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For more information about a specific instructor, click on the arrow beside the instructor name. Please consult ConnectCarolina (https://connectcarolina.unc.edu/) for the most up-to-date information about FYS offerings, meeting times, instructional modes, and availability.

Honors and non-Honors FYS are included in the list below. If you are not in the Honors Carolina program, but are nonetheless interested in registering for an Honors FYS, you can complete the Honors waitlist request form when it becomes available on the Honors Carolina website at 8:00 AM (Eastern) on Monday, June 14, 2021. In order for Honors students to successfully complete their requirements, Honors Carolina must give priority to those students in the program. However, plenty of non-Honors students are regularly enrolled in Honors FYS classes through this waitlist process. The earlier a waitlist request is submitted, the better your chances of obtaining a seat in an Honors FYS.

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)
American Studies (AMST)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Art and Art History (ARTH/ARTS)
Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies (ASIA)
Biology (BIOL)
Chemistry (CHEM)
Classics (CLAS)
Communication (COMM)
Computer Science (COMP)
Dramatic Art (DRAM)
Economics (ECON)
English and Comparative Literature (CMPL/ENGL)
Environmental Sciences and Engineering (ENVR)
Geography (GEOG)
Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)
Global Studies (GLBL)
History (HIST)
Marine Sciences (MASC)
Mathematics (MATH)
Music (MUSC)
Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)
Political Science (POLI)
Psychology and Neuroscience (NSCI/PYSC)
Public Policy (PLCY)
Religious Studies (RELI)
Romance Studies (ROML)
Sociology (SOCI)
Other Opportunities (First-Year Launch)

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)

AAAD 53-001: Experimentalism in Global Black Music and Performance Arts
Gen Eds: VP, GL
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
David Pier

Professor David Pier is an ethnomusicologist who researches music in Africa and the United States. His book, Ugandan Music in the Marketing Era: The Branded Arena is a ethnographic study of the commercialization of folk music and dance heritage in Uganda. He is currently working on a book on a Ugandan guitar genre known as kadongo kamu. Having started out as a jazz pianist, he is keenly interested in both the processes and underlying ideas of musical experimentalism, especially in global Black historical contexts.

This course centers on artists who are known for their radically experimental approach to music-making and performance, pushing at established boundaries of genre, form, and affect, while taking inspiration from black identity, history, and culture. Geographically, this course is not limited to the United States, but also examines avant-garde artistry in Africa, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean. The focus is mainly on music, with excursions into avant-garde jazz, Brazilian tropicália, Jamaican dub, and electronic music. But we do additionally discuss experimental dance and theatre. The special challenges faced by black artists in establishing themselves in artistic fields marked as modernist, given the historical domination of discourses and institutions of modernism/modernity by whites, are explored. Students have the option to either write a traditional research paper on a topic of their choice, or create their own experimental artistic project.

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American Studies (AMST)

AMST 51-001: Navigating America
Gen Eds: SS, CI, EE-Field Work
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Rachel A. Willis

Rachel A. Willis is a Professor of American Studies and Adjunct Professor of Economics at UNC. She has won numerous awards including the UNC Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, two Student Undergraduate Teaching Awards, and the Robert Sigmon Award for Service Learning. A three-time winner of the Chapman Award, she has been a Senior Fellow at the Global Research Institute and is a Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholar at the Carolina Center for Public Service. Her teaching methods incorporate innovative field study, collaborative assignments and experiential learning through events and programs outside of the classroom. A labor economist interested in global access to work, she has recently focused on the impact of climate change on port communities.

This seminar is designed to teach students how to navigate new intellectual terrain and process unfamiliar information from a variety of disciplinary perspectives with an emphasis on simulations, field study, reflections, and documentation. Each student will plan, implement, and document an individual short journey. This voyage of discovery on the campus or in the surrounding community will be chronicled with a documentary journal and presented to the class in a multi-media format that conveys the individual’s perspective, journey, and discoveries. Additionally, the class will collaboratively plan, implement, and document a common full day journey. This required field study will be a core aspect of the experiential education connection for the course.

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Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 53H-037: Darwin’s Dangerous Idea (Honors)
Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Paul Leslie

Paul Leslie’s professional interests focus on human ecology, and he has pursued this primarily through research among nomadic peoples in East Africa. His most recent project entails studying (while nursing an aged Land Rover across the African savanna) human-environment interactions in northern Tanzania, especially how the changing land use and livelihood patterns of the Maasai people living there affect and are affected by wildlife and conservation efforts. When not teaching or practicing anthropology, he enjoys bicycling, motorcycling, woodworking, and jazz.

Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to one of the most profound revolutions in the history of thought, generating stunning insights but also some misunderstanding and tragic abuse. This seminar aims to provide a clear understanding of how natural selection works, and how it doesn’t. We will examine objections to the theory; how the environmental and health problems we face today reflect processes of natural selection; and recent attempts to understand why we get sick, how we respond to disease, why we get old, why we choose mates the way we do, and more. Class sessions will feature a mix of lecture and discussion of concepts and issues. Students will also engage in small group projects—cooperative explorations of problems raised in class or in the readings and/or designing mini research projects.

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ANTH 62-001: Indian Country Today
Gen Eds: SS, US
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Valerie Lambert

Valerie Lambert is an associate professor and an enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation. She received her Ph.D. in Social Anthropology from Harvard University and has won awards for undergraduate teaching and for a book she wrote about her tribe. She has twice been elected president of the Association of Indigenous Anthropologists. Professor Lambert is married and the mother of two daughters, both of whom are college students.

With the United States as our geographic focus, this seminar explores a range of 20th- and early-21st-century American Indian topics and current issues. We look at Indian casinos, tribal colleges, identity, gender, tribal courts, sports, and other topics. An exploration of the history of American Indians before and after the arrival of Europeans, a history with which we begin the seminar, provides essential background for looking at the present and recent past. This seminar will help students better understand the challenges facing American Indian communities both internally and externally and the creative solutions being forged to address these challenges. It will also help students further develop skills in reading, writing, critical analysis, and public speaking.

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ANTH 63-001: The Lives of Others: Exploring Ethnography
Gen Eds: SS
MW, 04:40 PM – 05:55 PM
Townsend Middleton

Townsend Middleton is a political anthropologist of India and South Asia. His work focuses on movements for ‘tribal’ recognition and autonomy in the Himalayan region of Darjeeling, India. He teaches and writes on a variety of issues including identity politics, the state, and post/colonialism in South Asia and beyond.

Can we truly access, understand, and represent the lives of others? In this class, we will take on this question by taking up the practice of ethnography: a research method consisting of entering into a community, interacting with its members, observing social life, asking questions, and writing about our findings. Turning to anthropology and the growing number of disciplines using ethnography today, we will examine the ways ethnographers work to understand the people they work with. Over the semester, we will explore the method by becoming ethnographers ourselves. You, the student, will accordingly venture into the social world to conduct research on a topic and with a community of your choosing–thereby giving you first-hand knowledge of what it means to translate their worlds into your words. These are skills of social understanding that should serve students across their academic careers and beyond.

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ANTH 64-001: Public Archaeology in Bronzeville, Chicago’s Black Metropolis – CANCELLED 6/11/2021
Gen Eds: HS, NA
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Anna Agbe-Davies

Anna Agbe-Davies is an historical archaeologist whose excavations have explored the plantation societies of the colonial southeastern US and Caribbean, as well as towns and cities of the 19th and 20th century Midwest, with an emphasis on sites of the African diaspora. Her projects have included excavation and community collaboration at the sites of New Philadelphia, Illinois and the Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls on the south side of Chicago. Her research and teaching interests are strongly shaped by her own experiences as an undergraduate at the College of William and Mary and the time she spent working in museum settings before becoming a professor. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to that, she was a staff archaeologist for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s Department of Archaeological Research.

The term “African diaspora” usually refers to the consequences of the transatlantic slave trade, but there have been many diasporas of people of African descent. One major movement took place in the U.S. in the early 20th century when millions of people left small southern communities for large industrial northern cities. This seminar examines that phenomenon through the lens of a single site where migrants lived in the city of Chicago. The Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls was run by black women to provide social services for female migrants from 1926 through the 1960s. Research at this site combines elements of archaeology, anthropology and history to study their lives. Students, working in teams, will have the opportunity to contribute to the ongoing research effort via analysis of written records and artifacts. This multidisciplinary project will be of interest to students curious about 20th century history, African-American culture, museums and heritage, women’s and gender studies, migration and labor history.

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Art and Art History (ARTH/ARTS)

ARTH 55H-001: Art, Gender, and Power in Early Modern Europe (Honors)
Gen Eds: VP, NA
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Tania String

Dr. Tania String is an art historian specializing in the art of the Tudor period in England, and the Renaissance more broadly. She is the author of numerous books and articles on the portraits of Henry VIII. Before coming to UNC in 2010 she taught in England at the University of Bristol.

What did it mean to be a man or to be a woman in the Renaissance? This seminar will explore the ways in which constructions of gender are critical to understandings of the visual arts in the early modern period (c. 1400-1650). We will discuss and analyze a focused group of representations of men and women: portraits, mythological and biblical paintings and sculptures, and even turn our attention to the buildings these men and women inhabited. We will study the work of artists such as Michelangelo, Donatello, Titian, Holbein, and Rubens, amongst others, to find ways of understanding how masculinity and femininity were central concerns in early modern society and in the art produced in this period.

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ARTH 61-001: African American Art of the Carolinas
Gen Eds: VP, CI
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
John Bowles

John Bowles received his Ph.D. from UCLA in 2002 and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Program. He is an historian of African American art, who works from the assumption that art plays an important role in determining how we see ourselves as morally responsible individuals. In his research and teaching, he attempts to convey the urgency of art by addressing moral and political dilemmas we would often rather ignore. He has published articles and art criticism in various journals and has recently completed a book that examines the work of artist Adrian Piper. He is currently writing a book that explores how African American artists have engaged simultaneously with modernism, globalization and diaspora from the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s until today.

Focusing on the Carolinas, this seminar explores the many ways African Americans have used art to define themselves and their communities. We will ask how art has been used to maintain cultural traditions, shape American culture and build political solidarity from the era of colonialism and slavery to the present. We will study the cultivation of artistic practices from Africa; African American painters, sculptors and craftsmen who earned national reputations for the quality of their work; artists who re-imagined and redefined African American identity through art; and artists throughout the 20th century who represented the daily lives and hardships of rural and working-class blacks. Students will visit campus museums and archives and conduct original research using regional sources. Persistent questions throughout the semester will include, How does the art of African Americans in the Carolinas provoke us to question our own identities and roles within the region, and what is the contemporary role of art in shaping public discourse?

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ARTS 59-001: Time, A Doorway to Visual Expression
Gen Eds: VP
MW, 09:05 AM – 11:00 AM
Jim Hirschfield

Jim Hirschfield is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Art and Art History who as began contemplating the experience of time during his travels through the deserts of the southwest in his VW Microbus. He still treasures the experience of travel, which up until the recent pandemic, he would traveled for his artworks, for his research, with students enrolling in his study abroad summer program in Italy, and for adventure. Jim has received a number of art commissions from cities across the country: From Anchorage, Alaska to Fort Lauderdale, Florida and from San Diego, California to Orono, Maine. He has also received numerous awards for his art installations, which he describes as explorations in meditative and ethereal environments that expand our perceptions of time.

Alice Walker wrote “Time moves slowly, but passes quickly”. Tennessee Williams wrote, “Time is the longest distance between two places”. Throughout history, time has captivated and inspired artists, writers and musicians. From subtle movements to clearly defined sequences of change, artists will manipulate the element of time to enhance their ideas. “Time, A Doorway to Visual Expression”, considers the concept of time from a variety of perspectives and provides a path to investigate your own notions of time. As a group, we examine this mystifying topic through readings and discussions of Alan Lightman’s Einstein’s Dreams and Leonard Shlain’s Art and Physics. We also watch films, analyze videos and listen to music as we express our personal views through the art making process. As a first-year seminar, the course presumes no previous art experience and students may carry out their projects through a medium of their chossing (e.g., drawing, photography, painting, video, sound, performance and/or sculpture). We will immerse ourselves in the subject of time and create works of art inspired by our personal experiences and increased understanding of Time.

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Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (ASIA)

ASIA 55-001: Kung-Fu: The Concept of Heroism in Chinese Culture – CANCELLED 7/12/2021
Gen Eds: PH, BN
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Li-ling Hsiao

Li-ling Hsiao is associate professor of Chinese language and literature at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Her research encompasses literature, art, guqin music, history, and printing. She has published a book titled The Eternal Present of the Past: Illustration, Theatre, and Reading in the Wanli Period, 1573-1619 (Brill, 2007), and co-authored a book with Marinas Vlessas titled Xue Tao: Poet, Papermaker and Courtesan in China in 800 A.D. (Athens: Aiora Books, 2014). She has completed a draft of two books: Drama Illustration as Drama Criticism: Political Loyalty and Filial Piety in the Late Ming Illustrated Editions of Pipa ji. She is completing another monograph titled To Know or Not to Know through Music: Guqin Musicking Scenes in Yuan and Ming Drama. She currently serves as the Associate Dean and Director of First-Year Seminar at UNC-Chapel Hill. She came from a family of four generations of puppeteers.

Kung-fu has become a global phenomenon, but its central place in the traditional culture of China remains unknown to most of the world. This course will explore the rich and complex traditions of kung-fu in relation to the concept of the heroism (xia) from ancient to modern times. The course will be divided into three parts: part I focuses on the reflection of what a hero is in Chinese tradition, and this search for the definitions of “hero” will be approached from the ideas of what the “ideal man” is from Confucian terms comparing to Emerson’s ideas of “The American Scholars”; part II focuses on how the heroic story is told; and part III focuses on how a pursuit of heroism can go wrong. The course material will include historical biographies, kung-fu novels, theater, to kung-fu films.

This course focuses on one theme: how the ethical choices define an individual as a hero through the examples of kung-fu novels and films. The definitions and ethical choices are reasoned based on the Confucian concept of an ‘ideal man.’ How each individual conforms to and departs from the Confucian ethical values that form the commonly accepted moralities in Chinese cultural and philosophical traditions. While not fully embracing the values of altruism in Confucian philosophy, the definitions and ethical choices are mostly at odds with this Confucian position. This ethical challenge of the orthodox ethical tradition established by Confucianism is prevalent in kung-fu novels from ancient to modern times. Students will learn what the ‘ideal man’ is defined in Confucian terms, and then analyze the novels and films by challenging these ethical criteria.

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ASIA 61-001: India through the Lens of Master Filmmakers
Gen Eds: VP, BN, CI
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM; M, 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (for film viewing)
Pamela Lothspeich

Pamela Lothspeich teaches courses on Indian literature and film, the Hindu epics, and South Asian culture generally. Her research focuses on modern adaptations of the Mahabharata and Ramayana in literature and theater. Her first book, Epic Nation: Reimagining the Mahabharata in the Age of Empire (OUP: 2009), discusses how Indian writers in the colonial period often retold stories from the Mahabharata in ways that allegorically expressed patriotism and contested British rule. She is currently completing a second book on a modern Hindi epic known as “The Radheshyam Ramayana” and a popular style of theater called “Ramlila” which enacts the story of the Ramayana in an annual festival.

In this course, students will experience films by some of the most acclaimed directors working in various languages and regions of India, as well as the Indian diaspora. The cinematic journey in this course will introduce students to important themes in South Asian culture and history over the past 200 years. It will also introduce students to some of the formal elements of filmmaking to help them better “read” the text of film, and appreciate the craft and aesthetics of filmmaking. There will be weekly film screenings and related readings on Indian cinema, culture, and film theory. For the Communication-Intensive component of this course, students will receive feedback on a piece of their writing and be asked to revise and resubmit it. They will also be given opportunities to speak on assigned topics in class.

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Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 62H-001: Mountains Beyond Mountains: Infectious Disease in the Developing World (Honors)
Gen Eds: PL, GL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Mark Peifer

Mark Peifer is the Michael Hooker Distinguished Professor of Biology at UNC, where he and his lab study how the animal body is assembled during embryonic development, using genetic and cell biological tools. He was raised in Minnesota and is a first generation college student. His interest in global public health was stimulated by a desire to help students take a closer look at the world around them, and by the experiences he has had with the people of Haiti. He and his spouse live in the woods west of town, and his two daughters are both UNC grads, one a social worker and one a student teacher in second grade.

The global pandemic has refocused the attention of the world on the importance of using science to address pathogens in a global way, and on the inequities in our health care system in the US and globally. In this course we will examine the challenges of treating infectious disease in the developing world, and explore the root causes of global health care inequity. We will use HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis as examples, and the nation of Haiti as a case study, as we explore viral and bacterial pathogens, how they affect our bodies, and how we can use this information to develop better treatments. We’ll also explore innovative ways to bring health care to resource-poor nations.

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BIOL 66-001: Evolution and the Science of Life
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Joel Kingsolver

This interdisciplinary seminar will be taught by Kenan Distinguished Professor Joel Kingsolver (Biology). He has taught evolutionary biology and related classes for non-majors, biology majors and graduate students at UNC and other universities for over three decades. He is fascinated by the connections between science and art (particularly between biology and music), and has given numerous public presentations about evolution, biodiversity and human-caused environmental change for the Carolina Public Humanities Program at UNC. His research combines physiology, ecology and evolution to understand how insects respond to novel and changing environments, including climate change, invasive plants and parasites.

This interdisciplinary first-year seminar examines the roots, ideas, questions and applications of evolutionary biology. What is evolution, how does it work, and how do we study it? How did modern scientific theories of evolution emerge from the traditions of natural philosophy and natural history? How do we use evolution to understand fundamental questions ranging from adaptation, biological diversity and human origins to the evolution of disease, aging, sex and culture? We will learn about the central concepts of evolution, the scientific tools used to study evolution and the history of life, and apply these concepts and tools to understand how evolution occurs in the past, present and future.

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Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 89-001: Bread from Air? The Chemistry of Fertilizers
Gen Eds: PL, QI
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Alexander Miller

Professor Alexander Miller is fascinated by the ability to control chemical reactivity by altering molecular structures based on transition metal ions. He gets to work with an incredible group of chemists to help apply chemical principles to grand challenges in alternative energy and sustainability, including projects that can underpin the development of light-driven fuel production and sustainable ammonia synthesis. Prof. Miller is an enthusiastic teacher who believes in the power of student-driven discovery. He is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow and was (when he was younger) included in Forbes Magazine’s 30 Under 30 list in the Energy category.

Fear of a global famine inspired chemist Fritz Haber’s research into the production of ammonia from nitrogen in the air. Following a breakthrough laboratory discovery, engineer Carl Bosch led the development of a large-scale industrial process to produce ammonia… and together they changed the world. This First Year Seminar will introduce concepts of scientific inquiry and interdisciplinary collaboration in the context of the humankind’s utilization of fertilizers. Weaving together elements of plant biology, chemical synthesis and catalysis, environmental science, and technoeconomic analysis, the course will critically examine the past, present, and future of fertilizers.

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Classics (CLAS)

CLAS 55H-001: Three Greek and Roman Epics (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, NA, WB
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
James O'Hara

Professor James O’Hara received his A.B. in Classics from the College of the Holy Cross in 1981, and his Ph.D. in Classical Studies from the University of Michigan in 1986. From 1986 to 2001, he taught at Wesleyan University; since 2001 he has been the George. L. Paddison Professor of Latin at UNC, where he has also been department chair. His research and teaching interests are in Greek and Latin poetry, with special interests in Homer, Vergil, and the literature written during the reign of Rome’s first emperor, Augustus; other interests include Roman Civilization, Hellenistic poetry, didactic poetry, and satire.

The course will involve a close reading of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Vergil’s Aeneid, and as a transition from Homer to Vergil, we will also read several tragedies of Sophocles from fifth-century Athens. Epic and tragedy wrestled with topics central to Graeco-Roman civilization and provided (for good or bad) influential models of heroism and human values for later ages—along with raising fundamental questions about the individual’s relationship to society. We will analyze, discuss, and write about these works both as individual pieces of literature in a historical context, and in terms of how they position themselves in the poetic tradition; after reading the Iliad and Odyssey, we’ll see how heroic myth gets reworked for democratic Athens, and then how Vergil combines Homer, tragedy and other traditions to make a new poem for his time. We will look at aspects of structure and technique, questions of overall interpretation and values, and the interplay of genre and historical setting. Requirements: discussion, short online readings in addition to the primary texts, several short papers during the term, and a 6-10-page term paper.

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CLAS 61-001: Writing the Past
Gen Eds: LA, CI, WB
MWF, 03:35 PM – 04:25 PM
Emily Baragwanath

Emily Baragwanath studied at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, before taking up a Rhodes Scholarship to the University of Oxford, U.K. where she gained her doctorate in Classics. She has since held research fellowships at Christ Church, Oxford, at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington D.C., and in Heidelberg. Her main area of scholarly interest is the literary techniques employed by Greek historians in their construction of historical narratives. Her first book, Motivation and Narrative in Herodotus, winner of Oxford’s Conington Prize and the CAMWS Award for Outstanding Publication 2010, explores the representation of human motivation in Herodotus’ Histories. She is now examining the representation of women in the historian and philosopher Xenophon.

The intersection of history-writing, cinema and fiction will be our focus as we engage with the greatest Greek historians—Herodotus, Thucydides, Polybius—against the backdrop of modern renditions of the past and of war in cinema (including Peter Weir’s Gallipoli, Wolfgang Petersen’s Troy and Zack Snyder’s 300), documentaries (including Tolga Ornek’s Gallipoli), news footage and short stories. We will examine the strategies of each ancient writer in confronting challenges that remain pressing for directors, journalists, and historians today. These include difficulties of conflicting perspectives, biased evidence, and the limitations of memory, as well as broader questions about the nature of historical representation. The aim is for students to engage in critical and informed analysis of the strategies of our three ancient historians in ‘writing the past’, and to draw appropriate comparisons with the challenges that confront modern counterparts. The course will center on in-class group discussion and debate focused on questions arising from the week’s reading or viewing assignments. Students will write two short essays and a longer paper arising from their course project.

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Communication (COMM)

COMM 63-001: The Creative Process in Performance
Gen Eds: VP, CI, US
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Joseph Megel

Joseph Megel has spent the last 20 years focusing on the direction and development of new works, for theatre, film and video. Mr. Megel is a member of SSDC (Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers), Co-Artistic Director of StreetSigns Center for Literature and Performance in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and an Associate Artist for The Working Theatre in New York. He holds the M.F.A. degree from the Peter Stark Motion Picture Producing Program at the University of Southern California, a Master of Arts from the University of Cincinnati’s College Conservatory of Music and a B.S. in Speech from Northwestern University. He served for six years as Artistic Director of Playwrights Theatre of New Jersey, a new play development theatre, and continues to serve as Co-Executive Producer of Harland’s Creek Productions, producer of New York premieres of new plays, developmental producer of screenplays, readings and films.

Students in this seminar will attend and study the production process of multimedia, music, dance and theater performances on campus and on-line. The Process Series of the Performance Studies program in the Department of Communication Studies, Playmakers, Carolina Performing Arts, and others across campus and additional on-line performance. We will discuss how performance as it was experienced (pre-Covid) and as it currently experienced. We will examine performance through multiple lenses, from Aristotle’s Poetics, Peter Brooks’s Empty Space, up to current writing from Performance Studies scholars. We will explore the ways that performances engage us, communicating powerful ideas and emotions through their various media of expression. Students will research performance pieces, interview the performers, attend rehearsals and performances, and write essays that combine their own experiences of the performances with class readings. Students will also create their own performance pieces as they observe the relationship of preparation and practice to the spontaneity and surprise of performance.

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COMM 82-001: Food Politics from an Organizational Communication Perspective
Gen Eds: SS, CI, EE-Service Learning
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Sarah Dempsey

Sarah Dempsey is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication. Her research focuses on critical theories of work and professional life and the politics of voice, representation, and accountability in social change efforts. Her most recent research examines cultural discourses about work and labor in the context of the food industry. She is currently engaged in a book length project drawing on archival research, critical analysis of popular discourses and corporate practices, and interviews with contemporary food service workers, organizers, and living wage and fair wage advocates and business owners.

The globalization of food systems is both a hotly contested subject and a central part of contemporary life. This course provides an applied introduction to key debates by adopting a critical organizational communication lens on our globalized food system. Drawing on readings, popular media texts, discussions, and experiential activities, we will explore food system labor practices, the role of multinational companies and global commodity chains, the status of hunger and food deserts, the role of food marketing and consumption practices, and the growth of local and sustainable movements devoted to food justice. Throughout, we investigate how our global food system is shaped by different types of organizations operating within particular locales, such as North Carolina, USA.

This is an APPLES-designated service-learning course that requires service hours. In addition to experiential field activities and visits, our course is organized around group-based engaged research projects. Your success will depend upon your ability to work independently and practice collective leadership. This project will increase your research and writing skills, sharpen your leadership and collaborative skills, and provide you with applied insight into the themes of the course.

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Computer Science (COMP)

COMP 89-084: Lux Libertas: On the Knowledge, Manipulation and Display of Light
Gen Eds: PH, NA
MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM
Todd Ramón Ochoa and Montek Singh

Todd Ramón Ochoa is a cultural anthropologist who does fieldwork with religious communities in Cuba. He is a scholar of religion specializing in how communities tell stories to create unique understandings of the world. In this co-taught course, he will focus on the way light figures in creation stories, and also how philosophy can help us grapple with the distinction between light and dark.

Montek Singh’s general research interests lie in the areas of digital systems, high-performance and low-power digital design, and VLSI CAD. The main focus of his recent work is on asynchronous digital design, and its applications to embedded systems, multimedia, and system-on-a-chip design.

Light has figured centrally in human explanations and manipulations of the natural world: from creation narratives, to the Copernican Revolution, to the theory of relativity, to harvesting energy from sunlight, to shaping light inside phones and screens for the capture and display of images. The goal of this course is to bring students into an intellectual encounter with light, one that will provide a history of human understandings of light, experimental encounters with light in the laboratory, and orientations to theoretical paradigms that have resulted from the human manipulation of light. At its most broad, the course aims to introduce first year students to knowledge and matter-energy as things that we study, handle, and transform.

Course also offered as RELI 89-001

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Dramatic Art (DRAM)

DRAM 79-001: The Heart of the Play: Fundamentals of Acting, Playwriting, and Collaboration
Gen Eds: VP, CI
MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM
Mark Perry

Mark Perry teaches playwriting, play analysis and dramaturgy and serves as a resident dramaturg with PlayMakers Repertory Company. His plays A New Dress for Mona and The Will of Bernard Boynton have been produced by UNC’s Department of Dramatic Art, and both scripts are available from Drama Circle. Mark is a graduate of the University of Iowa’s Playwrights Workshop and a former recipient of the North Carolina Arts Council’s Literature Fellowship for playwriting.

The goal of this seminar is to get you doing theatre, to spark your creativity and to connect you with the deeper lessons of this dynamic art form. You will act. You will write. You will work with others. It will not always be easy, but if you are willing to stretch yourself, you should have a great time. Each lesson is organized around a principle or virtue inherent in the practice of the art. Participants study a quotation or two that relate to that principle and then engage in drama exercises that spring from that principle. By the end of the course, you will have gained skills to make you comfortable to write, stage and perform your own 10 minute plays. Not just for those interested in pursuing theatre, this seminar will give you a more holistic understanding of essential principles in the practice of your life.

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DRAM 81H-001: Staging America: The American Drama (Honors)
Gen Eds: VP, CI, NA
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Gregory Kable

Gregory Kable is a Teaching Professor in the Department of Dramatic Art, where he teaches dramatic literature, theatre history, and performance courses and serves as an Associate Dramaturg for PlayMakers Repertory Company. He also teaches seminars on Modern British Drama and American Musicals for the Honors program. He has directed dozens of productions at UNC and throughout the local community, and is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama.

This seminar examines our national drama from its colonial origins to the present. Participants read plays and criticism, screen videos, engage in critical writing, and consider performance as related means of exploring the visions and revisions constituting American dramatic history. We will approach American drama as both a literary and commercial art form, and look to its history to provide a context for current American theater practice. Readings are chosen for their intrinsic merit and historical importance, but also for their treatment of key issues and events in American life. Our focus throughout will be on the forces that shaped the American drama as well as, in turn, that drama’s ability to shed light on the national experience.

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DRAM 83-001: Spectacle in the Theatre
Gen Eds: VP
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
David Navalinsky

David Navalinsky is the Director of Undergraduate Production in the Department of Dramatic Art. David has taught at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Mississippi. David’s recent design work includes scenery for The Uncanny Valley by Francesca Talenti. The Uncanny Valley featured a Robothespian™, which is exactly what it sounds like. He has also written a documentary theatre piece Priceless Gem: An Athlete Story, which tells the stories of UNC athletes. David has worked professionally at South Coast Repertory in Orange County California, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, The Illinois Shakespeare Festival, and the Karamu Performing Arts Theatre in Cleveland, OH. Some of David’s favorite projects were at the Dallas Children’s Theater where he made a dinosaur collapse and pirates walk the plank.

This seminar will explore the artists, art and technology involved in creating the world of the play. It is intended as an overview for students who want to learn about theatrical design. Students will create their own designs in the areas of scenery, costumes, and lighting for three plays throughout the semester. The plays will be placed outside of their traditional setting while still maintaining the story and themes. Students have placed Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a trailer park and a daycare center for example. Careful historical research, close reading and analysis, text and source material, and collaboration will be the focus of the student projects.

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Economics (ECON)

ECON 55H-001: Economics of Sports (Honors)
Gen Eds: CI, EE-Mentored Research
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Rita Balaban

Rita Balaban is a Teaching Professor in the Department of Economics at UNC-Chapel Hill where she has been a faculty member since 2006. She earned her Ph.D. from the Department of Economics at the University of Pittsburgh in 1999 and prior to her arrival at UNC-CH, she taught at Samford University and the College of Charleston. Rita is an experienced teacher whose teaching interests are in Applied Microeconomics, specifically the Economics of Sports. She has won several university-wide teaching awards including the Chapman Family Award (201) and the Tanner Award (2015) for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. Her research interests are in economics pedagogy and she has presented her work at conferences in Wilmington, Philadelphia and San Diego.

This course uses real-world sports stories to introduce students to the study of economics. Through readings, lectures, discussions, personal experiences, and different activities we will use the sports industry to learn about the economic way of thinking, competitive and noncompetitive market structures, labor markets, contest design, market failure, and public finance.

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ECON 58H-001: Researching the Tools for Success in College (Honors)
Gen Eds: SS, QI
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Jane Cooley Fruehwirth

Jane Cooley Fruehwirth is an economist with research interests in the determinants of social, economic and racial inequality. A central theme to her research is the role of social context in shaping disadvantage, particularly in the context of schools and friendships. She studies education policies that are aimed at improving disadvantaged students’ outcomes, such as teaching practice, accountability and grade retention. More recently, her research delves into the determinants of mental health in adolescence. She is now teaming up with undergraduate researchers to help tackle the mental health crisis on college campuses.

In this Course-based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE), we will study the barriers and tools for success in college. This semester we will focus on the growing mental health crisis on college campuses. Students will synthesize existing evidence in the related literature and brainstorm potential solutions with classmates. They will choose a focal determinant/potential solution and create their own evidence on the topic.

Along with answering questions related to success that they may apply to their own college experiences and share with their peers, students will also learn the following skills:

  1. Data-story telling to effect policy change,
  2. The danger of mistaking correlation for causation,
  3. The rewards and challenges of doing research,
  4. How to finsynthesize dings in the primary literature without becoming overwhelmed,
  5. The power of economics to inform a range of questions.

Our discussions about causality will be grounded in economic theory and economic models will be taught as relevant to the research questions the class develops. Students immerse themselves in a research project and experience the reflection and revision involved in producing and disseminating original scholarship or creative works.

Questions for Students

  1. How do I establish my point of view, take intellectual risks, and begin producing original scholarship or creative works?
  2. How do I narrow my topic, critique current scholarship, and gather evidence in systematic and responsible ways?
  3. How do I evaluate my findings and communicate my conclusions?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Frame a topic, develop an original research question or creative goal, and establish a point of view, creative approach, or hypothesis.
  2. Obtain a procedural understanding of how conclusions can be reached in a field and gather appropriate evidence.
  3. Evaluate the quality of the arguments and/or evidence in support of the emerging product.
  4. Communicate findings in a clear and compelling ways.
  5. Critique and identify the limits of the conclusions of the project and generate ideas for future work.

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English and Comparative Literature (CMPL/ENGL)

CMPL 55-001: Comics as Literature
Gen Eds: VP
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Elyse Crystall

Dr. Elyse Crystall has been teaching courses on visual literacy – including graphic novels, comics, and film – and topics such as racism, anti-Semitism, and Islamophobia; (im)migration and borders; race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, and nationality; memory and trauma; and conquest, imperialism, colonialism, and empire for 25 years. Her role as the coordinator of social justice concentration for the English undergraduate major links to her commitment to social justice issues; her understanding of the critical importance of historical context; and her belief that race, ethnicity, class, gender, nationality, sexuality, among others, are both identity categories and social locations that shape how we see the world — and how the world sees us. Nothing is more gratifying to Dr. Crystall than when a group of students, an instructor, the texts assigned in the course, and the world outside the classroom work together to create meaning — new possibilities, new questions, and new ways of seeing.

Is it possible that people across generations and geographies see differently? What if what we see is related to who we are and our cultural beliefs? These are among the questions we will explore in this class on visual literacy and comics (in the form of adult graphic novels). We will question how meaning is made through the juxtaposition and framing of images as well as the relationship between words and images. In the process of comparing images, visual patterns emerge that enable the reader to identify artistic techniques and strategies that attempt to convey meaning where words might fail. We will work to sharpen our critical thinking (and reading) skills and reflect on how seeing is a socially and culturally circumscribed phenomenon. Creating a graphic narrative and a podcast about graphic novels are two projects we will undertake.

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ENGL 57H-001: Future Perfect: Science Fictions and Social Form (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Matthew Taylor

Matthew Taylor’s research focuses on the intersections among environmental humanities, critical theory (including posthumanism, biopolitics, science and technology studies, and critical race theory), and nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature. His first book, Universes without Us: Posthuman Cosmologies in American Literature (Univ. of Minnesota Press), examines cosmologies that challenge the utopianism of both past and present attempts at fusing self and environment.

What will our world look like in ten years? Fifty? One hundred? Will the future be a utopian paradise or a dystopian wasteland? Through a wide-ranging survey of popular science writing, novels, and films, this first year seminar will examine fictional and nonfictional attempts to imagine the future from the nineteenth century to the present. We will explore everything from futurology and transhumanism to warnings of imminent environmental collapse. Our focus will be less on assessing the accuracy of these predictions and more on determining what they tell us about the hopes and fears of the times in which they were made. The course will culminate in a short research paper on a future-oriented topic of your choosing.

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ENGL 59-001: Black Masculinity and Femininity
Gen Eds: LA, CI, US
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Tyree Daye

Tyree Daye is a poet from Youngsville, North Carolina. He is the author of two poetry collections River Hymns 2017 APR/Honickman First Book Prize winner and Cardinal forthcoming from Copper Canyon Press 2020. Daye is a 2017 Ruth Lilly Finalist and Cave Canem fellow. Daye’s work has been published in Prairie Schooner, New York Times, and Nashville Review. Daye won the 2019 Palm Beach Poetry Festival Langston Hughes Fellowship, 2019 Diana and Simon Raab Writer-In-Residence at UC Santa Barbara, and is a 2019 Kate Tufts Finalist. Daye most recently was awarded a 2019 Whiting Writers Award.

This first year seminar will use literature, film, and popular culture to explore different expressions of masculinity and femininity in the African American and Black diasporic context. Students will evaluate how artists use gender and sexuality for social critique and artistic innovation.

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ENGL 66-001: Blake 2.0: William Blake in Popular Culture
Gen Eds: LA, NA
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Joseph Viscomi

Joseph Viscomi, the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of English Literature, directs and co-edits the William Blake Archive blakearchive.org. His special interests are British Romantic literature, art, and printmaking. He has co-edited 9 illuminated works for The William Blake Trust and over 172 electronic editions of Blakes literary and art works for the Blake Archive. He is the author of Prints by Blake and his Followers, Blake and the Idea of the Book, and Blake’s Printed Paintings: Methods, Origins, Meanings. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Rockefeller Foundation, Getty Foundation, and the National Humanities Center.

William Blake, the visionary poet, artist and printmaker of the British Romantic period, has had enormous influence on modern art and popular culture. His illuminated poetry integrated word and image anticipating graphic novels and influencing many modern musicians, poets, writers (including Pullman, His Dark Materials Trilogy, Bono, Patti Smith and Jim Morrison). Using the Blake Archive, a hypertext of Blake’s poetry and art, we will study key Blake works as well as the digital medium that enables us to study these works in new ways. We will also explore the Web for performances and adaptations of the works we study and for works by musicians, painters, poets, writers, actors, playwrights, performers, dancers and film and video makers who were or are inspired or influenced by Blake. Students will share their discoveries with the class and produce critical or creative responses to a work by Blake or by an influenced artist.

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ENGL 81-001: Jane Eyre and Its Afterlives
Gen Eds: LA, CI, NA
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Jeanne Moskal

Jeanne Moskal is an award-winning teacher and mentor. She has authored a study of the poet William Blake and has edited the travel writings of Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein. Moskal’s book-in-progress analyzes twentieth-century adaptations of Jane Eyre.

Class members will reflect upon Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847) in its original contexts and study subsequent novels and films that engage with it. What makes a literary work a “classic”? How do later readers’ concerns affect their responses? Lovers of Jane Eyre are welcome, as are newcomers and skeptics. We will read Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847), ed. Richard J. Dunn; Grace Zaring Stone, The Bitter Tea of General Yen (1930); Daphne Du Maurier, Rebecca (1938); Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea (1966); and two books by Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (1985) and Why Be Happy When You Could be Normal? (2013). Films will be drawn from this list. English-language adaptions of 1934, 1943, 1970, and 2011; film adaptions in Spanish, Hindi, Tamil, and Mandarin; The Bitter Tea of General Yen, dir. Frank Capra (1933); Rebecca, dir. Alfred Hitchcock (1940); Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (BBC-TV, 1990); Wide Sargasso Sea (1993), dir. John Duigan. Your grade will be determined by a Creative Assignment, presented orally and in writing (8 pages; 45%), a Conversational Bibliography, presented orally and in writing (8 pages; 45%), and engaged, thoughtful participation in class discussions (10%).

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ENGL 89-001: Dreaming America: The Federal Arts Projects of the New Deal
Gen Eds: VP, US
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Leslie Frost

Leslie Frost is the author of Dreaming America: Popular Front Ideals and Aesthetics in Children’s Plays of the Federal Theatre Project. Columbus: The Ohio State UP, 2013. Her academic work centers on visual and performing arts and American literature since 1900. She is currently working on a project centered on U.S. Post Office murals (one of which is in the Chapel Hill post office) of the New Deal. She teaches classes on drama and American literature; in 2017 she adapted Sinclair Lewis’s it Can’t Happen Here for a staged reading at Historic Playmakers Theatre that she cast and produced.

From 1935-1939, America had a national theater. Born of the Great Depression, the Federal Theatre Project (FTP) was a Works Projects Administration (WPA) program to put unemployed people back to work. With almost one-third of the nation unemployed, the FTP provided jobs to the out of work and cheap or free entertainment to a people struggling with the hardships of the economic depression.

In this class we will study plays of the Federal Theatre Project that immerse us in traditional and new American theatrical forms. We will visit regional theatre productions and archival materials held in the Southern Historical Collection at Wilson Library that detail Playmakers’ founder Frederick Koch’s work as Southern Regional Director of Federal Theatre. We will also study American culture in the 1930s to investigate the relationship between theatrical art, culture, and politics, connections powerfully displayed by federal theatre’s vested interest in America’s working and middle classes, social justice issues, modernist aesthetics, and contextualized by its stormy relationship with the government committees that would investigate its politics and, ultimately, cause its demise.

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ENGL 89H-001: Close Encounters: The Science Fiction of the Shared Universe (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, CI, NA
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
David A. Ross

David A. Ross] is a graduate of Yale and Oxford. He has been a member of the Department of English & Comparative Literature at UNC–Chapel Hill since 2002. He is the author of A Critical Companion to William Butler Yeats (2009) and the co-editor/co-translator of The Search for the Avant-Garde, 1946–1969 (2012), the descriptive catalogue of the Taipei Fine Arts Museum. A collector and amateur scholar of traditional Chinese paintings and Japanese woodblock prints, he has served as president of Southeast Conference of the Association for Asian Studies and as both editor and book review editor of the Southeast Review of Asian Studies.

Darwin’s theories shattered humanity’s sense of solitary enthronement, of removal from a creation different in kind. Humanity had suddenly to think of itself in relation to a world—possibly even a universe —teeming with fellow accidents of evolution. The universe ceased to be something possessed and became something shared. But shared with whom? Shared on what basis? According to what hierarchy? Shared with creatures essentially like or unlike ourselves? Science fiction is preeminently the literature of the Darwinian universe. It emerged co-extensively, struggling to imagine the taxonomies of a universe that had been startlingly redefined as evolutionary and infinite in four dimensions. “O brave new world that has such people in it!” exclaimed Shakespeare. Science fiction uttered these same words, but with trepidation, wondering about the human place and future. Our course will consider the meanings, ramifications, and anxieties of a “shared universe,” drawing on a selection of science-fiction classics from H.G. Wells onward.

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Environmental Sciences and Engineering (ENVR)

ENVR 89-001: Environment-ECUIPP Lab: Connecting with Communities through Environmental Research for Public Health
Gen Eds: EE-Mentored Research
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Amanda Northcross

Prof. Amanda Northcross likes to build things and enjoys working together with students and communities to explore environmental health concerns, design field campaigns, and build and deploy networks of sensors to answer environmental health questions. With BS, MS and PhD degrees in chemical and environmental engineering she is passionate about health equity. Dr. Northcross has conducted environmental health and engineering research in Guatemala, Brazil, Nigeria and the United States. She will work together with faculty from UNC’s Water Institute to conduct community-engaged environmental research with first year students.

This course is an entry into an undergraduate learning community organized by the Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering. The ECUIPP Lab (Environmentally-Engaged Communities and Undergraduate students Investigating for Public health Protection) is a creative community of students, faculty members and practice partners. Students in ENVR 89-001 will become members of the Environment-ECUIPP Lab. Over the course of the semester they will design and conduct research that addresses a pressing environmental health issue in a local community. Students will work with the local community partner to develop a research question and use the resources of the ECUIPP Lab and the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering to answer the question through the research process. The course is a hands-on undergraduate research experience.

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ENVR 89-002: Environment-ECUIPP Lab: Connecting with Communities through Environmental Research for Public Health
Gen Eds: EE-Mentored Research
Meeting Pattern: TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Amanda Northcross

Prof. Amanda Northcross likes to build things and enjoys working together with students and communities to explore environmental health concerns, design field campaigns, and build and deploy networks of sensors to answer environmental health questions. With BS, MS and PhD degrees in chemical and environmental engineering she is passionate about health equity. Dr. Northcross has conducted environmental health and engineering research in Guatemala, Brazil, Nigeria and the United States. She will work together with faculty from UNC’s Water Institute to conduct community-engaged environmental research with first year students.

This course is an entry into an undergraduate learning community organized by the Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering. The ECUIPP Lab (Environmentally-Engaged Communities and Undergraduate students Investigating for Public health Protection) is a creative community of students, faculty members and practice partners. Students in ENVR 89-001 will become members of the Environment-ECUIPP Lab. Over the course of the semester they will design and conduct research that addresses a pressing environmental health issue in a local community. Students will work with the local community partner to develop a research question and use the resources of the ECUIPP Lab and the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering to answer the question through the research process. The course is a hands-on undergraduate research experience.

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Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 63-001: The Problem with Nature and Its Preservation
Gen Eds: PH
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Gabriela Valdivia

Gabriela Valdivia is political ecologist in the Geography Department at UNC-CH. Her research examines the political dimensions of natural resource governance. Her research spans environmental justice, resource governance, and the ethics of modern lifestyles related to oil consumption. Her latest research project focuses on the impact of oil extraction, regulatory policy and environmental practices on Native Amazon and Afro-Ecuadorian communities. She grew up in Peru and conducted ethnographic research in Ecuador and Bolivia, and brings these experiences into her courses on Latin America and courses on political ecology and nature-society relations.

This seminar explores how different meanings of nature help create the societies in which we live and evaluate the implications of efforts to transform and preserve Nature. Students will address conceptions and models of nature-society relations relevant to today’s world, from resource extraction, to the transformation and movement of resources, to conservation. Through original research and discussions on “untouched” and “dirty” natures, students will develop informed perspectives on Nature’s heterogeneity, and how this powerful idea matters to the organization and future of different societies. The readings and discussion will evaluate Western (especially American) conceptions of Nature and compare with other perspectives, including indigenous world views on “the good life,” to better understand questions of sovereignty, value and sustainable futures.

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GEOG 67-001: Politics of Everyday Life
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Sara Smith

Sara Smith is a political geographer with a South Asia focus, specializing in feminist political geography and political geographies of youth and the future. She has been involved in non-profit work and research in India since 1999. Her Ph.D. is in geography, and she has been teaching in UNC’s Department of Geography since 2009. Professor Smith’s current research in the Ladakh region of India’s Jammu and Kashmir State addresses the ways that individuals’ personal lives (especially their decisions about love and babies) are entangled in territorial struggle. Smith is developing a new project about how marginalized young people from India’s remote mountain regions experience university life in major Indian cities and how this shapes their politics. If you are curious, you can find out more about this work on her faculty website: https://sarasmith.web.unc.edu/.

This seminar examines the ways that politics, especially contests over territory, are part of our day-to-day life. We will explore a range of cases, from immigration policy and rhetoric in the US, to popular representations of geopolitics in film, to the politics of family planning in India. How do questions of love, friendship, family and youth identity tie into the international and national political stories that we see on the news? What does national identity have to do with our individual sense of self? We will also explore alternative ways that international politics have been studied, as feminist geopolitics or anti-geopolitics and questions of citizenship. Work for the seminar will involve original research on intersections of international politics and students’ daily life, as well as exploring representations of geopolitical issues in the media, film and fiction.

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Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)

GSLL 51-001: Stalin and Hitler: Historical Issues in Cultural and Other Perspectives
Gen Eds: HS, GL
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
David Pike

David Pike received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1978 in German Studies with a minor in Russian and has taught at UNC–CH since 1980. He is the author of three books, The Politics of Culture in Soviet -Occupied Germany, 1945-1949 (1993), Lukács and Brecht (1985), and German Writers in Soviet Exile, 1933-1945 (1982). His research takes him regularly to Berlin and Moscow.

This course deals with critical issues, in the broadest possible context, that dominated the twentieth century: the rise of fascism out of the carnage of World War One and the Bolshevik revolution to which the war and Czarist Russia’s involvement in it helped contribute. As the semester unfolds, drawing on a variety of historical and documentary films, and literature (memoirs, novels), we will take a comparative look at singular personalities like Lenin, Stalin and Hitler and examine the role played by such key figures in historical events of this magnitude. More towards the end of the semester, we glance briefly at the situation created in Western and Eastern Europe by the defeat of fascism and contemplate the origins and evolution of the cold war. We conclude with a consideration of the dissolution and democratization of Eastern European countries, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and, against the tragic background of the past, the recent reemergence of conflict between Russia and the “West.”

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GSLL 53-001: Early Germanic Culture: Myth, Magic, Murder, and Mayhem
Gen Eds: HS, NA, WB
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Most recent bio on record from 2013. Bio below was pulled from GSLL Department Website.
Paul Roberge

Paul Roberge is professor of Germanic languages and joint professor of linguistics at UNC-CH. He also holds the title of professor extraordinary of general linguistics at Stellenbosch University (South Africa). He did his graduate work at the University of Michigan, where he concentrated in both Germanic and general linguistics. He received MA degrees in 1973 (Germanic languages) and 1975 (linguistics), and the PhD in 1980. He came to Chapel Hill in 1985 by way of Princeton University (1980-85; visiting associate professor, 1988). His research and teaching areas include older Germanic dialects (esp. Gothic, Old High German, Old Saxon, Old Norse); comparative Germanic grammar; Afrikaans; pidgins and creoles; sociolinguistics; origin and evolution of human language.

This seminar is an introduction to the culture of the Germanic-language areas of northwestern Europe (Germany, Scandinavia, Anglo-Saxon England) from the Middle and Late Roman Empire (100-476 CE) through the Viking Age (traditionally 973-1066 CE). We shall study creation myths and mythic heroes as well as examine the nature of myth (as explanatory stories). From a specimen of sagas, poems, and historical documents (supplemented by inscriptions and charms), we shall explore political and legal structures, the use and abuse of power, gender roles, feuding, the ethos of might-makes-right, and expansionism (e.g., Viking exploration and settlement of North America). All texts are in Modern English translation. Class meetings will focus on analysis of readings, with the instructor providing the historical backdrop. Student will take turns preparing study questions and leading class discussion. Students will also research topics that are germane to the readings and present their findings orally to the members of the seminar.

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GSLL 69-001: Laughing and Crying at the Movies: Film and Experience
Gen Eds: VP
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Inga Pollmann

Inga Pollmann is Assistant Professor in Film Studies in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures and is also part of the Cinema and Media Studies program in English and Comparative Literature. Her research focuses on the history of film theory, intersections of film, science and philosophy, and the place of the moving image within aesthetic theory. As a consequence, her interests span across a variety of genres, styles, and periods, such as 1920s German cinema, melodrama, global new wave cinemas, and contemporary art cinema. She has written essays on Russian montage cinema, German abstract cinema, the interrelation of German biology and film theory in the 1920s, the question of mood and coldness in film, French film theory and evolution, and contemporary German cinema. Her latest book project entitled Cinematic Vitalism: Film Theory and the Question of Life engages with the role of conceptions of life and vitality in German and French aesthetic theory, philosophy, and theory of biology for film theory and practice from the 1910s-60s.

In this seminar, we will consider a puzzling question: Why is it that we cry at the movies? And why do we willingly, and lustfully, expose ourselves to such an experience? How do films make us laugh or recoil in horror, and what is the difference between experiencing this in a movie theater or at home? Crying, laughing or screaming are just a few of the possible responses a movie can elicit from its audience. We will focus on various film genres, including melodrama, horror and comedy, to venture a few preliminary answers. Additionally, we will make excursions into other genres and their emotional responses to think further about the physical and psychological aspects of film spectatorship. Over the course of this seminar, students will learn the basics of film analysis and gain an overview over the history of international film production, and they will also consider various definitions of, and approaches to, emotion, affect, and the body. Questions that will guide our investigation include: What is an emotion? What formal elements of a film can we identify that guide emotional response? What distinguishes crying from laughing and other emotional utterances? How do we account for the social role of laughing and crying in the movie theater, its communicative and contagious aspects? What is the role of gender in emotional response? What do emotional responses to film tell us about the medium film?

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GSLL 83-001: We, Robots: Identifying with our Automated Others in Fiction and Film
Gen Eds: LA, BN
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Eliza Rose

Eliza Rose is Assistant Professor and Laszlo Birinyi Sr. Fellow in Central European Studies in the Department of Germanic & Slavic Languages and Literatures. She researches art, film and science fiction from Poland and East Central Europe. Her in-progress book project, Working the Base: Alloys of Art and Industry in the People’s Poland, is a cultural history of art and film in the industrial workplace in late-socialist Poland. She is an author of science fiction and alumna of the Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers’ Workshop. Her stories can be found in Interzone and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction and have been translated into Polish and French.

The word “robot” was invented by Czech author Karel Čapek in 1920. Science fiction has had a long-running obsession with robots: fiction and film portray robots who have mastered and even surpassed the strange art of being human. Meanwhile, in contemporary robotics, to build a robot capable of walking is a difficult and costly feat of engineering. In this class, we will read and watch stories about robots from East and Central Europe with frequent detours into American culture.

Students will use fiction to develop critical perspectives on technology’s place in today’s world and to think creatively about the future. Students will learn and practice methods of writing from the traditional comparative essay to creative writing, research reports, and film reviews.

Films will be screened with English subtitles. All readings and discussions will be in English.

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Global Studies (GLBL)

GLBL 87H-001: The Migratory Experience (Honors)
Gen Eds: BN, GL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Carmen Huerta-Bapat

Carmen Huerta-Bapat holds a PhD in sociology from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, an MA in sociology from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, and an MA in political science from Rice University. She proudly ‘sampled’ multiple PhD programs before settling on sociology, which gives her a multi-faceted understanding of how knowledge is generated, as well as various methodological techniques. Her current research takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding how institutions work to incorporate underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, with a particular focus on immigrant communities. Specifically, her work examines how schools, universities, and police agencies react to the arrival of new migrant communities. She is currently pursuing projects that examine police behavior toward Latino immigrants in North Carolina, the social and health impacts associated with persecutory immigration policies, the negative impacts of microaggressions on first-generation college students, and parental involvement of Latino families in public education. Dr. Huerta-Bapat is currently drawing on her social science training and lived experience as a Latina immigrant in a project with the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Her work aims to design health interventions with marginalized communities to ensure that these actions are grounded in mutual understanding and respect.

This course presents a critical analysis of the migrant experience in North America and Europe. In addition to examining theoretical explanations for migration, this course will ensure that students develop a deep, personal, and practical appreciation of migration rooted in a social justice framework. To do so, we will utilize storytelling, documentaries, and my own firsthand lived experiences as a Latina immigrant. By the end of the course, students will:

  • Develop a clear understanding of the theories driving migration and the various motivations (forced or voluntary) of individuals embarking in this journey.
  • Become familiarized with the policies implemented by sending and receiving countries.
  • Understand the reception and backlash migrants face.
  • Assess whether media portrayals of immigrants via shows such as TLC’s 90 Day Fiancé accurately represent the empirical reality of the migratory experience.

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History (HIST)

HIST 66-001: Film and History in Europe and the United States, 1908-1968
Gen Eds: HS, GL, NA
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Louise McReynolds

Louise McReynolds’s research interests include Imperial Russia, with a particular focus on “middlebrow” culture. More specifically, she is interested in the development of mass communications and leisure-time activities, and how these helped to shape identities in the nineteenth century, leading up to the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. She is currently exploring the role of archeology in brokering the competing visions of “nationalism” and “imperialism” in Tsarist Russia. Her other interests include film history and theory, critical theory and cultures studies, and historiography.

History teachers often assign novels that capture the essence of the era. When they show movies, however, they tend to prefer filmic recreations on an historical event, and class discussion centers around “accuracy” and “objectivity.” This course takes a different approach, and treats films as primacy sources for studying the historical context in which they were made. Beginning with the development of narrative film in 1908, it will trace change by looking sequentially at those nationally specific genres that had repercussions beyond national borders. The primary historical themes will be the repercussions of two world wars in the United States and its European allies and enemies. Both wars played a pivotal role in the critique liberal democracies that consistently proved unable to fulfill their utopian aspirations, as analyzed so perceptively in the assigned book by Mark Mazower. The rise of socialism, which includes National Socialism, as an alternative to liberalism also played itself out on the Silver Screen.

A course such as this is especially important in our age of mass media, when people must be familiar with film as well as literature to be considered “culturally literate.” One cannot become learned, however, simply by viewing these films. Critics and audiences alike have been influenced by these movies for a wide variety of reasons, and this course will integrate a series of films into the dominant social, political, and economic environments that produced them. In the process, we will see how the motion picture industry has ignited controversial debates that move well beyond the courtyards of the old movie palaces. Students will also learn how to watch movies, that is, how to integrate the effects of a film’s formal aesthetics into its social and political contents.

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HIST 70-001: Seeing History in Everyday Places: Chapel Hill as a Case Study
Gen Eds: HS, CI, EE-Field Work
T, 03:30 PM – 06:00 PM
John Sweet

John Sweet is an American historian with wide-ranging interests. His research has focused on the colonial encounters of Africans, Native peoples, and Europeans–and how their interactions shaped the emergence of the American nation. He has also worked with other historians and literary scholars on the Jamestown colony and biographical approaches to the Black Atlantic. His current project explores the history of sex, dating, and the law in the early years of the American Republic; it is called Ruined: A Story of Rape and Retribution in Old New York.

This first-year seminar is an invitation to explore new ways of seeing the world around us. Our homes, our workplaces, our towns, our natural areas, our transportation networks—all are products of history, shaped by people, rich with meaning and full of surprises. The course explores the concept of cultural landscapes as a way of studying history and its legacies. Through a combination of field work, historical research and analysis, we will use maps, photographs, GIS resources and archival documents to understand how–and why–people in the past shaped our surroundings today.

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HIST 72H-001: Women’s Voices: 20th-Century European History in Female Memory (Honors)
Gen Eds: HS, CI, NA
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM; WILL BE TAUGHT AS A REMOTE SYNCHRONOUS COURSE
Karen Hagemann

Karen Hagemann is the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of History and Adjunct Professor of the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense. She published widely in Modern German, European and Transatlantic history combing political, social, cultural and military history with women’s and gender history. Her most recent English books are: Revisiting Prussia’s Wars against Napoleon: History, Culture, and Memory (Cambridge University Press, 2015); Gendering Post-1945 German History: Entanglements, ed. with Donna Harsch, and Friederike Brühöfener (Berghahn Books, 2019); and Oxford Handbook on Gender, War and the Western World since 1600, ed. with Stefan Dudink and Sonya O. Rose (Oxford University Press, 2020) (http://history.unc.edu/people/faculty/karenhagemann) and (https://hagemann.web.unc.edu/).

The seminar examines twentieth century European history through the lens of women’s autobiographical writings. It explores women’s voices from different generational, social and national backgrounds. We will read and discuss autobiographical texts by six women, who grew up in middle class families in Austria, Britain, France and Germany and wrote about their lives in the first half of the twentieth century. They all tried to make a difference in society and politics: Emmeline Pankhurst (1958-1928), a leader of the militant British suffragette movement; Alice Salomon (1872-1948), a liberal Jewish-German social reformer and activist of the German middle class women’s movement; Vera Brittain (1893-1970), a British volunteer nurse during World War I, who became after the war a peace activist and writer; Toni Sender (1888-1964), a German-Jewish socialist and one of the first female parliamentarians in Weimar Germany, who like Salomon after the Nazi’s takeover in 1933 had to flee Germany; Genevieve De Gaulle-Anthonioz (1920-2002), a French resistance fighter during World War II and a survivor of the women’s concentration camp Ravensbrück; and Ruth Klüger (1931-2020), an Austrian-Jewish student who survived Auschwitz and became a professor in the U.S. The overarching theme of the seminar is the struggle of women for equal economic, social and political rights. We will explore what effects social and political changes, revolutions and wars as well as the Holocaust had on this struggle and the lives of women in Europe more general. Through intensive discussions of the reading in class, group work and the opportunity to do research on an autobiography written by a European women born between the 1850s and 1920s of their own choice, the seminar offers students a unique approach to twentieth century European history, will introduce them to research and writing, and the resources UNC-Chapel Hill offers.

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HIST 83-001: African History through Popular Music
Gen Eds: HS, BN
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Lisa Lindsay

Lisa Lindsay is a historian of Africa and the African diaspora and is chair of the History Department. Her research focuses on the social history of West Africa, particularly Nigeria, and the Atlantic slave trade. She has published books about gender and colonialism, the transatlantic slave trade, and the life and times of an African American who made a life in West Africa beginning in the 1850s. She is also an amateur musician, playing regularly these days with two local bands (and in the past with bands in Africa and elsewhere).

The focus of this seminar is to examine popular music as a way of understanding African history from the 1930s to the present. We will read background materials on African historical developments and musical styles, do a lot of listening, and try to learn what African musicians tell us about their societies. We’ll focus in particular on what popular music can reveal about urbanism in Nigeria, politics in the Congo, globalization in Senegal and Mali, and apartheid and its aftermath in South Africa. Students will be asked to research, write about, and present songs in their historical contexts (in person and via podcasts); we’ll also attend some live performances as a class.

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HIST 89-001: Race in the Middle Ages
Gen Eds: HS, WB
MW, 03:35 PM – 04:50 PM
Brett Whalen

Brett Whalen teaches medieval European history with a focus on religious and intellectual topics. He has taught several First-Year Seminars in the past, including most recently “Time and the Medieval Cosmos” (team-taught with Chris Clemens from Physics). His seminar “Race in the Middle Ages” breaks new ground in his teaching about the medieval era. The class is offered in response to urgent contemporary issues around race, which medieval studies cannot ignore.

In recent years, medievalists have turned increasing attention to the ways that notions of racial difference were “invented” in the Middle Ages before modern concepts of race based on (pseudo) scientific theories and ideologies. This class treats race not an essential or substantial category of human existence, but rather—to borrow from Geraldine Heng—as “a structural relationship for the articulation and management of human differences.” As such, race is an historically constructed phenomenon. This course will explore how the Middle Ages played a role in the historical construction of race in the so-called Western tradition. It will also explore possible linkages between medieval and modern ideas of race and racism, including the attempted appropriation of the Middle Ages by contemporary white supremacists.

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HIST 89H-001: Race and Rights in the American Legal System: The Case of the Japanese American Internment (Honors)
Gen Eds: HS, US
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Eric L. Muller

Eric L. Muller is Dan K. Moore Distinguished Professor of Law in Jurisprudence and Ethics. Muller joined the UNC faculty in the fall of 1998. He has published articles in the Yale Law Journal, the Harvard Law Review, and the University of Chicago Law Review, among many other academic journals. His book “Free to Die for their Country: The Story of the Japanese American Draft Resisters of World War II,” was published in August of 2001 by the University of Chicago Press, and was named one of the Washington Post Book World’s Top Nonfiction Titles of 2001. His second book, “American Inquisition: The Hunt for Japanese American Disloyalty in World War II,” was published by the University of North Carolina Press in October of 2007. His most recent book, “Colors of Confinement: Rare Kodachrome Photographs of Japanese American Incarceration in World War II”, published by the University of North Carolina Press in association with the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, was profiled in the New York Times in June of 2012. It won the Joan Patterson Kerr Book Award from the Western History Association in 2013.

From 2008 through 2011, Muller served at the law school as Associate Dean for Faculty Development. In both 2010 and 2011, he received the Frederick B. McCall Award for Teaching Excellence, voted by the graduating classes.

Muller serves as Chair of the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina Press and is a member of the university-level Faculty Executive Committee at UNC-Chapel Hill.

From January of 2012 through December of 2015, Muller served as Director of UNC’s Center for Faculty Excellence, the campus’s faculty development center.

This seminar introduces students to the workings of the American court system and examines the historical development of the constitutional norm of equal protection of the laws, using one notorious historical episode – the removal and confinement of Japanese Americans in World War II – as its central example. Rather than presenting constitutional law as a group of static, binding pronouncements, it shows how constitutional principles evolve as a conversation among the branches of the federal government, between the federal and the state governments, and between ordinary citizens and their governments. Along the way, the seminar offers an overview of the ways in which the law treated Asian immigrants and Asian Americans in the late nineteenth and the twentieth centuries, and poses questions about the legacy of the Japanese American imprisonment for later problems of individual rights and liberties.

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Marine Sciences (MASC)

MASC 52-001: Living with Our Oceans and Atmosphere
Gen Eds: PL
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Wei Mei

Wei Mei is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Marine Sciences at UNC Chapel Hill. He holds a Ph.D. in Earth System Science from the University of California at Irvine, and a Master of Science in Meteorology and a Bachelor of Science in Atmospheric Sciences from Nanjing University (China). Dr. Mei is the instructor of “Environmental Systems Modeling” (MASC/ENEC/GEOL 415) and “Living with Our Oceans and Atmosphere” (MASC 52) at UNC. He was a guest lecturer for several undergraduate and graduate courses on atmosphere, oceans and climate prior to coming to UNC. Dr. Mei’s current research interests lie in extreme weather and climate events (including hurricanes and atmospheric rivers) and their effects on coastal hazards (e.g., storm surge, flooding, and high winds). His work has contributed to the recognition of the effect of ocean temperature on hurricane intensity and to the understanding of the link between hurricanes and climate.

This seminar will introduce students to the nature of the Earth’s oceans and atmosphere, and describe the processes that lead to our weather patterns and global climate. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the oceans and atmosphere affect human population, how oceanic and atmospheric changes are linked to increasing human activity, and how these changes can affect you. Basic principles and modern theories of changing climate, severe weather events, oceanic hazards, and interactions between the oceans and the atmosphere will be studied. Examples of presently active research being conducted at UNC and at other institutions will be used to highlight how the above topics are investigated scientifically. Readings will be taken from introductory textbooks on meteorology, oceanography and environmental sciences; and modern articles in periodicals such as Scientific American, Nature, American Scientist, National Geographic, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, and Weatherwise. Various websites, including those within the UNC Department of Marine Sciences, will be used. Classroom presentations, seminars, and group discussions and debates will be utilized.

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MASC 55-001: Change in the Coastal Ocean
Gen Eds: PL
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Christopher S. Martens

Christopher S. Martens earned his Ph.D. in Chemical Oceanography from Florida State University in 1972, then moved to Yale to complete two years of postdoctoral study before joining the faculty at UNC in 1974. His current research focuses on how biological processes affect the chemistry of coastal and deep-sea environments, including the expanding role of sponges in coral reef ecosystems, the impacts of recently discovered natural gas seeps found off the North Carolina coast and the fate of the huge volume of hydrocarbons released to the deep sea during the Deepwater Horizon disaster. He publishes widely, has twice been co-recipient of the international Geochemical Society’s Best Paper award in Organic Geochemistry and received the Ketchum Award for Leadership in Coastal Oceanography from the famous Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He is an experienced SCUBA, hard helmet, saturation and submersible diver and an underwater videographer. He has received a “Favorite Faculty” award for recognized excellence in undergraduate teaching.

This seminar provides students with opportunities to explore recent changes in marine environments caused by the interactions of fascinating oceanographic processes. Class presentations and discussions focus on the work of active marine scientists who combine their traditional disciplinary research with knowledge and skills from other fields as needed to understand new environmental challenges. This cross-cutting scientific approach prepares class members to recognize important connections between traditional disciplines to discover interdisciplinary research areas that they might wish to further explore during their undergraduate careers at Carolina. Each week we read a series of cutting-edge, non-technical research papers focused largely on recent changes in marine ecosystems in preparation for in-class discussions, laboratory demonstrations, and “video- and photo-trip” visits to field sites. We use information from those papers, other course materials and current research at Carolina, to investigate how biological, geological, physical, and geochemical processes interact to influence coastal, open-ocean, and tropical environments. Students are expected to actively participate in discussions during classes, in demonstrations using state-of-the art instrumentation in MASC laboratories, and in “hands on” mini-field experiments (as weather allows) designed to emphasize the importance of the scientific question rather than just the technology involved. Please note that this seminar has no prerequisites.

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Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 62H-001: Combinatorics (Honors)
Gen Eds: QI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Ivan Cherednik

Professor Ivan Cherednik is Austin H. Carr Distinguished Professor of Mathematics. Trained at the Steklov Mathematics Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences and at Moscow State University, his areas of specialization are Representation Theory, Combinatorics, Number Theory, Harmonic Analysis, and Mathematical Physics. Cherednik’s particular affection for Combinatorics is well known: he proved the celebrated Constant term conjecture in Combinatorics.

A leading expert in Modern Combinatorics wants to share his vision of the subject with the students. The seminar is a perfect background for future specialists in mathematics, physics, computer science, biology, economics, for those who are curious what statistical physics is about, what is cryptography, and how stock market works, and for everyone who likes mathematics.

The course will be organized around the following topics:

  1. Puzzles: dimer covering, magic squares, 36 officers
  2. Combinations: from coin tossing to dice and poker
  3. Fibonacci numbers: rabbits, population growth, etc.
  4. Arithmetic: designs, cyphers, intro to finite fields
  5. Catalan numbers: from playing roulette to stock market

The students will learn about the history of Combinatorics, its connections with the theory of numbers, its fundamental role in the natural sciences and various applications.

It is an advanced research course; all students are expected to participate in projects under the supervision of I.Ch. and the Graduate Research Consultant (the GRC Program). This seminar is partially supported by Honors Carolina.

The grades will be based on the exam, bi-weekly home assignments and the participation in the projects. The course requires focus and effort, but, generally, the students are quite satisfied with the progress they make (and their grades too).

From the Course Evaluation: “A difficult but wholly worthwhile course: I feel more competent for having taken it”, “I would recommend this FYS to others ONLY if they have a VERY strong affinity for and ability in Algebra (I thought I did, but I was wrong)”.

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MATH 89-001: Literate Scientific Computing
Gen Eds: QI
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Sorin Mitran

Sorin Mitran’s primary interest is scientific computation as applied to real-world problems. He works on methods that link different levels of description of natural phenomena ranging from the molecular scale to a continuum description. Mitran’s research group applies these methods to various fields such as biomechanics, complex fluid flow, phase transitions, and transport phenomena.

Computational modeling of natural phenomena has become a cornerstone of scientific inquiry, completing the traditional methods of theory construction and experimentation. The distinctive feature of scientific computation is exhaustive testing of our understanding of well-defined theoretical models, to an extent that is not possible without machines to rapidly carry out arithmetic operations. This seminar will introduce students to the art of successful scientific simulation. Simple models from the physical, biological, and social sciences will be introduced, given correct mathematical formulations, implemented in computer code, and analyzed. Concepts from the sciences, mathematics, and programming will be introduced as needed with no formal prerequisites beyond typical high school material. The objective will be to produce ‘live’ computational documents that serve as virtual experiments for some field of scientific inquiry.

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Music (MUSC)

MUSC 51-001: The Interplay of Music and Physics
Gen Eds: PL
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Laurie McNeil and Brent Wissick

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her Ph.D. in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. Her seminar grows out of her life as a choral singer (and, earlier, a violinist and recorder player). When not singing with the Choral Society of Durham, she can be found in her laboratory using lasers to study the properties of materials.

Brent Wissick has taught cello, chamber music and early music at UNC-CH since 1982; and performs across the US and abroad. But he has had a life-long interest in how instruments work and how sound is made. He loves encouraging musicians to understand some of these issues, and getting a broad range of science students involved in doing “musical” things. He thinks about physics when practicing the cello or viola da gamba, making CD recordings, rehearsing with ensembles, giving lessons and listening to music in a variety of spaces. He still wakes up every morning excited to make and study music with professional colleagues and undergraduates.

This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. Students who have never studied physics or music theory are welcome to enroll; there are no prerequisites. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects. This class is taught in person and does not accommodate remote learners. This class meets in various locations according to a schedule listed on the class Sakai site.

Students may also register for this course under PHYS 51.001.

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MUSC 56-001: Early-Modern Court Spectacle – ADDED 5/28/2021
Gen Eds: HS, CI, WB
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Elizabeth G. Elmi

Elizabeth G. Elmi holds a Ph.D. in musicology and an M.A. in Italian literature from Indiana University, and an A.B. in music and Italian from Vassar College. Specializing in the intersections of music and lyric poetry from late medieval and Renaissance Italy, her research investigates the vernacular song practices of 15th- and 16th-century Italy, as well as other cultural contact zones of the Mediterranean, through questions of orality and literacy, creative agency, politics, and identity. Elmi was named the winner of the 2020 International Musicological Society Outstanding Dissertation Award. She has also been awarded a Fulbright U.S. Scholar grant to the University of Basilicata (Italy) to conduct archival research toward her in-progress book Inscribing the Self in Occupied Southern Italy. Her work appears in both English and Italian publications, including Historical Performance and the Dizionario biografico degli italiani. She has presented at conferences, including the Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference, the American Musicological Society, and the Renaissance Society of America, as well as international seminars hosted by the Centro Europeo di Studi su Umanesimo e Rinascimento Aragonese and the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá. Before coming to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Elmi previously taught at Iowa State University and Indiana University Bloomington.

Nuns, shepherds, demi-gods, tyrants, warriors, angels, and saints. No matter what story you tell, spectacle is never just spectacle. Whether in an opera, a pageant, or a comic play, the costumes, stage machinery, and visual effects are deeply encoded with political, religious, and cultural meanings. This was true in early modern Europe as it is today. And just like today, music then had the power to enhance or even define those meanings—bringing together the eye and the ear to spark feelings of wonder, fear, power, and passion.

In this seminar, we will explore how music and spectacle—two of Aristotle’s six elements of Greek drama—worked together to create complex layers of meaning in various court cultures throughout late medieval and early modern Europe (ca. 1400–1750). In doing so, we will consider how the magnificent representations of aristocratic, imperial, and colonial power central to such dramatic performances reveal wider cultural issues of gender, race, and religion. The course structure will follow a series of thematic modules, each addressing several case studies, on topics such as colonial power, women and madness, religious fervor, political propaganda, and patronage. Each week, students will take an active role in analyzing, discussing, and presenting on these topics and their related case studies both in and outside of class. For the final project, students will work in groups to develop fictional podcast interviews between historical spectators of an early modern musical-dramatic performance of their choosing.

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MUSC 89-001: Songs of the Slave: The History of the African American Spiritual
Gen Eds: VP, US
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:15 PM
LaToya Lain

Applauded for her “wonderfully rich,” “powerful,” and “captivating” voice, American singer LaToya Lain, a native of New Orleans, Louisiana, studied voice at the University of Cincinnati – College Conservatory of Music, Florida State University, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Before joining the voice faculty of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dr. Lain served on the voice faculties of Central Michigan University, New York University, and Oakwood University. Equally at home in the teaching studio and on the performance stage, LaToya continues to perform solo recitals, oratorio, and opera worldwide. She is currently a member of the star-studded cast of Porgy and Bess at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. Dr. Lain’s research includes the intensive study and performance practice of Negro Spirituals. She has performed her lecture recital “Narrative of a Slave Woman: Songs of Hope, Justice, and Freedom” on concert stages and universities throughout the world. Consequently, she was one of 57 experts invited to author a short chapter in The Voice Teacher’s Cookbook: Creative Recipes for Teachers of Singing, as part of a series addressed to various groups of musicians. Her chapter is called “Delectable Diction and Dialect in the Negro Spiritual” and it was published this summer by Meredith Music Resources.

Born out of the oppressions of slavery, the spiritual is a folk song created by Africans forcibly brought to America and enslaved for 250 years. Spirituals were created through the combination of African melodies, rhythms, and performance practices with the influences of European Christian Hymnody. The Library of Congress has collected over 6,000 of these melodies. They contain themes of suffering, hope, rebellion, and longing. They tell the story of Africans in America through song and has become the catalyst through which all “American Music” was born. This course will examine and chronicle the origin and performance practice of the Negro Spiritual, it’s presence throughout American History and its influences on Contemporary American Music.

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Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD)

PWAD 89-015: September 11: Origins, Consequences, and Where Do We Go From Here
Gen Eds: HS, CI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Erinn Whitaker

Erinn Whitaker, a former senior analyst for the Central Intelligence Agency and US State Department, is a Professor of the Practice for the Peace, War and Defense Curriculum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. With nearly 15 years of experience overseas and in Washington, teaches courses such as “Writing and Briefing for Intelligence,” “Comparative Intelligence Regimes,” and “Cases in Counter Intelligence,” helping students interested in careers ranging from intelligence to public policy to journalism strengthen their written and oral communication skills. Whitaker earned a BA from Middlebury College, where she spent a year studying Russia in Siberia, and a MA from Georgetown University’s Walsh School of Foreign Service. She speaks German and Russian.

This first-year seminar will reflect upon the September 11 terrorist attacks in the United States, exploring how the terrorist attacks occurred and why the U.S. intelligence community and policymakers failed to anticipate and prevent them as well as the subsequent effects on the United States, the Middle East, and the world. The instructor, a former intelligence analyst, will lead students in discussions and in-class exercises to encourage critical analysis of the implications of terrorism, particularly on United States national security. A variety of assignments will require students to assess the causes and results of American national security decisions and alternative decisions that might have been made, supported with research and evidence.

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Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 54-001: Thinking about Time
Gen Eds: PH, WB
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
John T. Roberts

John T. Roberts is a Professor of Philosophy. His primary research interests are in philosophy of science, philosophy of physics, and metaphysics. He has published many articles on these subjects, and one book, The Law-Governed Universe. He loves contra dancing and traditional Cajun dancing (though he keeps these interests out of the classroom).

What is time? Do the past and the future exist, or only the present? Is the “flow of time” an objective feature of reality?

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PHIL 63-001: Mind, Brain, and Consciousness
Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Updated 8/2/2021: Please note that this course is taught via Remote Synchronous instruction
Ram Neta

Ram Neta is Professor of Philosophy at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he has taught since 2003. His research is an effort to understand what it is to be rational, and why rationality matters. In pursuing this broad question, he ends up addressing lots of related questions about the role of knowledge in our decision-making, the ways in which our training informs our experience of the world, and the function of evidence in deliberation. He has published scores of articles on these and related topics in academic journals.

Many features of human consciousness are puzzling. Why are people so ready to believe extraordinary claims on the basis of virtually no evidence whatsoever, but unwilling to accept the reality of well-documented phenomena? Why are people repulsed by some very ordinary biological phenomena but not by others? Why is it that some commonplace events can make some people anxious, while even near-fatal events can leave them unruffled? Why are we so much more willing to eat some things than others? This course will examine psychodynamic theories that attempt to explain these phenomena.

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Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)

PHYS 51-001: The Interplay of Music and Physics
Gen Eds: PL
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Laurie McNeil and Brent Wissick

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her Ph.D. in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. Her seminar grows out of her life as a choral singer (and, earlier, a violinist and recorder player). When not singing with the Choral Society of Durham, she can be found in her laboratory using lasers to study the properties of materials.

Brent Wissick has taught cello, chamber music and early music at UNC-CH since 1982; and performs across the US and abroad. But he has had a life-long interest in how instruments work and how sound is made. He loves encouraging musicians to understand some of these issues, and getting a broad range of science students involved in doing “musical” things. He thinks about physics when practicing the cello or viola da gamba, making CD recordings, rehearsing with ensembles, giving lessons and listening to music in a variety of spaces. He still wakes up every morning excited to make and study music with professional colleagues and undergraduates.

This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. Students who have never studied physics or music theory are welcome to enroll; there are no prerequisites. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects. This class is taught in person and does not accommodate remote learners. This class meets in various locations according to a schedule listed on the class Sakai site.

Students may also register for this course under MUSC 51.001.

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Political Science (POLI)

POLI 57-001: Democratic Governance in Contemporary Latin America
Gen Eds: SS, BN
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Jonathan Hartlyn

Jonathan Hartlyn is the Kenneth J. Reckford Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He grew up in Latin America, in Cuba, Mexico and Peru. He received his B.A. from Clark University, and a M.Phil. and Ph.D. from Yale University. His research and teaching interests focus on the comparative politics of Latin America. He spent several months in Argentina in fall 2017 advancing on his current research on democratic governance in the region. He also has on-going research on constitutional change in Latin America and on the dynamics of executive approval.

He has authored or co-authored dozens of articles and chapters on democratic transitions, gender and politics, migration and political parties, public opinion and institutional trust, and elections and electoral governance. His books include: The Politics of Coalition Rule in Colombia; The Struggle for Democratic Politics in the Dominican Republic; and the co-authored Latin America in the Twenty First Century: Toward a New Socio-Political Matrix. His publications have been translated into Spanish, Portuguese, German and Persian. He has served as an international election observer in the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and Venezuela.

Over the past forty years, Latin America has experienced the most prolonged and extensive period of democratic politics in its history. State power today is accessed through reasonably competitive and fair elections in many countries in the region, in contrast to past patterns of openly authoritarian rule. This democratic shift, though, has often been challenged by serious problems with political representation and the effective inclusion of citizens, and in some cases with more serious setbacks. The way power is practiced by those in power reflects historical continuities and new forms of corruption or other types of abuses of state resources, as well as various forms of populism. With important variations across the region, countries have struggled to respond effectively to the Covid-19 pandemic, and more broadly to provide citizen security, economic development and social inclusion.

In this course, we will explore these issues of democratic governance through a combination of readings, videos, discussion, occasional short lectures, and team-based analyses of selected countries. The course has no pre-requisites and assumes no prior knowledge of Latin America.

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POLI 89-001: What Does It Mean to Be a Good Citizen?
Gen Eds: PH
MWF, 12:20 PM – 01:10 PM
Nora Hanagan

Professor Nora Hanagan studies political ideas. She is particularly interested in the ideas that have animated American politics and history. She also researches different approaches to environmental and food politics. Her book, Democratic Responsibility: The Politics of Many Hands in America, examines whether individuals bear responsibility for harms that are caused by social institutions and processes. She has taught at Duke University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and is excited to be joining UNC this year. When she isn’t chasing her young children around, she likes gardening and hiking. She is also still trying to make a sourdough starter.

What, if any, responsibilities accompany democratic citizenship? Voting? Active participation in political meetings? Obeying laws? Volunteering in one’s community? Preserving natural resources for future generations? Adhering to certain values? Protesting unjust laws? This course offers an overview of the different ways in which Americans have answered these questions.

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POLI 89-002: Revolution: New York City in 1775 & Paris in 1791
Gen Eds: HS
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Matthew Weidenfeld

Dr. Matthew Weidenfeld has a wide range of teaching interests and experience in the history of political theory and in American Politics. Recently, his courses have featured role-immersive, Reacting to the Past Simulations. These consist of elaborate games, set in the past, in which students are assigned roles informed by classic texts in the history of ideas. Class sessions are run entirely by students; though he advises and guides students throughout. The simulations seek to draw students into the past, promote engagement with big ideas, and improve intellectual and academic skills.

Dr. Weidenfeld’s research and scholarship focus on two areas: the teaching and learning of political theory and the political theory of judgment. To pursue his research concerning the efficacy of role-immersive simulations in fostering a growth mindset, he was recently awarded a Growth Mindset Scholar Grant at High Point. His research has been published in several journals, including Political Research Quarterly, The Journal of Political Science Education, Contemporary Political Theory, and The European Journal of Political Theory.

This course is designed to throw students into New York City in 1775 and Paris in 1791 by recreating and engaging with the ideas and arguments of these times. The course will rely on the Reacting to the Past pedagogy. “Reacting to the Past” (RTTP) consists of elaborate games, set in the past, in which students are assigned roles informed by classic texts in the history of ideas. Class sessions are run entirely by students; instructors advise and guide students and grade their oral and written work. It seeks to draw students into the past, promote engagement with big ideas, and improve intellectual and academic skills. The course will be extremely hard work, but should also be intellectually engaging and, to put it simply, a good deal of fun.

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POLI 89-003: Political Issues in Europe Today – ADDED 6/30/2021
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Niklaus Steiner

Niklaus Steiner is a native of Thun, Switzerland, who moved to Chapel Hill with his family when his father became a professor at Carolina. He earned a bachelor’s degree with highest honors in international studies at UNC and a Ph.D. in political science at Northwestern University. He has had the good fortune of moving between cultures his whole life and because of this experience, his teaching and research interests are around immigration, refugees, human rights, nationalism, and citizenship. His textbook, International Migration and Citizenship Today seeks to facilitate classroom discussions on admission and membership in liberal democracies, and he is currently working on a 2nd edition. Before joining the political science department in 2020, he enjoyed working at UNC’s Center for Global Initiatives, the last 15 as the director, and he is especially proud of the work he and many colleagues from across campus did to bring diversity, equity and inclusion into global education at Carolina. When not at work, Niklaus is often cutting or replanting flowers in the garden, walking in the woods with his family or making something up in the kitchen.

Europe is facing numerous complex issues ranging from Brexit and populism to refugees and minority rights. A common thread running through many of its issues is the movement of people across national borders. This class examines an array of issues to explore how they affect, and are affected by, the politics in Europe, which are quite different from the politics in the United States. This class has two goals: 1) to give you a solid understanding of important issues affecting Europe today and comparing them to the U.S. so that you can contribute thoughtfully to discussions about them as a reader, writer and discussant; and 2) to introduce you to the many Europe-related faculty and resources at UNC if you want to explore this world region more deeply. This class encourages students from a wide range of backgrounds, experiences and perspectives to enroll because it benefits significantly from including such diversity.

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POLI 89-004: Political Issues in Europe Today – ADDED 8/6/2021
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTH, 05:00 PM – 06:15 PM
Niklaus Steiner

Niklaus Steiner is a native of Thun, Switzerland, who moved to Chapel Hill with his family when his father became a professor at Carolina. He earned a bachelor’s degree with highest honors in international studies at UNC and a Ph.D. in political science at Northwestern University. He has had the good fortune of moving between cultures his whole life and because of this experience, his teaching and research interests are around immigration, refugees, human rights, nationalism, and citizenship. His textbook, International Migration and Citizenship Today seeks to facilitate classroom discussions on admission and membership in liberal democracies, and he is currently working on a 2nd edition. Before joining the political science department in 2020, he enjoyed working at UNC’s Center for Global Initiatives, the last 15 as the director, and he is especially proud of the work he and many colleagues from across campus did to bring diversity, equity and inclusion into global education at Carolina. When not at work, Niklaus is often cutting or replanting flowers in the garden, walking in the woods with his family or making something up in the kitchen.

Europe is facing numerous complex issues ranging from Brexit and populism to refugees and minority rights. A common thread running through many of its issues is the movement of people across national borders. This class examines an array of issues to explore how they affect, and are affected by, the politics in Europe, which are quite different from the politics in the United States. This class has two goals: 1) to give you a solid understanding of important issues affecting Europe today and comparing them to the U.S. so that you can contribute thoughtfully to discussions about them as a reader, writer and discussant; and 2) to introduce you to the many Europe-related faculty and resources at UNC if you want to explore this world region more deeply. This class encourages students from a wide range of backgrounds, experiences and perspectives to enroll because it benefits significantly from including such diversity.

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Psychology and Neuroscience (NSCI/PYSC)

PSYC 54-001: Families and Children – CANCELLED 5/28/2021
Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 08:00 AM – 09:15 AM
Beth Kurtz-Costes

Beth Kurtz-Costes studies the development of adolescents’ academic motivation with particular attention to race/ethnicity and gender as social identities that shape youth’s experiences, goals, and achievement behaviors.

This course will consider family from a life-course perspective and family influences on child development. Research and theory concerning divorced and step families, single parents, gay and lesbian parents, and family processes that shape children’s development will be examined.

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PSYC 63-001: Use, Misuse, and Addiction to Drugs in the 21st Century
Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Catherine (Kay) Sanford

Catherine (Kay) Sanford, MSPH is a nationally recognized drug overdose prevention advocate and activist. She served as the state’s Injury Epidemiologist in the North Carolina Division of Public Health, identifying in 2002 the state’s incipient epidemic of fatal drug overdoses, primarily due to the misuse of prescription pain medication, and more recently, the rapidly increasing abuse of heroin and fentanyl, methamphetamines and cocaine. For 15 years she has lead and served on multiple overdose prevention task forces to design and evaluate overdose prevention and intervention strategies, design and collect more accurate overdose data, pass public health overdose prevention legislation and teach harm reduction to physicians, patients, law enforcement, criminal justice officers and inmates.

The medical and societal consequences of opioid and other drug use have reached epidemic proportions in the United States. Opioid overdose is now the leading cause of accidental death in the country, and the demographics and characteristics of the epidemic are constantly evolving. The purpose of this first-year student seminar is to understand the culture and physiological effects of beneficial and non-beneficial opioid use that includes pain management, overdose prevention, opioid use disorder, opioid overdose, diversion, legal consequences, harm reduction and treatment. Increased focus will include the rapidly evolving misuse, addiction and fatalities to and from cocaine and methamphetamines. Activities will include pre-class reading and weekly student-lead discussions of these materials; lectures from technical experts; group discussions; written summaries of class material; in-class debates on controversial issues, such as legalizing opioids or abstinence-only vs. medical assisted treatment; experiments on the effects of opioids on the behavior of laboratory rats; and development and presentation of an effective evidence-based opioid misuse and addiction prevention program.

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Public Policy (PLCY)

PLCY 54-001: U.S. Immigration
Gen Eds: SS, US
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Joaquín Rubalcaba

Joaquín Alfredo-Angel Rubalcaba is an assistant professor in the Department of Public Policy at UNC Chapel Hill. Dr. Rubalcaba received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of New Mexico and is an alumnus of the RWJF doctoral fellows program. His areas of interests broadly include health and labor economics. Specifically, he has explored the health and labor market outcomes among underrepresented and disadvantaged communities, while developing new empirical techniques to investigate the economic mechanisms and public policies driving these outcomes.

Currently, Dr. Rubalcaba’s research addresses the role of public policy in the overall socioeconomic wellbeing of immigrant communities. In this line of research, he investigates how policies such as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and the Real ID Act have impacted labor supply behavior and health insurance coverage. In another line of research, Dr. Rubalcaba is exploring new empirical techniques to estimate economic values. This particular research has demonstrated an empirically tractable method to assign economic value to health conditions, such as diabetes, ultimately increasing the economic tools used to inform policy decisions.

This seminar provides students with an opportunity to discuss current topics in United States immigration. Students will explore theories of migration, acculturation and assimilation, and the ways in which policies influence the well-being of immigrants.

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PLCY 61H-001: Policy Entrepreneurship and Public/Private/Non-Profit Partnerships (Honors)
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Daniel Gitterman

Daniel Gitterman is Duncan MacRae ’09 and Rebecca Kyle MacRae Professor and Chair of Public Policy at UNC-Chapel Hill. He also serves as Director of the Honors Seminar in Public Policy and Global Affairs (Washington, DC).

This seminar will define a policy entrepreneur and examine strategies used by policy entrepreneurs to achieve policy change or innovation in the policy making process. This course also aims to explore ways that public, private, and non-profit sectors collaborate to address problems that cannot be solved by one sector alone. There is growing recognition that sustainable solutions to some of the most complex challenges confronting our communities can benefit from these collaborative or “intersector” approaches.

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PLCY 75-001: Debates in Public Policy and Racial Inequality
Gen Eds: SS, CI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Fenaba Addo

Fenaba R. Addo is an associate professor in the department of public policy. Her research agenda consists of three intersecting lines of inquiry: (1 household finances and relationship outcomes; (2 family structure (cohabiting and marital relationships) and well-being; and (3 the role of consumer debt in recreating economic and racial inequality, primarily in the lives of women and children, young adults, and Black and Latinx families. Her work reflects an interest in bridging social demography with economic inequality and producing policy relevant work on marginalized and economically vulnerable populations in the United States. Dr. Addo was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar. She received her Ph.D. in Policy Analysis and Management from Cornell University and holds a B.S. in Economics from Duke University.

It has been over 150 years since the emancipation of black Americans and nearly 60 years since the passage of civil rights legislation, yet they still lag far behind white Americans in virtually every socioeconomic indicator. This course critically examines the causes, consequences of economic inequality and social policies to address these disparities, with a focus on racial disparities. We will examine the merits and limitation of various assumptions aimed at explaining these persistent disparities, explore how economic inequality is affected by race, systemic racism, and socioeconomic factors (education, labor market) and identify evidence-based policy options and proposal for reducing inequality. We will critically examine questions such as why do we need race-based policies in addition to economic based policies to address inequality within our society? Can policies promote wealth-building and also contribute to greater wealth equity? The course content will focus on the U.S. and be heavily weighted towards analyzing contemporary social and economic activity (2000-present).

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PLCY 76H-001: Global Health Policy (Honors)
Gen Eds: GL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Benjamin Meier

Professor Benjamin Meier’s interdisciplinary research—at the intersection of international law, public policy, and global health—examines the human rights norms that underlie global health policy. In teaching UNC courses in Justice in Public Policy, Health & Human Rights, and Global Health Policy, Professor Meier has been awarded the 2011 William C. Friday Award for Excellence in Teaching, the 2013 James M. Johnston Teaching Excellence Award, the 2015 Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Professorship in Undergraduate Teaching, and six straight annual awards for Best Teacher in Public Policy. He received his Ph.D. in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, his J.D. and LL.M. in International and Comparative Law from Cornell Law School, and his B.A. in Biochemistry from Cornell University.

Global health policy impacts the health and well being of individuals and peoples throughout the world. Many determinants of health operate at a global level, and many national policies, social practices, and individual health behaviors are structured by global forces. Concern for the spread of infectious diseases, increasing rates of chronic diseases and the effectiveness of health systems to provide quality care are among the daunting challenges to health policy makers.

With profound social, political and economic changes rapidly challenging global health, the aim of this course in Global Health Policy is to provide students with a variety of opportunities to understand the epidemiologic trends in world health, the institutions of global health governance, and the effects of globalization on global and national health policy.

This course provides an introduction to the relationship between international relations, global health policy and public health outcomes. The focus of this course will be on public policy approaches to global health, employing interdisciplinary methodologies to understand selected public health policies, programs, and interventions. Providing a foundation for responding to global health harms, this course will teach students how to apply policy analysis to a wide range of critical issues in global health determinants, interventions, and impacts.

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PLCY 80-001: Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Economic Growth
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Maryann Feldman

Maryann Feldman is Carolina’s S.K. Heninger Distinguished Professor of Public Policy, adjunct Professor of Finance at Kenan Flagler Business School and Research Fellow at the Kenan Institute for Private Enterprise. She has also taught at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Toronto. She attained her Ph.D. in Economics at Carnegie-Mellon University and is author of more than 80 academic articles, 2 books, and 9 edited volumes. Her work focuses on the spatial distribution of economic activity and understanding the factors that contribute to making certain places economically vibrant and creative. Her most recent work explores place-based economic processes that contribute to emerging industries, entrepreneurship and regional transformation. She is currently researching the industrial genesis of the Research Triangle Region.

The impact of COVID-19 has exacerbated stark inequalities and exposed inadequacies in our society. Conventional economic strategies often focus on stopgap measures aimed at the most conspicuous problems and have failed to create sustainable paths for widespread prosperity. The course develops students’ entrepreneurial mindset to search for new solutions. The class will cover the evolution of economic and political systems in prosperous societies and develop applied projects that empower students to impact their local communities and/or communities within North Carolina. The class focuses on critically connecting the historical context in order to envision resilient systems and solutions to contemporary challenges.

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Religious Studies (RELI)

RELI 64-001: Reintroducing Islam
Gen Eds: PH, BN, GL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Youssef Carter

Youssef Carter is interested in the manner in which religious discourses and movements become oriented in the direction of abolition. At the moment, he is fascinated with how Muslims in the United States and in West Africa interpret their religion as a means of empowerment in the face of oppression, while relying on scripture and prophetic narration to navigate hostile political realities. To that end, he is working on a book called “The Vast Oceans: Remembering God and Self on the Mustafawi Sufi Path” which is a multisite ethnography of a transatlantic spiritual network of African-American and West African Sufis that deploy West African spiritual training to navigate historical-political contexts in the U.S. South and beyond.

An introduction to the Islamic religious tradition, focusing on major themes of Islamic religious thought, bringing out both traditional spirituality and the critical issues confronting Muslims today.

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RELI 73H-001: From Dragons to Pokemon: Animals in Japanese Myth, Folklore, and Religion (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, BN, CI
TTH, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Barbara Ambros

Field of specialization: Religions of Asia Research interests: Religions in early modern through contemporary Japan; gender studies; critical animal studies; place and space; and pilgrimage. Fun fact: she holds a third-degree black belt in Shotokan karate and serves as the faculty advisor for the UNC Shotokan Club.

This seminar examines the cultural construction of animals in Japanese myth, folklore, and religion. We will discuss various kinds of animals: those that occur in the natural world, those that are found in myths and folklore, and those that have appeared in popular media such as animation. We will explore how images of various animals were culturally constructed as tricksters, gods, monsters, or anthropomorphic companions; how animals were ritualized as divine, demonic, or sentient beings in Buddhism, Shinto, and folk religion; and how animals could serve as metaphors that embodied collective ideals or anxieties. Most of our readings will focus on primary and secondary texts from the Japanese tradition (in English), but we will also read theoretical texts on human-animal relationships and historical studies on animals in the larger Asian context. We will also view and analyze several Japanese films, both anime and documentaries, that deal with animals and environmental issues.

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RELI 85-001: Sex, Marriage, and Family in Religion
Gen Eds: PH, GL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Juliane Hammer

Juliane Hammer is an associate professor of Islamic studies in the Department of Religious Studies. She specializes in the study of gender and sexuality in Muslim societies and communities, race and gender in US Muslim communities, as well as contemporary Muslim thought, activism and practice, and Sufism. She is the author of Palestinians Born in Exile: Diaspora and the Search for a Homeland (2005) and American Muslim Women, Religious Authority, and Activism: More Than a Prayer (2012), Peaceful Families: American Muslim Efforts against Domestic Violence (2019), as well as the co-editor of A Jihad for Justice: The Work and Life of Amina Wadud and the Cambridge Companion to American Islam. She is currently working on a book project on patriarchal perspectives on marriage and sexuality in American Muslim communities, and on queer Muslims and religious practice.

This course approaches the central role of discourses about sexual norms, marriage, and family in select religious traditions. It asks how religious traditions have defined and negotiated normative models for marriage and family in their connection to larger theological frameworks and religious source texts.

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RELI 89-001: Lux Libertas: On the Knowledge, Manipulation and Display of Light
Gen Eds: PH, NA
MW, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Todd Ramón Ochoa and Montek Singh

Todd Ramón Ochoa is a cultural anthropologist who does fieldwork with religious communities in Cuba. He is a scholar of religion specializing in how communities tell stories to create unique understandings of the world. In this co-taught course, he will focus on the way light figures in creation stories, and also how philosophy can help us grapple with the distinction between light and dark.

Montek Singh’s general research interests lie in the areas of digital systems, high-performance and low-power digital design, and VLSI CAD. The main focus of his recent work is on asynchronous digital design, and its applications to embedded systems, multimedia, and system-on-a-chip design.

Light has figured centrally in human explanations and manipulations of the natural world: from creation narratives, to the Copernican Revolution, to the theory of relativity, to harvesting energy from sunlight, to shaping light inside phones and screens for the capture and display of images. The goal of this course is to bring students into an intellectual encounter with light, one that will provide a history of human understandings of light, experimental encounters with light in the laboratory, and orientations to theoretical paradigms that have resulted from the human manipulation of light. At its most broad, the course aims to introduce first year students to knowledge and matter-energy as things that we study, handle, and transform.

Course also offered as COMP 89-084

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Romance Studies (ROML)

ROML 89-001: Contagion and Culture: Lessons from Italy
Gen Eds: LA, WB
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Maggie Fritz-Morkin

Maggie Fritz-Morkin studies the literature and culture of medieval Italy. She has published numerous essays on the ethics of visceral language, and is finishing a book on obscenity in the literary works of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio. Her current research interests include the obsession with fraud in late medieval Italy, conflicting theories of debt and obligation, and medieval women’s voices in the articulation of justice.

Set in plague-stricken Florence of 1348, Boccaccio’s Decameron begins with a portrait of social unravelling and civic collapse that is uncannily familiar in our jarring new pandemic reality. What can medieval literature and philosophy tell us about how to live when our knowledge, institutions, and laws falter? Who is at fault when catastrophe strikes? What is the role of art in responding to trauma, in rebuilding society? How does communal suffering compare to private suffering? How are power and privilege revealed, increased, or challenged in a pandemic? How do the narratives we tell about different maladies shape our lives and communities? This course explores Italian responses over the course of seven centuries to these questions, and reflects on how the Italian story continues to shape North American culture.

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ROML 89-002: We Are All Watsons: Crime Fiction from the Portuguese-Speaking World
Gen Eds: LA, BN
MWF, 01:25 PM – 02:15 PM
Chloe Hill

Chloe Hill received her Ph.D. from Brown University where she developed her research on contemporary Brazilian fiction, world literature, and globalization. She is particularly interested in reimagining hegemonic forms of transcultural exchange through twenty-first century literary narratives. Beyond her scholarly research, Hill is also a translator of Brazilian literature with an affinity for genre fiction, such as the detective novel and cli-fi. In her free time, Hill enjoys true crime podcasts, crossword puzzles, and reality TV.

This first year seminar will examine the relationship between literature and society through detective fiction from Portugal, Brazil, and Angola. Why is crime fiction such a popular genre? What does it reveal about crime, punishment and justice? Why are we so enthralled by its depiction of society’s underbelly? In what ways does this kind of literature comment on deviance, morality, and social norms? What does crime fiction tell us about – or how might it subvert – institutional power and national identity?

In this course, students will be introduced to canonical writers from the Portuguese-speaking world and contemporary voices through crime fiction. This course will not only provide an overview of the genre in the Portuguese language but it will also examine how the genre has circulated transatlantically in the Portuguese-speaking world. Beyond the study of fiction, we will also engage with the diverse criminal justice systems of the Lusophone world.

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Sociology (SOCI)

SOCI 58-001: Globalization, Work, and Inequality – CANCELLED 5/28/2021
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Ted Mouw

Ted Mouw is a sociologist who studies social demography, labor markets and inequality. He received his Ph.D. (in sociology) and M.A. (in economics) in 1999 from Michigan. He is currently working on a project on globalization and low-wage labor markets. There are three components to this project: 1) Longitudinal evidence on “dead end jobs” and working poverty in the U.S., 2) immigration and the labor market for Mexican migrants and 3) industrialization and labor conditions in Mexico and Indonesia. He has also researched the use of job contacts to find work and racial friendship segregation in schools. After college he lived in Indonesia for two years, where he taught English, studied Indonesian and Javanese, and climbed volcanoes.

This seminar, which presents a comparative and multidisciplinary perspective on how globalization affects labor markets and inequality, will consist of two parts. First, we will discuss basic sociological and economic models of work and globalization and then students will apply these models to three case studies: 1) “sweatshops” and the question of international labor standards, 2) industrialization and development in China and Indonesia and 3) immigration and economic integration between the U.S. and Mexico. Students will prepare research papers on one of the three case studies. Course readings will be supplemented by the teacher’s current research on two questions: 1) What are conditions actually like for workers in Nike plants in Indonesia? (Interviews and a photo-narrative) and 2) How does the labor market work for undocumented Mexican workers? (Interviews from Carrboro, NC, part of Mouw’s personal research project.)

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SOCI 64-001: Equality of Educational Opportunity Then and Now
Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Karolyn Tyson

Karolyn Tyson is Professor in the Department of Sociology. She earned her doctorate in sociology in 1999 from the University of California at Berkeley. Her main fields of interest are sociology of education, social psychology and social inequality. Dr. Tyson’s publications have examined the processes by which schools reproduce social inequality and how the schooling experience affects students’ attitudes toward school. Her overall program of research centers on understanding how cultural, structural and individual-level factors affect school achievement and contribute to unequal educational outcomes.

The 1954 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka case centered on one of the most significant and controversial issues in American public education: equality of educational opportunity. Now more than 60 years after this historic Supreme Court decision, this seminar will use a sociological lens to examine in depth the social conditions that precipitated the case, other relevant court decisions, the changing definitions of race and the educational landscape over the past 6 decades. Topics include de jure and de facto segregation, busing, between-school segregation, tracking and ability grouping, the black-white achievement gap and residential segregation. Students will read historical and contemporary accounts and research reports on the move and progress toward equality of educational opportunity, view films related to the topic, conduct original research exploring young adults’ educational experiences, perspectives on equality of educational opportunity, and hopes for their future children. Students will prepare an oral presentation and a research paper.

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Other Opportunities (First-Year Launch Courses)

First-Year Launch courses are designed and structured for incoming first-year students with no prior college experience. Students join faculty members who are accomplished teachers in small classes that offer an introduction to a major. This small setting gives students the opportunity to engage actively with their peers and faculty as they learn the foundations of a long-term sequence of study. Students will work together to reveal how scholars pose problems, discover truths, resolve controversies, and evaluate knowledge in a specific field.

BIOL 101-003: First-Year Launch: Principles of Biology
Gen Eds: Students receive PL if they complete BIOL 101; they receive PX if they complete both BIOL 101 and 101L.
TTH, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Jennifer Coble

This course is the prerequisite to most higher courses in biology. An introduction to the fundamental principles of biology, including cell structure, chemistry, and function; genetics; evolution; adaptation; and ecology. (See department concerning Advanced Placement credit.) Three lecture hours a week.

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