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Due to ongoing issues associated with COVID-19, the class meeting patterns were adjusted by the University to create more time between classes for physical distancing requirements. We have therefore removed the meeting patterns from this page. Additionally, instructional modes in many FYS were previously adjusted to Face-to-Face/Hybrid, Remote Only, or HyFlex. After the first week of fall 2020 classes, all FYS were moved to the Remote Only instructional mode. Please consult ConnectCarolina (https://connectcarolina.unc.edu/) for the most up-to-date information about FYS offerings, meeting times, and availability.

For more information about a specific instructor, please click on the instructor name, if highlighted.

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)
American Studies (AMST)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Art and Art History (ARTH/ARTS)
Asian Studies (ASIA)
Biology (BIOL)
Chemistry (CHEM)
Classics (CLAS)
Communication (COMM)
Dramatic Art (DRAM)
Economics (ECON)
English and Comparative Literature (CMPL/ENGL)
Environmental Sciences and Engineering (ENVR)
European Studies (EURO)
Geography (GEOG)
Geological Sciences (GEOL)
Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)
Global Studies (GLBL)
History (HIST)
Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST)
Linguistics (LING)
Marine Sciences (MASC)
Mathematics (MATH)
Media and Journalism (MEJO)
Music (MUSC)
Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)
Political Science (POLI)
Psychology and Neuroscience (NSCI/PYSC)
Public Policy (PLCY)
Religious Studies (RELI)
Romance Studies (ROML)
Sociology (SOCI)
Other Opportunities (First Year Launch)

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)

AAAD 53-001: Experimentalism in Global Black Music and Performance Arts
Gen Eds: VP, GL
David Pier

Professor David Pier is an ethnomusicologist who researches music in Africa and the United States. His book, Ugandan Music in the Marketing Era: The Branded Arena is a ethnographic study of the commercialization of folk music and dance heritage in Uganda. He is currently working on a book on a Ugandan guitar genre known as kadongo kamu. Having started out as a jazz pianist, he is keenly interested in both the processes and underlying ideas of musical experimentalism, especially in global Black historical contexts.

This course centers on artists who are known for their radically experimental approach to music-making and performance, pushing at established boundaries of genre, form, and affect, while taking inspiration from black identity, history, and culture. Geographically, this course is not limited to the United States, but also examines avant-garde artistry in Africa, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean. The focus is mainly on music, with excursions into avant-garde jazz, Brazilian tropicália, Jamaican dub, and electronic music. But we do additionally discuss experimental dance and theatre. The special challenges faced by black artists in establishing themselves in artistic fields marked as modernist, given the historical domination of discourses and institutions of modernism/modernity by whites, are explored. Students have the option to either write a traditional research paper on a topic of their choice, or create their own experimental artistic project.

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American Studies (AMST)

AMST 51-001: Navigating America
Gen Eds: SS, CI, EE-Field Work
Rachel A. Willis

Rachel A. Willis is a Professor of American Studies and Adjunct Professor of Economics at UNC. She has won numerous awards including the UNC Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, two Student Undergraduate Teaching Awards, and the Robert Sigmon Award for Service Learning. A three-time winner of the Chapman Award, she has been a Senior Fellow at the Global Research Institute and is a Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholar at the Carolina Center for Public Service. Her teaching methods incorporate innovative field study, collaborative assignments and experiential learning through events and programs outside of the classroom. A labor economist interested in global access to work, she has recently focused on the impact of climate change on port communities.

This seminar is designed to teach students how to navigate new intellectual terrain and process unfamiliar information from a variety of disciplinary perspectives with an emphasis on simulations, field study, reflections, and documentation. Each student will plan, implement, and document an individual short journey. This voyage of discovery on the campus or in the surrounding community will be chronicled with a documentary journal and presented to the class in a multi-media format that conveys the individual’s perspective, journey, and discoveries. Additionally, the class will collaboratively plan, implement, and document a common full day journey. This required field study will be a core aspect of the experiential education connection for the course.

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AMST 55-001: Birth and Death in the United States
Gen Eds: PH, CI, US
Timothy Marr

Timothy Marr is an Associate Professor in the Department of American Studies, where since 2000 he has taught courses on mating and marriage, cultural memory, and tobacco. His research interests include the life and works of Herman Melville and American approaches to Islam and Muslims.

This course explores birth and death as common human rites of passage impacted by changing American historical and cultural contexts. Since both are defining life events that remain beyond experiential recall, studying them in interdisciplinary ways opens powerful insights into how culture mediates the construction of bodies, social identities, and philosophical meanings. Readings and assignments are designed to examine changing anthropological rituals, medical procedures, scientific technologies, and ethical quandaries. We will also explore a variety of representations of birth and death in literary expression, film, and material culture as well as in hospitals, funeral homes, and cemeteries.

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Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 53H-037: Darwin’s Dangerous Idea (Honors)
Gen Eds: SS
Paul Leslie

Paul Leslie’s professional interests focus on human ecology, and he has pursued this primarily through research among nomadic peoples in East Africa. His most recent project entails studying (while nursing an aged Land Rover across the African savanna) human-environment interactions in northern Tanzania, especially how the changing land use and livelihood patterns of the Maasai people living there affect and are affected by wildlife and conservation efforts. When not teaching or practicing anthropology, he enjoys bicycling, motorcycling, woodworking, and jazz.

Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to one of the most profound revolutions in the history of thought, generating stunning insights but also some misunderstanding and tragic abuse. This seminar aims to provide a clear understanding of how natural selection works, and how it doesn’t. We will examine objections to the theory; how the environmental and health problems we face today reflect processes of natural selection; and recent attempts to understand why we get sick, how we respond to disease, why we get old, why we choose mates the way we do, and more. Class sessions will feature a mix of lecture and discussion of concepts and issues. Students will also engage in small group projects—cooperative explorations of problems raised in class or in the readings and/or designing mini research projects.

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ANTH 62-001: Indian Country Today
Gen Eds: SS, US
Valerie Lambert

Valerie Lambert is an associate professor and an enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation. She received her Ph.D. in Social Anthropology from Harvard University and has won awards for undergraduate teaching and for a book she wrote about her tribe. She has twice been elected president of the Association of Indigenous Anthropologists. Professor Lambert is married and the mother of two daughters, one of whom is a college student and the other, a high school student.

With the United States as our geographic focus, this seminar explores a range of 20th- and early-21st-century American Indian topics and current issues. We look at Indian casinos, tribal colleges, identity, gender, tribal courts, sports, and other topics. An exploration of the history of American Indians before and after the arrival of Europeans, a history with which we begin the seminar, provides essential background for looking at the present and recent past. This seminar will help students better understand the challenges facing American Indian communities both internally and externally and the creative solutions being forged to address these challenges. It will also help students further develop skills in reading, writing, critical analysis, and public speaking.

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ANTH 63.001: The Lives of Others: Exploring Ethnography
Gen Eds: SS
Townsend Middleton

Townsend Middleton is a political anthropologist of India and South Asia. His work focuses on movements for ‘tribal’ recognition and autonomy in the Himalayan region of Darjeeling, India. He teaches and writes on a variety of issues including identity politics, the state, and post/colonialism in South Asia and beyond.

Can we truly access, understand, and represent the lives of others? In this class, we will take on this question by taking up the practice of ethnography: a research method consisting of entering into a community, interacting with its members, observing social life, asking questions, and writing about our findings. Turning to anthropology and the growing number of disciplines using ethnography today, we will examine the ways ethnographers work to understand the people they work with. Over the semester, we will explore the method by becoming ethnographers ourselves. You, the student, will accordingly venture into the social world to conduct research on a topic and with a community of your choosing–thereby giving you first-hand knowledge of what it means to translate their worlds into your words. These are skills of social understanding that should serve students across their academic careers and beyond.

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ANTH 64-001: Public Archaeology in Bronzeville, Chicago’s Black Metropolis
Gen Eds: HS, NA
Anna Agbe-Davies

Anna Agbe-Davies is an historical archaeologist whose excavations have explored the plantation societies of the colonial southeastern US and Caribbean, as well as towns and cities of the 19th and 20th century Midwest, with an emphasis on sites of the African diaspora. Her projects have included excavation and community collaboration at the sites of New Philadelphia, Illinois and the Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls on the south side of Chicago. Her research and teaching interests are strongly shaped by her own experiences as an undergraduate at the College of William and Mary and the time she spent working in museum settings before becoming a professor. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to that, she was a staff archaeologist for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s Department of Archaeological Research.

The term “African diaspora” usually refers to the consequences of the transatlantic slave trade, but there have been many diasporas of people of African descent. One major movement took place in the U.S. in the early 20th century when millions of people left small southern communities for large industrial northern cities. This seminar examines that phenomenon through the lens of a single site where migrants lived in the city of Chicago. The Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls was run by black women to provide social services for female migrants from 1926 through the 1960s. Research at this site combines elements of archaeology, anthropology and history to study their lives. Students, working in teams, will have the opportunity to contribute to the ongoing research effort via analysis of written records and artifacts. This multidisciplinary project will be of interest to students curious about 20th century history, African-American culture, museums and heritage, women’s and gender studies, migration and labor history.

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ANTH 89-034: Transforming Our Food Systems
Gen Eds: SS, NA
Don Nonini

Don Nonini is a sociocultural anthropologist who received his PhD in Anthropology from Stanford University; prior to graduate school, he worked as a restaurant cook for 1 1/2 years in San Francisco. Since he received his degree, his research and teaching specializations have been the Chinese diaspora of the Asia Pacific, the politics and political economy of urban life in the United States and in Southeast Asia, and social movements and social activism around food in the urban U.S.

This course employs an anthropological approach to the study of the human relationship to food, to contemporary food systems, and to the processes by which they are transformed. First, we consider how an anthropological (and especially ethnographic) approach to the study of food asks questions about food’ s connection to culture, to self, to home and family, to cultural heritage, to cities and to politics. Second, we explore how to study contemporary “food systems” using an anthropological approach. Third, we examine the challenges facing contemporary food systems such as hunger, the intensive use of energy and agro-industry, the abuse of food laborers, and GMO’s, toxins and wastes as products of agro-industrialism. Finally, we explore several social movements that seek to remedy such challenges.

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ANTH 89.036: By Persons Unknown: Race and Reckoning in North Carolina – ADDED 6/15/2020
Gen Eds: HS, US
Glenn Hinson

By training and spirit, Glenn Hinson is a folklorist, one who works with communities to explore grassroots creativity and the many ways that it holds meaning. Though he is white, much of his work over the years has been with Black communities, whose members have repeatedly schooled him on the simple fact that any exploration of artistry must address the critical and all-encompassing context of racism. Their challenge led to the creation of the Descendants Project, a collaborative initiative in which students and communities work together to address racial histories. This FYS extends this initiative by focusing on a single NC county.

“By persons unknown” is the phrase historically used across the white South to erase the identities of the killers responsible for lynchings. Though communities certainly knew who these murderers were, the press and the courts publicly denied this knowledge, offering the killers a cloak of anonymity. This research-intensive seminar explores this act of cloaking, addressing the legacy of race and racial terrorism in N.C. by using archival resources and community testimony. The class projects—focusing on a single county—will explore the public erasure of Black histories, the careful craftings of public memory, and the far-reaching impact of racist practices on the economic, educational, social, and political lives of communities. Our goal is not merely to “study” racist practice, but to actively confront it, working with community members to build public awareness of the legacies of racial violence, and assisting in efforts to create public memorials to that violence’s victims.

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ANTH 89-056: Race and Small Town America – CANCELLED 6/15/2020
Gen Eds: SS, US
Karla Slocum

Karla Slocum is also Associate Professor of Anthropology. Slocum specializes in studies of place identities, black-identified communities and history, and rural engagements with global economic change in the Caribbean and the United States. She is the author of Free Trade and Freedom: Neoliberalism, Place and Nation in the Caribbean (University of Michigan Press, 2006). Her second book, The Appeal of a Black Place: Lured by History, Space and Race in American Black Towns , is under contract with the University of North Carolina Press. The book examines the contemporary attraction of historic, rural black towns in the Western U.S. amid their simultaneous status as economically fragile and socially remote communities.

Race is a prominent feature of American life and the U.S. is made up of more small towns than large cities. What, then, does race mean for small town American life? The goal of this course is for students to understand how race shapes the ways that people live their lives in U.S. small and rural towns? We will address such questions as: How do a rural identity and a racial identity intersect? How do different racial groups experience rural life? How is race significant for small town experiences in the areas of: economies and work; education; culture and identity; health and environment; and community history and heritage? To explore these questions, we will focus on ethnographic studies of specific rural communities.

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ANTH 89H-001: Anthropology and the Tourism Encounter (Honors)
Gen Eds: SS, GL
Florence Babb

Florence Babb is a professor of Anthropology and Latin American Studies who has long carried out research and teaching on race, gender, sexuality, and other forms of social difference and inequality in Latin America. She is part of her department’s Concentration on Race, Difference, and Power, and she recently published her fourth book, entitled Women’s Place in the Andes: Engaging Decolonial Feminist Anthropology. She enjoys providing her students with challenging material that they can discuss and debate in class. Her seminars are lively and give students the chance to help lead class discussion.

This Honors First-Year Seminar considers anthropological approaches to travel and tourism in the contemporary world and asks what focusing on travel and tourism can tell us more broadly about cultures and societies. We will examine differences of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and national origin in the experiences of travelers as well as of those who work in the service industries that accommodate travelers’ needs. We will examine the ways in which travel destinations are often represented and marketed as “exotic” locations, appealing to notions of the desirable, foreign “other.” We will ask how the commodification of cultural identities and practices shapes the tourism encounter of tourists and toured. In addition, we will ask how power relations are negotiated and what prospects communities in the global South have for actively constructing the terms of their engagement with travelers from the global North. Students will play an active part in seminar discussion of the value of travel and tourism as a lens for understanding social, economic, and political dynamics of significance in the world today. Students will research, write, and present papers that they develop in consultation with the instructor. You will take part in working groups focused on particular areas of the anthropology of travel and tourism. Occasionally, attendance at outside lectures and other events will be recommended.

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Art and Art History (ARTH/ARTS)

ARTH 55H-001: Art, Gender, and Power in Early Modern Europe (Honors)
Gen Eds: VP, NA
Tania String

Dr. Tania String is an art historian specializing in the art of the Tudor period in England, and the Renaissance more broadly. She is the author of numerous books and articles on the portraits of Henry VIII. Before coming to UNC in 2010 she taught in England at the University of Bristol.

What did it mean to be a man or to be a woman in the Renaissance? This seminar will explore the ways in which constructions of gender are critical to understandings of the visual arts in the early modern period (c. 1400-1650). We will discuss and analyze a focused group of representations of men and women: portraits, mythological and biblical paintings and sculptures, and even turn our attention to the buildings these men and women inhabited. We will study the work of artists such as Michelangelo, Donatello, Titian, Holbein, and Rubens, amongst others, to find ways of understanding how masculinity and femininity were central concerns in early modern society and in the art produced in this period.

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ARTH 61-001: African American Art of the Carolinas
Gen Eds: VP, CI
John Bowles

John Bowles received his Ph.D. from UCLA in 2002 and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Program. He is an historian of African American art, who works from the assumption that art plays an important role in determining how we see ourselves as morally responsible individuals. In his research and teaching, he attempts to convey the urgency of art by addressing moral and political dilemmas we would often rather ignore. He has published articles and art criticism in various journals and has recently completed a book that examines the work of artist Adrian Piper. He is currently writing a book that explores how African American artists have engaged simultaneously with modernism, globalization and diaspora from the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s until today.

Focusing on the Carolinas, this seminar explores the many ways African Americans have used art to define themselves and their communities. We will ask how art has been used to maintain cultural traditions, shape American culture and build political solidarity from the era of colonialism and slavery to the present. We will study the cultivation of artistic practices from Africa; African American painters, sculptors and craftsmen who earned national reputations for the quality of their work; artists who re-imagined and redefined African American identity through art; and artists throughout the 20th century who represented the daily lives and hardships of rural and working-class blacks. Students will visit campus museums and archives and conduct original research using regional sources. Persistent questions throughout the semester will include, How does the art of African Americans in the Carolinas provoke us to question our own identities and roles within the region, and what is the contemporary role of art in shaping public discourse?

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ARTS 82-001: Please Save This: Exploring Personal Histories through Visual Language
Gen Eds: VP
Roxana Pérez-Méndez

Roxana Pérez-Méndez is an Associate Professor and the chair of the department’s Diversity Committee. She specializes in alternative art practices as well as video performance and installation art. In addition to this FYS, she teaches undergraduate sculpture and installation courses. Pérez-Méndez is originally from Puerto Rico and her art often explores her immigrant experience – working to understand someone caught between experiences in Puerto Rico and the United States.

This seminar will investigate the idea of personal histories in visual art. As a seminar class in a studio environment, the course will be organized around several themes that drive artists to create and explore the methods by which they turn this research practice into art. As a catalyst to our own art making and to lending our voice to that of others, we will explore the idea of personal history and memory through readings, as well as looking at contemporary artists whose work functions in an autobiographical framework.

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Asian Studies (ASIA)

ASIA 52-001: Food in Chinese Culture
Gen Eds: LA, BN
Gang Yue

Dr. Gang Yue teaches a variety of courses on modern China, Tibet, and Chinese American experiences.

“You are what you eat,” but equally important is how you eat it and how you write about food and eating. The rich tradition of Chinese food and the even richer tradition of writing about food offer great food for thought. This course explores the major themes and topics related to food and the food culture of China as well as Chinese food in North America. Readings include two non-fiction books by Chinese American authors, namely, The Fortune Cookie Chronicles: Adventures in the World of Chinese Food by Jennifer Lee and Serve the People: A Stir-Fried Journey Through China by Jen Lin-Liu, as well as select fictional works by such Chinese authors as Wang Meng and Mo Yan. This course is reading-intensive. It is not a cooking class.

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ASIA 72-001: Transnational Korea: Literature, Film, and Popular Culture
Gen Eds: LA, BN, CI
Jonathan Kief

Jonathan Kief is a scholar of modern Korean literature and culture whose research focuses on interactions between words and images in postcolonial North and South Korea. He is also interested in the Korean diaspora, the history of Korean translation practices, and the history of radio and television in Cold War-era East Asia. His teaching combines literature, film, and popular culture to help students explore both the contemporary globalization of Korean culture and the robust history of transnational exchanges that it builds upon. Before moving to North Carolina, he lived in Korea, Japan, and many different parts of the U.S.

Taking the recent Korean Wave phenomenon as its point of departure, this course introduces students to the history of transnational imaginations in modern and contemporary Korean culture. Drawing upon literature, film, television, and secondary scholarship, we will explore how a diverse array of Korean cultural producers have used narratives of cross-border travel, migration, and exchange to rethink Korea’s place in the world and refashion Korean identity. In each section of the course, we will consider a different domain or dimension of border-crossing activity: education; labor; migration and diaspora; North-South interactions; war and military; cosmopolitan imaginings and the making of “global Korea.” In so doing, we will learn to think critically about the relationship between works from colonial Korea, postcolonial North Korea, postcolonial South Korea, and the Korean diaspora, and we will also gain a more nuanced understanding of popular culture’s place within its broader social and historical contexts.

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ASIA 73-001: Popular Culture in the Arab World
Gen Eds: SS, BN
Ana Vinea

Ana Vinea is a cultural anthropologist of the Middle East with research and teaching interests in medicine, occult practices, religion, and popular culture. Her current research examines revivalist Islamic therapies as prominent sites of innovation and contestation within changing medical, religious, and media landscapes. Vinea holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the Graduate Center of the City University in New York. Before joining UNC she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Michigan Society of Fellows, University of Michigan.

This First Year Seminar introduces students to popular culture in the Arab world. It aims to move away from the mass-mediated view of the Arab world as the land of terrorists, oppressed women, or oil billionaires to highlight the region’s dynamism, creativity, and complexity. We will investigate the production and consumption of popular culture in the region as an entry point for understanding aspects of the histories, cultures, and societies that form the Arab world. We will ask what can film, television, or music tell us about state power, inequality, national identities, gender, or political and social struggles? How is Arab popular culture integrated in global circuits of meaning and representations? And how can it be mobilized in times of revolutionary upheaval? The class will rely on anthropological readings alongside direct engagements with examples of popular culture from the Middle East.

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Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 64-001: Modeling Fluid Flow through and around Organs and Organisms – CANCELLED 5/27/2020
Gen Eds: PL
Laura Miller

Laura Miller is a Professor of Biology and Mathematics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her M.S. in Zoology from Duke University in 1999 and her Ph.D. from the Courant Institute of Mathematics at New York University in 2004. Her dissertation was on “The aerodynamics of tiny insect flight.” Dr. Miller then continued her work in mathematical biomechanics and physiology at the University of Utah from 2004-2006. She then joined the faculty in the Department of Mathematics and later the Department of Biology at UNC in January of 2007. Using her training in both mathematics and biology, she continues to apply mathematical modeling, computational fluid dynamics, and experimental fluid dynamics to better understand how organisms interact with their environments. Her current research interests include the feeding and swimming mechanics of jellyfish, the coupled electromechanical problem of tubular heart pumping, and the aerodynamics of flight in the smallest insects and spiders.

The focus of this first year seminar will be on organisms living within moving fluids. The natural world is replete with examples of animals and plants whose shape influences flow to their benefit. For example, the shape of a maple seed generates lift to allow for farther dispersal. The structure of a pinecone helps it to filter pollen from the air. A falcon’s form during a dive reduces drag and allows it to reach greater speeds. In this course, students will develop semester long projects with the goal of understanding how organisms deal the air and water around them. In collaboration with the UNC Makerspace, we will mathematically describe the shape of organisms using photogrammetry, 3D scanning, and computer aided design (CAD). We will use the resulting 3D objects in numerical simulations of flow around organisms. We will also 3D print these objects and place them inside flow tanks for comparison to simulation. Please note that there are no prerequisites for this course, and all students are invited to join the class.

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BIOL 89-001: Genes and Determinism
Gen Eds: PH
Jon Hibshman and Samuel Murray

Jon Hibshman received a BS in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Philosophy from Gettysburg College (2012) and a PhD in Genetics and Genomics from Duke University (2017). His current research interests center around the question of how cells and animals cope with stressful environments. He is focused on organismal signaling in response to environmental changes and the biochemistry of protectants that allow cells to survive desiccation.

Samuel Murray is a postdoctoral researcher at Duke University. Before coming to Duke, he earned his PhD from the University of Notre Dame in philosophy. His work focuses on the psychology of acting over time and how vigilance interacts with attention, memory, and control to facilitate temporally extended agency. Additionally, he works on normative questions of moral responsibility–especially responsibility for negligence–and has an abiding interest in the history of early modern philosophy.

There is a long history of debate about the relative contributions of nature and nurture to determinations of who we are. To what extent are we defined by our genes versus our experiences? We will discuss philosophical and biological approaches to this question. In the past quarter of a century scientific advances have made possible analysis of individual genetic sequence data. However ethical discussions of how to manage these data are in their infancy. A wealth of sequence data has led to questions such as: How do our genetic makeup and our environmental experiences interact with each other? Should genetic predispositions reduce personal ethical responsibility? Can genes predict aggressive behavior and future criminals? This course will review some of the history of the nature/nurture debate and provide a framework to address questions of free will and determinism in light of modern biology.

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Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 70-001: You Don’t Have to Be a Rocket Scientist
Gen Eds: PL
Cynthia Schauer

Professor Cynthia Schauer received her B.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Colorado State University. She is an inorganic chemist with academic interests in the conversion of CO2 to fuels. Problems of particular interest include the design of new catalysts for CO2 reduction, and understanding the interplay between molecular structure, electronic structure, and redox potential. She also uses computational techniques to attain a full understanding of energetics and reaction pathways in systems of interest. Outside the lab, she enjoys hiking and cooking.

The underlying theme of this seminar is the development of the basic tools for extracting information from, or finding flaws in, news reports and popular science writing. Working in groups, students will examine the global energy problem, including its impact on the economy and relationship to the environment. Students will evaluate the potential for alternative energy sources, such as solar energy and biomass fuels, to meet future needs and deliberate on the roles that scientists, government, and private industry will need to play in order to achieve a solution to this complicated but critical problem. The seminar will include reading and short writing assignments, student-led discussions and debates, and a final project presentation.

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CHEM 73-001: From Atomic Bombs to Cancer Treatments: The Broad Scope of Nuclear Chemistry
Gen Eds: PL
Todd Austell

Todd Austell received his BS in Chemistry in 1987 and his PhD in Chemistry in 1996, both at UNC. He spent one year working in the pharmaceutical industry prior to graduate school and another year as an Assistant Professor at the United States Air Force Academy prior to returning to his current position. As an undergraduate, he participated in the Department of Energy and American Chemistry Society’s Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry. Topical studies in nuclear chemistry have been a hobby of his since that time. His graduate research involved separation science, and he is currently involved in both curriculum development within the chemistry department and in a long-term study of how middle school and secondary math education/preparation affects student performances in college general chemistry. His hobbies include hiking, camping, disc golf and gardening as well as following all UNC athletics.

Nuclear chemistry is a field that touches the lives of everyone perhaps every day of their lives. This seminar will approach the topic of nuclear chemistry on the level of an introductory chemistry class with no prerequisite. Atomic structure, nuclear fission and nuclear fusion processes will be studied to provide the background necessary to understand their applications. Nuclear weapons and nuclear power will be covered in detail with discussion of topics relevant both for today’s society and for the future. Other topics including household applications, nuclear medicine, radiation safety and the problematic issue of radioactive waste storage will be discussed. The seminar will include guest lecturers from the various fields of nuclear chemistry, selected reading assignments, topical student-led discussions, possible facility trips/tours and a final project presentation on a relevant topic.

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Classics (CLAS)

CLAS 57H-001: Dead and Deadly Women: Greek Tragic Heroines from Aeschylus to Eliot (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, NA
Sharon James

Professor Sharon James specializes in Roman comedy, Latin poetry, and women in ancient Greece and Rome. She has published many articles on these subjects, as well as a book on Roman love elegy (published in 2003); she is currently preparing a large-scale book on women in Greek and Roman New Comedy (the plays of Menander, Plautus, and Terence). She is also the co-editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Women in the Ancient World (published 2012). Professor James regularly teaches all these subjects at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Her lecture courses, CLAS/WMST 240/240H (Women in Ancient Greece) and CLAS/WMST 241/241H (Women in Ancient Rome) are cross-listed between Classics and Women’s Studies. In summer 2012 she co-directed an NEH Institute on the performance of Roman comedy. She has two very lively dogs who keep her busy at home. In 2013, she won the University’s William C. Friday/Class of 1986 Award for Excellence in Inspirational Teaching.

In this course, we will study the great tragic heroines of ancient Greek drama, focusing on Clytemnestra, Medea, Alcestis, Phaedra, the Trojan Women, Antigone. We will also read a contemporary novel, by Fay Weldon, that engages many of these mythic women. We will studythe Greek tragedies intensively, along with their reception in later art, from paintings to poems, stage productions to sculptures, operas to ballets. Our questions will include: why does Greek tragedy focus so intensely on women? Are the playwrights misogynists or do they express some sympathy for women? What about these female characters grabbed the imaginations not only of ancient Greek playwrights but of later writers, painters, composers, not to mention readers? How are their stories relevant to the 21st century? Did the ancient Athenians know something we don’t?

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CLAS 59-001: Ancient Magic and Religion
Gen Eds: CI, EE-Mentored Research, WB
Suzanne Lye

Suzanne Lye received her A.B. from Harvard University, where she studied organic chemistry and the history of antibiotics. After receiving her Ph.D. in Classics from the University of California, Los Angeles, she was awarded a Postdoctoral Fellowship at Dartmouth College. At present, she is working on a book-length project about conceptions of the afterlife in ancient Greek Underworld narratives from Homer to Lucian. She has also participated in several digital humanities initiatives through Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies, including the Homer Multitext Project. She has published on ancient epic, ancient religion and magic, ancient representations of gender and ethnicity, modern pedagogy, and Classical reception.

Bindings and curses, love charms and healing potions, amulets and talismans – from simple spells to complex group rituals, ancient societies made use of both magic and religion to try to influence the world around them. In this course, we shall examine the roles of magic and religion in the ancient Greek
and Roman worlds, paying special attention to their local contexts and to the myths and actual techniques ancient practitioners used to serve their clientele.

In this class, we examine descriptions of religious and magical practices in the multicultural contexts of ancient Greece and Rome. Our sources include literary accounts, legal documents, and material objects, such as inscriptions, amulets, tablets, magical images, and papyri. Additionally, instruction for this class incorporates a combination of locations and technologies, including the the BeAM Makerspaces, the Greenlaw Gameroom, and the Ackland Art Museum. During the course of the term, students will be expected to analyze ancient literature and material artifacts, construct replicas of ancient objects, and explore reconstructions of the ancient Greco-Roman world in video games.

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Communication (COMM)

COMM 51-001: Organizing and Communicating for Social Entrepreneurs
Gen Eds: SS
Steve May

Steve May Associate Professor of Communication and is an Ethics Fellow with the Parr Center for Ethics. He received his B.A. and M.A. from Purdue University and his Ph.D. from the University of Utah. His research focuses on communication, ethics, and corporate social responsibility. He has taught courses in Organizational Communication, Teamwork, and Organizational Ethics. He has also taught several APPLES service learning courses in which students provided consulting services to non-profit agencies. He is currently serving as a consultant for the Kenan Institute for Ethic’s new initiative, Ethics at Work. He also provides facilitation and community problem-solving expertise to the Dispute Settlement Center. Originally from Indiana, Steve enjoys basketball, hiking, and international travel.

This seminar is designed to show how we can better understand organizational communication through the medium of different metaphors (e.g., machine, organism, culture, political system, psychic prison). More specifically, the seminar is designed to show how social entrepreneurs—or any other organizational members—can use these metaphors of organizational communication as tools for informing and guiding their entrepreneurial efforts. The course has four primary objectives. First, to introduce students to the theory and practice of social entrepreneurship, with particular attention to successful social entrepreneurs. Second, to provide students with a systematic and critical understanding of organizational communication theory and research related to social entrepreneurship, including the factors involved in the functioning and analysis of today’s complex organizations. Third, to show students how this understanding can be used as a practical tool for their own social entrepreneurship. Finally, to allow students to explore the ways in which organizations are simultaneously the medium and outcome for social, political, economic, technological, and ideological change in our culture.

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COMM 62-001: African American Literature and Performance
Gen Eds: VP
Renée Alexander Craft

Renée Alexander Craft is an associate professor with a joint appointment in the Department of Communication and Curriculum in Global Studies. Her research and teaching focus on Black Diaspora literature and culture. More specifically, Alexander Craft investigates the ways Black Diaspora communities have and continue to use imagination as a tool for liberation. For the past seventeen years, her research and creative projects have centered on an Afro-Latin community located on the Caribbean coast of Panama who call themselves and their carnival performance tradition “Congo.” She has completed three projects that reflect this focus: an ethnographic monograph titled When the Devil Knocks: The Congo Tradition and the Politics of Blackness in 20th Century Panama, a digital humanities project titled Digital Portobelo: Art + Scholarship + Cultural Preservation (digitalportobelo.org), and a novel based in large part on her field research titled She Looks Like Us.

What if Black pirates raided European slave ships to liberate enslaved Africans? What if African Americans could time travel? What if the most powerful being the world has ever seen were a Black female vampire or telepath? Those “what if’s” fit within a genre called Black speculative fiction. Focused on speculative fiction, fantasy, and science fiction written by Black Diaspora authors, this semester challenges students to think critically and creatively about modern structures of race and racism. Using historical and theoretical readings to guide us, we travel to the worlds these authors create, seek to understand the workings of race there, and return to our contemporary contexts to reflect and critique what we have witnessed. How do understandings of race and racism in these worlds help us engage with structures of race and racism in ours? What racial logics motivate the main characters and the sociopolitical movements of which they are apart? What is the relationship between Blackness there and Blackness here?

“Performance” will serve as a process–oriented, participatory, and experiential way to interpret, analyze, and re-present course materials. This includes collaborative in-class workshop performances as well as short, rehearsed solo and ensemble performances. Performance, then, will function as part of our repertoire of engagement alongside readings, screenings, critical discussions, journal assignments, and analytical papers.

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COMM 89-001: Make a Zine! Do-It-Yourself Writing, Publishing, and Distribution – CANCELLED 5/18/2020
Gen Eds: LA
Bill Brown

Bill Brown is a writer and filmmaker living in North Carolina where he is an Associate Professor of Media Production in the Department of Communication. He received a BA from Harvard University and an MFA from the California Institute of the Arts.

Brown’s films have screened at venues around the world, including the Rotterdam Film Festival, the London Film Festival, the Sundance Film Festival, and Lincoln Center.

Brown is the co-founder of The Zine Machine: Durham Printed Matter Festival, now entering its third year. His travel zine, Dream Whip, is published by Microcosm Publishing.
Zines (pronounced “zeens”) are self-published labors of love. Though they take a multitude of forms (hand-written pamphlets, comic books, collages), tackle all manner of topics (from romance to rock n’ roll, graffiti to global politics), and explore a variety of genres (self-help, sci-fi, teen lit, punk rock, poetry), they all share a passion for uncompromising creative expression. In a world of virtual media, zines are things you can hold in your hands and that circulate in the world.
This is a hands-on seminar. You will be introduced to the history, culture, and politics of zines; you will be visited by local zine makers and participate in zine-making workshops; and you will conceive and create your own zine, and organize a zine festival to share the zines you make.

This seminar is a perfect fit for budding writers, poets, cartoonists, and anyone with an interest in personal, creative expression.

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Dramatic Art (DRAM)

DRAM 79-001: The Heart of the Play: Fundamentals of Acting, Playwriting, and Collaboration
Gen Eds: VP, CI
Mark Perry

Mark Perry teaches playwriting, play analysis and dramaturgy and serves as a resident dramaturg with PlayMakers Repertory Company. His plays A New Dress for Mona and The Will of Bernard Boynton have been produced by UNC’s Department of Dramatic Art, and both scripts are available from Drama Circle. Mark is a graduate of the University of Iowa’s Playwrights Workshop and a former recipient of the North Carolina Arts Council’s Literature Fellowship for playwriting.

The goal of this seminar is to get you doing theatre, to spark your creativity and to connect you with the deeper lessons of this dynamic art form. You will act. You will write. You will work with others. It will not always be easy, but if you are willing to stretch yourself, you should have a great time. Each lesson is organized around a principle or virtue inherent in the practice of the art. Participants study a quotation or two that relate to that principle and then engage in drama exercises that spring from that principle. By the end of the course, you will have gained skills to make you comfortable to write, stage and perform your own 10 minute plays. Not just for those interested in pursuing theatre, this seminar will give you a more holistic understanding of essential principles in the practice of your life.

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DRAM 81H-001: Staging America: The American Drama (Honors)
Gen Eds: VP, CI, NA
Gregory Kable

Gregory Kable is a Teaching Professor in the Department of Dramatic Art, where he teaches dramatic literature, theatre history, and performance courses and serves as an Associate Dramaturg for PlayMakers Repertory Company. He also teaches seminars on Modern British Drama and American Musicals for the Honors program. He has directed dozens of productions at UNC and throughout the local community, and is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama.

This seminar examines our national drama from its colonial origins to the present. Participants read plays and criticism, screen videos, engage in critical writing, and consider performance as related means of exploring the visions and revisions constituting American dramatic history. We will approach American drama as both a literary and commercial art form, and look to its history to provide a context for current American theater practice. Readings are chosen for their intrinsic merit and historical importance, but also for their treatment of key issues and events in American life. Our focus throughout will be on the forces that shaped the American drama as well as, in turn, that drama’s ability to shed light on the national experience.

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DRAM 83-001: Spectacle in the Theatre
Gen Eds: VP
David Navalinsky

David Navalinsky is the Director of Undergraduate Production in the Department of Dramatic Art. David has taught at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Mississippi. David’s recent design work includes scenery for The Uncanny Valley by Francesca Talenti. The Uncanny Valley featured a Robothespian™, which is exactly what it sounds like. He has also written a documentary theatre piece Priceless Gem: An Athlete Story, which tells the stories of UNC athletes. David has worked professionally at South Coast Repertory in Orange County California, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, The Illinois Shakespeare Festival, and the Karamu Performing Arts Theatre in Cleveland, OH. Some of David’s favorite projects were at the Dallas Children’s Theater where he made a dinosaur collapse and pirates walk the plank.

This seminar will explore the artists, art and technology involved in creating the world of the play. It is intended as an overview for students who want to learn about theatrical design. Students will create their own designs in the areas of scenery, costumes, and lighting for three plays throughout the semester. The plays will be placed outside of their traditional setting while still maintaining the story and themes. Students have placed Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a trailer park and a daycare center for example. Careful historical research, close reading and analysis, text and source material, and collaboration will be the focus of the student projects.

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DRAM 87H-001: Style: A Mode of Expression (Honors) – CANCELLED 8/6/2020
Gen Eds: VP, CI, NA
McKay Coble

McKay Coble teaches design, both scenic and costume for the theatre and the history of material culture. She fell in love with the power of choice as far as visuals are concerned early in her career as a Carolina student and have never turned back. She is a professor in the Department of Dramatic Art and is a resident designer for PlayMakers Repertory Company. Dr. Coble uses the many and varied artistic venues on campus as co-instructors and the class will be visiting them during the course of the semester. Students will likely join her on a design journey as she created the scenery for a production for PRC. Students will have the opportunity to see the process and product.

This seminar studies the elements of design in their pure form and in context, surveys a history of period styles and theatre, and identifies their causes.
Consider Oscar Wilde’s statement from The Decay of Living 1889:

“Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life. This results not merely from Life’s imitative instincts, but from the fact that the self conscious aim of Life is to find expression, and that Art offers it certain beautiful forms through which it may realize that energy…”

Do you agree or disagree?

Art and design have frequently shown the inner life of humankind throughout history better than political, intellectual or social history. While a period’s style is seldom defined by the everyday choices of everyday people and is most often recorded in the works of artists, writers and intellectuals we must recognize the “times” as a major motivator for all stylistic choices. Even minor arts reflect major events.
We will study the elements of design as they exist in their pure form; a “tool box” of elements available to artists and practice the principles to which design is bound.
We will survey a history of period styles, period theatre and identify their causes.
We will explore one period’s style as a foundation for the next and dispel the Star Trek premise that future styles will only reflect the future.

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Economics (ECON)

ECON 55H-001: Economics of Sports (Honors)
Gen Eds: CI, EE-Mentored Research
Rita Balaban

Rita Balaban is a Teaching Professor in the Department of Economics at UNC-Chapel Hill where she has been a faculty member since 2006. She earned her Ph.D. from the Department of Economics at the University of Pittsburgh in 1999 and prior to her arrival at UNC-CH, she taught at Samford University and the College of Charleston. Rita is an experienced teacher whose teaching interests are in Applied Microeconomics, specifically the Economics of Sports. She has won several university-wide teaching awards including the Chapman Family Award (2018) and the Tanner Award (2015) for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. Her research interests are in economics pedagogy and she has presented her work at conferences in Wilmington, Philadelphia and San Diego.

This course uses real-world sports stories to introduce students to the study of economics. Through readings, lectures, discussions, personal experiences, and different activities we will use the sports industry to learn about the economic way of thinking, competitive and noncompetitive market structures, labor markets, contest design, market failure, and public finance.

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ECON 89-001: Researching the Tools for Success in College – CANCELLED 5/19/2020
Gen Eds: EE-Mentored Research, QI
Jane Cooley Fruehwirth

Jane Cooley Fruehwirth is an economist with research interests in the determinants of social, economic and racial inequality. A central theme to her research is the role of social context in shaping disadvantage, particularly in the context of schools and friendships. She studies education policies that are aimed at improving disadvantaged students’ outcomes, such as teaching practice, accountability and grade retention. More recently, her research delves into the determinants of mental health in adolescence. She is now teaming up with undergraduate researchers to help tackle the mental health crisis on college campuses.

In this Course-based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE), we will study the barriers and tools for success in college. Students will develop a measure of success and identify a focal barrier to success in collaboration with classmates and drawing on existing research. Students will synthesize existing evidence in the related literature, collect their own data and create their own evidence on the topic.

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English and Comparative Literature (CMPL/ENGL)

CMPL 55-001: Comics as Literature – CANCELLED 5/29/2020
Gen Eds: VP
Elyse Crystall

Dr. Elyse Crystall has been teaching courses on visual literacy – including graphic novels, comics, and film – and topics such as racism, anti-Semitism, and Islamophobia; (im)migration and borders; race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, and nationality; memory and trauma; and conquest, imperialism, colonialism, and empire for 25 years. Her role as the coordinator of social justice concentration for the English undergraduate major links to her commitment to social justice issues; her understanding of the critical importance of historical context; and her belief that race, ethnicity, class, gender, nationality, sexuality, among others, are both identity categories and social locations that shape how we see the world — and how the world sees us. Nothing is more gratifying to Dr. Crystall than when a group of students, an instructor, the texts assigned in the course, and the world outside the classroom work together to create meaning — new possibilities, new questions, and new ways of seeing.

Is it possible that people across generations and geographies see differently? What if what we see is related to who we are and our cultural beliefs? These are among the questions we will explore in this class on visual literacy and comics (in the form of adult graphic novels). We will question how meaning is made through the juxtaposition and framing of images as well as the relationship between words and images. In the process of comparing images, visual patterns emerge that enable the reader to identify artistic techniques and strategies that attempt to convey meaning where words might fail. We will work to sharpen our critical thinking (and reading) skills and reflect on how seeing is a socially and culturally circumscribed phenomenon. Creating a graphic narrative and a podcast about graphic novels are two projects we will undertake.

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ENGL 57H-001: Future Perfect: Science Fictions and Social Form (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA
Matthew Taylor

Matthew Taylor’s research focuses on the intersections among environmental humanities, critical theory (including posthumanism, biopolitics, science and technology studies, and critical race theory), and nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature. His first book, Universes without Us: Posthuman Cosmologies in American Literature (Univ. of Minnesota Press), examines cosmologies that challenge the utopianism of both past and present attempts at fusing self and environment.

What will our world look like in ten years? Fifty? One hundred? Will the future be a utopian paradise or a dystopian wasteland? Through a wide-ranging survey of popular science writing, novels, and films, this first year seminar will examine fictional and nonfictional attempts to imagine the future from the nineteenth century to the present. We will explore everything from futurology and transhumanism to warnings of imminent environmental collapse. Our focus will be less on assessing the accuracy of these predictions and more on determining what they tell us about the hopes and fears of the times in which they were made. The course will culminate in a short research paper on a future-oriented topic of your choosing.

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ENGL 66-001: Blake 2.0: William Blake in Popular Culture – CANCELLED 5/18/2020
Gen Eds: LA, NA
Joseph Viscomi

Joseph Viscomi, the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of English Literature, directs and co-edits the William Blake Archive. His special interests are British Romantic literature, art and printmaking. He has co-edited 9 illuminated works for The William Blake Trust and over 145 electronic editions for the Blake Archive. He is the author of Prints by Blake and his Followers, Blake and the Idea of the Book and numerous essays on Blake’s illuminated printing, color printing and reception. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Rockefeller Foundation, Getty Foundation and National Humanities Center.

William Blake, the visionary poet, artist and printmaker of the British Romantic period, has had enormous influence on modern art and popular culture. His illuminated poetry integrated word and image anticipating graphic novels and influencing many modern musicians, poets, writers (including Pullman, His Dark Materials Trilogy, Bono, Patti Smith and Jim Morrison). Using the Blake Archive, a hypertext of Blake’s poetry and art, we will study key Blake works as well as the digital medium that enables us to study these works in new ways. We will also explore the Web for performances and adaptations of the works we study and for works by musicians, painters, poets, writers, actors, playwrights, performers, dancers and film and video makers who were or are inspired or influenced by Blake. Students will share their discoveries with the class and produce critical or creative responses to a work by Blake or by an influenced artist.

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ENGL 87-001: Jane Austen, Then and Now – CANCELLED 5/18/2020
Gen Eds: VP
Inger Brodey

Inger Brodey was born in Kyoto, Japan, and studied at the Albert-Ludwigs Universität in Freiburg, Germany, as well as at Waseda University in Tokyo, before receiving her Ph.D. from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her primary interest is in the history of the novel in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Europe and Meiji Japan. Her books include Ruined by Design: Shaping Novels and Gardens in the Culture of Sensibility (Routledge, 2008), which won the 2009 SAMLA Studies Book Award. Her UNC awards include a Spray-Randleigh Faculty Fellowship, a Brandes Honors Curriculum Development Award, and a Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. She currently serves as the Bank of America Distinguished Term Associate Professor in Honors and is completing a book on Cowboys and Samurai in film.

In this course, we will study all of Jane Austen’s six major novels. In addition, we study one film adaptation of each novel to determine what aspects of Austen’s work translates into the film medium and what aspects are harder to capture in a cinematic format. Students will gain a thorough knowledge of Austen’s innovations in narrative and place in literary history. After receiving in-class instruction on filming, students may create their own adaptation of a scene from one of Austen’s novels as a final research project.

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ENGL 89-001: Contemporary Social Problems in Short Stories, the Social Sciences and the Press
Gen Eds: LA, CI
Luc Bovens and Hilary Lithgow

Professor Luc Bovens is a core member of the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program. He works across a broad range of topics and issues spanning rationality, epistemology, morality and political philosophy.

Hilary Lithgow specializes in British literature of the long nineteenth century, as well as the literature of war from World War I to today. Her current research, teaching and public humanities work focuses on contemporary literature of war, on the value that literature can have for people in their everyday lives, and on what literature might be able to show us about our world and experiences that we might not otherwise be able to see.

We will read works of short fiction from around the globe that address a range of social and political problems. The course addresses these issues from three angles. We will touch on topics that are prominent in the news today such as opiate addiction, arranged marriage, trafficking, bullying, social exclusion, charitable giving, implicit bias, and basic income. First, we read a short story that addresses the social or political issue. Second, we choose a recent and prominent study in the social sciences that addresses the issue. And third, we investigate how the issue is being reported in the press. Our goal will be to explore the different ways in which literature, social science and journalism construct issues of broad social and political relevance, the opportunities and limits of these constructions and what might be gained by using all three (rather than only one) to understand and respond to these issues.

Students may also register for this course under PHIL 89.001.

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ENGL 89-003: Scottish Gaelic Folksong and Vernacular Verse in the North American Diaspora – CANCELLED 4/20/2020
Gen Eds: US, CI
Tiber Falzett

Tiber Falzett has conducted over a decade of fieldwork with Scottish Gaelic speakers in Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada and the Outer Hebrides and West Highlands of Scotland. A fluent Scottish Gaelic speaker as well as a singer and bagpiper, Dr. Falzett has presented and performed from hearthsides and villages halls to national broadcast media in both Scotland and Canada. As an active folklorist and musician, he especially values opportunities to share the Scottish Gaelic language and its music with others and the power that both language and music hold in breaking down barriers and bringing people together.

In this seminar, we will delve into the treasure trove of Scottish Gaelic song tradition and vernacular verse transmitted and composed in the North American Diaspora, from the earliest surviving examples of verse made in Revolutionary eighteenth-century North Carolina to the living Scottish Gaelic song tradition in Cape Breton Island, Canada. Scottish Gaelic texts will be engaged in English translation and students will be encouraged to participate fully from discussing a text’s imagery to singing its choruses. Rooted in over four-centuries of oral tradition, these compositions give voice to a dynamic yet, to the outside observer, subaltern tradition of song-making carried across the Atlantic by emigrants and exiles from the eighteenth century onward. This large corpus of material that offers vivid insights into the experiences of Scottish Gaels in what are today the United States of America and Canada remains largely underexplored within the academy. This is in-spite of the fact that it offers some of the earliest examples of poetic expression among minoritized immigrant groups in the continent. Key concepts to be explored will include oral and literary frameworks of representation, the function, performance and transmission of song and verse in the social world, and the methods of documentation and collection of oral texts that by the mid-twentieth century became increasingly endangered with rapid attrition of the Gaelic language as the vital force in expressing everyday experience. At its heart, this verse was composed to be sung and shared at the communal level, representing a poetic lifeblood that gives voice to Scottish Gaelic experience over generations in which the lines between composer, performer, and audience were often blurred. For this reason, the texts examined will be placed in the functional contexts of their oral performance by engaging archival recordings made in the twentieth century. Attention will also be given to the popularization of these rooted songs now performed globally from commercial recordings that top the record charts to soundtracks for feature-length films. Ultimately, this unique body of knowledge represents an unparalleled literary inheritance that has been both highly valued and devotedly maintained in the collective memory of Scottish Gaelic-speaking communities on both sides of the Atlantic.

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ENGL 89-005: Projections of Empire: Fiction and Film
Gen Eds: LA, GL
David J. Baker

David J. Baker is a professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. He teaches Renaissance literature, including the plays of Shakespeare. He is the author of Between Nations: Shakespeare, Spenser, Marvell, and the Question of Britain and On Demand: Writing for the Market in Early Modern England. He lived for 17 years in Hawai’i, whose state flag features the “Union Jack”–the flag of the United Kingdom–in the upper left-hand corner, just one of the many traces that the British Empire has left around the world.

This course examines depictions of empire in twentieth-century fiction and film – of power, identity, and culture under British colonialism – which it reconsiders from the vantage point of the twenty-first century. We will think about genre as well: the implications of transforming a novel into a film. Texts will include “The Man Who Would Be King” and Kim, by Rudyard Kipling; Things Fall Apart, by Chinua Achebe; A Passage to India, by E. M. Forster; and Heart of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad, and we will view films based on or influenced by these novels (for instance, Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now). Our goal will be to understand how, why and by whom British empire was represented in the past, and how those representations have shaped the world we live in today.

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ENGL 89H-001: American Poetry in Motion (Honors))
Gen Eds: LA, EE-Mentored Research
Eliza Richards

Eliza Richards is Professor of English, with a concentration in American literature before 1900 and American poetry. She has written about Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, poetry of the US Civil War, and popular women’s poetry. Professor Richards has won awards for teaching on both the graduate and undergraduate level.

This course focuses on the creative processes involved in writing poetry. We will look at poets’ revisions of their work, their statements about poetry, their letters to and from other writers, and the publication and reception of their poems in their own time. We will concentrate on specific case studies: the manuscripts and letter-poems of the reclusive writer Emily Dickinson; the notebooks, letters, and poems of Walt Whitman that he wrote while tending the wounded in the Civil War hospitals; the poems, manuscripts, and letters of George Moses Horton, who taught himself to read and write and published two books of poetry while enslaved in North Carolina; and the drafts, revisions, and animal drawings of twentieth-century modernist Marianne Moore. The course seeks to develop close reading skills that are crucial for interpreting poetry; to explore how social and cultural conditions both limit and enable poetic expression, and how poets analyze and criticize those conditions; to strengthen writing and oral communication skills; and to develop research skills.

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Environmental Sciences and Engineering (ENVR)

ENVR 89-001: Environment-ECUIPP Lab: Connecting with Communities through Environmental Research for Public Health
Gen Eds: EE-Mentored Research
Amanda Northcross

Prof. Amanda Northcross likes to build things and enjoys working together with students and communities to explore environmental health concerns, design field campaigns, and build and deploy networks of sensors to answer environmental health questions. With BS, MS and PhD degrees in chemical and environmental engineering she is passionate about health equity. Dr. Northcross has conducted environmental health and engineering research in Guatemala, Brazil, Nigeria and the United States. She will work together with faculty from UNC’s Water Institute to conduct community-engaged environmental research with first year students.

This course is an entry into an undergraduate learning community organized by the Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering. The ECUIPP Lab (Environmentally-Engaged Communities and Undergraduate students Investigating for Public health Protection) is a creative community of students, faculty members and practice partners. Students in ENVR 89-001 will become members of the Environment-ECUIPP Lab. Over the course of the semester they will design and conduct research that addresses a pressing environmental health issue in a local community. Students will work with the local community partner to develop a research question and use the resources of the ECUIPP Lab and the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering to answer the question through the research process. The course is a hands-on undergraduate research experience.

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European Studies (EURO)

EURO 89-001: Europe and the U.S. in a Changing World
Gen Eds: SS, GL
Liesbet Hooghe

Liesbet Hooghe is the W.R. Kenan Professor of Political Science at UNC-Chapel Hill and Robert Schuman Fellow at the European University Institute, Florence. Her research interests are in political behavior (elites, political parties, public opinion), multilevel governance and decentralization, European integration, international organization. In 2017 she received the Daniel Elazar Distinguished Scholar Award for Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations of the APSA. Hooghe’s recent co-authored books include The European Commission in the 21st Century (OUP, 2013); Measuring Regional Authority (OUP, 2016); Community, Scale and Regional Governance (OUP, 2016); and Measuring International Authority (OUP, 2017). Homepage: http://hooghe.web.unc.edu.

This course introduces students to European society and the European Union, and the respects in which European politics differs from American politics. The first section of the course engages Europe and the European Union. Why is there a European Union? How does it operate? How has it developed? What difference has it made in the lives of Europeans? What kind of polity is emerging at the European level? How is European integration contested? Is European integration the beginning of the end of the national state in Western Europe, or will states constrain the loss of sovereignty? The second section of the course compares American with European politics. How are elections and the practice of government different? How do welfare and health care in the United States differ from Western Europe? To what extent do conceptions and practice in foreign policy differ between Europe and the USA? Are Europeans from Venus and Americans from Mars, as a famous American scholar once argued, or is the reality more fine-grained?

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Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 52-001: Political Ecology of Health and Disease
Gen Eds: SS, CI, GL
Michael Emch

Dr. Michael Emch is W.R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Geography and Epidemiology at UNC. His expertise is in infectious disease ecology, spatial epidemiology, neighborhood determinants of health, and geographic information science applications of public health. He leads the Spatial Health Research Group which conducts research that explores spatio-temporal patterns of disease, primarily infectious diseases of the developing world. His research group focuses on diverse topics such as the role of population-environment drivers in pathogen evolution, how social connectivity contributes to disease incidence, and using environmental indicators to predict disease outbreaks. For more information see the Spatial Health Research Group website at spatialhealth.web.unc.edu/.

This course examines the ecology of infectious diseases including environmental and anthropogenic drivers of those diseases. During the semester we will focus on several case studies of diseases including COVID-19, malaria, cholera, and HIV/AIDS. The biophysical and evolutionary drivers of diseases will be examined as well as the political, economic, social, and environmental systems that shape health and disease across spatial and temporal scales. A political ecological framework is used to examine such topics as how political forces and economic interests helped shape the HIV/AIDS and malaria pandemics in Africa and beyond. We will also examine how emerging infectious diseases such as COVID-19 diffuse through populations and how public health efforts and geographical and epidemiological modelling and analyses can be used to predict and limit their spread.

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GEOG 58-001: Making Myth-Leading Memories: Landscapes of Remembrance – ADDED 8/1/2020
Gen Eds: SS
Jonathan Lepofsky

This course considers memorial landscapes created to reinforce values symbolized by the person, group, or event memorialized. It looks at how disagreements and cultural changes affect memorial landscape interpretation.

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GEOG 67-001: Politics of Everyday Life
Gen Eds: SS, GL
Sara Smith

Sara Smith is a political geographer with a South Asia focus, specializing in feminist political geography and political geographies of youth and the future. She has been involved in non-profit work and research in India since 1999. Her Ph.D. is in geography, and she has been teaching in UNC’s Department of Geography since 2009. Professor Smith’s current research in the Ladakh region of India’s Jammu and Kashmir State addresses the ways that individuals’ personal lives (especially their decisions about love and babies) are entangled in territorial struggle. Smith is developing a new project about how marginalized young people from India’s remote mountain regions experience university life in major Indian cities and how this shapes their politics. If you are curious, you can find out more about this work on her faculty website: https://sarasmith.web.unc.edu/.

This seminar examines the ways that politics, especially contests over territory, are part of our day-to-day life. We will explore a range of cases, from immigration policy and rhetoric in the US, to popular representations of geopolitics in film, to the politics of family planning in India. How do questions of love, friendship, family and youth identity tie into the international and national political stories that we see on the news? What does national identity have to do with our individual sense of self? We will also explore alternative ways that international politics have been studied, as feminist geopolitics or anti-geopolitics and questions of citizenship. Work for the seminar will involve original research on intersections of international politics and students’ daily life, as well as exploring representations of geopolitical issues in the media, film and fiction.

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Geological Sciences (GEOL)

GEOL 72H-001: Field Geology of Eastern California (Honors)
Gen Eds: PL, EE-Mentored Research
Drew Coleman

Drew Coleman’s research focuses on understanding how the Earth works by determining the rates of processes (mountain building, extinction, volcanism, etc.) that occurred in the past. To accomplish this he and his students date rocks. His teaching is inquiry based and he is most happy when he is teaching “hands on” in the field or lab.

Have you ever wanted to stand on a volcano, see a glacier, trace out an earthquake fault, or see the Earth’s oldest living things? This seminar is designed around a one-week field trip to eastern California, where students will study geologic features including active volcanoes, earthquake-producing faults, and evidence for recent glaciation and extreme climate change. Before the field trip (which will take place the week of Fall Break and be based at a research station near Bishop, California), the class will meet twice a week to learn basic geologic principles and to work on developing field research topics. During the field trip students will work on field exercises (e.g. mapping, measuring, and describing an active fault; observing and recording glacial features) and collect data for the research projects. After the field trip, students will obtain laboratory data from samples collected during the trip and test research hypotheses using field and laboratory data. Grading will be based on presentation of group research projects, and on a variety of small projects during the trip (notebook descriptions, mapping projects, etc.). Students may be required to pay some of the costs of the trip (a maximum of about $500.) This course will require missing three days of classes. The course is designed to teach basic geology “on the rocks”, so there are no prerequisites. Link to Yosemite Nature Notes video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5RQp77uVPA

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GEOL 89-001: Sound Scape of Our World
Gen Eds: PL, EE-Field Work, QI
Jonathan Lees

Jonathan Lees works on problems of seismological interest, especially directed at geophysical, tectonic, volcanological and atmospheric studies. His research is aimed at understanding the dynamics of volcanic explosions: how do we characterize the shallow conduit system as well as the deep plumbing structure of the volcano edifice. He pioneered investigations in seismic tomography in regional and local settings using earthquakes as sources. He is currently investigating acoustic waves recorded in the stratosphere: a problem that will inform planetary research on Venus and Jupiter.

Let’s open our ears and minds and listen to the world around us. What is the difference between a bird song and a violin? The roar of a crowd at a sporting event and an exploding volcano? This seminar will explore sound: we will develop an appreciation of our acoustic environment. Instruction will be exploration based and we will learn how to record acoustic sounds in natural and man-made environments. What are signals? What is noise? How are sound signals perceived by our ears and also analyzed scientifically? We will explore the various bands of acoustic communication and the ambient signals that comprise our sound environment. Field observations will be a major focus, where we will record our own data on personal cell phones (or computers) as well as professional equipment. We will learn how to extract data from these devices for detailed analysis in the frequency and time domains. Computer programs will be provided for visualization, spectral analysis and simulated wave propagation to help quantify our perceptions. No prerequisites are required, just curiosity. Grading will be based on written reports, class participation, and group projects. A capstone project will be required as a presentation and written summary of field observations.

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Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)

GSLL 59-001: Moscow 1937: Dictatorships and Their Defenders
Gen Eds: HS, GL
David Pike

David Pike received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1978 in German Studies with a minor in Russian and has taught at UNC–CH since 1980. He is the author of three books, The Politics of Culture in Soviet -Occupied Germany, 1945-1949 (1993), Lukács and Brecht (1985), and German Writers in Soviet Exile, 1933-1945 (1982). His research takes him regularly to Berlin and Moscow.

This seminar deals in the broadest possible context with two critical issues that dominated the 20th century: the rise of fascism out of the carnage of World War I and the Bolshevik revolution to which the war and Czarist Russia’s involvement in it helped contribute. As the semester unfolds, drawing on a variety of historical and documentary films, and literature (memoirs, novels), we will take a comparative look at singular personalities like Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler and examine the role played by such key figures in historical events of this magnitude. Towards the end of the semester, we will glance briefly at the situation created in Western and Eastern Europe by the defeat of fascism and contemplate the origins and evolution of the cold war. We will conclude the seminar with a consideration of the dissolution and democratization of Eastern European countries, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and, against the tragic background of the past, the general prognosis for democracy in the future.

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GSLL 85-001: Children and War
Gen Eds: LA, GL
Hana Pichova

Hana Pichova specializes in twentieth century Czech prose. Her published work focuses on literature in exile; on literary representations of cultural and sculptural events; and on literary historiography.

In this course we will explore narratives and films about WWII and post-war realities as experienced by children and teens. Forced to grow up quickly and unnaturally, children seek normalcy in the most unexpected places. Their imaginary escapes and creative endeavors become not only a means of their survival, but also a form of documenting the suffering humans inflict upon each other. As we read these “documents” we will consider the historical realities they reveal, while paying close attention to the literary quality of each narrative and how it shapes our understanding of, and response to, the narrated events.

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Global Studies (GLBL)

GLBL 87H-001: The Migratory Experience (Honors)
Gen Eds: BL, GL
Carmen Huerta

Dr. Carmen Huerta holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from UNC-Chapel Hill, a M.A in sociology from UNC-Chapel Hill, and a M.A. in political science from Rice University. Her research agenda takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding how American institutions such as universities, schools and police bureaucracies are working to incorporate underrepresented racial and ethnic groups. Her current research explores the impact of micro-aggressions on the lived experience of First-Generation College Students, police behavior toward new Latino migrants in North Carolina during the 2000s, and the social and health impacts associated with the immigration enforcement climate in the U.S. on Latino communities.

Dr. Huerta has considerable experience teaching interdisciplinary courses, including those in Spanish literature, political science, sociology, public administration and education. She has taught at various elite institutions over the past 20 years including: Duke, Penn State, Rice, Elon and UNC.
She draws on her personal experience as a Latina first-generation college student to guide her student-centered teaching philosophy.

The seminar will critically analyze the migrant experience in both North America and Europe. Migration is a calculated decision that individuals, families, and groups make in an effort to improve their living conditions. We will adopt an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the motivation of migrants, the nature of the migrant journey to their destination states, and their integration into their new societies.

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History (HIST)

HIST 50-001: Time and the Medieval Cosmos
Gen Eds: HS
Chris Clemens and Brett Whalen

Dr. Chris Clemens is the Jaroslav Folda Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Senior Associate Dean of Natural Sciences. He studies stellar remnants and the debris from old planetary systems around them. Dr. Clemens is also a faculty member of the Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies.

Brett Edward Whalen (associate professor, History) received his PhD from Stanford in 2005 and has been at Carolina ever since. He teaches classes on the medieval church, the crusades, and the apocalypse. As a child, he spent cold, clear winter nights in Vermont looking through his telescope at celestial bodies.

Time and the Medieval Cosmos will introduce first-year students to the basic motions of the solar system as viewed from the Earth and the mechanical and mathematical models used to reproduce them. The course will also immerse students in the world of medieval and early modern education, theology, and natural philosophy, challenging them to understand the historical conditions that shaped views of the cosmos in the premodern world. Last but not least, the class will raise broader questions about the relationship between faith and reason, along with the role of institutional authorities in determining the boundaries of “acceptable” knowledge.

Students may also register for this course under PHYS 50.001.

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HIST 74-001: Emperors, Courts, and Consumption: The Mughals of India – CANCELLED 5/28/2020
Gen Eds: HS, BN
Emma Flatt

Emma Flatt’s research has focused on mentalities and practices in the courtly societies of medieval South India. She is currently writing a book which examines how skills like perfume-making, astrological divination, gardening, magical spells and letter writing allowed nobles to succeed at court. She is also researching the history of friendship in medieval South Asia. Originally from the UK, she has lived, studied and worked in India, Italy and Singapore.

The Mughal Empire (1526-1858) is not only one of the most well-known of South Asian polities, it was also the grandest and longest lasting empire in Indian history. At its height this empire covered almost the entire subcontinent and its rulers and elites were responsible for much of the iconic architecture and painting associated with India in the popular mind today. Rich in textual, material and visual primary sources, in recent years this period has been the focus of vibrant and exciting scholarly work, which has re-evaluated long-held assumptions about the nature of pre-modern South Asia. Through a study of autobiographical texts, contemporary accounts, objects, architecture and later representations in scholarly works, films, novels and Wikipedia entries, we will analyze the complex ways in which this powerful dynasty portrayed itself and the various ways it is remembered today.

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HIST 89-001: Truth and Reconciliation in South Africa
Gen Eds: HS, BN
Lauren Jarvis

Lauren Jarvis is a historian of 20th-century South Africa. Her current research focuses on how ideas move and, more specifically, how religious communities move them. In South Africa, these questions are especially interesting because of the ways that race and racism shaped Africans’ mobility and access to land and, as a result, the growth of Christianity in the country. Jarvis is also in the early stages of research for a book project on South Africans’ contributions to international humanitarianism and human rights history over the twentieth century. Jarvis completed her BA in History at an institution a few miles down the road (rhymes with “fluke”) and her MA and PhD in History at Stanford University. Before coming to UNC, she taught at Stanford, San Francisco State University, and the University of Utah. Jarvis has spent more than five years in South Africa working and doing research and hopes that students will leave this course convinced, as she is, that South Africa is actually the center of the universe. (Just kidding…sort of!)

How do countries overcome histories of racial injustice, inequality, and violence? What role can history play in promoting reconciliation? In 1994, South Africa embarked upon an experiment to answer these questions. The centerpiece of South African efforts was the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). From 1995-2002, TRC appointees did research and interviewed thousands of South Africans to uncover a hidden history of apartheid-era violence in the hope that truth would bring about reconciliation. South Africans still debate whether the TRC met its aims, but the model of the TRC has been emulated around the world since. This course will examine the significance of the TRC in the longer history of transitional justice from the end of World War II to the present. Students will conduct historical research, whether about South Africa or another country, in order to propose their own plans for a truth commission.

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HIST 89H-001: Race and Rights in the American Legal System: The Case of the Japanese American Internment (Honors)
Gen Eds: HS, US
Eric L. Muller

Eric L. Muller is Dan K. Moore Distinguished Professor of Law in Jurisprudence and Ethics. Muller joined the UNC faculty in the fall of 1998. He has published articles in the Yale Law Journal, the Harvard Law Review, and the University of Chicago Law Review, among many other academic journals. His book “Free to Die for their Country: The Story of the Japanese American Draft Resisters of World War II,” was published in August of 2001 by the University of Chicago Press, and was named one of the Washington Post Book World’s Top Nonfiction Titles of 2001. His second book, “American Inquisition: The Hunt for Japanese American Disloyalty in World War II,” was published by the University of North Carolina Press in October of 2007. His most recent book, “Colors of Confinement: Rare Kodachrome Photographs of Japanese American Incarceration in World War II”, published by the University of North Carolina Press in association with the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, was profiled in the New York Times in June of 2012. It won the Joan Patterson Kerr Book Award from the Western History Association in 2013.

From 2008 through 2011, Muller served at the law school as Associate Dean for Faculty Development. In both 2010 and 2011, he received the Frederick B. McCall Award for Teaching Excellence, voted by the graduating classes.

Muller serves as Chair of the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina Press and is a member of the university-level Faculty Executive Committee at UNC-Chapel Hill.

From January of 2012 through December of 2015, Muller served as Director of UNC’s Center for Faculty Excellence, the campus’s faculty development center.

This seminar introduces students to the workings of the American court system and examines the historical development of the constitutional norm of equal protection of the laws, using one notorious historical episode – the removal and confinement of Japanese Americans in World War II – as its central example. Rather than presenting constitutional law as a group of static, binding pronouncements, it shows how constitutional principles evolve as a conversation among the branches of the federal government, between the federal and the state governments, and between ordinary citizens and their governments. Along the way, the seminar offers an overview of the ways in which the law treated Asian immigrants and Asian Americans in the late nineteenth and the twentieth centuries, and poses questions about the legacy of the Japanese American imprisonment for later problems of individual rights and liberties.

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Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST)

IDST 89-001: Bones, Borders, and Bureaucracy: Statehood in Mesopotamia, Xinjiang, and Beyond
Gen Eds: HS, BN
Arianne Ekinci, Christine Mikeska, Adams Nager, Banu Gökariksel

Note: This course will be taught by three Royster Fellows under the supervision of the Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education, Dr. Banu Gökariksel.

Arianne Ekinci is a History PhD student focusing on minority history in the PRC and diaspora. After graduating from Reed College with a double major in Chinese and History in 2010, Arianne worked for Teach for China, an international high school, and a university in Xinjiang before starting graduate school. She focuses on experiences of the Turkic-Muslim Uyghur minority in China and abroad.

Christine Mikeska is a Ph.D. student in the Anthropology Department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, specializing in zooarchaeology in Southwest Asia. Christine received her BA in Archaeology and Classical Civilizations from Boston University and her MA in Anthropology from UNC-Chapel Hill. Currently, she works on several excavations in Cyprus and Turkey, the latter of which includes her dissertation field site where she studies the animal economy of ancient Hattusa, the Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. She is interested in animal economies, early state formation, and Southwest Asia.

Adams Nager is a Ph.D. student in the Public Policy Department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Adams holds a Bachelor’s in Economics and a Master’s in Political Economy and Public Policy from Washington University in St. Louis, and spent four years at the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, a think-tank in Washington, D.C., writing on the economics behind trade and technology policy. At UNC, his research focuses on regional economic development policies. He is interested in issues and policies surrounding development of advanced industries, inclusive growth, rural growth, and the impact of business location incentives.

Banu Gökariksel is an Associate Professor of Geography and the Royster Distinguished Professor at The Graduate School at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She has a joint appointment in the Curriculum of Global Studies and adjunct appointment in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies at Duke University. She served as the co-editor of the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies (2014-2018). Professor Gökariksel received her PhD in Geography from the University of Washington, Seattle and MA in Sociology/Anthropology from Bogaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey. She was awarded the 2017 Chapman Family University Teaching Award and the 2018 American Association of Geographers Enhancing Diversity Award. She is the co-director of Duke Middle East in Europe summer program.

This seminar introduces students to the study of the state and its subjects, focusing specifically on case studies drawn from ancient, historic, and modern Asia. From modern nation-states to ancient and medieval city-states and empires, students will examine governments and the people they govern through three different disciplinary lenses—archaeology, history, and public policy—in this team-taught course. Students will be asked to think critically about roles of government, the relationship between the governing entity and the governed, and how states and subjects differ through time and space. Students will explore the role and impacts of leaders, the monopolization of violence, and the state as an economic unit. Case studies that range from the earliest states in Mesopotamia and the Indus Valley to the modern nation-state and national identity in China and Turkey will introduce students to the culture, geography, and political history of several key states in Asia.

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Linguistics (LING)

LING 50-001: Language in the U.S.A.
Gen Eds: SS
Benjamin Frey

Benjamin Frey’s research interests center on sociolinguistics, with particular emphasis on language shift. His current project is a book manuscript on the process of shift as analyzed through the lens of economics, politics, religion, and race. The book notes the important roles of community agency and boundaries in insulating social networks, and compares the shift situations of several communities across the United States.

The motivation for Dr. Frey’s interest in language shift is primarily in language revitalization. If people can understand the processes that led to a shift away from endangered languages, they can also work with communities to promote their growth. As a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, the mission of language revitalization is close to his heart.

After joining the American Studies faculty in July of 2015, Dr. Frey has taught courses in Cherokee language and sociolinguistics. One of his particular interests in teaching is in inspiring students to see how classroom knowledge can apply to real world social situations. In his ‘America’s Threatened Languages’ course, he encourages students to consult census data to supplement historical knowledge about community development. This helps to form a picture of how shift situations unfold.

In 2013, he was the recipient of a Carolina Postdoctoral Fellowship for Faculty Diversity. During that time, he received an award for commitment to service from the Office of Postdoctoral Affairs.

The linguistic landscape of the United States in historical and contemporary perspective: American English dialects, language maintenance and shift among Native American and immigrant groups, language politics and policy.

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Marine Sciences (MASC)

MASC 52-001: Living with Our Oceans and Atmosphere
Gen Eds: PL
John Bane

Born in his mother’s home town of Kalamazoo, Michigan, John Bane lived in several locations throughout the U.S and abroad with his military family (his father was an Air Force pilot). He returned to earn his B.S. in Physics and Mathematics at Western Michigan University before going on to Florida State University for a Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography. Following a year at LSU where he studied coastal processes in the Gulf of Mexico, John joined the faculty at UNC.

John conducts research on the dynamics of the Gulf Stream and coastal currents, ocean-atmosphere interaction processes, and marine renewable energy. This work focuses on mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric variability that occurs on daily and longer time scales. Past study regions include the Gulf Stream from the southeastern United States to the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean, the coastal ocean and atmosphere off the U. S. west coast, from southern California to Oregon, the northern Gulf of Mexico, and the shallow waters of the Bahama Banks. He has been involved in the promotion of marine alternative energy, from both wind and ocean current resources. Presently he is a member of two investigator groups funded through the National Science Foundation (Physical Oceanography Program) and the North Carolina Renewable Ocean Energy Program. These studies are ongoing in the Cape Hatteras region, offshore of the Carolinas and Virginia.

This seminar will introduce students to the nature of the Earth’s oceans and atmosphere, and describe the processes that lead to our weather patterns and global climate. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the oceans and atmosphere affect human population, how oceanic and atmospheric changes are linked to increasing human activity, and how these changes can affect you. Basic principles and modern theories of changing climate, severe weather events, oceanic hazards, and interactions between the oceans and the atmosphere will be studied. Examples of presently active research being conducted at UNC and at other institutions will be used to highlight how the above topics are investigated scientifically. Readings will be taken from introductory textbooks on meteorology, oceanography and environmental sciences; and modern articles in periodicals such as Scientific American, Nature, American Scientist, National Geographic, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, and Weatherwise. Various websites, including those within the UNC Department of Marine Sciences, will be used.

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MASC 55-001: Change in the Coastal Ocean
Gen Eds: PL
Christopher S. Martens

Christopher S. Martens earned his Ph.D. in Chemical Oceanography from Florida State University in 1972, then moved to Yale to complete two years of postdoctoral study before joining the faculty at UNC in 1974. His current research focuses on how biological processes affect the chemistry of coastal and deep-sea environments, including the expanding role of sponges in coral reef ecosystems, the impacts of recently discovered natural gas seeps found off the North Carolina coast and the fate of the huge volume of hydrocarbons released to the deep sea during the Deepwater Horizon disaster. He publishes widely, has twice been co-recipient of the international Geochemical Society’s Best Paper award in Organic Geochemistry and received the Ketchum Award for Leadership in Coastal Oceanography from the famous Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He is an experienced SCUBA, hard helmet, saturation and submersible diver and an underwater videographer. He has received a “Favorite Faculty” award for recognized excellence in undergraduate teaching.

This seminar provides students with opportunities to explore recent changes in marine environments caused by the interactions of fascinating oceanographic processes. Class presentations and discussions focus on the work of active marine scientists who combine their traditional disciplinary research with knowledge and skills from other fields as needed to understand new environmental challenges. This cross-cutting scientific approach prepares class members to recognize important connections between traditional disciplines to discover interdisciplinary research areas that they might wish to further explore during their undergraduate careers at Carolina. Each week we read a series of cutting-edge, non-technical research papers focused largely on recent changes in marine ecosystems in preparation for in-class discussions, laboratory demonstrations, and “video- and photo-trip” visits to field sites. We use information from those papers, other course materials and current research at Carolina, to investigate how biological, geological, physical, and geochemical processes interact to influence coastal, open-ocean, and tropical environments. Students are expected to actively participate in discussions during classes, in demonstrations using state-of-the art instrumentation in MASC laboratories, and in “hands on” mini-field experiments (as weather allows) designed to emphasize the importance of the scientific question rather than just the technology involved. Please note that this seminar has no prerequisites.

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MASC 59-001: Extreme Microorganisms: Pushing the Limits of Life on Earth and Beyond
Gen Eds: PL
Andreas Teske

Andreas Teske is a biochemist by training, but became fascinated by the microbial world of the oceans and focused his Ph.D. research on the ecology and diversity of marine bacteria that catalyze the sulfur cycle. After completing his Ph.D. at Bremen University and the Max-Planck-Institute for Marine Microbiology in Germany in 1995, he spent his postdoc years at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and stayed on as Assistant Scientist. Andreas Teske joined the UNC Marine Sciences faculty in 2002. His research interests include the microbiology of the deep marine subsurface, and microbial ecosystems of petroleum seeps and hydrothermal vents. In search of novel extreme marine microorganisms, he and his students are participating in a wide range of research cruises.

We will expand our horizons in biology by learning about some of the most extreme microorganisms on the planet – microorganisms that thrive without oxygen in deep marine sediments and in the Earth’s crust, under high temperatures in boiling hot springs or in superheated deep-sea water under high pressure, and under chemical stress factors (high sulfide and heavy metal concentrations) that were once thought to be incompatible with life. Numerous extremophilic (extreme-loving) microorganisms of different metabolic types have been isolated in the laboratory as pure cultures; others have been observed in Nature but have so far resisted cultivation. Extremophiles provide opportunities to study the unusual and strange biochemistry that allows them to thrive in their unique habitats; they are also valuable model systems for potential life on other planets. We will get to know the unusual habitats where extremophiles are found, for example hot springs and volcanic areas on land (Yellowstone) and in the ocean (hydrothermal vents), and we will explore the earliest history of extremophiles as some of the most ancient microorganisms on Earth.

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Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 62H-001: Combinatorics (Honors)
Gen Eds: QI
Ivan Cherednik

Professor Ivan Cherednik is Austin H. Carr Distinguished Professor of Mathematics. Trained at the Steklov Mathematics Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences and at Moscow State University, his areas of specialization are Representation Theory, Combinatorics, Number Theory, Harmonic Analysis, and Mathematical Physics. Cherednik’s particular affection for Combinatorics is well known: he proved the celebrated Constant term conjecture in Combinatorics.

A leading expert in Modern Combinatorics wants to share his vision of the subject with the students. The seminar is a perfect background for future specialists in mathematics, physics, computer science, biology, economics, for those who are curious what statistical physics is about, what is cryptography, and how stock market works, and for everyone who likes mathematics.
The course will be organized around the following topics:

• Puzzles: dimer covering, magic squares, 36 officers
• Combinations: from coin tossing to dice and poker
• Fibonacci numbers: rabbits, population growth, etc.
• Arithmetic: designs, cyphers, intro to finite fields
• Catalan numbers: from playing roulette to stock market

The students will learn about the history of Combinatorics, its connections with the theory of numbers, its fundamental role in the natural sciences and various applications.
It is an advanced research course; all students are expected to participate in projects under the supervision of I.Ch. and the Graduate Research Consultant (the GRC Program). This seminar is partially supported by Honors Carolina.

The grades will be based on the exam, bi-weekly home assignments and the participation in the projects. The course requires focus and effort, but, generally, the students are quite satisfied with the progress they make (and their grades too).
From the Course Evaluation: “A difficult but wholly worthwhile course: I feel more competent for having taken it”, “I would recommend this FYS to others ONLY if they have a VERY strong affinity for and ability in Algebra (I thought I did, but I was wrong)”.

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MATH 69-001: Unfolding Infinity: Mathematical Origami and Fractal Symmetry – CANCELLED 5/19/2020
Gen Eds: QI
Mark McCombs

Mark McCombs is a Teaching Professor of Mathematics. He teaches Selected Topics in Mathematics, Calculus 1–3, Discrete Math and First Year Seminars focusing on mathematical art. He strives to help students explore how mathematical ideas resonate with fields typically perceived as non-mathematical. He uses UNC’s BeAM network to develop maker-based activities that cultivate students’ analytical creativity. He enjoys making 3D origami sculpture and digital fractal art (https://www.deviantart.com/boygnius/gallery/), some of which was exhibited at the 2018 Bridges Conference in Stockholm, Sweden. One of his sculptures is now on display in Stockholm’s National Museum of Science and Technology!

Have you ever wanted to be able to hold infinity in the palm of your hand? This course engages students in an exploration of the interplay between mathematics, origami, and fractal symmetry. Learning objectives will include mastering basic origami folding techniques, identifying and applying fundamental symmetry operations, recognizing and analyzing fractal symmetry, and creating geometric tessellations. Students will use image editing software (Illustrator and Photoshop), mathematical imaging software (Geometer’s Sketchpad and Ultra Fractal), and the laser cutter in UNC’s BeAM space, to design and create modular origami and fractal tessellation artwork. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and small group work, as well as submit short written assignments on course topics.

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Media and Journalism (MEJO)

MEJO 89-001: Polarized Politics, Fake News and Preparing for Election 2020
Gen Eds: CI
Ferrel Guillory

Ferrel Guillory is a professor of the practice of journalism at the UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communication. He founded the Program on Public Life (formerly the Program on Southern Politics, Media and Public Life) in 1997 to build bridges between the academic resources at UNC-Chapel Hill and the governmental, journalism and civic leaders of North Carolina and the South. Guillory is a co-founder of EducationNC, a nonprofit news and policy organization, and he is a senior fellow at MDC, a Southern think tank.

This course offers first year students an opportunity to explore American public life through the lens of professional journalism. Students will read explanatory journalism, examine what makes information credible or not. By engaging in group discussions and writing their own analyses, they will deepen their understanding of how government and politics play out in states and communities in today’s often-fractious United States. In addition to learning more about journalism and democracy, the course seeks to instill in students a sense of idealism and engaged citizenship.

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Music (MUSC)

MUSC 51-001: The Interplay of Music and Physics
Gen Eds: PL
Laurie McNeil and Brent Wissick

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her Ph.D. in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. Her seminar grows out of her life as a choral singer (and, earlier, a violinist and recorder player). When not singing with the Choral Society of Durham, she can be found in her laboratory using lasers to study the properties of materials.

Brent Wissick has taught cello, chamber music and early music at UNC-CH since 1982; and performs across the US and abroad. But he has had a life-long interest in how instruments work and how sound is made. He loves encouraging musicians to understand some of these issues, and getting a broad range of science students involved in doing “musical” things. He thinks about physics when practicing the cello or viola da gamba, making CD recordings, rehearsing with ensembles, giving lessons and listening to music in a variety of spaces. He still wakes up every morning excited to make and study music with professional colleagues and undergraduates.

This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects. This class is taught in hybrid mode, with most meetings held in person. Fully remote learners may not enroll in this class.

Students may also register for this course under PHYS 51.001.

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Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD)

PWAD 89-015: September 11: Origins, Consequences, and Where Do We Go From Here
Gen Eds: HS, CI
Admiral Dennis C. Blair and Erinn Whitaker

As Director of National Intelligence from January 2009 to May 2010, Admiral Dennis C. Blair led sixteen national intelligence agencies and provided integrated intelligence support to the President, Congress, and operations in the field. During his 34-year Navy career, Blair served on guided missile destroyers in both the Atlantic and Pacific fleets and commanded the Kitty Hawk Battle Group. Prior to retiring from the Navy in 2002, Blair served as Commander in Chief of the U.S. Pacific Command. A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, Blair earned a master’s degree from Oxford University as a Rhodes scholar.

Erinn Whitaker, a former senior analyst for the Central Intelligence Agency and US State Department, is a Professor of the Practice for the Peace, War and Defense Curriculum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. With nearly 15 years of experience overseas and in Washington, teaches courses such as “Writing and Briefing for Intelligence,” “Comparative Intelligence Regimes,” and “Cases in Counter Intelligence,” helping students interested in careers ranging from intelligence to public policy to journalism strengthen their written and oral communication skills. Whitaker earned a BA from Middlebury College, where she spent a year studying Russia in Siberia, and a MA from Georgetown University’s Walsh School of Foreign Service. She speaks German and Russian.

This first-year seminar will reflect upon the September 11 terrorist attacks in the United States, exploring how the terrorist attacks occurred and why the U.S. intelligence community and policymakers failed to anticipate and prevent them as well as the subsequent effects on the United States, the Middle East, and the world. The instructors, a former senior leader in the U.S. intelligence community and armed forces and a former intelligence analyst, will lead students in discussions and in-class exercises to encourage critical analysis of the implications of terrorism, particularly on United States national security. A variety of assignments will require students to assess the causes and results of American national security decisions and alternative decisions that might have been made, supported with research and evidence.

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Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 63-001: Mind, Brain, and Consciousness
Gen Eds: SS
Ram Neta

Ram Neta is Professor of Philosophy at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he has taught since 2003. His research is an effort to understand what it is to be rational, and why rationality matters. In pursuing this broad question, he ends up addressing lots of related questions about the role of knowledge in our decision-making, the ways in which our training informs our experience of the world, and the function of evidence in deliberation. He has published scores of articles on these and related topics in academic journals.

Animals who grow up in the wild exhibit a great deal of individual variation in their appetites and aversions, and we can explain some of this variation by appeal to ontogenetic factors, some of it by appeal to environmental factors, and some by appeal to the interaction of these two factors. But humans who grow up in civilization exhibit an even wider range of individual psychological variation, and this wider variation can be explained only by appeal to a range of factors that have come to be known as “psychodynamic”. In this course, we will study these psychodynamic factors. We will devote a little more than half of the semester reading Freud’s lectures on psychoanalysis, and the rest of the semester to reading an overview of other psychodynamic theories of the mind, such as object relations theory and self psychology. We will develop our understanding of these various theories by applying them to the interpretation of a variety of characters in modern fiction, much of which has been shaped by the influence of these ideas. Our goal will be eventually to be able to understand idiosyncratic features of our own psychologies by appeal to some of these psychodynamic theories.

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PHIL 89-001: Contemporary Social Problems in Short Stories, the Social Sciences and the Press
Gen Eds: LA, CI
Luc Bovens and Hilary Lithgow

Professor Luc Bovens is a core member of the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program. He works across a broad range of topics and issues spanning rationality, epistemology, morality and political philosophy.

Hilary Lithgow specializes in British literature of the long nineteenth century, as well as the literature of war from World War I to today. Her current research, teaching and public humanities work focuses on contemporary literature of war, on the value that literature can have for people in their everyday lives, and on what literature might be able to show us about our world and experiences that we might not otherwise be able to see.

We will read works of short fiction from around the globe that address a range of social and political problems. The course addresses these issues from three angles. We will touch on topics that are prominent in the news today such as opiate addiction, arranged marriage, trafficking, bullying, social exclusion, charitable giving, implicit bias, and basic income. First, we read a short story that addresses the social or political issue. Second, we choose a recent and prominent study in the social sciences that addresses the issue. And third, we investigate how the issue is being reported in the press. Our goal will be to explore the different ways in which literature, social science and journalism construct issues of broad social and political relevance, the opportunities and limits of these constructions and what might be gained by using all three (rather than only one) to understand and respond to these issues.

Students may also register for this course under ENGL 89.001.

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Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)

PHYS 50-001: Time and the Medieval Cosmos
Gen Eds: HS
Chris Clemens and Brett Whalen

Dr. Chris Clemens is the Jaroslav Folda Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Senior Associate Dean of Natural Sciences. He studies stellar remnants and the debris from old planetary systems around them. Dr. Clemens is also a faculty member of the Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies.

Brett Edward Whalen (associate professor, History) received his PhD from Stanford in 2005 and has been at Carolina ever since. He teaches classes on the medieval church, the crusades, and the apocalypse. As a child, he spent cold, clear winter nights in Vermont looking through his telescope at celestial bodies.

Time and the Medieval Cosmos will introduce first-year students to the basic motions of the solar system as viewed from the Earth and the mechanical and mathematical models used to reproduce them. The course will also immerse students in the world of medieval and early modern education, theology, and natural philosophy, challenging them to understand the historical conditions that shaped views of the cosmos in the premodern world. Last but not least, the class will raise broader questions about the relationship between faith and reason, along with the role of institutional authorities in determining the boundaries of “acceptable” knowledge.

Students may also register for this course under HIST 50.001.

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PHYS 51-001: The Interplay of Music and Physics
Gen Eds: PL
Laurie McNeil and Brent Wissick

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her Ph.D. in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. Her seminar grows out of her life as a choral singer (and, earlier, a violinist and recorder player). When not singing with the Choral Society of Durham, she can be found in her laboratory using lasers to study the properties of materials.

Brent Wissick has taught cello, chamber music and early music at UNC-CH since 1982; and performs across the US and abroad. But he has had a life-long interest in how instruments work and how sound is made. He loves encouraging musicians to understand some of these issues, and getting a broad range of science students involved in doing “musical” things. He thinks about physics when practicing the cello or viola da gamba, making CD recordings, rehearsing with ensembles, giving lessons and listening to music in a variety of spaces. He still wakes up every morning excited to make and study music with professional colleagues and undergraduates.

This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects. This class is taught in hybrid mode, with most meetings held in person. Fully remote learners may not enroll in this class.

Students may also register for this course under MUSC 51.001.

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PHYS 55-001: Introduction to Mechatronics
PX, QI
Stefan Jeglinski

In a previous 30-year career, Stefan Jeglinski designed and built instrumentation, learned to program from scratch, and performed R&D for large and small companies. For five years he was an actual rocket scientist, so when he says “this ain’t rocket science,” he knows what he’s talking about! He broke away from rockets to complete his PhD in experimental solid state physics at the University of Utah, and then returned to industry where he spent over 15 years in all aspects of product development for electron microscopy, before landing at UNC in 2010 to share everything he’s learned. In addition to his love of teaching physics, he brings a lifetime of real-world experience and stories about building, making, and engineering across disciplines.

Mechatronics is a multidisciplinary synergy of STEM fields, specifically physics, engineering, electronics, and computer science. All students, regardless of their educational goals, will achieve critical introductory skills in numerical reasoning and analysis, model-building and prototyping, computer programming and electronics, and will demonstrate proficiency and knowledge about topics that increasingly impact society. The course focuses on four areas: Numeracy and Proportional Reasoning, Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing, Computer Technology (Programming and Electronics), and Current and Future technologies (aka, shall we welcome our new mechatronic overlords – robotics, AI, and quantum computing). The course goals are to prepare students for academic success at UNC, to help science students be more capable scientists, and to help ALL students be stronger and better-informed citizens of the world.

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Political Science (POLI)

POLI 57-001: Democratic Governance in Contemporary Latin America
Gen Eds: SS, BN
Jonathan Hartlyn

Jonathan Hartlyn is the Kenneth J. Reckford Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He grew up in Latin America, in Cuba, Mexico and Peru. He received his B.A. from Clark University, and a M.Phil. and Ph.D. from Yale University. His research and teaching interests focus on the comparative politics of Latin America. He spent several months in Argentina in fall 2017 advancing on his current research on democratic governance in the region. He also has on-going research on constitutional change in Latin America and on the dynamics of executive approval.

He has authored or co-authored dozens of articles and chapters on democratic transitions, gender and politics, migration and political parties, public opinion and institutional trust, and elections and electoral governance. His books include: The Politics of Coalition Rule in Colombia; The Struggle for Democratic Politics in the Dominican Republic; and the co-authored Latin America in the Twenty First Century: Toward a New Socio-Political Matrix. His publications have been translated into Spanish, Portuguese, German and Persian. He has served as an international election observer in the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and Venezuela.

With a wave of democratization that began in 1978 and peaked in the mid-1990s, Latin America is experiencing the most prolonged and extensive period of democratic politics in its history. For most countries in the region, state power is accessed through reasonably competitive, fair, and clean elections, in contrast to past patterns of authoritarian rule, though with increasing exceptions and setbacks. Alongside this democratic shift, however, in many countries in the region the exercise of state power reflects historical continuities or new examples of corruption, clientelism and other abuses of state resources. This challenges the ability of governments to provide citizen security, economic development and social inclusion.

In this course, we will study these issues through a combination of readings, videos, discussion, occasional short lectures, and team-based analyses of selected countries. It has no pre-requisites and assumes no prior knowledge of Latin America.

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POLI 63-001: Social Movements and Political Protest and Violence
Gen Eds: SS, NA
Pamela Conover

Pamela Conover, Burton Craige Professor of Political Science, was educated at Emory University and received her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota. Professor Conover teaches courses dealing with political psychology, and social movements and political protest. In the past, Professor Conover’s research has concerned the nature of political thinking and the politics of identity and citizenship. She also coauthored the book Feminism and the New Right. Her current research is focused on the Trump brand, election aversion, and gender bias in the national news media. In her spare time, she enjoys cycling and being walked by her two golden retrievers, Izzy and Henry.

This seminar focuses on explaining and understanding social movements and the collective political behaviors that they promote (e.g. demonstrations, protests, violence, and eco-terrorism). Our theoretical focus will be interdisciplinary, drawing on research in political behavior, social psychology, sociology, political theory, and the law. We will discuss when and why collective action occurs, who participates, what forms it takes, and how governments respond. Substantively, we will study a variety of movements including: The Tea Party movement, Black Lives Matter, #MeToo movement, the Environmental movement, the Animal Rights movement, and the White Nationalist movement. We will use a variety of approaches and resources: class discussions, films, wiki writing, online discussions, novels, and texts. Grades will be based on class participation, a writing project, and several group wiki papers.

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POLI 70-001: Political Conflict in the European Union and the United States
Gen Eds: SS, NA
Gary Marks

Gary Marks is Burton Craige Professor of Political Science and Robert Schuman Fellow at the European University Institute, Florence. He served as the director and co-founder the UNC Center for European Studies and EU Center of Excellence. In 2017 he received the Daniel Elazar Distinguished Federalism Scholar Award from the American Political Science Association and has received the Humboldt Prize for his contributions to political science. Professor Marks has written more than a dozen books and is one of the most cited scholars worldwide in political science.

This course is concerned with politics and political conflict in the European Union and the United States. In part one you will learn about how democracy works (or doesn’t work) in liberal democracies. Why did socialism fail in the United States? What difference does the electoral system make? What are the reasons for the rise of nationalism and populism in Europe and the United States? How have these societies struggled with the challenge of the Coronavirus?

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POLI 75-001: Thinking about Law – CANCELLED 7/1/2020
Gen Eds: PH
Charles Szypszak

Charles Szypszak is Albert Coates Distinguished Professor of Public Law and Government. He has been with the School of Government since 2005. Prior to that, he was an attorney and director of a general practice firm in New Hampshire. He provides legal counsel to state, national and international institutions, organizations and public officials and teaches Law for Public Administration in the graduate program in public administration. He has taught and worked on law reforms in Poland and Russia. He is the recipient of the University’s J. Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award and the School of Government’s Coates Distinguished Professorship for Teaching Excellence.

Are you interested in being a lawyer or public official? Do you know what it means to “think like a lawyer?” Have you considered why people mostly honor the law? Where do you find “the law?” How do judges decide difficult cases? This seminar will explore the notion of a rule of law, formal and customary law, legal analysis, judicial interpretation and the realities of the adversarial system and law practice. We will consider what makes law seem legitimate and how to assess whether it promotes liberty and justice. This seminar will challenge students to be reflective and critical about their own perspectives and to explore personal responsibility for promoting a rule of law. Students will be engaged in analytical thinking and expression through required participation in teacher-led dialogues based on assigned readings and with research and writing assignments. Reading materials include selections from court cases and other sources that provide an introduction to the notion of a rule of law, the sources of law that govern us and protect our individual rights, the nature of legal analysis, the different methods of judicial interpretation, and the realities of law practice and the adversarial system.

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POLI 76-001: The Obama Presidency
Gen Eds: SS, US
Christopher J. Clark

Christopher J. Clark’s research focuses on black electoral representation and its influence on political processes. Clark earned his Ph.D. in Political Science in 2010 from the University of Iowa, and he has been on faculty at UNC since July 2012. Chris is a huge sports fan, with his favorite teams being the Kansas City Chiefs (NFL), Kansas Jayhawks (college basketball), and Iowa Hawkeyes (college football). He is married to Tiana and is father of Kaya, Cadence, and Kinlee; they all bring him great joy. Chris enjoys reading, cooking, playing sports, and he is active in his church community.

This course examines the presidency of Barack Obama, the first African American to serve in the nation’s highest office. The course is broken down into four parts. The first part studies Shirley Chisholm and Jesse Jackson, two black people who ran for President prior to Obama. The second part examines Obama prior to running for office, reading a book that he authored. The third part of the class examines Obama’s presidency, both how he reached office and a look back at what he achieved while in office. The last part of the class considers American politics post-Obama, with a particular focus on race/ethnicity.

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POLI 89-001: What Does It Mean to Be a Good Citizen? – ADDED 7/24/2020
Gen Eds: PH
Nora Hanagan

Professor Nora Hanagan studies political ideas. She is particularly interested in the ideas that have animated American politics and history. She also researches different approaches to environmental and food politics. Her book, Democratic Responsibility: The Politics of Many Hands in America, examines whether individuals bear responsibility for harms that are caused by social institutions and processes. She has taught at Duke University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and is excited to be joining UNC this year. When she isn’t chasing her young children around, she likes gardening and hiking. She is also still trying to make a sourdough starter.

What, if any, responsibilities accompany democratic citizenship? Voting? Active participation in political meetings? Obeying laws? Volunteering in one’s community? Preserving natural resources for future generations? Adhering to certain values? Protesting unjust laws? This course offers an overview of the different ways in which Americans have answered these questions.

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POLI 89-002: Immigrants and Refugee in World Politics – ADDED 7/24/2020
Gen Eds: SS, GL
Niklaus Steiner

Niklaus Steiner is a native of Thun, Switzerland who moved to Chapel Hill with his family when his father became a professor at Carolina. He had the good fortune of moving between Switzerland and the United States while growing up and he ended up earned a bachelor’s degree with highest honors in international studies at UNC. He then went on to earn his Ph.D. in political science at Northwestern University. Because of his own movement across borders and cultures, his research and teaching interests are immigration, refugees, nationalism and citizenship. He has written a number of books and article on these topics, including the textbook “International Migration and Citizenship Today” that aims to facilitate classroom discussions on admission and membership in democracies.

The movement of people across international borders is one of the most politically controversial issues in the world today. This class focuses on two different types of global migrants, immigrants and refugees, and explores why these two groups move out of their countries and how they are treated by receiving countries. Immigrants and refugees have traditionally been thought of as politically, legally and ethically different from each other and this class explores these differences, but it also explores the many ways that they are similar. This class encourages students from a wide range of backgrounds, experiences and perspectives to enroll because it benefits significantly from including such diversity.

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POLI 89-003: Global Political Risk Analysis – ADDED 7/28/2020
Gen Eds: SS, GL
Layna Mosley

Professor Layna Mosley joined the faculty at UNC Chapel Hill in 2004. Her research and teaching focus on the politics of the global economy, as well as international relations more broadly. Mosley’s research investigates the connections between domestic politics and the global economy. Some of her work examines the effect of multinational production and global supply chains on workers’ rights in developing countries, as well as the ways in which U.S. trade policies might affect workers’ rights abroad. With respect to labor rights, she also is interested in efforts at private sector governance, such as the Bangladesh Accord on Building and Fire Safety. Another stream of Mosley’s research focuses on the politics of sovereign debt, and on how professional investors evaluate and react to political institutions and government policy choices. In the current era of financial globalization, these market reactions sometimes limit democratically-elected governments’ ability to meet the demands of their citizens. She also investigates how low- and middle-income governments manage their relationships with creditors, including how they decide whether to borrow from commercial banks or bond investors, and how they market themselves to potential bond buyers.

This is a course that focuses on the intersection of politics, on the one hand, and business and economics, on the other. This course explores the impact of international and national political institutions, as well as political events, on firms’ and investors’ strategies and decisions. Political institutions, including trade and investment agreements; democratic or non-democratic governance structures; and national labor and environmental regulations, affect business strategy decisions. Political events, especially elections as well as mass protest and demonstrations, also can heighten political risk. The cases we explore involve a range of countries, with varying degrees of democratic governance, as well as varying levels of economic development.

We draw on academic research to consider how business leaders assess risk at the firm- and country-level, and to evaluate how governments that want to attract or retain investment seek to ameliorate political risk. We also consider strategic interaction between governments and economic actors: each of these actors attempts to anticipate how the other will act in each situation, given the rules of the game as well as the interests at stake. We approach these issues via the lens of case studies of specific events, firms and countries. These cases allow us to draw out broader lessons, as well as to appreciate how social scientists have evaluated the links between political institutions and economic exchange.

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Psychology and Neuroscience (NSCI/PYSC)

PSYC 63-001: Use, Misuse, and Addiction to Drugs in the 21st Century
Gen Eds: SS
Catherine (Kay) Sanford

Catherine (Kay) Sanford, MSPH is a nationally recognized drug overdose prevention advocate and activist. She served as the state’s Injury Epidemiologist in the North Carolina Division of Public Health, identifying in 2002 the state’s incipient epidemic of fatal drug overdoses, primarily due to the misuse of prescription pain medication, and more recently, the rapidly increasing abuse of heroin and fentanyl, methamphetamines and cocaine. For 15 years she has lead and served on multiple overdose prevention task forces to design and evaluate overdose prevention and intervention strategies, design and collect more accurate overdose data, pass public health overdose prevention legislation and teach harm reduction to physicians, patients, law enforcement, criminal justice officers and inmates.

The medical and societal consequences of opioid and other drug use have reached epidemic proportions in the United States. Opioid overdose is now the leading cause of accidental death in the country, and the demographics and characteristics of the epidemic are constantly evolving. The purpose of this first-year student seminar is to understand the culture and physiological effects of beneficial and non-beneficial opioid use that includes pain management, overdose prevention, opioid use disorder, opioid overdose, diversion, legal consequences, harm reduction and treatment. Increased focus will include the rapidly evolving misuse, addiction and fatalities to and from cocaine and methamphetamines. Activities will include pre-class reading and weekly student-lead discussions of these materials; lectures from technical experts; group discussions; written summaries of class material; in-class debates on controversial issues, such as legalizing opioids or abstinence-only vs. medical assisted treatment; experiments on the effects of opioids on the behavior of laboratory rats; and development and presentation of an effective evidence-based opioid misuse and addiction prevention program.

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Public Policy (PLCY)

PLCY 54-001: U.S. Immigration
Gen Eds: SS, US
Joaquín Alfredo-Angel Rubalcaba

Joaquín Alfredo-Angel Rubalcaba is an assistant professor in the Department of Public Policy at UNC Chapel Hill. Dr. Rubalcaba received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of New Mexico and is an alumnus of the RWJF doctoral fellows program. His areas of interests broadly include health and labor economics. Specifically, he has explored the health and labor market outcomes among underrepresented and disadvantaged communities, while developing new empirical techniques to investigate the economic mechanisms and public policies driving these outcomes.

Currently, Dr. Rubalcaba’s research addresses the role of public policy in the overall socioeconomic wellbeing of immigrant communities. In this line of research, he investigates how policies such as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and the Real ID Act have impacted labor supply behavior and health insurance coverage. In another line of research, Dr. Rubalcaba is exploring new empirical techniques to estimate economic values. This particular research has demonstrated an empirically tractable method to assign economic value to health conditions, such as diabetes, ultimately increasing the economic tools used to inform policy decisions.
This seminar provides students with an opportunity to discuss current topics in United States immigration. Students will explore theories of migration, acculturation and assimilation, and the ways in which policies influence the well-being of immigrants.

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PLCY 61H-001: Policy Entrepreneurship and Public/Private/Non-Profit Partnerships (Honors)
Daniel P. Gitterman

Daniel P. Gitterman is Duncan MacRae ’09 and Rebecca Kyle MacRae Professor and Chair of Public Policy and Director of the Honors Seminar on Public Policy and Global Affairs in DC.

This seminar will define a policy entrepreneur and examine strategies used by policy entrepreneurs to achieve policy change or innovation in the policy making process. This course also aims to explore ways that public, private, and non-profit sectors collaborate to address problems that cannot be solved by one sector alone. There is growing recognition that sustainable solutions to some of the most complex challenges confronting our communities can benefit from these collaborative or “intersector” approaches.

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PLCY 75-001: Debates in Public Policy and Racial Inequality
SS, CI
Cassandra Davis

Dr. Cassandra Davis is a Research Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Within the last four years, Dr. Davis has held the role of principal investigator on five research evaluations, with the most recent of these projects focused on the impacts of hurricanes on schools, educators, and students in low-income communities. Dr. Davis has also collaborated with school districts to assist them with improving graduation rates of underrepresented groups, supporting students with learning differences, identifying opportunity and achievement gaps amongst students, assessing the quality of professional development training for school personnel, and investigating ways to engage parents. Dr. Davis’ areas of interest include education policy, the impact of natural disaster on schools and communities, program evaluation, qualitative research methods, and the social and historical context in education.

Dr. Davis holds a Ph.D. in Education from UNC Chapel Hill.

This course is designed to introduce students to debates about the impact of policies on inequalities in the United States. We will begin the class by reviewing work on inequalities more broadly. At the beginning of the semester, we will touch on topics like Black Lives Matter, historical oppression, systemic racism, and Whiteness. From there, we will move to investigate the use of education policy as a tool to maintain inequalities within the United States. We will tackle areas such as Indian boarding schools, the desegregation of schools, academic tracking, criminalization of Black and Brown students, and achievement testing.

In this class, students will review relevant research, policies, court cases, and projects that aim to either maintain or eliminate inequality. Students will also be expected to engage in thought-provoking conversations around disparities and will be encouraged to think critically about challenging topics. Additionally, students will work individually and in small groups on a series of assignments over the semester. Prerequisites are not required for this introductory course.

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PLCY 76H-001: Global Health Policy (Honors)
Gen Eds: GL
Benjamin Meier

Benjamin Meier is Associate Professor of Public Policy. Professor Meier’s interdisciplinary research—at the intersection of international law, public policy, and global health—examines the human rights norms that underlie global health policy. In teaching UNC courses in Justice in Public Policy, Health & Human Rights, and Global Health Policy, Professor Meier has been awarded the 2011 William C. Friday Award for Excellence in Teaching, the 2013 James M. Johnston Teaching Excellence Award, the 2015 Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Professorship in Undergraduate Teaching, six annual awards for Best Teacher in Public Policy, and the 2019 Teaching Innovation Award in the Department of Health Policy & Management. He received his Ph.D. in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, his J.D. and LL.M. in International and Comparative Law from Cornell Law School, and his B.A. in Biochemistry from Cornell University.

Global health policy impacts the health and well being of individuals and peoples throughout the world. Many determinants of health operate at a global level, and many national policies, social practices, and individual health behaviors are structured by global forces. Concern for the spread of infectious diseases, increasing rates of chronic diseases and the effectiveness of health systems to provide quality care are among the daunting challenges to health policy makers.

With profound social, political and economic changes rapidly challenging global health, the aim of this course in Global Health Policy is to provide students with a variety of opportunities to understand the epidemiologic trends in world health, the institutions of global health governance, and the effects of globalization on global and national health policy.

This course provides an introduction to the relationship between international relations, global health policy and public health outcomes. The focus of this course will be on public policy approaches to global health, employing interdisciplinary methodologies to understand selected public health policies, programs, and interventions. Providing a foundation for responding to global health harms, this course will teach students how to apply policy analysis to a wide range of critical issues in global health determinants, interventions, and impacts.

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PLCY 85-001: Reforming America’s Schools
Gen Eds: SS, NA
Douglas Lauen

Dr. Douglas Lauen’s work seeks to understand the effects of educational policies, school types, and school contextual factors on student outcomes. He focuses on areas that policymakers can control and that have high relevance to current educational policy debates. To date his academic research covers four areas: 1) classroom poverty composition, 2) educational accountability, 3) performance incentives, and 4) school choice. Sociological and economic theory and policy relevance guide his work, which employs rigorous quantitative research designs. His work often examines the heterogeneity of effects across socially, economically, and educationally disadvantaged student subgroups because reducing educational inequality depends on whether policies and settings have differential effects on disadvantaged and minority students.

This seminar will examine the role of schools and other institutions play in determining life chances, which educational interventions work well for economically and academically disadvantaged students, and what to do when institutions cease to work well. Students will learn how to analyze complex educational public policy problems while exploring questions of effectiveness, inequality, resource management, and politics.

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Religious Studies (RELI)

RELI 63-001: The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls
Gen Eds: HS, WB
Jodi Magness

Jodi Magness is the Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism. Before coming to UNC–Chapel Hill in 2002, she taught at Tufts University for ten years. Professor Magness received her B.A. in Archaeology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and her Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from the University of Pennsylvania. She has participated on numerous excavations in Israel and Greece, and currently directs excavations at Huqoq in Israel. Professor Magness’ publications include a book entitled The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls (2002).

The Dead Sea Scrolls have been described as the most important archaeological discovery of the 20th century. The first scrolls were discovered in 1947, in a cave near the site of Qumran by the Dead Sea. Eventually the remains of over 900 scrolls were found in 11 caves around Qumran. The scrolls date to the time of Jesus and include the earliest preserved copies of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). They were deposited in the caves by members of a Jewish sect called the Essenes who lived at Qumran. In this seminar, students explore the meaning and significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls – and learn about broader issues such as how canons of sacred scripture developed among Jews and Christians – through classroom discussions, thought papers, and creative assignments.

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RELI 67-001: Nature, Culture, and Self-Identity: Religion in the Construction of Social Life – ADDED 5/11/2020
Gen Eds: SS
Lauren Leve

Lauren Leve received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology. Now an associate professor of Religious Studies, she has been living and working in Nepal since 1990; sometimes for a few weeks at a time, sometimes for a few years. Her research has also brought her to Thailand, Sri Lanka, India, and Singapore. She has written on topics that include Buddhism, globalization, women’s empowerment, theories of rural revolution, human rights, and suffering. Her recent book is titled “The Buddhist Art of Living in Nepal: Ethical Practice and Religious Reform.” She is currently working on a project on gender, health, politics, and the rise of Christianity in Nepal. Professor Leve is grateful to the monks, nuns, householders, newly-literate women, NGO staff, Maoists, Christians and others who have opened their lives to her and taught her to (try to) see through their eyes. She reports that it’s a little disorienting at first, but that once you learn to learn from others’ perspectives, there’s no better way to live in the world!

This course explores how different religious traditions conceive of human nature and cultural personhood, and the ways that these understandings are reflected in diverse forms of personal identity and public life.

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RELI 70-001: Jesus in Scholarship and Film
Gen Eds: SS
Bart Ehrman

Bart Ehrman is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies. He has taught at Carolina since 1988. He is author or editor of thirty books and is widely regarded as a leading expert on the New Testament and the history of the early Christian church. He is also a well-known teacher on campus, having won the Undergraduate Students Teaching Award, the Bowman and Gordon Gray Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and the John William Pope Center Spirit of Inquiry Teaching Award.

This seminar will examine how historians have reconstructed the life, teachings and death of the historical Jesus. We will look at the Gospels of the New Testament, as well as references to Jesus in other writings (Roman and Jewish sources, as well as Gospels that did not make it into the New Testament). In addition, we will explore how Jesus has been portrayed in modern film, including such Biblical “epics” as The Greatest Story Ever Told, such “period pieces” as Jesus Christ Superstar, such brilliant retellings as Jesus of Montreal and such controversial films as The Last Temptation of Christ and The Passion of the Christ. The ultimate goals of the seminar are to see what we can say about the historical man Jesus himself and how Jesus came to be portrayed in both ancient sources and modern imagination.

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RELI 73H-001: From Dragons to Pokemon: Animals in Japanese Myth, Folklore and Religion
LA, BN, CI
Barbara Ambros

Field of specialization: Religions of Asia Research interests: Religions in early modern through contemporary Japan; gender studies; critical animal studies; place and space; and pilgrimage. Fun fact: she holds a third-degree black belt in Shotokan karate and serves as the faculty advisor for the UNC Shotokan Club.

This seminar examines the cultural construction of animals in Japanese myth, folklore, and religion. We will discuss various kinds of animals: those that occur in the natural world, those that are found in myths and folklore, and those that have appeared in popular media such as animation. We will explore how images of various animals were culturally constructed as tricksters, gods, monsters, or anthropomorphic companions; how animals were ritualized as divine, demonic, or sentient beings in Buddhism, Shinto, and folk religion; and how animals could serve as metaphors that embodied collective ideals or anxieties. Most of our readings will focus on primary and secondary texts from the Japanese tradition (in English), but we will also read theoretical texts on human-animal relationships and historical studies on animals in the larger Asian context. We will also view and analyze several Japanese films, both anime and documentaries, that deal with animals and environmental issues.

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Romance Studies (ROML)

ROML 89-001: Iberian Identities
Gen Eds: LA, GL
Paulo Rodrigues Ferreira

Paulo Rodrigues Ferreira is a Lecturer of Portuguese. He received his Ph. D. in Contemporary History from the University of Lisbon, Portugal. He specializes in Iberian studies. In his doctoral thesis, he analyzed the cultural relations between Portugal and Spain, and focused on the evolution of the concept of Iberism – or the utopian dream that Portugal and Spain could form a unified country. Aside from publishing articles on the Iberian relations, he has been doing research on topics related to Portuguese literature. He is also a writer of fiction and has published three collections of short stories and a novel.

Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, numerous Iberian intellectuals promoted the idea that Portugal and Spain could combine efforts to overcome the crises that plagued the Peninsula. The Iberian intelligentsia came up with theories whose aim was to bring Portugal, Spain, and their ex-colonies closer together. In this course, students will become familiar with the contemporary histories of Portugal and Spain and with Iberian literature. Students will study culture from perspectives that may inspire them to reflect upon concepts such as decadence and identity. Furthermore, we will discuss the connections between the end of the Iberian colonial adventure in America and the crises that led the elites of both countries to meditate on the necessity of rediscovering new lifestyles. We will address the following questions: Why is it utopian to think that Portugal and Spain could become a single country? What does it mean to be Portuguese, Spanish, and European?

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ROML 89-002: La Mode: Fashion in French Culture
Gen Eds: VP, NA
Ellen Welch

Ellen Welch is Professor in the French & Francophone Studies program where she teaches on French cultural history, literature, and theater and performance. A specialist of Ancien Régime France, she has written books on the history of exoticism in French literature and on the role of the performing arts (especially ballet) in early modern diplomacy. She holds a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and a BA from Brown University, where working on an honors thesis sparked the passion for research that she now enjoys sharing with UNC undergrads.

French culture and fashion have been synonymous since the age of Louis XIV. This is not only because Paris traditionally occupied the center of the global fashion industry. It’s also because fashion has a respected place in French culture. This seminar investigates what fashion has meant to French-speaking writers, artists, and philosophers through the centuries. We will explore key episodes in the history of French fashion from the emergence of the idea of fashion in the seventeenth century, to Marie-Antoinette’s role as fashion icon, to the birth of haute couture in the 20th century, to the contemporary “street style” phenomenon, current reconsiderations of concepts of femininity and masculinity, and debates about fashion’s impact on the environment and global economy. Along the way, we’ll discover how French thinkers have interpreted the allure and significance of fashion from the perspectives of sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, and gender studies. In short, we will consider what it means to take fashion seriously.

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Sociology (SOCI)

SOCI 58-001: Globalization, Work, and Inequality
Gen Eds: SS, GL
Ted Mouw

Ted Mouw is a sociologist who studies social demography, labor markets and inequality. He received his Ph.D. (in sociology) and M.A. (in economics) in 1999 from Michigan. He is currently working on a project on globalization and low-wage labor markets. There are three components to this project: 1) Longitudinal evidence on “dead end jobs” and working poverty in the U.S., 2) immigration and the labor market for Mexican migrants and 3) industrialization and labor conditions in Mexico and Indonesia. He has also researched the use of job contacts to find work and racial friendship segregation in schools. After college he lived in Indonesia for two years, where he taught English, studied Indonesian and Javanese, and climbed volcanoes.

This seminar, which presents a comparative and multidisciplinary perspective on how globalization affects labor markets and inequality, will consist of two parts. First, we will discuss basic sociological and economic models of work and globalization and then students will apply these models to three case studies: 1) “sweatshops” and the question of international labor standards, 2) industrialization and development in China and Indonesia and 3) immigration and economic integration between the U.S. and Mexico. Students will prepare research papers on one of the three case studies. Course readings will be supplemented by the teacher’s current research on two questions: 1) What are conditions actually like for workers in Nike plants in Indonesia? (Interviews and a photo-narrative) and 2) How does the labor market work for undocumented Mexican workers? (Interviews from Carrboro, NC, part of Mouw’s personal research project.)

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SOCI 66-001: Citizenship and Society in the United States
Gen Eds: SS, NA
Andrew Perrin

Andrew Perrin is a cultural sociologist who specializes in American democracy, citizenship, and public opinion. He received his Ph.D. in sociology in 2001 from the University of California, Berkeley. He has conducted research on, among other topics, letters to the editor; the importance of, and contests over, time in American politics; human rights in the U.S.; and just what we mean when we talk about “public opinion.” He is currently working on research on the relationship between college education and democratic citizenship.

Popular unrest. The resurgence of authoritarian styles and practices in politics. Democratic collapse. Political tumult around the globe in recent decades has put elites, and others, on edge as young democracies have collapsed and longer standing ones appear to be stumbling. In the United States, basic stability and democratic expansion have been accompanied by increasing citizen distrust of institutions, growing social divisions, and contestation over basic citizenship rights. Acute observers have long seen the U.S. as a harbinger of the promise and peril of modern democracies. What is the fate of democracy in the U.S.? What does that portend, if anything, for other democracies, or for the general principle of popular sovereignty—the idea that the people govern themselves? We investigate these and related questions by actively consulting political theory and empirical research in the social sciences. Our investigation will include class-time collaboration with a similar course being taught by a political scientist at Williams College. A highly recommended, but optional, study trip to Washington, DC, in November will allow both classes to meet and discuss elections and popular sovereignty with practitioners and elected officials. (NOTE: Students may be asked to pay part of the cost of the Washington trip, approximately $400, and may need to miss two days of classes.)

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Other Opportunities

First Year Launch Course

GEOL 101-005: Planet Earth – First Year-Launch
Gen Eds: PX when taken with GEOL 101L
Michelle Haskin

This first-year launch course will introduce geological concepts through the lens of U.S. national parks and a plate tectonic framework. The course will take a small-group approach to in-class work where developing collaboration and communication skills will be a focus. Students will apply their talents, skills, knowledge, and creativity to investigate related topics of interest as they manifest in a specific U.S. National Park to examine the interconnectedness of the geologic sciences and other fields of study. They will present their work in a manner appropriate to their project. Because this course is geared toward students newer to the university environment, the course will also discuss adjacent issues relevant to first-year students such as studying approaches, professionalism, as well as usefulness of meta-cognition, self-reflection, and feedback. Students will practice employing these ideas and approaches though individual and small-group work. Optional laboratory: GEOL 101L. PX Gen Ed credit for GEOL 101+101L.

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