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Please consult ConnectCarolina (connectcarolina.unc.edu) for the most up-to-date information about FYS offerings and availability.

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Summer Session 1
Summer Session 2

Summer Session 1

GEOL 89-001: Sound Scape of Our World – CANCELLED 4/15/2020
Gen Eds: PL, EE, QI
MTWThF, 09:45 AM – 11:15 AM
Jonathan Lees

Jonathan Lees works on problems of seismological interest, especially directed at geophysical, tectonic, volcanological and atmospheric studies. His research is aimed at understanding the dynamics of volcanic explosions: how do we characterize the shallow conduit system as well as the deep plumbing structure of the volcano edifice. He pioneered investigations in seismic tomography in regional and local settings using earthquakes as sources. He is currently investigating acoustic waves recorded in the stratosphere: a problem that will inform planetary research on Venus and Jupiter.

Let’s open our ears and minds and listen to the world around us. What is the difference between a bird song and a violin? The roar of a crowd at a sporting event and an exploding volcano? This seminar will explore sound: we will develop an appreciation of our acoustic environment. Instruction will be exploration based and we will learn how to record acoustic sounds in natural and man-made environments. What are signals? What is noise? How are sound signals perceived by our ears and also analyzed scientifically? We will explore the various bands of acoustic communication and the ambient signals that comprise our sound environment. Field observations will be a major focus, where we will record our own data on personal cell phones (or computers) as well as professional equipment. We will learn how to extract data from these devices for detailed analysis in the frequency and time domains. Computer programs will be provided for visualization, spectral analysis and simulated wave propagation to help quantify our perceptions. No prerequisites are required, just curiosity. Grading will be based on written reports, class participation, and group projects. A capstone project will be required as a presentation and written summary of field observations.

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MEJO 89-001: Polarized Politics, Fake News and Preparing for Election 2020
Gen Eds: CI
MTWThF, 01:15 PM – 02:45 PM
Ferrel Guillory

Ferrel Guillory is a professor of the practice of journalism at the UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communication. He founded the Program on Public Life (formerly the Program on Southern Politics, Media and Public Life) in 1997 to build bridges between the academic resources at UNC-Chapel Hill and the governmental, journalism and civic leaders of North Carolina and the South. Guillory is a co-founder of EducationNC, a nonprofit news and policy organization, and he is a senior fellow at MDC, a Southern think tank.

This course offers first year students an opportunity to explore American public life through the lens of professional journalism. Students will read explanatory journalism, examine what makes information credible or not. By engaging in group discussions and writing their own analyses, they will deepen their understanding of how government and politics play out in states and communities in today’s often-fractious United States. In addition to learning more about journalism and democracy, the course seeks to instill in students a sense of idealism and engaged citizenship.

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Summer Session 2

ASIA 65.001: Philosophy on Bamboo: Rethinking Early Chinese Thought
Gen Eds: PH, WB
MTWThF, 01:15 PM – 02:45 PM
Uffe Bergeton

Uffe Bergeton is a historian of early China with a focus on pre-Qin (i.e. pre-221 BCE) language, history and thought. Originally from Denmark, he has lived and studied in France, Taiwan and China. In his first book (The Emergence Of Civilizational Consciousness in Early China: History Word By Word) he uses lexical changes to trace the emergence of proto-anthropological concepts in the Warring States period (481-221 BCE). His current research project uses a similar approach to trace evolving conceptualizations of armed conflict in the pre-Qin period.

Over the last few decades a large number of bamboo manuscripts of hitherto unknown texts dating to the fourth to the first century BCE have been excavated from various sites in China. This wealth of new materials has led many scholars to rethink longstanding assumptions about early Chinese thought. In order to enable students to engage directly with the recently discovered texts and cutting-edge research on them, this course will briefly introduce students to the received classics of the pre-Qin period, such as the Analects, the Mozi, the Mencius, and the Daodejing. Rather than merely providing an introduction to these traditional texts, we will study how recently discovered texts challenge traditional readings of pre-Qin works and lead us to question traditional classifications of pre-Qin works into “schools of thought” or isms such as Confucianism, Legalism, Daoism, etc.

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PHIL 51.001: Who Was Socrates? – CANCELLED 3/18/2020
Gen Eds: PH, NA, WB
MTWThF, 09:45 AM – 11:15 AM
Mariska Leunissen

Mariska Leunissen works in ancient philosophy, with special interests in Aristotelian natural philosophy and philosophy of science. Leunissen is the author of two monographs (Explanation and Teleology in Aristotle’s Science of Nature, CUP 2010, and From Natural Character to Moral Virtue in Aristotle, OUP 2017), two edited volumes, and several journal articles and book chapters. Her current work focuses on Aristotle’s uses of signs, testimony, analogy, and other methods for establishing facts in empirically underdetermined domains. She joined the faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill in fall of 2011. Before coming to Chapel Hill, she completed an MA in Classics and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy at Leiden University, The Netherlands.

Socrates is by far the most famous Greek philosopher and, perhaps, the first real philosopher known in the Western tradition. In this seminar, we explore the intellectual and historical context within which Socrates is thought to have revolutionized philosophy so as to better understand his significance for his contemporaries and for us. Our focus, however, will be on the large and perennial human questions that Socrates made his own: How should we live? What is justice? What is virtue? What sort of society should we strive to provide for our families and for ourselves? Each week we will read a part of one of the primary texts and discuss it carefully in the class. These discussions will serve both as a testing-ground for ideas and as preparation for the writing assignments. By learning to talk and write in an engaging but disciplined ways about books and ideas that are both exciting and significant, we will not only be finding out about Socrates but also be taking up the Socratic challenge to live the examined life.

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