A labor economist interested in global access to work, she has recently focused on the impact of climate change on port communities.

This seminar is designed to teach students how to navigate new intellectual terrain and process unfamiliar information from a variety of disciplinary perspectives with an emphasis on simulations, field study, reflections, and documentation. Each student will plan, implement, and document an individual short journey. This voyage of discovery on the campus or in the surrounding community will be chronicled with a documentary journal and presented to the class in a multi-media format that conveys the individual’s perspective, journey, and discoveries. Additionally, the class will collaboratively plan, implement, and document a common full day journey. This required field study will be a core aspect of the experiential education connection for the course.

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AMST 54.001: The Indians’ New Worlds: Southeastern Histories from 1200 to 1800
Gen Eds: HS, US, WB
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Margaret Scarry

Margaret Scarry’s fascination with Native American cultures began in high school, when she participated in an archaeological field school on Summer Island, Michigan. She pursued her interest through undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of Michigan, where she earned her Ph.D. in 1986. Though her first archaeological experience was in the Midwest, she soon shifted her interest to the Southeast, where she investigates Native American foodways—the activities and ideas by which people acquire, distribute, prepare, present, consume, and think about food. Much of her research has focused on the Moundville chiefdom, which flourished in Alabama from about A.D. 1100 to 1500. After a number of years in Florida and Kentucky, Scarry joined the anthropology faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill in 1995. Among other things, she teaches courses on archaeology, food and culture, and archaeobotany.

By AD 1200, most Southeastern Indians were farmers who lived in societies ruled by hereditary chiefs. After 1500, encounters between Indians and Europeans changed the lives of all concerned, but the changes took place in, and were shaped by, existing cultures. This seminar uses reading, discussion, and lecture to examine the lives of Southern Indians and to understand how encounters and interaction with European explorers and colonists changed the worlds in which the Indians lived. Students will learn how archaeologists and historians work, both separately and together, to study the past of Native societies. Students will study and analyze archaeological artifacts, Spanish accounts of Southeastern Indians, and other primary materials in class. These activities, along with various role-playing exercises, will directly involve the students in the study of Native people in the period between 1200 and 1800. Grades will be based on class participation, two short papers, participation in a group project, and a final paper related to the group project.

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Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 54.001: The Indians’ New Worlds: Southeastern Histories from 1200 to 1800
Gen Eds: HS, US, WB
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Margaret Scarry

Margaret Scarry’s fascination with Native American cultures began in high school, when she participated in an archaeological field school on Summer Island, Michigan. She pursued her interest through undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of Michigan, where she earned her Ph.D. in 1986. Though her first archaeological experience was in the Midwest, she soon shifted her interest to the Southeast, where she investigates Native American foodways—the activities and ideas by which people acquire, distribute, prepare, present, consume, and think about food. Much of her research has focused on the Moundville chiefdom, which flourished in Alabama from about A.D. 1100 to 1500. After a number of years in Florida and Kentucky, Scarry joined the anthropology faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill in 1995. Among other things, she teaches courses on archaeology, food and culture, and archaeobotany.

By AD 1200, most Southeastern Indians were farmers who lived in societies ruled by hereditary chiefs. After 1500, encounters between Indians and Europeans changed the lives of all concerned, but the changes took place in, and were shaped by, existing cultures. This seminar uses reading, discussion, and lecture to examine the lives of Southern Indians and to understand how encounters and interaction with European explorers and colonists changed the worlds in which the Indians lived. Students will learn how archaeologists and historians work, both separately and together, to study the past of Native societies. Students will study and analyze archaeological artifacts, Spanish accounts of Southeastern Indians, and other primary materials in class. These activities, along with various role-playing exercises, will directly involve the students in the study of Native people in the period between 1200 and 1800. Grades will be based on class participation, two short papers, participation in a group project, and a final paper related to the group project.

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ANTH 89.036: By Persons Unknown: Race and Reckoning in North Carolina
Gen Eds: HS, US
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Glenn Hinson

By training and spirit, Glenn Hinson is a folklorist, one who works with communities to explore grassroots creativity and the many ways that it holds meaning. Though he is white, much of his work over the years has been with Black communities, whose members have repeatedly schooled him on the simple fact that any exploration of artistry must address the critical and all-encompassing context of racism. Their challenge led to the creation of the Descendants Project, a collaborative initiative in which students and communities work together to address racial histories. This FYS extends this initiative by focusing on a single NC county.

“By persons unknown” is the phrase historically used across the white South to erase the identities of the killers responsible for lynchings. Though communities certainly knew who these murderers were, the press and the courts publicly denied this knowledge, offering the killers a cloak of anonymity. This research-intensive seminar explores this act of cloaking, addressing the legacy of race and racial terrorism in N.C. by using archival resources and community testimony. The class projects—focusing on a single county—will explore the public erasure of Black histories, the careful craftings of public memory, and the far-reaching impact of racist practices on the economic, educational, social, and political lives of communities. Our goal is not merely to “study” racist practice, but to actively confront it, working with community members to build public awareness of the legacies of racial violence, and assisting in efforts to create public memorials to that violence’s victims.

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ANTH 89.056: Race and Small Town America – CANCELLED 11/11/2019
Gen Eds: SS, US
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Karla Slocum

Karla Slocum is also Associate Professor of Anthropology. Slocum specializes in studies of place identities, black-identified communities and history, and rural engagements with global economic change in the Caribbean and the United States. She is the author of Free Trade and Freedom: Neoliberalism, Place and Nation in the Caribbean (University of Michigan Press, 2006). Her second book, The Appeal of a Black Place: Lured by History, Space and Race in American Black Towns , is under contract with the University of North Carolina Press. The book examines the contemporary attraction of historic, rural black towns in the Western U.S. amid their simultaneous status as economically fragile and socially remote communities.

Race is a prominent feature of American life and the U.S. is made up of more small towns than large cities. What, then, does race mean for small town American life? The goal of this course is for students to understand how race shapes the ways that people live their lives in U.S. small and rural towns? We will address such questions as: How do a rural identity and a racial identity intersect? How do different racial groups experience rural life? How is race significant for small town experiences in the areas of: economies and work; education; culture and identity; health and environment; and community history and heritage? To explore these questions, we will focus on ethnographic studies of specific rural communities.

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Art and Art History (ARTH/ARTS)

ARTH 51.001: Cathedrals, Abbeys, Castles: Gothic Art and Architecture (c. 1130-1450)
Gen Eds: VP, WB
MWF, 01:25 PM – 02:15 PM
Christoph Brachmann

Professor Christoph Brachmann graduated from Technical University Berlin, Germany, in 1994 with a Ph.D. thesis on 13th century French gothic architecture. In 2004 he presented his “Habilitationsschrift”, his second book, on Lorraine Court art in the late 15th, early16th centuries, published in 2006.

After having taught between 1994 and 2009 at the Technical University Berlin (“Assistant”, “Oberassistent”), Christoph Brachmann became in 2010 Mary H. Cain Distinguished Professor of Art History at UNC Chapel Hill. His research focuses on Central European art of the Middle Ages and early modern times (esp. France and Germany).

This course explores Gothic church and secular architecture in France and Europe between 1130 and ca 1450. We will focus not only on the formal and constructive progresses in architecture during this period, but also on the social, political, and economic aspects of medieval society that affected all these developments. Case studies will integrate the churches full array of stained glass windows, as well as the plethora of sculptures embellishing the colossal portals of these buildings.

Students will combine the study of architecture with the study of medieval culture, exploring for example the impact of the cult of saints, princely courts and civil authority, religious reform and radicalism and rising urbanism. By the end of the course students will be familiar with canonical works of European art and architecture, and understand the fruitful exchange within Europe during this period. The focus on single works in a variety of media – architecture, sculpture, glass painting – will offer the opportunity to study them in depth while also gaining exposure to a range of interpretive methods and the richness of the historical context.

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ARTH 89.001: World’s Fairs: Back to the Future!
Gen Eds: HS, CI, US
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Allie Thomas and Lyneise Williams

Dr. Allie Thomas is an assistant professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning. Her research looks at how technology can be used to address both environmental sustainability and social equity within the transportation sector. She relies upon qualitative methods to investigate the phenomenon of how and why technologies are accepted or rejected. Her work has looked bus rapid transit adaption in China, electric bikes in San Francisco, and the use of ridehailing services across generations. She is currently working on understanding how transit agencies adapt cashless fare technologies and how equity is taken into consideration.

Dr. Lyneise Williams is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (PhD Yale 2004). She is the author of Latin Blackness in Parisian Visual Culture, 1852-1932, (February 2019, Bloomsbury Academic Publishers). She teaches courses on representations of sports, museum studies, fashion, among other topics. She is the founder and director of VERA (Visual Electronic Representations in the Archive) Collaborative which raises awareness about the distortions and erasures in visual representations, linked to reproduction technology, that particularly impacts communities of color and other under-represented communities. In Fall 2016, Williams served as a Getty Scholar Fellow at the Getty Research Institute. She currently serves on the North Carolina Chief Justice Advisory Commission on Portraits.

This seminar uses U.S. World’s Fairs, examples of constructed images of the modern city to investigate the changing image of “America”. We selected six U.S. World’s Fairs between 1893 and 1965 (1884 World Cotton Centennial, New Orleans; 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago; 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition, Saint Louis; 1939 New York World’s Fair, New York City; 1962 Seattle World’s Fair; 1964/1965 New York World’s Fair, New York City). By examining them in detail, we can follow shifts in conceptions of American cities, and ask questions such as the role pomp and display play in configuring who belongs in these cities, where they are positioned in relation to it, and who is excluded from it. In parallel, we can see the trajectory of planning from the progressive era to the entrepreneurial era.

Students may also register for this course under PLAN 89.001.

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ARTH 89.002: How Do We See?
Gen Eds: PH
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Maggie Cao and Laurie McNeil

Maggie Cao is the David G. Frey Assistant Professor of art history. She studies eighteenth and nineteenth-century American art. She received her B.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard and joined the faculty at UNC in 2016. Her intellectual interests include intersections of art and finance and the visual culture of science and technology. She has published essays on topics including camouflage, counterfeiting, financial bubbles, and arctic exploration.

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her PhD in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. In her research laboratory, she uses optics and lasers to study the properties of semiconductors and biological materials.

We will explore “how we see” in two senses. In the first, literal, sense we will explore the physics of vision and how it allows us to perceive the location and size of objects as well as their color. In the second, metaphorical, sense we will explore visual artifacts and how objects are represented in artistic media. We will experiment with image formation using mirrors and lenses and try to understand how painters in the Renaissance used such tools to create their art. We will examine the artistic manipulation of visual perception using such techniques as linear perspective and anamorphosis. Finally, we will use techniques such as infrared reflectivity to “make the unseen seen,” extending our visual powers to explore artistic processes. This course is taught by a professor of physics and a professor of art history, each bringing her own perspective to what it means to see.

Students may also register for this course under PHYS 89.001.

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Asian Studies (ASIA)

ASIA 69.001: Wars and Veterans: Iran, Iraq, and Afghanistan
Gen Eds: LA, CI, GL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Claudia Yaghoobi

Claudia Yaghoobi is a Roshan Institute Assistant Professor in Persian Studies in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She teaches courses on Middle Eastern and Persian Literature. Yaghoobi’s recent publications include “Yusuf’s Queer Beauty in Persian Cultural Productions”, Comparatist (2016); “Socially Peripheral, Symbolically Central: Sima in Behrouz Afkhami’s Showkaran”, Journal of Asian Cinema (2016); “Subjectivity in ?A??ar’s Shaykh San’an Story in The Conference of the Birds”, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture (2014); and “Sexual Trauma and Spiritual Experience: Rabi?a al-?Adawiyya and Margery Kempe”, Persian Literary Studies Journal (2014). Her book, Subjectivity in ‘Attar, Persian Sufism, and European Mysticism, will be released in May 2017 by Purdue University Press.

In this course, we will explore the various ways that wars and conflicts, particularly Iran-Iraq, U.S.-Iraq, and U.S.-Afghanistan wars, have been portrayed in literature, film, and photography. We will attempt to deepen and enrich our understanding of war experienced by both veterans and civilians of each country. We will examine the impact of war on the human psyche in regards with violence. We will read books by American war veterans and Middle East authors contemplating the wars and their consequences. We will look at each writer’s perspective on war and their interpretation of it comparatively. In order to enhance our understanding of the phenomenon of war, we will also read supplementary articles on criticism of war and a few on psychology of war. There will be film screening on these wars which will give students the opportunity to examine these wars in a different medium than just literature. We will also look at war photography and analyze the perspectives of each photographer and the impact war has not only on people who are involved but on outside observers as well. All readings will be in English. The class will be conducted in the form of a combination of lectures, discussion, and experimentations.

Students may also register for this course under PWAD 69.001.

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ASIA 89.001: Imagining Palestine
Gen Eds: LA, BN
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Nadia Yaqub

Nadia Yaqub’s research has treated Arab cultural texts ranging from medieval literature and contemporary oral poetry to modern prose fiction and visual culture. Most recently she has focused on Palestinian literature and visual culture. Her current work has focused on two distinct areas: 1) Palestinian cinema and 2) women and transgression in the Arab World. Her most recent books are Palestinian Cinema in the Days of Revolution (2018, University of Texas Press) and Bad Girls of the Arab World (2017, University of Texas Press), a collection she coedited with Dr. Rula Quawas from the University of Jordan.

This course explores the idea of Palestine as it is presented in Palestinian writings, films, and other creative works. We will study what Palestine is for the Palestinians, none of whom have lived in a Palestinian state and many of whom have spent more time in exile than in the land that has been known historically as Palestine; how Palestinian relationships to and expectations of Palestine may have changed over time; and how Palestinian portrayals of their dreamed-of homeland have affected our own perceptions of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and the Arab world generally. How have Palestinian art, film, and literature helped to shape Palestinian identities and aspirations in different ways over the course of modern Palestinian history? In what ways have art, film, and literature intersected with Palestinian politics and a sense of political and personal agency?

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City and Regional Planning (PLAN)

PLAN 52.001: Race, Sex, and Place in America – ADDED 11/15/2019
Gen Ed: SS
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Mai Nguyen

Dr. Mai Nguyen is an Associate Professor in the City & Regional Planning Department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her Master’s in Sociology at the Pennsylvania State University and PhD in Urban Planning at the University of California, Irvine. She is an expert in housing policy, community economic development, immigration and urban growth phenomena. She also teaches courses in the Housing and Community Development specialization with the focus of teaching about practices and policies that create transformative community change. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

This seminar will expose students to the complex dynamics of race, ethnicity and gender and how these have shaped the American city since 1945. It will examine both the historical record as well as contemporary works of literature and film to probe the ways race and ethnicity have contributed to the culture of urban life in the United States. It will also explore the different ways women and men perceive, understand, occupy and use urban space and the built environment. Drawing upon the scholarship of several disciplines (urban planning, ethnic studies, sociology and American history), the seminar will examine a broad spectrum of topics, including the social construction of race, the creation of the underclass label, residential segregation, the significance of Hurricane Katrina, sexual identity and space, and immigration. The last portion of the course will focus on planning and policy tools that have the potential to alleviate racial/ethnic and gender inequality in space.

Students may also register for this course under WGST 51.001.

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PLAN 89.001: World’s Fairs: Back to the Future!
Gen Eds: HS, CI, US
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Allie Thomas and Lyneise Williams

Dr. Allie Thomas is an assistant professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning. Her research looks at how technology can be used to address both environmental sustainability and social equity within the transportation sector. She relies upon qualitative methods to investigate the phenomenon of how and why technologies are accepted or rejected. Her work has looked bus rapid transit adaption in China, electric bikes in San Francisco, and the use of ridehailing services across generations. She is currently working on understanding how transit agencies adapt cashless fare technologies and how equity is taken into consideration.

Dr. Lyneise Williams is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (PhD Yale 2004). She is the author of Latin Blackness in Parisian Visual Culture, 1852-1932, (February 2019, Bloomsbury Academic Publishers). She teaches courses on representations of sports, museum studies, fashion, among other topics. She is the founder and director of VERA (Visual Electronic Representations in the Archive) Collaborative which raises awareness about the distortions and erasures in visual representations, linked to reproduction technology, that particularly impacts communities of color and other under-represented communities. In Fall 2016, Williams served as a Getty Scholar Fellow at the Getty Research Institute. She currently serves on the North Carolina Chief Justice Advisory Commission on Portraits.

This seminar uses U.S. World’s Fairs, examples of constructed images of the modern city to investigate the changing image of “America”. We selected six U.S. World’s Fairs between 1893 and 1965 (1884 World Cotton Centennial, New Orleans; 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago; 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition, Saint Louis; 1939 New York World’s Fair, New York City; 1962 Seattle World’s Fair; 1964/1965 New York World’s Fair, New York City). By examining them in detail, we can follow shifts in conceptions of American cities, and ask questions such as the role pomp and display play in configuring who belongs in these cities, where they are positioned in relation to it, and who is excluded from it. In parallel, we can see the trajectory of planning from the progressive era to the entrepreneurial era.

Students may also register for this course under ARTH 89.001.

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Classics (CLAR/CLAS)

CLAS 55H.001: Three Greek and Roman Epics (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, NA, WB
MWF, 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM
James O’Hara

Professor James O’Hara received his A.B. in Classics from the College of the Holy Cross in 1981, and his Ph.D. in Classical Studies from the University of Michigan in 1986. From 1986 to 2001, he taught at Wesleyan University; since 2001 he has been the George. L. Paddison Professor of Latin at UNC, where he has also been department chair. His research and teaching interests are in Greek and Latin poetry, with special interests in Homer, Vergil, and the literature written during the reign of Rome’s first emperor, Augustus; other interests include Roman Civilization, Hellenistic poetry, didactic poetry, and satire.

The course will involve a close reading in English of Homer’s ILIAD and ODYSSEY and Vergil’s AENEID, and as a transition from Homer to Vergil, we will also read the tragedies of Sophocles from fifth-century Athens. It was epic and tragedy that formulated the bases of Graeco-Roman civilization and provided the models of heroism and human values for the Western Tradition—along with raising fundamental questions about the individual’s relationship to society. We will analyze, discuss, and write about these works both as individual pieces of literature in a historical context, and in terms of how they position themselves in the poetic tradition; after reading the ILIAD and ODYSSEY, we’ll see how heroic myth gets reworked by tragedy for democratic Athens, and then how Vergil combines Homer, tragedy and other traditions to make a new poem for his time. We will look at aspects of structure and technique, questions of overall interpretation and values, and the interplay of genre and historical setting. Requirements: discussion, short online readings in addition to the primary texts, several short papers during the term, and a 6-10-page term paper.

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CLAS 67.001: Helen of Troy: From Homer to Hollywood
Gen Eds: LA, WB
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Patricia Rosenmeyer

Prof. Patricia Rosenmeyer has degrees in Classics from Harvard (B.A.), Cambridge (M.A.), and Princeton (Ph.D.). She taught at Michigan, Yale, and Wisconsin, before accepting the Paddison Chair of Classics at UNC-Chapel Hill in fall 2017. Prof. Rosenmeyer pursues a range of scholarly interests in ancient Greek literature, and has published four books and one edited volume. She has received fellowships from ACLS, NEH, the Mellon Foundation, and the Loeb Library. Her current research focuses on Homer, Sappho, reception studies, and translation strategies in early 20th-century Europe. She is eager to share her fascination with Helen of Troy with interested students.

Helen of Troy is said to have been the most beautiful woman in the world, yet we have no evidence of what she really looked like. This missing piece has worked in her favor, as authors and artists have tried to “fill in the blank” ever since. For over two millennia, her story has inspired countless creative responses, from Homer’s Iliad to Hollywood’s Troy. Helen makes us think about issues that still resonate today: how do we define beauty? what is worth fighting for? how far should one go for love? In this course, we will study the story of Helen in multiple retellings, asking questions about the value of beauty, the risks of desire, and the consequences for society when individuals place love above all else. Students will read ancient and modern sources, analyze and debate them, and write about the issues. The course requires no prior knowledge of the material.

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CLAS 89.001: Ancient Magic and Religion
Gen Eds: LA, WB
MWF, 12:20 PM – 01:10 PM
Suzanne Lye

Suzanne Lye received her A.B. from Harvard University, where she studied organic chemistry and the history of antibiotics. After receiving her Ph.D. in Classics from the University of California, Los Angeles, she was awarded a Postdoctoral Fellowship at Dartmouth College. At present, she is working on a book-length project about conceptions of the afterlife in ancient Greek Underworld narratives from Homer to Lucian. She has also participated in several digital humanities initiatives through Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies, including the Homer Multitext Project. She has published on ancient epic, ancient religion and magic, ancient representations of gender and ethnicity, modern pedagogy, and Classical reception.

Bindings and curses, love charms and healing potions, amulets and talismans – from simple spells to complex group rituals, ancient societies made use of both magic and religion to try to influence the world around them. In this course, we shall examine the roles of magic and religion in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, paying special attention to their local contexts and to the myths and actual techniques ancient practitioners used to serve their clientele.

In this class, we examine descriptions of religious and magical practices in the multicultural contexts of ancient Greece and Rome. Our sources include literary accounts, legal documents, and material objects, such as inscriptions, amulets, tablets, magical images, and papyri.

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Communication (COMM)

COMM 89.001: Environmental Communication and the Media
Gen Eds: SS, GL
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
David Monje

Dr. David Monje’s research and teaching interests are in the environment, art, aesthetics and politics. He has travelled widely pursuing these interests and brings a broad perspective to the class. His interdisciplinary approach to teaching is informed by his education: he has BFA in painting, a BA in Linguistics, an MA in Communication and Society, and Ph.D. in Cultural Studies and Communication.

This seminar introduces first year students to the ways in which climate science, ecology and environmental science and climate change intersect with and are represented in politics, cultural artifacts, and the media. From television news, newspapers, and radio to social media such as Facebook and Twitter, climate change is a political, social, and cultural phenomenon. Climate change and global warming are also potentially consequential natural phenomena that scientists study, write about, and theorize about.

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Computer Science (COMP)

COMP 60H.011: Robotics with LEGO® (Honors)
Gen Eds: QI
MWF, 09:05 AM – 10:20 AM
Henry Fuchs

Henry Fuchs is the Federico Gil Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has been active in computer graphics and computer systems since the 1970s, with rendering algorithms (BSP Trees), hardware (Pixel-Planes), virtual environments, tele-immersion systems and medical applications. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and recipient of the 2015 ACM SIGGRAPH Steven Anson Coons Award, the highest award in computer graphics.

This seminar explores the process of design and the nature of computers by designing, building, and programming LEGO® robots. Competitions to evaluate various robots are generally held at the middle and/or at the end of the semester. Previous programming experience is not required. Assignments will typically take one to two weeks, most of them building on a previously constructed robot and making one that will perform a more complex task. Early robots will follow black race course routes or run through mazes constructed on the floor of the robotics laboratory. Later robots may play simple games with human users. Others robots will play simple soccer games, remotely controlled by human handlers. Most assignments will include a written report, as well as a demonstration of a working robot and a listing of its computer program.

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COMP 89H.080: Video Killed the Radio Star: Netflix, Deep Fakes, and Body Cams (HONORS) – CANCELLED 12/11/2019
Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Ketan Mayer-Patel

Professor Ketan Mayer-Patel received his BA, MS, and PhD degrees in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley. He joined the faculty at UNC in January 2000. As a graduate student, Prof. Mayer-Patel authored the first open source implementation of the MPEG video standard which was subsequently downloaded more than 1,000,000 times. His research interests are centered on challenges of large-scale distributed multimedia applications.

The rise of streaming video as a data type has completely transformed our relationship to audiovisual information and the ways in which we use it. Today, over 70% of all Internet traffic is in the form of video. This Honors first year seminar introduces students to the technology underlying the various ways video data has become an essential component of our everyday lives and experiences.

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Dramatic Art (DRAM)

DRAM 83.001: Spectacle in the Theatre
Gen Eds: VP
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
David Navalinsky

David Navalinsky is the Director of Undergraduate Production in the Department of Dramatic Art. David has taught at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Mississippi. David’s recent design work includes scenery for The Uncanny Valley by Francesca Talenti. The Uncanny Valley featured a Robothespian™, which is exactly what it sounds like. He has also written a documentary theatre piece Priceless Gem: An Athlete Story, which tells the stories of UNC athletes. David has worked professionally at South Coast Repertory in Orange County California, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, The Illinois Shakespeare Festival, and the Karamu Performing Arts Theatre in Cleveland, OH. Some of David’s favorite projects were at the Dallas Children’s Theater where he made a dinosaur collapse and pirates walk the plank.

This seminar will explore the artists, art and technology involved in creating the world of the play. It is intended as an overview for students who want to learn about theatrical design. Students will create their own designs in the areas of scenery, costumes, and lighting for three plays throughout the semester. The plays will be placed outside of their traditional setting while still maintaining the story and themes. Students have placed Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a trailer park and a daycare center for example. Careful historical research, close reading and analysis, text and source material, and collaboration will be the focus of the student projects.

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Economics (ECON)

ECON 58.001: History of Financial Crisis, 1637-2013
Gen Eds: HS, NA
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
John Komlos

John Komlos is Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Munich (Germany). He also taught at Harvard, Duke and in Austria and Switzerland. Born in Budapest, he became a refugee during the revolution of 1956, and grew up in Chicago where he received Ph.D.s in both history and economics from the University of Chicago where Nobel-Prize winning economist Robert Fogel induced him to study the effect of economic processes on human biology. Komlos devoted most of his academic career developing this research agenda, which culminated in his founding the journal “Economics and Human Biology” in 2003.

Would you like to find out about the financial crisis of 2008? This seminar will discuss the reasons why the crisis happened, examine critically how the government responded to the crisis, and why it has been difficult for the economy to regain its pre-crisis momentum. We will also discuss the similarities between the Meltdown and other historical financial crisis. Students will gain a broader understanding of the global economy in which we live and work. In addition, the historical perspective will enable students to gain a more thorough appreciation of the challenges that lie ahead for their generation. The aim of the seminar is not to concentrate on facts but rather to comprehend the big picture of economic processes in their social and political context in a very long-run perspective. Lots of discussion, lots of audio visual material will make this an exciting way to start your college career.

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Education (EDUC)

EDUC 65.001: School Daze: What’s School Got to do with Getting an Education?
T, 03:30 PM – 06:15 PM
Suzanne Gulledge

Suzanne Gulledge is a Professor of Education with specializations in Curriculum and Instruction, Ethics and Education and International and Experiential Teaching and Learning. She was named a UNC-Chapel Hill University Engaged Scholar in 2009 and has numerous teaching awards and Honors. International and global studies and community based service learning are among her teaching and research interests. She developed and continues to lead educator initiatives and study abroad courses. Those have been in South Africa, Tanzania, Scotland, Northern Ireland and China. Gulledge is the director of the Academic Leadership Program in the Institute for the Arts and Humanities. Active on the Carolina campus in faculty governance and in interdisciplinary academic activities, she directs a Carolina Seminar, has been elected to the Carolina Faculty Council Executive Committee, Chancellor’s Advisory Committee, Faculty Assembly and University Government Committee. She has been Chair of the Faculty and a Division Coordinator and Program Chair in the School of Education. She has served on advisory boards for the Center for Faculty Excellence, Carolina Navigators of the Center for Global Education, APPLES Service Learning Program, the Ackland Museum and Carolina Performing Arts – Arts at the Core. Teacher education and teacher professional development, in addition to social foundations, ethics, and social studies education, are Gulledge’s primary scholarly interests.

What does it mean to be an educated person? What function do schools serve? This seminar builds on the experiences of schooling that students bring to the university. In an innovative update to the pedagogy of this popular First Year Seminar, it will now feature design thinking and use of “makerspaces” as a way for students to “actualize” their ideas and learning about how schooling can be updated and revised to better meet the aims of “real” education in the Twenty-first Century and beyond. The seminar includes readings, speakers and experiences as stimuli for them to engineer new paradigms, approaches, structures and tools for education of the future. Students are challenged to re-consider and de-construct what they know about education and schools as a result of those experiences and then re-conceptualize, redesign and create their new vision for schooling as educative in new ways. The seminar considers traditional schooling along with non-traditional and international approaches to educating youngsters. There are no pre-requisites for this class. Students’ first-hand knowledge and experiences combined with a critical perspective will encourage innovative thinking about ways and places of learning with the aim of generating proposals for new or reformed schools and new forms of public education for the future through collaboration, making and design thinking.

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English and Comparative Literature (CMPL/ENGL)

ENGL 57H.001: Future Perfect: Science Fictions and Social Form (Honors)
John L. Townsend III FYS in English
Gen Eds: LA
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Matthew Taylor

Matthew Taylor’s research focuses on the intersections among environmental humanities, critical theory (including posthumanism, biopolitics, science and technology studies, and critical race theory), and nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature. His first book, Universes without Us: Posthuman Cosmologies in American Literature (Univ. of Minnesota Press), examines cosmologies that challenge the utopianism of both past and present attempts at fusing self and environment.

What will our world look like in ten years? Fifty? One hundred? Will the future be a utopian paradise or a dystopian wasteland? Through a wide-ranging survey of popular science writing, novels, and films, this first year seminar will examine fictional and nonfictional attempts to imagine the future from the nineteenth century to the present. We will explore everything from futurology and transhumanism to warnings of imminent environmental collapse. Our focus will be less on assessing the accuracy of these predictions and more on determining what they tell us about the hopes and fears of the times in which they were made. The course will culminate in a short research paper on a future-oriented topic of your choosing.

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ENGL 71H.001: Doctors and Patients (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Kym Weed

Kym Weed is a Teaching Assistant Professor in English & Comparative Literature and the Co-Director of the HHIVE Lab and Associate Director the MA program in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. She earned her PhD from UNC and recently returned to Chapel Hill via Vanderbilt University’s Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Her research focuses on the intersection of science and literature in late-nineteenth-century American literature and culture as well as historical and contemporary understandings of illness, health, disability, and embodiment. She teaches courses in health humanities, disability studies, American literature, and writing.

When medical anthropologist Arthur Kleinman writes that “illness has meaning,” he reminds us that the human experience of being sick involves more than bodily symptoms. Moreover, the effects of illness and debility are rarely confined to one person. In this course, we will analyze a diverse collection of writers who have taken as their topic the human struggle to make sense of suffering and debility through a range of genres including fiction, non-fiction, graphic memoir, podcasts, and oral histories.

Divided into five units, the course will allow us to explore not just the medical, but also the personal, ethical, cultural, spiritual, and political facets of illness from the perspectives of patients, healers, and families. Central texts may include Abby Norman’s /Ask Me About My Uterus/, Damon Tweedy’s /Black Man in a White Coat/, and Jennifer Brea (dir.) /Unrest/. We will also read shorter selections from an array of authors, such as Atul Gawande, Bettina Judd, Arthur Kleinman, Audre Lorde, Mia Mingus, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, and Susan Sontag. Additionally, students will utilize the growing archive of oral histories from the Stories to Save Lives project to learn more about the experiences of patients, healers, and families from across North Carolina.

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ENGL 89.001: Narrating Climate Change: Making the Global Personal
Gen Eds: NA, EE-Mentored Research
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Heidi Kim and Erika Wise

Professor Heidi Kim has taught a first-year seminar every year since she arrived at Carolina in 2010, and her classes have done original research on World War I veterans, the World War II Japanese American incarceration, the environmental history of Ocracoke in the Outer Banks, and more. Researching, publishing, and speaking on these specialties and others, such as the novels of William Faulkner, has taken her all over the world, including a fondly remembered book tour in Hawai’i. She is especially excited to be co-teaching a course that will make some use of her undergraduate biochemistry degree and quantitative skills.

Erika Wise’s research focuses on western North America’s climate and water resources in both recent times and in the prehistoric past. After earning a BS in Earth Sciences from UC- Santa Cruz, she worked at the USGS and later for an environmental consulting company. Dr. Wise became interested in Geography after some “odd” jobs (cooking on a dive boat, picking lychees, packing bananas) left her thinking about human-environment connections. She focused on climate-air quality interactions for her MA, then stumbled upon the University of Arizona’s world-renowned Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research and became a dendroclimatologist en route to her PhD.

Climate change has become one of the defining issues of our time. Studied in the sciences for decades, this topic has increasingly been taken up in the arts and humanities, as scholars seek to understand potential impacts on societies and our emotional response to a changing environment. Weather and climate have always impacted human societies in ways both large and small, and writers have reflected upon this in their literature, taking global level changes and turning them into personal narratives of drought and displacement; of hope and fear. In this first-year seminar, we aim to “make the global personal” by using personal narratives found in literature to introduce students to the science of climate change. Through an interdisciplinary examination of climate change, students will work both independently and collaboratively as they pose their own questions and make decisions to critically evaluate climate change information. We will emphasize the important role that communication has played in understanding climate change in both the sciences and in the humanities. Our goals for students in the course include: 1) learning about the global dimensions of climate change and applying that knowledge to local problems; 2) gaining familiarity with qualitative and quantitative research methods and skills; 3) exercising research skills by working independently and collaboratively; and 4) practicing and improving skills of critical reading, analytical writing, and oral presentation. We will accomplish these goals by careful selection of writings that introduce issues central to climate change, and then using those writings to delve into the underlying science while exploring how this science intersects with the personal narratives contained in the writings through critical reading and analytical writing. Students will put readings into action through a semester-long research project on a selected climate change issue.

Students may also register for this course under GEOG 89.001.

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ENGL 89.002: Apocalypse When?
Gen Eds: LA, NA
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Taylor Cowdery

Taylor Cowdery is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. His research focuses on how medieval poets think about the materiality of their poems—or in short, what they think their poems are made of. He’s also interested in the history of gender and sexuality, the history of book, the novel, and critical theory. He has two cats, but only one of them is named after a literary figure.

Plenty of us feel like we’re living in the end times—but why do some of us feel like they happened long ago, or that they’re just around the corner? This course considers the representation of the apocalypse in Western literature and culture from two angles: first, as the product of a religious fascination with the end of time, and second, as a phenomenon whose significance depends upon whether it has occurred, will occur, or is occurring at this very moment. Students will read a selection of texts drawn both from the Bible and from parallel religious traditions (for instance, medieval visions of the apocalypse, or the Babylonian Epic of Gilgamesh) alongside novels and essays by writers attempting to think through the significance of the apocalypse as both a temporal and an historical event.

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ENGL 89.003: Dreaming America: The Federal Theatre Project
Gen Eds: VP, US
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Leslie Frost

Leslie Frost is the author of Dreaming America: Popular Front Ideals and Aesthetics in Children’s Plays of the Federal Theatre Project. Columbus: The Ohio State UP, 2013. Her academic work centers on visual and performing arts and American literature since 1900. She is currently working on a project centered on U.S. Post Office murals (one of which is in the Chapel Hill post office) of the New Deal. She teaches classes on drama and American literature; in 2017 she adapted Sinclair Lewis’s it Can’t Happen Here for a staged reading at Historic Playmakers Theatre that she cast and produced.

From 1935-1939, America had a national theater. Born of the Great Depression, the Federal Theatre Project (FTP) was a Works Projects Administration (WPA) program to put unemployed people back to work. With almost one-third of the nation unemployed, the FTP provided jobs to the out of work and cheap or free entertainment to a people struggling with the hardships of the economic depression.

In this class we will study plays of the Federal Theatre Project that immerse us in traditional and new American theatrical forms. We will visit regional theatre productions and archival materials held in the Southern Historical Collection at Wilson Library that detail Playmakers’ founder Frederick Koch’s work as Southern Regional Director of Federal Theatre. We will also study American culture in the 1930s to investigate the relationship between theatrical art, culture, and politics, connections powerfully displayed by federal theatre’s vested interest in America’s working and middle classes, social justice issues, modernist aesthetics, and contextualized by its stormy relationship with the government committees that would investigate its politics and, ultimately, cause its demise.

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ENGL 89H.001: The Literature of the Last Man (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, CI, NA
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
David A. Ross

David A. Ross is a graduate of Yale and Oxford. He has been a member of the Department of English & Comparative Literature at UNC–Chapel Hill since 2002. He is the author of A Critical Companion to William Butler Yeats (2009) and the co-editor/co-translator of The Search for the Avant-Garde, 1946–1969 (2012), the descriptive catalogue of the Taipei Fine Arts Museum. A collector and amateur scholar of traditional Chinese paintings and Japanese woodblock prints, he has served as president of Southeast Conference of the Association for Asian Studies and as both editor and book review editor of the Southeast Review of Asian Studies.

This course considers post-apocalyptic scenarios involving the depopulation of the earth and ponders the existential solitude that befalls “the last man.” It pays particular attention to the interconnection between the “last man” scenario and related narratives of social dislocation: the Robinsonade (i.e., tale of the castaway), the Western, the wilderness survival adventure. Our questions will be various: What explains the anxieties implicit in the “last man” scenario? What does the last man teach us about ourselves? What if any consolations are available to a mortal species?

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Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 50.001: Mountain Environments
Gen Eds: PL
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Diego Riveros-Iregui

Dr. Diego Riveros-Iregui received a Ph.D. in Ecology and Environmental Sciences from Montana State University (2008), a M.S. in Geology from the University of Minnesota (2004), and a B.S. in Geology from the National University of Colombia (1999). His research interests include watershed science, forest and soil processes, ecosystem ecology, and landscape biophysical responses to environmental change. His field studies include highly impacted sites of the Andes Mountains of Colombia and the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador. He publishes in journals such as Global Change Biology, Water Resources Research, and Geophysical Research Letters. He is an avid runner and can be followed on Twitter @carbonshed.

This seminar focuses on understanding the physical geography of mountain environments and the processes that have created them, shaped them, and sustained them. There are several reasons for studying the environments of mountains: (a) they reveal integrative earth systems processes that can be readily observed and understood; (b) the processes are not oversimplified, but have spatial complexity at scales that can be methodically analyzed; and (c) mountains often reveal the intricate dynamics of coupled human-natural systems. We will explore mountain environments by concentrating on processes that shape the landscape, patterns that are apparent because of those active processes, and how the concept of scale (both through space and time) define the patterns that we observe when go on a hike or when we drive across the country. We will draw examples from different environments, including the Appalachian Mountains, the Rocky Mountains, and the Andes.

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GEOG 56.001: Local Places in a Globalizing World
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Altha Cravey

Altha Cravey became a geographer because she loves to travel and see new things. Her research focuses on globalization, labor, and gender issues in contemporary Mexico. She is beginning to publish on globalization in the US South as well. Cravey was born and raised in Illinois and Indiana and worked as a construction electrician for eleven years before finishing her undergraduate education. Her dissertation at the University of Iowa was supported by a four-year Iowa Fellowship and was published as Women and Work in Mexico’s Maquiladoras (Rowman and Littlefield, 1998). Cravey loves to bicycle around campus and Chapel Hill.

Globalization is a word we hear every day, but what does it mean for us in local places? Specifically, what can an understanding of globalization tell us about Carolina and nearby places? This seminar weaves together perspectives on globalization with hands-on exploration of Carolina and its place in today’s global “knowledge economy,” and the University’s founding in relation to the globalizing forces of that day. Our focus will shift back and forth between the global and the local, even to the microscale of our campus. We will learn through a variety of experiences and approaches, including fieldwork, old documents, and some introductory GIS (geographic information systems) exercises in addition to readings, class discussion, and group work. By the end of the seminar, students will not only have an understanding of globalization and the very real connections between the global and the local, but also a unique perspective on our university.

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GEOG 63.001: The Problem with Nature and Its Preservation
Gen Eds: PH
MWF, 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM
Gabriela Valdivia

Gabriela Valdivia is political ecologist in the Geography Department at UNC-CH. Her research examines the political dimensions of natural resource governance. Her research spans environmental justice, resource governance, and the ethics of modern lifestyles related to oil consumption. Her latest research project focuses on the impact of oil extraction, regulatory policy and environmental practices on Native Amazon and Afro-Ecuadorian communities. She grew up in Peru and conducted ethnographic research in Ecuador and Bolivia, and brings these experiences into her courses on Latin America and courses on political ecology and nature-society relations.

This seminar explores how different meanings of nature help create the societies in which we live and evaluate the implications of efforts to transform and preserve Nature. Students will address conceptions and models of nature-society relations relevant to today’s world, from resource extraction, to the transformation and movement of resources, to conservation. Through original research and discussions on “untouched” and “dirty” natures, students will develop informed perspectives on Nature’s heterogeneity, and how this powerful idea matters to the organization and future of different societies. The readings and discussion will evaluate Western (especially American) conceptions of Nature and compare with other perspectives, including indigenous world views on “the good life,” to better understand questions of sovereignty, value and sustainable futures.

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GEOG 89.001: Narrating Climate Change: Making the Global Personal
Gen Eds: NA, EE-Mentored Research
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Heidi Kim and Erika Wise

Professor Heidi Kim has taught a first-year seminar every year since she arrived at Carolina in 2010, and her classes have done original research on World War I veterans, the World War II Japanese American incarceration, the environmental history of Ocracoke in the Outer Banks, and more. Researching, publishing, and speaking on these specialties and others, such as the novels of William Faulkner, has taken her all over the world, including a fondly remembered book tour in Hawai’i. She is especially excited to be co-teaching a course that will make some use of her undergraduate biochemistry degree and quantitative skills.

Erika Wise’s research focuses on western North America’s climate and water resources in both recent times and in the prehistoric past. After earning a BS in Earth Sciences from UC- Santa Cruz, she worked at the USGS and later for an environmental consulting company. Dr. Wise became interested in Geography after some “odd” jobs (cooking on a dive boat, picking lychees, packing bananas) left her thinking about human-environment connections. She focused on climate-air quality interactions for her MA, then stumbled upon the University of Arizona’s world-renowned Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research and became a dendroclimatologist en route to her PhD.

Climate change has become one of the defining issues of our time. Studied in the sciences for decades, this topic has increasingly been taken up in the arts and humanities, as scholars seek to understand potential impacts on societies and our emotional response to a changing environment. Weather and climate have always impacted human societies in ways both large and small, and writers have reflected upon this in their literature, taking global level changes and turning them into personal narratives of drought and displacement; of hope and fear. In this first-year seminar, we aim to “make the global personal” by using personal narratives found in literature to introduce students to the science of climate change. Through an interdisciplinary examination of climate change, students will work both independently and collaboratively as they pose their own questions and make decisions to critically evaluate climate change information. We will emphasize the important role that communication has played in understanding climate change in both the sciences and in the humanities. Our goals for students in the course include: 1) learning about the global dimensions of climate change and applying that knowledge to local problems; 2) gaining familiarity with qualitative and quantitative research methods and skills; 3) exercising research skills by working independently and collaboratively; and 4) practicing and improving skills of critical reading, analytical writing, and oral presentation. We will accomplish these goals by careful selection of writings that introduce issues central to climate change, and then using those writings to delve into the underlying science while exploring how this science intersects with the personal narratives contained in the writings through critical reading and analytical writing. Students will put readings into action through a semester-long research project on a selected climate change issue.

Students may also register for this course under ENGL 89.001.

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Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)

GSLL 50.001: Literary Fantasy and Historical Reality
Gen Eds: LA, CI, NA
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Clayton Koelb

Clayton Koelb is Guy B. Johnson Distinguished Professor of German and Professor of English and Comparative Literature. Before coming to Carolina he was Professor of German and Comparative Literature at the University of Chicago, and he has been visiting Professor at Purdue, Minnesota, and Princeton. He has published many books on literary history and literary theory, including two that are especially relevant to this course: The Incredulous Reader, which deals with the issue of why we like stories we might not believe; and Legendary Figures, which examines the depiction of ancient history in modern novels.

This seminar focuses on five blockbuster pop novels about the distant past, from the time of early man (Clan of the Cave Bear) to the days of the conquistadors (Aztec). Each book tries to imagine how life might have been long ago. Do they get it right? We’ll check the facts and see. After working in small teams that report orally on evidence relating to the time and place treated fictionally in one of the works being read, students engage in research on a topic of their choice culminating in a substantial final project.

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GSLL 60.001: Avant-Garde Cinema: History, Themes, Textures
Gen Eds: VP
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Richard Langston

Richard Langston joined the faculty at Carolina in the fall of 2002, was promoted to the rank of associate professor in 2008, and then became full professor in 2019. His research focuses generally on twentieth- and twenty-first century German literature and film. More specifically, he is interested in the continued afterlife of the experimental arts beginning in the early twentieth century (expressionism, Dada, surrealism, etc.) in art and culture today.

Students explore the international history, filmic techniques and cultural meanings of non-narrative cinema of the 20th century. Students also transform in-class discussions and individual essays into video projects.

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GSLL 87.001: Literature Confronting Totalitarianism – CANCELLED 1/7/2020
Gen Eds: LA
TTH, 09:30AM – 10:45 AM
Stanislav Shvabrin

Stanislav Shvabrin has researched, published and lectured on the history and culture of Russian diasporas, comparative verse theory, poetics and politics of national memory and translation studies. Apart from his scholarly and editorial work on Vladimir Nabokov, he has written on Georgy Ivanov, Andrei Kurbsky, Mikhail Kuzmin and Marina Tsvetaeva.

What is totalitarianism? Can a portrayal of suffering, even death, under a totalitarian state, have artistic value, or must it remain only a political pamphlet? This seminar studies authors who reveal the crimes of totalitarianism, while also showing the moral strength and/or weaknesses of humans victimized by the totalitarian state.

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GSLL 89.001: Nature and Death: Ecological Crises in German Literature and Film
Gen Eds: LA, NA
MW, 03:35 PM – 04:50 PM
Christina Weiler

Christina Weiler was born in Oberstdorf, a small village in the Bavarian Alps, and has lived and taught in Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the US. Her research focuses on German literature, culture, and philosophy of the long eighteenth century in a comparative and interdisciplinary framework. Particularly, she is interested in German Romanticism, metaphor studies, philosophy of nature and the senses, and environmental studies. She has published on J.G. Herder, E.T.A. Hoffmann, and German film. In her research, she explores questions about nature and ecology. She is also interested in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

This seminar explores ecological crises and their depiction in German literature and film. We will focus on the central themes of nature and death. The texts and films we will discuss will range from early Romantic fairy tales to present-day documentaries and climate-change literature (cli-fi). We will encounter (human) animals in crisis. Together, we will face nuclear catastrophes, flooding, landslides, mass extinction, and climate change.

As a First-Year Seminar, this course goes beyond the traditional lecture and discussion format. It invites students to explore new and old ideas, engage with complex issues, and become active learners through inquiry, analysis, discovery, and action. Students will research a current ecological issue of their choice and give a presentation on it. They will also engage with the texts and films through critical analysis in writing and address an environmental issue creatively in their final project.

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GSLL 89.002: We, Robots: Identifying with our Automated Others in Fiction and Film
Gen Eds: LA, BN
MW, 03:35 PM – 04:50 PM
Eliza Rose

Eliza Rose teaches Central European Studies in the Department of Germanic & Slavic Languages and Literatures. Her areas of research are literature, film and art from East and Central Europe with a regional focus on Poland and a thematic focus on science fiction. She investigates how visual and material culture expresses changing attitudes toward science, technology and industry in the Socialist Bloc. She considers how utopian thought outlived the Stalinist period and still persists today. She is an author of science fiction, and her stories can be found in Interzone, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, and Galaxies SF.

The word “robot” was invented by Czech author Karel Capek in 1920. Robots were born out of fiction and continue to be coupled with fiction today. Film and television depict robots capable of deceit, diplomacy, labor, and love – robots who have mastered and often surpassed the strange art of being human. Robots are theorized, fetishized, and feared. Meanwhile, in contemporary robotics, to program a robot even capable of walking is a complex and costly feat of engineering, and fields like AI and machine learning have little interest in the humanoid form.

In this class, we will read and watch human fictions about robots to consider the question: what do they reveal about their human authors? Following a lineage of robot stories that begins with Karel Capek, we will read beyond the anglosphere and encounter futurist visions from East and Central Europe, with occasional detours into German and American culture.

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History (HIST)

HIST 55.001: Preventing Broken Hearts in North Carolina: History and Health Care in the South
Gen Eds: HS, EE-Mentored Research
T, 03:35 PM – 06:05 PM
Rachel Seidman and Ross Simpson

Rachel F. Seidman is Director of the Southern Oral History Program in the Center for the Study of the South at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, where she also holds adjunct appointments in History, American Studies, and Women & Gender Studies. Seidman has a Ph.D. in history from Yale University, and a BA from Oberlin College. Her new book is Speaking of Feminism: Todays Activists on the Past, Present and Future of the U.S. Women’s Movement (UNC Press, 2019). She is also the author of The Civil War: A History in Documents (Oxford University Press, 2001) which the National Social Studies Association named one of the Best Books in the Social Studies that year, and co-editor of Our Documents: 100 Milestone Documents from the National Archives (Oxford University Press, 2003). She was a 2018-19 Fulbright Scholar and spent the spring semester researching and teaching in Finland.

Dr. Ross Simpson is Professor of Medicine and Clinical Professor of Epidemiology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr. Simpson completed his medical degree at Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC, and followed that with an internship and residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in cardiology at the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago. He received both his PhD and MPH in Epidemiology from the UNC School of Public Health.

Dr. Simpson is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Disease and certified by the National Board of Medical Examiners. He is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the American College of Physicians and a Fellow of the National Lipid Association. Dr. Simpson is principal investigator of SUDDEN, a population-based study of the epidemiology of all-cause, out-of-hospital, sudden unexpected death (OHSUD) in adults under age 65. His other areas of research interest include the management of hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease, and he has lectured nationally and internationally on these topics. His work is widely published, and he serves as a reviewer for numerous medical publications.

In this interdisciplinary course, students will explore how scientists and humanists approach complex problems, and what happens when they work together to solve them. Team-taught by a cardiologist and a historian, this class will tackle several major questions: Why do people in rural areas of our state tend to face significant health challenges? What has changed about our state’s health care system over the last fifty years, and how have those changes benefitted people or harmed them? How do attitudes, experiences, and stories passed down through generations in families and communities shape how people view their own health, interact with healthcare providers, and make choices about medical care? How do life histories and family stories shape doctors’ medical choices and careers? What is the current state of our knowledge about cardiology and health inequalities? How can scientists and humanists work together to improve outcomes and prevent more broken hearts? Students will undertake seminar-style discussions, field trips, papers, and a final project. Emphasis will be on critical thinking in an interdisciplinary context.

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HIST 72H.001: Women’s Voices: 20th-Century European History in Female Memory (Honors) – CANCELLED 12/12/2019
Gen Eds: HS, CI, NA
T, 03:35 PM – 06:05 PM
Karen Hagemann

Karen Hagemann is the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of History and Adjunct Professor of the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense. She published widely in Modern German, European and Transatlantic history combing political, social, cultural and military history with women’s and gender history. Her most recent monograph is Revisiting Prussia’s Wars against Napoleon: History, Culture, and Memory (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Currently she has finished as the general editor the work on the Oxford Handbook on Gender, War and the Western World since 1600. (http://history.unc.edu/people/faculty/karenhagemann) and (https://hagemann.web.unc.edu/)

The seminar examines twentieth century European history through the lens of women’s autobiographical writings. It explores women’s voices from different generational, social and national backgrounds. We will read and discuss autobiographical texts by five women, who grew up in middle class families in Austria, Britain, France and Germany and wrote about their lives in the first half of the twentieth century. They all tried to make a difference in society and politics: Alice Salomon (1872-1948), a liberal Jewish-German social reformer and activist of the German middle class women’s movement; Vera Brittain (1893-1970), a British volunteer nurse during World War I, who became after the war a peace activist and writer; Toni Sender (1888-1964), a German-Jewish socialist and one of the first female parliamentarians in Weimar Germany, who like Salomon after the Nazi’s takeover in 1933 had to flee Germany; Genevieve De Gaulle-Anthonioz (1920-2002), a French resistance fighter during World War II and a survivor of the women’s concentration camp Ravensbrück; and Ruth Klüger (1931-), an Austrian-Jewish student who survived Auschwitz and became a professor in the U.S. The overarching theme of the seminar is the struggle of women for equal economic, social and political rights. We will explore what effects social and political changes, revolutions and wars as well as the Holocaust had on this struggle and the lives of women in Europe more general. Through intensive discussions of the reading in class, group work and the opportunity to do research on a female autobiography of their own choice, the seminar offers students a unique approach to twentieth century European history and will introduce them to research and writing.

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HIST 89.002: Watching TV to Understand History
John L. Townsend III FYS in History
Gen Eds: HS, NA
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Donald Reid

Donald Reid is an historian of the French Resistance and of labor in France. He received the Tanner Award for excellence in undergraduate teaching. Reid has published widely on the relation of literature and film to the interpretation and presentation of history. His most recent book, ‘Opening the Gates: The Lip Affair, 1968-1981’ (2018), will come out in French in the spring of 2020.

The television series is a media on which Americans and Europeans are increasingly dependent for their entertainment and education. Since 1945 and particularly since the early 1970s, the French have fought in the academy and in a diversity of sites in the public sphere over how to tell the history of the occupation and liberation of France during World War II. Can a television series present the complexities of this history? To address this question, students will learn about scriptwriting and filming and will analyze A French Village, a series with ambitious aesthetic goals—it was the first television series in France written following models derived from successful American series—as well as in the presentation of history.

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HIST 89.003: African American Music as History
Gen Eds: HS, US
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Jerma A. Jackson

Jerma A. Jackson is a historian who examines African American life and culture in the twentieth century.

Over the course of the twentieth century, African Americans built new communities and moved about the country in search of opportunity and freedom. To explore these efforts we will concentrate on music. We will investigate how black people across time and space created and used music. During the semester will direct our attention to three core groups–black artists, music entrepreneurs and audiences. From these multiple perspectives, we will explore two crucial themes: 1) how music nurtured distinctive communities and 2) the social and cultural contexts in which these communities emerged, flourished, and changed.

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Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST)

IDST 89.001: In the Flesh: The Constructed Body in Medieval and Renaissance Europe
Gen Eds: HS, WB
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Allison Gose, Lanier Walker, Jennifer Wu, Banu Gökariksel

Note: This course will be taught by three Royster Fellows under the supervision of the Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education, Dr. Banu Gökariksel.

Allison Gose is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History, concentrating on the early Middle Ages and the Carolingian Empire (751-888 CE). Her current research examines early medieval religious life, particularly monasticism, and the creation of intellectual networks along frontiers.

Lanier Walker is a doctoral student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature focusing on early modern British literature. Her research interests include material culture, the history of the book, manuscript culture, the history of medicine, and Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. Before coming to Carolina, Lanier studied and worked at the Victoria & Albert Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. She is a Caroline H. and Thomas S. Royster Fellow and the recipient of the James R. Gaskin Award for excellence in teaching composition.

Jennifer Wu is a Caroline H. and Thomas S. Royster Fellow in art history. She specializes in Northern Renaissance art and material culture. Her research interests include portraiture, transcultural exchange, and the intersection of word and image. Jennifer has served as a Samuel H. Kress Intern for museum education at the Ackland Art Museum. Prior to her studies in art history, she had extensive careers as a mathematics teacher in secondary education and as a business professional in marketing and sales.

Banu Gökariksel is an Associate Professor of Geography and the Royster Distinguished Professor at The Graduate School at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She has a joint appointment in the Curriculum of Global Studies and adjunct appointment in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies at Duke University. She served as the co-editor of the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies (2014-2018). Professor Gökariksel received her PhD in Geography from the University of Washington, Seattle and MA in Sociology/Anthropology from Bogaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey. She was awarded the 2017 Chapman Family University Teaching Award and the 2018 American Association of Geographers Enhancing Diversity Award. She is the co-director of Duke Middle East in Europe summer program.

Professor Gökariksel’s research examines bodies, intimacy, and everyday spaces as key sites of politics and geopolitics. Her work addresses geography of religion and feminist political and cultural geographies and engages feminist and social theory to analyze embodied and lived experiences of religion and secularism, the production of social difference, and the formation of subjects, borders, and territory. She has been conducting multi-method fieldwork research that focuses on the politics of everyday life and questions of religion, secularism, and pluralism in Turkey since 1996. Professor Gökariksel is interested in similar questions about religious, racial, and gender/sexual diversity, shared spaces, and social justice in the US and in Europe (specifically Germany) as well.

What are bodies? This may seem like a simple question to ask given that each of us has one. But the body you inhabit as you read this paragraph is more than a living system of flesh and blood; indeed, your body is as much a cultural, political and social symbol as it is a biological animal.
This course will explore the construction of bodies in medieval and Renaissance Europe through three interdisciplinary lenses: the historical, the art historical, and the literary. The class will focus on reading and viewing primary source evidence, from plays and poems to chronicles and works of art, and analyzing how this material speaks to persisting or innovative ways of understanding the body and what is “normal.” Ultimately, students will use the three disciplines to generate a working definition of bodies and their meanings in the world, both then and now.

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Information and Library Science (INLS)

INLS 73.001: Smart Cities
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Arcot Rajasekar

Arcot Rajasekar is a Professor in the School of Library and Information Sciences, a Chief Scientist at the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) and co-Director of Data Intensive Cyber Environments (DICE) Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A leading proponent of policy-oriented large-scale data management, Rajasekar has several research projects funded by the NSF, NARA, NIH and other funding agencies. Rajasekar has a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Maryland at College Park and has more than 100 publications in the areas of data grids, digital library, persistent archives, logic programming and artificial intelligence. His latest projects include the Datanet Federation Consortium and the Data Bridge that is building a social network platform for scientific data.

A smart city is one where the needs of a populace meet the needs of environmental sustainability. The balance between the social and environmental issues is governed by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) that power a smart city infrastructure. In this course, we learn about the influence of urban networks, smart city urban planning, energy as a catalyst of sustainable development, smart city infrastructure, sustainable transportation, flow of information and communications, smart grids, digital infrastructure and the role of data and information technology. We will discuss criteria for measuring the smartness of a city, including quality of life, citizen governance, and discuss issues that go towards the making of a future smart city. Several case studies will be presented with guest lecturers invited to present on critical thinking and practices in smart city development.

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Latin American Studies (LTAM)

LTAM 89.001: The United States and Latin America
Gen Eds: HS, GL
T, 03:30 PM – 06:15 PM
Louis Pérez

Louis Pérez – Principal teaching fields include twentieth-century Latin America, the Caribbean, and Cuba. Recent publications include: Cuba and the United States: Ties of Singular Intimacy, 1770s-1980s (3rd ed., Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2003); Cuba: Between Reform and Revolution (5th ed., New York: Oxford University Press, 2014); On Becoming Cuban: Identity, Nationality and Culture (2nd ed., Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2007); Cuba in the American Imagination: Metaphor and the Imperial Ethos (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008): The Structure of Cuban History: Meaning and Purpose of the Past (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013). Pérez has served on a number of journal editorial boards, including: Inter-American Economic Affairs, Latin American Research Review, The Americas, and the American Historical Review. He is presently the series editor of “Envisioning Cuba” at the University of North Carolina Press.

The United States and Latin America will offer a FYS inter-disciplinary seminar dedicated to an examination of U.S. relations with the Latin America and responses in Latin America to U.S. policy, including dictatorship, revolution, and immigration. LTAM 89 will be a thematic examination of U.S.-Latin America relations spanning the twentieth century into the present. Students will study relations as a process within the logic of competing national interests and conflicting national aspirations. Attention will be given to the process by which the Untied States has pursued strategic objectives, economic interests, and political influence and the impact on Latin American political institutions, economic development, social relationships, and cultural forms.

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Marine Sciences (MASC)

MASC 51.001: Global Warming: Science, Social Impacts, Solutions
Gen Eds: PL, QI
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Marc Alperin

Dr. Marc Alperin’s work involves the use of stable isotopes as natural tracers of sedimentary processes. He is particularly interested in carbon cycling in coastal sediments and its role in the global carbon budget. Recent projects have included studies of the biogeochemistry of organic compounds dissolved in sediment pore waters, the fate of organic matter deposited on the seafloor, anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments, and the effects of dissolved organic nitrogen and carbon in atmospheric precipitation on coastal ecosystems. Dr. Alperin also co-leads the CHAOS Biogeochemistry Laboratories.

Students will examine evidence that human activity has caused global warming, investigate scientists’ ability to predict climate change, and discuss the political and social dimensions of global climate change.

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MASC 57H.001: From “The Sound of Music” to “The Perfect Storm” (Honors)
Gen Eds: PL, QI
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Alberto Scotti

Professor Alberto Scotti’s research focuses on problems of applied fluid dynamics which are environmentally and/or geophysically relevant. Presently, he is involved in several projects involving stratified flows interacting with topography, internal waves (linear and nonlinear) and boundary layer turbulence using a combination of theoretical and numerical tools.

We are constantly surrounded by phenomena that are wave-like in nature. We communicate over short distances with sound waves, while we use electromagnetic waves over long distances. We see waves when we stand at beach, and the weather we experience is controlled very often by wave-like features of the jet stream.

In this seminar, we will develop the conceptual framework necessary to
understand waves, starting from laboratory observations. The main goal is to expose the common traits of waves, and how they can be used to enhance our understanding and predict the outcome of a broad range of important physical phenomena.

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Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 89.001: Mathematics of Voting
Gen Eds: QI
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Linda Green

Linda Green graduated from the University of Chicago with a B.S. and M.S. in mathematics and from Princeton University with a Ph.D. in mathematics. After doing research in 3-dimensional topology, she worked in industry developing mathematical models of breast cancer. She joined the faculty of UNC Chapel Hill in 2013. Since then, she has taught every class in the Precalculus-Calculus sequence as well as first year seminars. Dr. Green was a 2018 recipient of the UNC Math Department’s Teaching Award. A problem solver at heart, she is eager to turn her attention to the problem of evaluating and improving election systems.

What properties should a fair election have and are these properties achievable in theory and in practice? How can mathematics and statistics be used to expose election fraud and gerrymandering? What might voting systems look like if they were designed by mathematicians? Students will address these questions as they compare different election systems, evaluate their strengths, weaknesses, and abuses, and design improvements to current structures. Topics will include ranked voting, approval voting, exit polls, election fraud, and gerrymandering. The course will include some data analysis, but no prior experience is needed.

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MATH 89.002: Unfolding Infinity: Mathematical Origami and Fractal Symmetry
Gen Eds: QI
TTH,
09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Mark McCombs

Mark McCombs is a Teaching Professor of Mathematics. He teaches Selected Topics in Mathematics, Calculus 1–3, Discrete Math, and the FYS, “Mathematics, Art, and the Human Experience.” He strives to help students explore how mathematical ideas resonate with fields typically perceived as non-mathematical. He has begun using UNC’s BeAM network to develop maker-based activities that cultivate students’ analytical creativity. Dr. McCombs enjoys making 3D origami sculpture and digital fractal art (https://www.deviantart.com/boygnius/gallery/), some of which was exhibited at the 2018 Bridges Conference in Stockholm, Sweden. One of his sculptures is now on display in Stockholm’s National Museum of Science and Technology!

Have you ever wanted to be able to hold infinity in the palm of your hand? This course engages students in an exploration of the interplay between mathematics, origami, and fractal symmetry. Learning objectives will include mastering basic origami folding techniques, identifying and applying fundamental symmetry operations, recognizing and analyzing fractal symmetry, and creating geometric tessellations. Students will use image editing software (Illustrator and Photoshop), mathematical imaging software (Geometer’s Sketchpad and Ultra Fractal), and the laser cutter in UNC’s BeAM space, to design and create modular origami and fractal tessellation artwork. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and small group work, as well as submit short written assignments on course topics.

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Music (MUSC)

MUSC 63.001: Music on Stage and Screen
Gen Eds: VP, CI
MW, 03:35 PM – 04:50 PM
Anne MacNeil

Before joining the faculty at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where she holds appointments in the Department of Music and the Department of English and Comparative Literatures, Professor Anne MacNeil taught at Northwestern University and the University of Texas at Austin. Her areas of specialization include Renaissance music, music and spectacle, commedia dell’arte, opera, performance studies, historiography, and digital humanities. Her current research encompasses digital humanities, the use of boats, barges, and waterways as venues for musical and theatrical performance in and around Renaissance Mantua; early-modern laments; operatic settings of tales of the Trojan Wars; and the intersections of music, ceremony, and biography in the lives of Isabella d’Este, Margherita Farnese, and Eleonora de’ Medici. Professor MacNeil is Co-Director of the international consortium IDEA: Isabella d’Este Archive (https://isabelladeste.web.unc.edu), an interdisciplinary digital humanities environment for studies relating to Isabella d’Este (1474-1539).

This seminar is designed to offer students the tools and techniques for understanding multi-media, staged musical works like opera, musical theater, and film. The goal of the seminar is to develop students’ analytical skills in verbal and non-verbal media and to encourage their visualization of the potential and implications of artistic forms and structures. No ability to read music is required. We will discuss musical, visual, and textual narratives, source materials, and the various means by which such multi-media artworks are transmitted to modern audiences (e.g., written scores, LPs/CDs, staged performances, movies, etc.). We will focus on music for silent films, and students will create their own soundtracks for silent film scenes.

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MUSC 89.001: Songs of the Slave: The History of the African American Spiritual
Gen Eds: VP, US
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:15 PM
LaToya Lain

Applauded for her “wonderfully rich,” “powerful,” and “captivating” voice, American singer LaToya Lain, a native of New Orleans, Louisiana, studied voice at the University of Cincinnati – College Conservatory of Music, Florida State University, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Before joining the voice faculty of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dr. Lain served on the voice faculties of Central Michigan University, New York University, and Oakwood University. Equally at home in the teaching studio and on the performance stage, LaToya continues to perform solo recitals, oratorio, and opera worldwide. She is currently a member of the star-studded cast of Porgy and Bess at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. Dr. Lain’s research includes the intensive study and performance practice of Negro Spirituals. She has performed her lecture recital “Narrative of a Slave Woman: Songs of Hope, Justice, and Freedom” on concert stages and universities throughout the world. Consequently, she was one of 57 experts invited to author a short chapter in The Voice Teacher’s Cookbook: Creative Recipes for Teachers of Singing, as part of a series addressed to various groups of musicians. Her chapter is called “Delectable Diction and Dialect in the Negro Spiritual” and it was published this summer by Meredith Music Resources.

Born out of the oppressions of slavery, the spiritual is a folk song created by Africans forcibly brought to America and enslaved for 250 years. Spirituals were created through the combination of African melodies, rhythms, and performance practices with the influences of European Christian Hymnody. The Library of Congress has collected over 6,000 of these melodies. They contain themes of suffering, hope, rebellion, and longing. They tell the story of Africans in America through song and has become the catalyst through which all “American Music” was born. This course will examine and chronicle the origin and performance practice of the Negro Spiritual, it’s presence throughout American History and its influences on Contemporary American Music.

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Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD)

PWAD 69.001: Wars and Veterans: Iran, Iraq, and Afghanistan
Gen Eds: LA, CI, GL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Claudia Yaghoobi

Claudia Yaghoobi is a Roshan Institute Assistant Professor in Persian Studies in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She teaches courses on Middle Eastern and Persian Literature. Yaghoobi’s recent publications include “Yusuf’s Queer Beauty in Persian Cultural Productions”, Comparatist (2016); “Socially Peripheral, Symbolically Central: Sima in Behrouz Afkhami’s Showkaran”, Journal of Asian Cinema (2016); “Subjectivity in ?A??ar’s Shaykh San’an Story in The Conference of the Birds”, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture (2014); and “Sexual Trauma and Spiritual Experience: Rabi?a al-?Adawiyya and Margery Kempe”, Persian Literary Studies Journal (2014). Her book, Subjectivity in ‘Attar, Persian Sufism, and European Mysticism, will be released in May 2017 by Purdue University Press.

In this course, we will explore the various ways that wars and conflicts, particularly Iran-Iraq, U.S.-Iraq, and U.S.-Afghanistan wars, have been portrayed in literature, film, and photography. We will attempt to deepen and enrich our understanding of war experienced by both veterans and civilians of each country. We will examine the impact of war on the human psyche in regards with violence. We will read books by American war veterans and Middle East authors contemplating the wars and their consequences. We will look at each writer’s perspective on war and their interpretation of it comparatively. In order to enhance our understanding of the phenomenon of war, we will also read supplementary articles on criticism of war and a few on psychology of war. There will be film screening on these wars which will give students the opportunity to examine these wars in a different medium than just literature. We will also look at war photography and analyze the perspectives of each photographer and the impact war has not only on people who are involved but on outside observers as well. All readings will be in English. The class will be conducted in the form of a combination of lectures, discussion, and experimentations.

Students may also register for this course under ASIA 69.001.

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Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 63.001: Mind, Brain, and Consciousness
Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Ram Neta

Ram Neta is Professor of Philosophy at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he has taught since 2003. His research is an effort to understand what it is to be rational, and why rationality matters. In pursuing this broad question, he ends up addressing lots of related questions about the role of knowledge in our decision-making, the ways in which our training informs our experience of the world, and the function of evidence in deliberation. He has published scores of articles on these and related topics in academic journals.

Animals who grow up in the wild exhibit a great deal of individual variation in their appetites and aversions, and we can explain some of this variation by appeal to ontogenetic factors, some of it by appeal to environmental factors, and some by appeal to the interaction of these two factors. But humans who grow up in civilization exhibit an even wider range of individual psychological variation, and this wider variation can be explained only by appeal to a range of factors that have come to be known as “psychodynamic”. In this course, we will study these psychodynamic factors. We will devote a little more than half of the semester reading Freud’s lectures on psychoanalysis, and the rest of the semester to reading an overview of other psychodynamic theories of the mind, such as object relations theory and self psychology. We will develop our understanding of these various theories by applying them to the interpretation of a variety of characters in modern fiction, much of which has been shaped by the influence of these ideas. Our goal will be eventually to be able to understand idiosyncratic features of our own psychologies by appeal to some of these psychodynamic theories.

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PHIL 68H.001: Moral Life (Honors)
Gen Eds: PH
MW, 03:35 PM – 04:50 PM
Douglas MacLean

Douglas MacLean’s current research focuses on practical ethics and issues in moral and political theory that are particularly relevant to practical concerns. Most of his recent writing examines how values do and ought to influence decisions, both personal decisions and government policies.

Modern (post-Enlightenment) moral philosophy is primarily concerned with analyzing or defining moral concepts. This includes basic or “thin” concepts like good, bad, right, wrong, and ought; and it includes “thick” concepts that are more cognitively specific, such as kindness, cruelty, courage, cowardice, empathy, integrity, or selfishness. Thick concepts are often used to characterize moral virtues and vices.
Another aim of moral philosophy, which has been less pronounced in the modern era but was the central moral question in ancient times is: What is the proper or ideal life for a human being? How ought we to live? This seminar will focus on that ancient question, but it will draw heavily on modern philosophical works and concepts to help illuminate it.

We will begin with the Socrates, the first philosopher in the Western tradition to focus specifically on ethics, and then we will look briefly at other Greek philosophers, including Aristotle and the Stoic philosopher Epictetus. From there we move to more modern and contemporary philosophy, examining what modern moral theories tell us about the nature of a morally ideal life and what critics of these theories say about how human beings ought to live. Readings will be drawn primarily from philosophy but some literature and movies will also be on the syllabus.

The class will be conducted as a seminar, and students will be expected to take the lead in discussing various topics. There will be no exams, but there will be at least five papers plus reports to the class. Students will also be required to come up with examples of morally good lives and explain and defend their choice of those examples.

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PHIL 85.001: Reason, Religion, and Reality in the Copernican Revolution
Gen Eds: PH
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Marc Lange

Marc Lange is Theda Perdue Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and (for the past eight years) Chair of the Philosophy Department. He specializes in the philosophy of science and related areas of metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophy of mathematics, along with the philosophy of physics and the philosophy of biology. He is the author of many books and articles on these subjects. He won UNC’s 2016 Distinguished Teaching Award for Post-Baccalaureate Instruction and a Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professorship for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. (For a brief sample of his teaching, see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_SKmqh5Eu4Y)

Although we know that Copernicus and Galileo were correct in theorizing that the Earth orbits the Sun (rather than vice versa), it is less clear that the evidence they possessed for their theory was conclusive. The ways that Copernicus and Galileo argued for their theory reveal a great deal about how scientific theories are tested. In this seminar, we will examine their arguments in order to better understand the logic by which scientific theories are confirmed and, ultimately, justified. We will consider whether astronomy (and other sciences) can really discover that a theory not only accurately predicts our observations, but also accurately describes what we cannot see from where we are, with our naked eyes. We will think about whether the Catholic Church was justified at the time in regarding Copernicanism as merely one among many fairly successful techniques for predicting the night sky’s appearance. We will also investigate whether Galileo could argue for his telescope’s reliability and use mere “thought-experiments” to defend Copernicanism. To grapple with these various issues, we will read some history of science (and some of what 16th- and 17th-century astronomers actually wrote), and also some philosophical accounts of the logic of theory testing. We will also look closely at the events surrounding the notorious trial of Galileo. Ultimately, we will gain a more nuanced conception of scientific reasoning and of how scientific revolutions occur. No prior background in philosophy or in science is presupposed.

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PHIL 89.001: Self: Transformation and Aspiration
Gen Eds: PH
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Jennifer Morton

Professor Jennifer Morton is an associate professor in the Philosophy department and the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics program. Her research focuses on moral and political philosophy and philosophy of education. Her book Moving Up Without Losing Your Way (Princeton University Press, 2019) explores the ethical costs that first-generation and low-income students face in the path of upward mobility.

Novels, memoirs, and aisles of self-help books attest to our desire to transform ourselves. Yet, the idea of self-transformation is puzzling. If a person decides to embark on a new adventure in the hopes of transforming herself, can she really become a new self or is she merely exhibiting her preexisting adventurousness? What about the aspiring college student who is hoping that college will change him? How can we make sense of his aspiration? In this class, we will critically examine the idea of aspiration and transformation. Readings for this course will be drawn from philosophical, literary, and popular literature.

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Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)

PHYS 53.001: Handcrafting in the Nanoworld: Building Models and Manipulating Molecules
Gen Eds: PL
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Michael R. Falvo

Michael R. Falvo is a Research Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. He received his BS in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1991, and his PhD in physics from UNC-CH in 1997. He is a former winner of the UNC Student Undergraduate Teaching Award presented annually to three professors by the undergraduate student body, and is a member of the UNC Academy of Distinguished Teaching Scholars. His current research focuses is on the physics of proteins and cells. He stretches, pokes and prods nanometer scale biological systems such as viruses, biopolymer strands, and individual protein molecules to test their mechanical properties. Falvo has a long-standing interest in science outreach and frequently presents workshops for the public and k-12 teachers. He has also co-authored two books on nanoscience for middle school science teachers.

The nanoworld is a strange and captivating place. It is a world of molecules vibrating trillions of times a second, quantum dots emitting rainbow colors, DNA encoding information in molecular bonds, and protein motors driving the complex machinery of the cell. At this scale, nature has unique rules and behaviors, some of which are amazing and unexpected. We are still uncovering these rules, and are only beginning to apply this new knowledge to technology. Can we build molecular machines that cure disease or clean up the environment? Can we make computers using single molecule transistors? How do viruses and other bio systems “assemble” themselves? In this seminar, we dive into the basic physics, chemistry and biology that describe the nanometer scale world. We will also try to distinguish the true promise of nanoscience from the hype. Students will engage in class discussions informed by their weekly reading of selected scientific literature. They will also participate in small group projects building physical models of nanoscale objects and phenomena, and perform calculations to gain a quantitative understanding of the physics underlying the nanoworld. No prerequisite is required for this course, but a spirit of adventure is.

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PHYS 89.001: How Do We See?
Gen Eds: PH
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Maggie Cao and Laurie McNeil

Maggie Cao is the David G. Frey Assistant Professor of art history. She studies eighteenth and nineteenth-century American art. She received her B.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard and joined the faculty at UNC in 2016. Her intellectual interests include intersections of art and finance and the visual culture of science and technology. She has published essays on topics including camouflage, counterfeiting, financial bubbles, and arctic exploration.

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her PhD in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. In her research laboratory, she uses optics and lasers to study the properties of semiconductors and biological materials.

We will explore “how we see” in two senses. In the first, literal, sense we will explore the physics of vision and how it allows us to perceive the location and size of objects as well as their color. In the second, metaphorical, sense we will explore visual artifacts and how objects are represented in artistic media. We will experiment with image formation using mirrors and lenses and try to understand how painters in the Renaissance used such tools to create their art. We will examine the artistic manipulation of visual perception using such techniques as linear perspective and anamorphosis. Finally, we will use techniques such as infrared reflectivity to “make the unseen seen,” extending our visual powers to explore artistic processes. This course is taught by a professor of physics and a professor of art history, each bringing her own perspective to what it means to see.

Students may also register for this course under ARTH 89.002.

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Political Science (POLI)

POLI 52.001: Friendship in Political Thought
Gen Eds: PH, CI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Susan Bickford

Susan Bickford grew up in rural Ohio, did her undergraduate work at Bryn Mawr College, and received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Her research and teaching focus on feminist political theory, the impact of conflict and inequality on democratic politics, and ancient Greek political thought. She is the author of The Dissonance of Democracy: Listening, Conflict, and Citizenship. In 2013, she made it to the regional tryouts for Jeopardy, but Alex Trebek has not yet invited her to be on the show.

From Facebook friends to BFFs, friendship is a crucial part of our lives; friendship has also been a crucial concern in the history of political thought. In this class, we will investigate what relationships have been designated “friendship” in the past, and investigate why are they of such concern to political and ethical philosophers. What is the work that “friendship” does in the political and ethical thought of ancient thinkers like Plato, Aristotle, Cicero? How – and why – do Montaigne and Emerson write about it? Where do we find the most provocative and insightful contemporary writing about friendship? Above all: what is friendship’s relation to politics and to ethical life?

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POLI 57.001: Democratic Governance in Contemporary Latin America
John L. Townsend III FYS in Political Science
Gen Eds: SS, BN
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Jonathan Hartlyn

Jonathan Hartlyn is the Kenneth J. Reckford Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He grew up in Latin America, in Cuba, Mexico and Peru. He received his B.A. from Clark University, and a M.Phil. and Ph.D. from Yale University. His research and teaching interests focus on the comparative politics of Latin America, especially with relation to questions of democratization, political institutions, and state-society relations. He spent several months in Argentina in fall 2017 advancing on his current research on democratic governance in the region. He also has on-going research on constitutional change in Latin America and on the dynamics of executive approval.

He has authored or co-authored dozens of articles and chapters on democratic transitions, gender and politics, migration and political parties, public opinion and institutional trust, and elections and electoral governance, among other topics, in multiple journals and edited volumes. His books include: The Politics of Coalition Rule in Colombia; The Struggle for Democratic Politics in the Dominican Republic; and the co-authored Latin America in the Twenty First Century: Toward a New Socio-Political Matrix. His publications have been translated into Spanish, Portuguese, German and Persian.

With a wave of democratization that began in 1978 and peaked in the mid-1990s, Latin America is experiencing the most prolonged and extensive period of democratic politics in its history. For most countries in the region, state power is accessed through reasonably competitive, fair, and clean elections, in contrast to past patterns of authoritarian rule, though with exceptions and setbacks. In spite of this democratic shift, in many countries in the region the exercise of state power reflects historical continuities or new examples of corruption, clientelism and other abuses of state resources. This complicates the ability of governments to provide citizen security, economic development and social inclusion.

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Psychology and Neuroscience (NSCI/PSYC)

NSCI 61.001: Drug Addiction: Fact and Fiction
Gen Eds: PL, CI
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Kathryn (Kate) Reissner

Kathryn (Kate) Reissner received her PhD from the University of California, where she performed research on the neurobiology of learning and memory. Dr. Reissner went on to perform postdoctoral research at the Medical University of South Carolina, where she studied the role of glutamate transport in the development of cocaine addiction. She joined the Department of Psychology at UNC-CH as an Assistant Professor in 2013. Research in the Reissner lab is focused on the long lasting changes in the brain’s reward circuitry induced by cocaine abuse which mediate enduring vulnerability to relapse, with emphasis on neuron-astrocyte interactions.

Illicit and legal drugs make the user feel good but also promote the development of dependence and long-lasting changes in brain physiology. In this biological psychology seminar, we will take a multi-disciplinary approach to learn about the neurobiology of drug addiction with a focus on the following questions: How do we define addiction? What are the beneficial and harmful psychological effects of abused drugs? What has scientific research revealed about the neurobiology of the “brain on drugs”? Do most users become addicts? How is drug addiction treated? We will tackle these and other questions through classroom discussions/debates, lectures, movies, reading and writing assignments, and an optional tour of a residential substance abuse recovery program. In this communication intensive seminar, critical analysis of information about the neurobiology of addiction will be used to separate fact from fiction.

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PSYC 54.001: Families and Children
Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Shauna Cooper

Dr. Shauna Cooper studies the cultural and contextual factors that contribute to positive youth development, with a specific focus on African American adolescents and families. Visit her online: African American Youth Development Research Laboratory.

In this First Year Seminar we will consider family as a context for children’s development. Contemporary families are highly diverse, and topics covered in class reflect this diversity. We will examine characteristics of traditional, divorced and step families, single parents, gay and lesbian parents, and immigrant families. In addition to taking two examinations, students will interview a family member and write a five-page paper based on that interview. Each student will also give a class presentation on a family-related topic.

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PSYC 68.001: Psychology of Emotion
Gen Eds: SS
MWF, 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM
Kristen Lindquist

Dr. Kristen Lindquist is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and the director of the Carolina Affective Science Lab. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Boston College and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Harvard University Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative and the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging. Dr. Lindquist’s research uses social cognitive, psychophysiological and neuroscience methods to understand the nature of human emotion.

This seminar is designed especially for students interested in exploring the psychological and neuroscientific study of emotion. The seminar assumes students will have diverse backgrounds and there are no pre-requisites. Topics will include theoretical models of emotion process and structure, as well as discussions of psychological research bearing on questions such as “Can you read emotions in the faces of other people?” (emotional expressions), “How is emotion expressed in the body?” (autonomic physiology), “Where do emotions live in the brain?” (affective neuroscience), “Is emotion a source of wisdom or the enemy of rationality?” (emotion and reasoning), “Does emotion help or hurt your relationships with other people?” (emotion and social behavior), “Can you control your emotions or do they control you?” (emotion regulation), “Do emotions drive you crazy?” (emotion and psychopathology) and “Are women really the more emotional sex?” (gender and emotion). A range of perspectives in psychology will be explored, spanning social, cultural, developmental, clinical, cognitive and comparative psychology disciplines. Each week, a portion of the classes will be dedicated to discussions of research studies led by Dr. Lindquist. The rest of the classes will be less formal group-based discussions and demonstrations. Discussions will be used to explain or demonstrate especially important ideas, to discuss concepts covered in the assigned readings and to discuss the “real world” implications of class topics. Several discussion sessions will be dedicated to visits to Dr. Lindquist’s lab and the Biomedical Research Imaging Center, where students can experience research techniques and methods in a hands-on setting. Students will be evaluated based on exam performance, on a written research proposal, on an oral presentation of the research proposal and on participation in discussions.

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PSYC 89.001: Talking about Numbers: Communicating Research Results to Others
Gen Eds: PL, QI
MW, 12:20 PM – 01:35 PM
Viji Sathy

Viji Sathy is an award-winning Teaching Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill teaching the very classes she credits for charting her own professional career in Quantitative Psychology: statistics and research methods. Professor Sathy is also the Program Evaluator of the of the Chancellor’s Science Scholars a program aimed at increasing representation of underrepresented students in STEM PhDs. She is engaged in numerous activities on campus using data-driven techniques to promote student success. She leads faculty development workshops around the country on active learning as well as inclusified classrooms in an effort to broaden participation in the sciences. She was born in India but grew up in a small town in NC and is a proud recipient of public education (K-PhD) in NC, with three degrees from UNC-Chapel Hill.

How do you persuade others with numbers? What general principles should you think about when sharing data with others? What are the common biases and fallacies that we have in understanding numbers and statistics? How do you figure out if you should trust results from research studies reported in the media? This seminar introduces students to the many ways that data are reported to the public in our everyday lives-through advertising and media as well as scientific journal articles. Students in this course will create models in the BeAM spaces on campus that will help make abstract topics about numbers more concrete. Students will learn practical skills that will be useful in subsequent classes at Carolina and after graduation (e.g., in graduate school, in work, as a consumer, as a citizen).

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Public Policy (PLCY)

PLCY 51.001: The Global Environment in the 21st Century
Gen Eds: GL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Elizabeth Sasser

Elizabeth Sasser is a public policy practitioner with extensive experience in federal and state government. Prior to joining UNC Public Policy as a Lecturer, Elizabeth served as policy advisor at the U.S. Department of Energy during the first term of the Obama Administration. She worked with Administration leadership on strategies to advance the nation’s interests on environmental and energy issues, focusing primarily on bilateral relations with China. Prior to her time in the Administration, she was a policy advisor to two North Carolina governors on energy and education issues. She has a B.A. and an M.P.P. from Duke University and studied at Peking University in Beijing, China, where she developed a fluency in Mandarin.

Many serious environmental threats are global in scope. Just think of the way we produce and consume energy; how waste produced in one corner of the world travels by air, sea and land to pollute another corner; and how ecosystems that transcend national boundaries are impacted by human behavior. Who is responsible for governing these global environmental challenges? This seminar explores linkages among nations, global environmental institutions and the environmental problems they cause and seek to rectify. We will examine how global environmental policy is made, with specific attention to the roles of institutions and nations. Topics include the evolution of environmental policy in the United States; China impact on the global environment; global environmental institutions such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change; risks to the environment through pollution of land and sea by waste; and global energy and environmental implications of shale gas and fracking. No prerequisites are necessary.

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PLCY 75.001: Debates in Public Policy and Racial Inequality
Gen Eds: SS, CI
MW, 02:30 PM – 03:45 PM
Cassandra Davis

Dr. Cassandra Davis is a Research Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Within the last four years, Dr. Davis has held the role of principal investigator on five research evaluations, with the most recent of these projects focused on the impacts of hurricanes on schools, educators, and students in low-income communities. Dr. Davis has also collaborated with school districts to assist them with improving graduation rates of underrepresented groups, supporting students with learning differences, identifying opportunity and achievement gaps amongst students, assessing the quality of professional development training for school personnel, and investigating ways to engage parents. Dr. Davis’ areas of interest include education policy, the impact of natural disaster on schools and communities, program evaluation, qualitative research methods, and the social and historical context in education.

Dr. Davis holds a Ph.D. in Education from UNC Chapel Hill.

Is inequality a policy choice? Students in this course will examine and participate in debates around whether and which policies have the capacity to create, sustain, exacerbate, and/or ameliorate inequalities in the United States.

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PLCY 80.001: Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Economic Growth
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Maryann Feldman

Maryann Feldman is Carolina’s S.K. Heninger Distinguished Professor of Public Policy, adjunct Professor of Finance at Kenan Flagler Business School and Research Fellow at the Kenan Institute for Private Enterprise. She has also taught at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Toronto. She attained her Ph.D. in Economics at Carnegie-Mellon University and is author of more than 80 academic articles, 2 books, and 9 edited volumes. Her work focuses on the spatial distribution of economic activity and understanding the factors that contribute to making certain places economically vibrant and creative. Her most recent work explores place-based economic processes that contribute to emerging industries, entrepreneurship and regional transformation. She is currently researching the industrial genesis of the Research Triangle Region.

This seminar provides an introduction to entrepreneurship and innovation with a focus on their geographic concentration in specific places. Using the Research Triangle region as our laboratory, this course will consider how regional economies are transformed through innovation and entrepreneurship. The course emphasizes entrepreneurs as part of a larger societal system that both determines what is possible and also changes in response to entrepreneurial actions. The role of public policy in providing incentives for entrepreneurship and innovation and setting social priorities is discussed. Wednesday sessions will be devoted to using data analytics to examine trends in innovation, entrepreneurship and places.

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Religious Studies (RELI)

RELI 65.001: Myth, Philosophy, and Science in the Ancient World
Gen Eds: PH, WB
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Zlatko Pleše

Zlatko Pleše received his PhD in Classics at Yale University, where he specialized in ancient philosophy and medicine, early Christianity, Hellenistic rhetoric and Coptic language. He taught at various universities in Europe and the US, including Yale and Wesleyan University, and is currently Professor of Ancient Mediterranean religions (Greco-Roman world, early Christianity and late antiquity) at Carolina. He has published monographs and articles on Platonist philosophers of the Roman imperial period, ancient Gnostic and Hermetic writings, apocryphal gospels, and early modern theories of nationhood in South-Eastern Europe.

This interdisciplinary course explores various, often conflicting ways of conceiving and shaping reality in the ancient world – religious, scientific, and philosophical. The course is organized around a series of case studies: (1) the formation and makeup of the cosmos; (2) the origin of mankind and its sexual differentiation; (3) the invention of the ‘self’; (4) the origin and nature of dreams; (5) foundations of law, justice, and morality. Short writing assignments, in-class discussions, oral presentations, and a term-paper will be used to introduce students into a complex intellectual network of natural scientists, philosophers, and oral story-tellers throughout the ancient Mediterranean world. Readings include Near Eastern mythical narratives and Homeric poems and hymns; selections from the earliest Greek philosophers through Plato’s dialogues to Hellenistic and Roman philosophical schools; works from the famous Hippocratic corpus and Galen’s medical treatises; and various religious texts from ancient Greece and Rome, early Christianity, and late antiquity.

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RELI 78.001: Reading the Bible: Now and Then
Gen Eds: LA, WB
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
David Lambert

David Lambert is interested in the Hebrew Bible as a textual object whose interpretation stands to tell us as much about its readers and their communities as it does about ancient Israelite origins. In that vein, he looks to bring historical critical approaches to the Hebrew Bible into closer conversation with the history of biblical interpretation.This theme comes to the fore in his forthcoming book, How Repentance Became Biblical: Judaism, Christianity, and the Interpretation of Scripture. It considers the development of repentance as a concept around the turn of the Common Era and how it came to be naturalized as an essential component of religion through a series of reading practices that allowed nascent Jewish and Christian communities to locate repentance in Scripture. He works with a wide range of literature, and this project involves texts from throughout the corpus of the Hebrew Bible, as well as late Second Temple Judaism (Apocrypha, Pseudepigrapha, and Dead Sea Scrolls), Hellenistic Judaism, the New Testament, and Rabbinic literature. He is now focusing on a series of studies that aim to assess more broadly how modern Western notions of the subject have shaped biblical interpretation and, especially, translation practices.

An introduction to the interpretation of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. We will look at the biblical text as modern interpreters and through the eyes of the Bible’s earliest Jewish and Christian interpreters with special attention to changing assumptions about how to read the Bible and the nature of Scripture itself.

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RELI 89H.001: Researching Religion in Women’s Lives (Honors)
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Lauren Leve and Lisa Pearce

Lauren Leve received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology. Now an associate professor of Religious Studies, she has been living and working in Nepal since 1990; sometimes for a few weeks at a time, sometimes for a few years. Her research has also brought her to Thailand, Sri Lanka, India, and Singapore. She has written on topics that include Buddhism, globalization, women’s empowerment, theories of rural revolution, human rights, and suffering. Her recent book is titled “The Buddhist Art of Living in Nepal: Ethical Practice and Religious Reform.” She is currently working on a project on gender, health, politics, and the rise of Christianity in Nepal. Professor Leve is grateful to the monks, nuns, householders, newly-literate women, NGO staff, Maoists, Christians and others who have opened their lives to her and taught her to (try to) see through their eyes. She reports that it’s a little disorienting at first, but that once you learn to learn from others’ perspectives, there’s no better way to live in the world!

Lisa Pearce, a Professor of Sociology and Faculty Fellow at the Carolina Population Center, is a sociologist of family, religion, and the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Her research is based in the United States, Nepal, and Kenya. She has written two books, A Faith of Their Own: Stability and Change in the Religiosity of American’s Adolescents (with Melinda Lundquist Denton) and Mixed Method Data Collection Strategies (with William G. Axinn). Professor Pearce enjoys working with students to collect different kinds of data, moving back and forth between open-ended exploration and the systematic testing of ideas that emerge. She has been on the faculty at Carolina for 17 years.

How do religious beliefs and practices shape gender identities, values, and expectations in different religious cultures? How are these understandings reflected, contested, and/or creatively transformed by women within religious traditions, and at different times? How do we know what we think we know? This course examines the relations between women and religion across different traditions and in diverse global contexts, asking how religious modes of authority and ethical being-in-the-world shape women’s aspirations for self-actualization and position them in relation to both opportunities and constraints. The course also asks, how can we know and measure these relations? Arguments about women and religion are based on evidence that reflect different sets of assumptions and are collected in different ways. Throughout the semester, we’ll explore key methods for data collection and analysis in the Humanities and Social Sciences through a series of hands-on research assignments, culminating in a final research project. Practical experience generating and interpreting diverse types of data will reveal the ways that scientific and humanistic modes of inquiry can work together to pose and answer key questions about women, gender, and human social life. This is a special class that is co-taught by two instructors—one from the Department of Sociology and one from Religious Studies.

Students may also register for this course under SOCI 89H.001.

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Romance Studies (ROML)

ROML 89.001: Environmental Issues in Literature and Film: Italy in Global Conversation
Gen Eds: LA, NA
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Serenella Iovino

A philosopher by training, Serenella Iovino is among the leading animators of the international debate about environmental cultural studies. Her award-winning books talk about landscapes and bodies, literary visions and artistic resistance, nonhuman companions and alien intimacies, earthquakes, pollutions, and cosmic creativity. She is Professor at UNC since 2019 with the first-ever joint appointment including Italian Studies and Environmental Humanities.

From plastic pollution to climate change, from mass extinction to deforestation, environmental issues occupy our conversations, concerns, anticipations. But why should we care about the environment? And what can the humanities do about it, which scientists or politicians would not do better or more effectively? By studying how literature and film can contribute to shaping our environmental imagination, this FYS will explore in theory and practice the role of artistic creativity in conveying relevant insights about our ecological crises and planetary communities. The scope of the course is global, with a fresh and zesty Italian taste.

The Environmental Humanities are a dialogue between civil society and the academe’s liveliest energies. The goal of this FYS is to invite freshpeople to join a debate where our planetary anxieties and hopes become critical forms of cultural activism.

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ROML 89H.001: Sex, Sexuality and the Body in Early Modern European Literature (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, NA
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Lucia Binotti

Lucia Binotti is a Philologist turned into Digital Humanist. She works on material and cultural history and in the mechanisms that construct linguistic and cultural identity. Binotti has always been fascinated with the cultural and social parallels that the printing revolution of the sixteenth century shares with the information technology revolution of today. Her latest projects take her reflection on the place of the humanities in 21st century education outside of the walls of academia, in an endeavor to produce artifacts that will enhance the dissemination and fruition of social and cultural knowledge among a broader public.

The aim of this course is to explore the cultural constructions of gender and sexuality in the literature of Medieval and Renaissance Southern Europe. We will approach questions such as the status of women and the context of misogyny, the societal role of same-sex relations, the presentation and visualization of sexuality, desire and the body. We will observe the period through the lens of 5 overarching themes that recur at different moments and in different texts throughout the course: “Sex, beauty and artistic creation,” “Sex, marriage and family,” “Sex and religion”, “Sex and science,” “Sex, deviancy, and crime.” Using such themes as the framework for our interpretations we will read, analyze, and discuss in loose chronological order an array of literary works mostly of the Iberian and Italian tradition, from which we will tease out a interdisciplinary understanding of the cultural and aesthetic forces that shaped the representation of sex and sexual love before the advent of the scientific theories that in turn define modern gender and sexuality for us today. This historical approach will offer insights into the shaping of our own cultural and personal attitudes. By focusing our attention on the challenged and changing meanings of sexuality, this course aims to strengthen your skills of critical analysis.

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Sociology (SOCI)

SOCI 53.001: The Consequences of Welfare Reform and Prospects for the Future
Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Jessica Houston Su

Dr. Jessica Houston Su is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and a Faculty Fellow in the Carolina Population Center. She earned her doctorate in sociology from Cornell University in 2014. Her research focuses on American family life and social inequality. As a family demographer, she uses a sociological lens and quantitative analytic techniques to examine social patterns of family formation and how they are related to the health and well-being of parents and children. Her research contributes to the sociological literature in families, health, inequality, work, and demography.

President Bill Clinton ended “welfare as we know it” in 1996 when he signed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act into law. This significant and historical welfare reform fundamentally changed the federal safety net in the United States and abolished guaranteed aid for those in poverty. In this first-year seminar, we will use a sociological lens to investigate the causes and consequences of welfare reform, as well as the subsequent expansion of other antipoverty programs designed to help the working poor. We will consider a range of viewpoints that inform current policy debates; topics will include the conceptualization and measurement of poverty, causes of poverty, public and political attitudes toward welfare and the role of the government, and the implementation and efficacy of antipoverty policies.

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SOCI 89.001: Poverty, Inequality, and Health in America
Gen Eds: SS, US
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Kathleen Mullan Harris

Kathleen Mullan Harris is the James Haar Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Adjunct Professor of Public Policy. Her research focuses on social inequality and health with particular interests in family demography, the transition to adulthood, health disparities and family formation. Harris directs the 20-year NIH longitudinal Add Health Study, which is following 20,000+ teens into adulthood. Under Harris’ leadership, the study has pioneered innovative study designs and integrative multidisciplinary research to understand social, environmental, behavioral, and biological linkages in developmental and health trajectories from adolescence into adulthood. Her publications appear in a wide range of disciplinary journals. She is currently the only woman at UNC elected to the National Academy of Sciences (2014).

This First Year Seminar examines issues of poverty, social and economic inequality and health in America. Course content will focus particularly on health disparities according to patterns of poverty and inequality and according to socioeconomic disadvantage associated with single-mother families, teenage and nonmarital childbearing, child poverty, immigration, and race and ethnicity. This seminar is coupled with an Experiential Education (EE) requirement that will give students firsthand experiences with how poverty and inequality is experienced in the lives of American men, women, children, and families. Students will carry out a research project on how the poverty and inequality they observe in their community service work is related to health outcomes or health disparities. The research project thus combines the experiential education on poverty and inequality students gain in the community with the academic scholarship on health disparities from course materials and other health-related research materials specific to their research project topic.

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SOCI 89H.001: Researching Religion in Women’s Lives (Honors)
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Lauren Leve and Lisa Pearce

Lauren Leve received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology. Now an associate professor of Religious Studies, she has been living and working in Nepal since 1990; sometimes for a few weeks at a time, sometimes for a few years. Her research has also brought her to Thailand, Sri Lanka, India, and Singapore. She has written on topics that include Buddhism, globalization, women’s empowerment, theories of rural revolution, human rights, and suffering. Her recent book is titled “The Buddhist Art of Living in Nepal: Ethical Practice and Religious Reform.” She is currently working on a project on gender, health, politics, and the rise of Christianity in Nepal. Professor Leve is grateful to the monks, nuns, householders, newly-literate women, NGO staff, Maoists, Christians and others who have opened their lives to her and taught her to (try to) see through their eyes. She reports that it’s a little disorienting at first, but that once you learn to learn from others’ perspectives, there’s no better way to live in the world!

Lisa Pearce, a Professor of Sociology and Faculty Fellow at the Carolina Population Center, is a sociologist of family, religion, and the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Her research is based in the United States, Nepal, and Kenya. She has written two books, A Faith of Their Own: Stability and Change in the Religiosity of American’s Adolescents (with Melinda Lundquist Denton) and Mixed Method Data Collection Strategies (with William G. Axinn). Professor Pearce enjoys working with students to collect different kinds of data, moving back and forth between open-ended exploration and the systematic testing of ideas that emerge. She has been on the faculty at Carolina for 17 years.

How do religious beliefs and practices shape gender identities, values, and expectations in different religious cultures? How are these understandings reflected, contested, and/or creatively transformed by women within religious traditions, and at different times? How do we know what we think we know? This course examines the relations between women and religion across different traditions and in diverse global contexts, asking how religious modes of authority and ethical being-in-the-world shape women’s aspirations for self-actualization and position them in relation to both opportunities and constraints. The course also asks, how can we know and measure these relations? Arguments about women and religion are based on evidence that reflect different sets of assumptions and are collected in different ways. Throughout the semester, we’ll explore key methods for data collection and analysis in the Humanities and Social Sciences through a series of hands-on research assignments, culminating in a final research project. Practical experience generating and interpreting diverse types of data will reveal the ways that scientific and humanistic modes of inquiry can work together to pose and answer key questions about women, gender, and human social life. This is a special class that is co-taught by two instructors—one from the Department of Sociology and one from Religious Studies.

Students may also register for this course under RELI 89H.001.

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Women’s and Gender Studies (WGST)

WGST 51.001: Race, Sex, and Place in America – ADDED 11/15/2019
Gen Ed: SS
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Mai Nguyen

Dr. Mai Nguyen is an Associate Professor in the City & Regional Planning Department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her Master’s in Sociology at the Pennsylvania State University and PhD in Urban Planning at the University of California, Irvine. She is an expert in housing policy, community economic development, immigration and urban growth phenomena. She also teaches courses in the Housing and Community Development specialization with the focus of teaching about practices and policies that create transformative community change. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

This seminar will expose students to the complex dynamics of race, ethnicity and gender and how these have shaped the American city since 1945. It will examine both the historical record as well as contemporary works of literature and film to probe the ways race and ethnicity have contributed to the culture of urban life in the United States. It will also explore the different ways women and men perceive, understand, occupy and use urban space and the built environment. Drawing upon the scholarship of several disciplines (urban planning, ethnic studies, sociology and American history), the seminar will examine a broad spectrum of topics, including the social construction of race, the creation of the underclass label, residential segregation, the significance of Hurricane Katrina, sexual identity and space, and immigration. The last portion of the course will focus on planning and policy tools that have the potential to alleviate racial/ethnic and gender inequality in space.

Students may also register for this course under PLAN 52.001.

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Other Opportunities

First Year Launch Course

GEOL 101-005: Planet Earth – First Year-Launch
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Gen Eds: PX when taken with GEOL 101L
Michelle Haskin

This first-year launch course will introduce geological concepts through the lens of U.S. national parks and a plate tectonic framework. The course will take a small-group approach to in-class work where developing collaboration and communication skills will be a focus. Students will apply their talents, skills, knowledge, and creativity to investigate related topics of interest as they manifest in a specific U.S. National Park to examine the interconnectedness of the geologic sciences and other fields of study. They will present their work in a manner appropriate to their project. Because this course is geared toward students newer to the university environment, the course will also discuss adjacent issues relevant to first-year students such as studying approaches, professionalism, as well as usefulness of meta-cognition, self-reflection, and feedback. Students will practice employing these ideas and approaches though individual and small-group work. Optional laboratory: GEOL 101L. PX Gen Ed credit for GEOL 101+101L.

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