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For more information about a specific instructor, please click on the instructor name with an arrow. Please consult ConnectCarolina (https://connectcarolina.unc.edu/) for the most up-to-date information about FYS offerings, meeting times, instructional modes, and availability.

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)
American Studies (AMST)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Art and Art History (ARTH/ARTS)
Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (ASIA)
Biology (BIOL)
City and Regional Planning (PLAN)
Classics (CLAS)
Communication (COMM)
Dramatic Art (DRAM)
English and Comparative Literature (CMPL/ENGL)
Exercise and Sport Sciences (EXSS)
Geography (GEOG)
Geological Sciences (GEOL)
Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)
Global Studies (GLBL)
History (HIST)
Honors (HNRS)
Information and Library Science (INLS)
Marine Sciences (MASC)
Mathematics (MATH)
Music (MUSC)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)
Political Science (POLI)
Psychology and Neuroscience (NSCI/PYSC)
Public Policy (PLCY)
Religious Studies (JWST/RELI)
Romance Studies (ROML)
Sociology (SOCI)
Women’s and Gender Studies (WGST)

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)

AAAD 51-001: Masquerades of Blackness
Gen Eds: VP, US
TTh, 01:15 PM – 02:30 PM
Charlene Regester

Charlene Regester is an Associate Professor in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies and Affiliate Faculty for the Global Cinema Minor. She received her BA, MA, Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is the author of African American Actresses: The Struggle for Visibility, 1900-1960 (which was nominated by the press to the NAACP Image Awards). She is the 2011 recipient of the Trailblazer Award Hayti Heritage Film Festival and 2007 Oscar Micheaux Book and Film Award from the Oscar Micheaux Film Festival, South Dakota. She has appeared on North Carolina Bookwatch with UNC-TV 2011; WUNC-FM Radio “The State of Things;” and Turner Movie Classics. Documentaries in which she has appeared include: Movies of Color: Black Southern Cinema (2003, Tom Thurman director), Beyond Tara: The Extraordinary Life of Hattie McDaniel (2001), Madison Davis Lacy director), and Birth of a Movement (2017, Bestor Cram and Susan Gray directors).

This seminar is designed to investigate how the concept of race has been represented in cinema historically, with a particular focus on representations of race when blackness is masqueraded. Its intent is to launch an investigative inquiry into how African Americans are represented on screen in various time periods, how we as spectators are manipulated by these cinematic constructions of race, and how race is marked or coded other than through visual representation. Students will view films that deal with “passing” from the various historical periods and will utilize theoretical concepts introduced in class to read these visual representations. Films selected for viewing include the pre-World War II Era, the Civil Rights Era, and the “Post-Racial” era. Students will be required to write three papers that reflect their ability to apply theoretical concepts to reading racialized representations on screen in these three historical periods to demonstrate their understanding of how racial masquerades have evolved over time and continue to persist in contemporary culture.

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AAAD 54-001: African Migrations, Boundaries, Displacements, and Belonging
Gen Eds: VP, GL
TTh, 09:45 AM – 11:00 AM
Michael Lambert

Michael Lambert is an Associate Professor of African Studies and Anthropology. His research has principally been in francophone West Africa with a focus on issues related to migration. He has lived for over five years in Senegal and the neighboring nation of Mauritania, where he served as a Peace Corps volunteer, and he has travelled extensively throughout the continent. His first book, Longing for Exile: Migration and the Making of a Translocal Community in Senegal (West Africa) (Heinemann, 2002), explores the cultural and social history of urban migration in a Senegalese community. His most recent book (co-authored), Up from These Hills: Memories of Cherokee Boyhood (Nebraska [Bison Books], 2011), explores American Indian experience in the mid-20th century.

Boundary making, migration, and population displacement have been significant dimensions of the contemporary African experience. How has boundary making, broadly defined (inclusive of national borders, rural-urban distinctions, and ethnic and racial groupings, for example), shaped contemporary Africa? What types of and through what processes were boundaries were created? How did the African people respond to these processes? What population displacements unfolded in the context of this boundary making? And how did the people of Africa make sense of and understand boundary making, migration, and displacement? These are some of the questions we will be examining in this interactive and discussion oriented class. We will build our examination of these issues around six novels written by African authors. These novels will provide insight into the ways by which boundaries, migration, and displacement impacted the everyday lives of the African people.

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American Studies (AMST)

AMST 51-001: Navigating America
Gen Eds: SS, CI, EE- Field Work
MW, 12:20 PM – 01:35 PM
Rachel A. Willis

Rachel A. Willis is a Professor of American Studies and Adjunct Professor of Economics at UNC. She has won numerous awards including the UNC Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, two Student Undergraduate Teaching Awards, and the Robert Sigmon Award for Service Learning. A three-time winner of the Chapman Award, she has been a Senior Fellow at the Global Research Institute and is a Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholar at the Carolina Center for Public Service. Her teaching methods incorporate innovative field study, collaborative assignments and experiential learning through events and programs outside of the classroom. A labor economist interested in global access to work, she has recently focused on the impact of climate change on port communities.

Together we will analyze American journeys and destinations, focusing on how resources, technology, transportation, and cultural influences have transformed the navigation and documentation of America in AMST 51. This seminar is also designed to teach students how to navigate new intellectual terrain and process unfamiliar information from a variety of disciplinary perspectives with an emphasis on discussion, field study, and documentation. Finally, we will also analyze UNC’s terrain, academic structure, and co-curricular offerings. This will be done through synchronous remote instruction in Zoom with required attendance.

This semester we will focus on the Appalachian Trail, the National Park System, the national highway system, UNC’s campus, and individual student journeys. The primary assignment for each student will be to research and plan, implement, and document a physical individual journey through a short presentation and webpage. The journey plan and documentation will be developed in stages and designed in collaboration with the instructor via individual Zoom appointments. Research on destinations will be supported by the UNC Wilson Library Special Collections professional staff through training and assistance in scanning documents and maps. Additionally, a grant from the Center for Faculty Excellence and the University Libraries will enable each student to receive training and complete the development of a digital assignment using Adobe SPARK software to contribute a webpage on their journey to our class website. The Digital Accessibility Office will provide training to make the class website more accessible. Written FORUM reflections most weeks along with the journey plan proposal will satisfy the writing requirement for the seminar and permit students to revise and resubmit their writing throughout the semester.

The training, research, planning, field study, presentation, and webpage development will be a core aspect of the experiential education (EE) and communications intensive (CI) attributes for the seminar even though the course teaching mode is synchronous remote. Offered on Zoom, this FYS will require installing free ADOBE software from UNC and the use of a video camera and shared screen functions in Zoom during our regular class times for interactive small group and individual assignments. Residence in Chapel Hill is NOT required for success in the course, but full attendance and participation via Zoom with a camera every class meeting is required.

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AMST 54-001: The Indians’ New Worlds: Southeastern Histories from 1200 to 1800
Gen Eds: HS, US, WB
TTh, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Margaret Scarry

Margaret Scarry’s fascination with Native American cultures began in high school, when she participated in an archaeological field school on Summer Island, Michigan. She pursued her interest through undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of Michigan, where she earned her Ph.D. in 1986. Though her first archaeological experience was in the Midwest, she soon shifted her interest to the Southeast, where she investigates Native American foodways—the activities and ideas by which people acquire, distribute, prepare, present, consume, and think about food. Much of her research has focused on the Moundville chiefdom, which flourished in Alabama from about A.D. 1100 to 1500. After a number of years in Florida and Kentucky, Scarry joined the anthropology faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill in 1995. Among other things, she teaches courses on archaeology, food and culture, and archaeobotany.

By AD 1200, most Southeastern Indians were farmers who lived in societies ruled by hereditary chiefs. After 1500, encounters between Indians and Europeans changed the lives of all concerned, but the changes took place in, and were shaped by, existing cultures. This seminar uses reading, discussion, and lecture to examine the lives of Southern Indians and to understand how encounters and interaction with European explorers and colonists changed the worlds in which the Indians lived. Students will learn how archaeologists and historians work, both separately and together, to study the past of Native societies. Students will study and analyze archaeological artifacts, Spanish accounts of Southeastern Indians, and other primary materials in class. These activities, along with various role-playing exercises, will directly involve the students in the study of Native people in the period between 1200 and 1800. Grades will be based on class participation, two short papers, participation in a group project, and a final paper related to the group project.

Students may also register for this course under ANTH 54-001.

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AMST 89-001: Food and the Media
Gen Eds: LA, CI, NA
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Kelly Alexander

Kelly Alexander is a visiting professor of Food Studies in the American Studies department. She is a graduate of the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, and holds a PhD in Cultural Anthropology from Duke University. She is the author of Hometown Appetites: The Story of Clementine Paddleford, the Forgotten Food Writer Who Chronicled How America Ate (Random House, 2008) and co-author of the New York Times bestselling barbecue cookbook Smokin’ with Myron Mixon (Ballantine, 2011). She is currently at work on a book about about the politics and ethics of food waste recirculation. Before her work in higher education Alexander was a senior editor at Saveur magazine, where she won a James Beard Journalism Award for her writing. She has written for numerous newspapers and magazines on food, including The New York Times, O: The Oprah Magazine, and The Atlantic Monthly, on subjects ranging from: the value of vintage relish trays; the enduring business model of Hooter’s; the horticultural and botanical triumphs of Michigan cherries; and the cultural significance of Popeye’s fried chicken sandwiches.

From Chrissy Teigen’s Twitter feed to the Travis Scott meal at McDonald’s to politicians on the campaign trail eating ice cream and barbecue, this course examines how food representations establish, question, reinforce, reproduce, and destroy cultural and social assumptions about individuals and communities. Students will examine and critically analyze advertising materials, TV shows, films, cookbooks, social media, magazines, blogs, and videos, among other media, to identify key elements and themes of how those representations are used and what they mean in American culture. We will consider Instagram “gastroporn” in the context of M.F.K. Fisher essays, and the concept of the “Other” in terms of both Edna Lewis and “Ratatouille.” Ultimately, we will connect representations of food to food’s role in shaping popular culture and its impact on contemporary social and political debates.

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Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 54-001: The Indians’ New Worlds: Southeastern Histories from 1200 to 1800
Gen Eds: HS, US, WB
TTh, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Margaret Scarry

Margaret Scarry’s fascination with Native American cultures began in high school, when she participated in an archaeological field school on Summer Island, Michigan. She pursued her interest through undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of Michigan, where she earned her Ph.D. in 1986. Though her first archaeological experience was in the Midwest, she soon shifted her interest to the Southeast, where she investigates Native American foodways—the activities and ideas by which people acquire, distribute, prepare, present, consume, and think about food. Much of her research has focused on the Moundville chiefdom, which flourished in Alabama from about A.D. 1100 to 1500. After a number of years in Florida and Kentucky, Scarry joined the anthropology faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill in 1995. Among other things, she teaches courses on archaeology, food and culture, and archaeobotany.

By AD 1200, most Southeastern Indians were farmers who lived in societies ruled by hereditary chiefs. After 1500, encounters between Indians and Europeans changed the lives of all concerned, but the changes took place in, and were shaped by, existing cultures. This seminar uses reading, discussion, and lecture to examine the lives of Southern Indians and to understand how encounters and interaction with European explorers and colonists changed the worlds in which the Indians lived. Students will learn how archaeologists and historians work, both separately and together, to study the past of Native societies. Students will study and analyze archaeological artifacts, Spanish accounts of Southeastern Indians, and other primary materials in class. These activities, along with various role-playing exercises, will directly involve the students in the study of Native people in the period between 1200 and 1800. Grades will be based on class participation, two short papers, participation in a group project, and a final paper related to the group project.

Students may also register for this course under AMST 54-001.

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ANTH 68-001: Forced Out and Fenced In: Ethnography of Latinx Immigration
Gen Eds: SS, US
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Angela Stuesse

Dr. Angela Stuesse is a cultural anthropologist of Latino and Latin America who studies immigration, race, labor, social movements, and activist research. Her new book, Scratching Out a Living, explores how Latino migration has transformed the U.S. South. Other recent work focuses on the policing, detention, and deportation of Latino communities and on undocumented young people’s access to higher education. She believes in the transformative potential of education, fostering horizontal relationships of shared learning, and creating opportunities for students to problem-solve real world issues. www.AngelaStuesse.com

Undocumented immigration receives considerable media attention in the United States today. But what does it actually mean to be undocumented? How does illegality shape the lived realities of migrants themselves? Through in-depth engagement with five new ethnographies on the topic, this course examines the social, political, and legal challenges faced by undocumented Latino immigrants and their families. Through the lens of legal anthropology, which seeks to understand the relationship between law/policy, social relations, and inequality, students will explore the hazards of unauthorized crossing at the U.S.-Mexico border, processes of and obstacles to legalization, economic and health effects of workplace exploitation, coming-of-age challenges of undocumented youth, and consequences of detention and deportation. The authors of each ethnography will be invited to join us via Skype for an informal Q&A conversation.

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Art and Art History (ARTH/ARTS)

ARTH 52-001: Celts–Druid Culture
Gen Eds: WB
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Dorothy Verkerk

Dorothy Verkerk received her M.A. and Ph.D. from Rutgers University. Her area of specialization is early medieval art, and her research interests include the interplay between images and texts in early medieval manuscripts, particularly the ways in which images interpret the meanings of texts through visual references to extra-textual elements such as popular sermons, liturgical rites, political necessities and catechisms. She has been studying Celts (defined as those who speak/spoke a Celtic language) since 1995, when she first began teaching the course Celtic Art and Cultures. She received a small grant from Chancellor Hooker’s CCI funds to create the web site Celtic Art and Cultures, which has become the “most linked to” at the university. As she developed the course, she shifted the interest from the historical Celts to how “Celts” were an 18th-century construct, specifically the Druid class.

The ancient Druids (the intellectual class) have fascinated writers for centuries, though there is little reliable information about them, opening the door for fanciful theories and exposing the foibles of the so-called experts on Druids. This seminar will begin with what is known about Druids from primary textual sources such as Julius Caesar’s De Bello Gallico. The focus will then shift to early modern and modern authors who created a vast array of Druids that provide insights into the development of British national identities and established ‘alternative’ religions, visual culture and protest movements. The Druids are cast in roles as patriotic, wise and environmentally sensitive, and at other times they are cast as demonic and wicked. The seminar will examine how identities are created.

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ARTH 54H-001: Art, War, and Revolution (Honors)
Gen Eds: VP, NA
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Daniel Sherman

Daniel Sherman received his undergraduate degree from Harvard and his Ph.D. from Yale. He came to UNC in 2008 having taught previously at Rice University and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he was also Director of the Center for 21st Century Studies. A specialist in modern art and French cultural history, he has written and edited several books on art museums, the commemoration of World War I in France, and the fascination with so-called primitive cultures in France after World War II; he is now working on the history of archaeology. As a historian who has taught French studies, art history, and general humanities courses, he is committed to discussion and debate across traditional disciplinary boundaries.  He enjoys travel, photography, baking, and hanging out with his cats.

This course explores the complex relationship between art, war, and conflict.  We will consider the tensions between glorifying war and violence and memorializing their victims, between political justification and moral outrage, between political programs (many of the works being commissioned to legitimate a particular view of war) and the malleability of meaning.  In most weeks, we focus on single or small groups of works, mostly from Europe and the U.S.,  in a variety of media: painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and graphic arts, taking the opportunity to study them in depth while also gaining exposure to a range of interpretive methods and the richness of the historical context. We also look at the ways works of art themselves become the trophies or stakes of conflict.

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ARTS 82-1: Please Save This: Exploring Personal Histories through Visual Language
Gen Eds: VP
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Roxana Pérez-Méndez

Roxana Pérez-Méndez is an Associate Professor and the chair of the department’s Diversity Committee. She specializes in alternative art practices as well as video performance and installation art. In addition to this FYS, she teaches undergraduate sculpture and installation courses. Pérez-Méndez is originally from Puerto Rico and her art often explores her immigrant experience – working to understand someone caught between experiences in Puerto Rico and the United States.

This seminar will investigate the idea of personal histories in visual art. As a seminar class in a studio environment, the course will be organized around several themes that drive artists to create and explore the methods by which they turn this research practice into art. As a catalyst to our own art making and to lending our voice to that of others, we will explore the idea of personal history and memory through readings, as well as looking at contemporary artists whose work functions in an autobiographical framework.

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Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (ASIA)

ASIA 57-001: Dis-Orienting the Orient
Gen Eds: VP, BN
MWF, 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM
Dwayne Dixon

Dwayne Dixon’s ethnographic research is focused on several intersecting issues within a broadly imagined Asia: youth culture, city spaces and urban life, media, and body experiences. These various interests coalesce in his work on Japanese young people situated in Tokyo, especially the lives and practices of skateboarders. As an anthropologist, he emphasizes fieldwork methods of extended engagement with his subjects, including the use of ethnographic video to produce visual documents that coincide with the use of video cameras by the young people themselves. His ongoing research into Asian skateboard culture involves studying the global incorporation of young skateboarders into the Olympic structure in preparation for the 2020 Tokyo Summer Games where skateboarding will be included for the first time. Additionally, he is doing research on guns as a prosthetic; investigating the ways training and imagination construct an embodied relationship between the physical perception of perpetual threat as it relates to the immediate environment and the unknown. This research is informed by changes in small arms use and the narratives around them since the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq reshaped the global arms trade and the specific American experience of conflict in Western Asia.

Examines how the East is constructed as the Orient in different historical periods: 19th-century European colonialism, 1950s to 1960s Hollywood films, contemporary Japanese animation, and the current global war on terrorism.

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ASIA 60-001: Israeli Culture and Society: Collective Memories and Fragmented Identities
Gen Eds: BN
TTh, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Yaron Shemer

Yaron Shemer was born in Jerusalem, Israel. He is a Levine/Sklut Fellow in Jewish Studies and an associate professor of Israeli Culture and Modern Hebrew in the Department of Asian Studies. He earned his degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Film & Television from Tel Aviv University in 1983 and then worked as an assistant director at the Israeli Educational Television in Tel Aviv. He earned his M.A. and Ph.D. in Film Studies from the University of Texas at Austin. From 1991 to 2008 he taught at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Shemer’s current research interests include Jewish and Islamic terrorism in Middle Eastern and North African cinema, and the Jew in Arab cinema. Dr. Shemer is the author of “Identity, Place, and Subversion in Contemporary Mizrahi Cinema in Israel” (U. of Michigan Press, 2013).

This seminar is oriented toward students who are interested in learning about the culture and society of modern Israel. Specifically, we will examine the transformative power of the early Zionist discourse in the formation of the new State of Israel and the challenges to this discourse in years that followed. Consequently, the emphasis in this class will be on the cultural and social manifestation of the tensions between the creeds of “one nation” and “the melting pot” on the one hand, and the reiteration of ethnic, gender, and religious identities on the other. The first five sessions will provide contextual and background accounts for later discussions. Then, until the middle of the semester, the seminar will focus on various arenas of Israeli culture, past and present. The second part of the semester will be devoted to selected themes and case studies pertinent to culture and society in modern Israel.

Students may also register for this course under JWST 60-001.

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ASIA 89-002: Imagining Palestine
Gen Eds: LA, BN
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Nadia Yaqub

Nadia Yaqub’s research has treated Arab cultural texts ranging from medieval literature and contemporary oral poetry to modern prose fiction and visual culture. Most recently she has focused on Palestinian literature and visual culture. Her current work has focused on two distinct areas: 1) Palestinian cinema and 2) women and transgression in the Arab World. Her most recent books are Palestinian Cinema in the Days of Revolution (2018, University of Texas Press) and Bad Girls of the Arab World (2017, University of Texas Press), a collection she coedited with Dr. Rula Quawas from the University of Jordan.

This course explores the idea of Palestine as it is presented in Palestinian writings, films, and other creative works. We will study what Palestine is for the Palestinians, none of whom have lived in a Palestinian state and many of whom have spent more time in exile than in the land that has been known historically as Palestine; how Palestinian relationships to and expectations of Palestine may have changed over time; and how Palestinian portrayals of their dreamed-of homeland have affected our own perceptions of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and the Arab world generally. How have Palestinian art, film, and literature helped to shape Palestinian identities and aspirations in different ways over the course of modern Palestinian history? In what ways have art, film, and literature intersected with Palestinian politics and a sense of political and personal agency?

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Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 53-001: Biotechnology: Genetically Modified Foods to the Sequence of the Human Genome
Gen Eds: PL
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Jill Dowen

Jill Dowen, PhD, is a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Integrative Program in Biological and Genome Sciences, and an Assistant Professor in the Biochemistry and Biophysics Department and the Biology Department at UNC-Chapel Hill. Dr. Dowen’s lab is investigating the function of DNA loops involving genes and their regulatory elements. Projects in her lab address how genome organization impacts the expression of genes in different cell types during development and how disruptions in these mechanisms lead to human diseases such as cancers and developmental syndromes.

A good life depends on access to adequate food and medical care. Advances in biotechnology have made possible both agriculture and medicine, and further advances may allow us to feed and keep healthy a burgeoning population in both developed and undeveloped countries. This seminar will examine the science behind a number of striking recent advances in biology, including animal cloning, genetic engineering of crop plants, development of new therapeutic drugs, development of embryonic stem cells, and deciphering of the complete human genome sequence. Students will debate how specific technological advances force us to confront new social and ethical choices, such as whether you want your own genome to be sequenced. We will also consider how new technologies are actually implemented, especially in regard to recent public health challenges such as Zika and SARS-CoV-2 viruses.  The seminar should bring together the humanistic and technical impulses in students, and is open to students planning careers in scientific or humanities fields.

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BIOL 89-001: Good Genes
Gen Eds: PL
TTh, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Lillian Zwemer

Dr. Lillian Zwemer is new to UNC, but an old hand at the intersection of science and society. She did her dissertation and postdoctoral research in genomics, interwoven with participation in various interest groups for science policy, public communication, and medical ethics. Dr. Zwemer loves teaching so much that she no longer does research, but still enjoys bringing discussions of cutting-edge technology, ongoing research, and real-world applications into the classroom. She is known for her enthusiasm and relatability as well as her passion for relating Biology to the fundamentals of the human experience.

Reproduction, or passing on one’s genes, is both the most ancient feature of life on earth and the continued focus of cutting-edge medical technology. This course examines our biological imperative and cultural quest to make babies. The syllabus leverages Biology’s interdisciplinary scope, integrating bioethics, reproductive law and medicine, behavioral economics, genetic engineering, disability studies, and gender studies as we examine the biological particulars of creating life. A mixture of teaching methods will be employed, including traditional lectures, in-class discussions, group work, peer-to-peer teaching, and flipped-classroom online learning.

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City and Regional Planning (PLAN)

PLAN 58-001: Globalization and the Transformation of Local Economies
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTh, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Meenu Tewari

Meenu Tewari teaches economic development and regional planning in the department of City and Regional Planning. Her interest in studying issues of poverty and development grew out of observing the paradoxes of growth and innovation and resilience that are simultaneously mixed in with deprivation, want and need in industrializing countries like India where she grew up. This led her to study economic and international development at M.I.T, where she earned her Master’s and Doctoral degrees before joining the faculty at UNC. She works on issues of comparative economic and industrial development, the political economy of poverty, small firms, public sector reform and the informal sector. Her work has been published in several journals, and she has served as research consultant for several international organizations including, the Inter-American Development Bank, the International Labor Organization, UNIDO and the World Bank.

Walk down Franklin Street or into any Wal-Mart store and you will enter into the international economy of the 21st century. These days it is hard to go far without encountering someone or something that is part of a global network of production, trade, and consumption. This seminar examines how globalization impacts economic, political, social and spatial structures of regional and local landscapes. This year we will examine the most vivid symbol of globalization—the Covid-19 pandemic that has swept around the globe and turned life on its head, virtually halting the world as we knew it, in its tracks. Through contemporary writing, news, film, documentaries, readings and popular accounts (blogs) we will examine how the pandemic has impacted cities across a number of dimensions:  food security, health, transportation, the economy, housing (especially for the poor and the homeless), inequity, vulnerability and human dignity.  Together, through blogs, cases and projects we will examine what pathways to resilient post-pandemic recoveries look like, for cities and our communities.

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Classics (CLAS)

CLAS 51H-001: Greek Drama from Page to Stage (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, CI, WB
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Al Duncan

Al Duncan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics. He holds a B.A. in English and Classical Languages & Literature from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in Classics and the Humanities from Stanford University. Having previously taught in Classics and Comparative Literature at the University at Utah, he joined the Carolina faculty in 2015 and offers a variety of courses on ancient Greek language and literature and ancient Mediterranean culture. Professor Duncan’s research focuses on theatrical production, aesthetics, and genre. He is currently preparing a book on ugliness in Greek drama, as well as several chapters and articles on the material and cognitive aspects of ancient theater.

Taking a participatory approach to ancient Greek drama, this course pairs readings of three Athenian playwrights (Aeschylus, Euripides, and Aristophanes) with performance-oriented activities, readings, and writings. At its most traditional, this course surveys the historical and cultural context of the so-called “classical” Athens of the fifth-century BCE, placing particular focus on the political, religious, and aesthetic forces that gave rise to humankind’s first recorded theater.

More ambitiously, however, this course probes the dual nature of theater — its distinct but intertwined existences as script and performance — through sustained investigations of some of its earliest and most influential texts. In years past, this course placed emphasis on collaborative performance, but of course live theater has being profoundly disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. New modes and models of performance are emerging, and this course will embrace digital collaboration and creativity through projects such as radio dramas/podcasts, TikTok-style video submissions, and the like. Together we will explore how we can best bring these ancient works to life so that they may have a positive impact on our world.

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CLAS 57-001: Dead and Deadly Women: Greek Tragic Heroines from Aeschylus to Eliot
Gen Eds: LA, NA
Sharon James

Professor Sharon James specializes in Roman comedy, Latin poetry, and women in ancient Greece and Rome. She has published many articles on these subjects, as well as a book on Roman love elegy (published in 2003); she is currently preparing a large-scale book on women in Greek and Roman New Comedy (the plays of Menander, Plautus, and Terence). She is also the co-editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Women in the Ancient World (published 2012). Professor James regularly teaches all these subjects at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Her lecture courses, CLAS/WMST 240/240H (Women in Ancient Greece) and CLAS/WMST 241/241H (Women in Ancient Rome) are cross-listed between Classics and Women’s Studies. In summer 2012 she co-directed an NEH Institute on the performance of Roman comedy. She has two very lively dogs who keep her busy at home. In 2013, she won the University’s William C. Friday/Class of 1986 Award for Excellence in Inspirational Teaching.

In this course, we will study the great tragic heroines of ancient Greek drama, focusing on Clytemnestra, Medea, Alcestis, Phaedra, the Trojan Women, Antigone. We will also read a contemporary novel, by Fay Weldon, that engages many of these mythic women. We will studythe Greek tragedies intensively, along with their reception in later art, from paintings to poems, stage productions to sculptures, operas to ballets. Our questions will include: why does Greek tragedy focus so intensely on women? Are the playwrights misogynists or do they express some sympathy for women? What about these female characters grabbed the imaginations not only of ancient Greek playwrights but of later writers, painters, composers, not to mention readers? How are their stories relevant to the 21st century? Did the ancient Athenians know something we don’t?

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Communication (COMM)

COMM 63-001: The Creative Process in Performance
Gen Eds: VP, CI, US
MW, 01:25 PM – 02:40 PM
Joseph Megel

Joseph Megel has spent the last 20 years focusing on the direction and development of new works, for theatre, film and video. Mr. Megel is a member of SSDC (Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers), Co-Artistic Director of StreetSigns Center for Literature and Performance in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and an Associate Artist for The Working Theatre in New York. He holds the M.F.A. degree from the Peter Stark Motion Picture Producing Program at the University of Southern California, a Master of Arts from the University of Cincinnati’s College Conservatory of Music and a B.S. in Speech from Northwestern University. He served for six years as Artistic Director of Playwrights Theatre of New Jersey, a new play development theatre, and continues to serve as Co-Executive Producer of Harland’s Creek Productions, producer of New York premieres of new plays, developmental producer of screenplays, readings and films.

Students in this seminar will attend and study the production process of multimedia, music, dance and theater performances on campus and on-line. The Process Series of the Performance Studies program in the Department of Communication Studies, Playmakers, Carolina Performing Arts, and others across campus and additional on-line performance. We will discuss how performance as it was experienced (pre-Covid) and as it currently experienced. We will examine performance through multiple lenses, from Aristotle’s Poetics, Peter Brooks’s Empty Space, up to current writing from Performance Studies scholars. We will explore the ways that performances engage us, communicating powerful ideas and emotions through their various media of expression. Students will research performance pieces, interview the performers, attend rehearsals and performances, and write essays that combine their own experiences of the performances with class readings. Students will also create their own performance pieces as they observe the relationship of preparation and practice to the spontaneity and surprise of performance.

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COMM 82-01: Food Politics from an Organizational Communication Perspective
Gen Eds: SS, CI, EE- Service Learning
TTh, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Sarah Dempsey

Sarah Dempsey is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication. Her research focuses on critical theories of work and professional life and the politics of voice, representation, and accountability in social change efforts. Her most recent research examines cultural discourses about work and labor in the context of the food industry. She is currently engaged in a book length project drawing on archival research, critical analysis of popular discourses and corporate practices, and interviews with contemporary food service workers, organizers, and living wage and fair wage advocates and business owners.

The globalization of food systems is both a hotly contested subject and a central part of contemporary life. This course provides an applied introduction to key debates by adopting a critical organizational communication lens on our globalized food system. Drawing on readings, popular media texts, discussions, and experiential activities, we will explore food system labor practices, the role of multinational companies and global commodity chains, the status of hunger and food deserts, the role of food marketing and consumption practices, and the growth of local and sustainable movements devoted to food justice. Throughout, we investigate how our global food system is shaped by different types of organizations operating within particular locales, such as North Carolina, USA.

This is an APPLES-designated service-learning course that requires service hours. In addition to experiential field activities and visits, our course is organized around group-based engaged research projects. Your success will depend upon your ability to work independently and practice collective leadership. This project will increase your research and writing skills, sharpen your leadership and collaborative skills, and provide you with applied insight into the themes of the course.

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COMM 89-001: Environmental Communication and the Media
Gen Eds: SS, GL
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
David Monje

Dr. David Monje’s research and teaching interests are in the environment, art, aesthetics and politics. He has travelled widely pursuing these interests and brings a broad perspective to the class. His interdisciplinary approach to teaching is informed by his education: he has BFA in painting, a BA in Linguistics, an MA in Communication and Society, and Ph.D. in Cultural Studies and Communication.

This seminar introduces first year students to the ways in which climate science, ecology and environmental science and climate change intersect with and are represented in politics, cultural artifacts, and the media. From television news, newspapers, and radio to social media such as Facebook and Twitter, climate change is a political, social, and cultural phenomenon. Climate change and global warming are also potentially consequential natural phenomena that scientists study, write about, and theorize about.

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Dramatic Art (DRAM)

DRAM 87H-001: Style: A Mode of Expression (Honors)
Gen Eds: VP, CI, NA
MW, 11:15 AM – 12:45 PM
McKay Coble

McKay Coble teaches design, both scenic and costume for the theatre and the history of material culture. She fell in love with the power of choice as far as visuals are concerned early in her career as a Carolina student and have never turned back. She is a professor in the Department of Dramatic Art and is a resident designer for PlayMakers Repertory Company. Dr. Coble uses the many and varied artistic venues on campus as co-instructors and the class will be visiting them during the course of the semester. Students will likely join her on a design journey as she created the scenery for a production for PRC. Students will have the opportunity to see the process and product.

This seminar studies the elements of design in their pure form and in context, surveys a history of period styles and theatre, and identifies their causes.

Consider Oscar Wilde’s statement from The Decay of Living 1889:

“Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life. This results not merely from Life’s imitative instincts, but from the fact that the self conscious aim of Life is to find expression, and that Art offers it certain beautiful forms through which it may realize that energy…”

Do you agree or disagree?

Art and design have frequently shown the inner life of humankind throughout history better than political, intellectual or social history. While a period’s style is seldom defined by the everyday choices of everyday people and is most often recorded in the works of artists, writers and intellectuals we must recognize the “times” as a major motivator for all stylistic choices. Even minor arts reflect major events.

We will study the elements of design as they exist in their pure form; a “tool box” of elements available to artists and practice the principles to which design is bound.

We will survey a history of period styles, period theatre and identify their causes.

We will explore one period’s style as a foundation for the next and dispel the Star Trek premise that future styles will only reflect the future.

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English and Comparative Literature (CMPL/ENGL)

CMPL 89-001: Curiosity and the Birth of the Imagination
Gen Eds: LA, WB
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Marsha S. Collins

Marsha S. Collins is a Professor of Comparative Literature.  Her research focuses on Early Modern Spanish Literature and Culture in the context of Early Modern Europe, Literature and the Visual Arts, and Idealizing Forms of Literature. She is the author of three books, over thirty articles, and is currently writing a book on friendship and community in Cervantes’s Don Quixote. She loves dogs, yoga, piano, travel, being at the ocean, and spending time with family and friends.

Today we tend to see curiosity and imagination as two peas in a very positive pod. Yet, although they have often been linked together, neither curiosity nor the imagination has always been viewed in such a favorable light. Pandora’s curiosity supposedly unleashed all ills and calamities upon the world. In the sixteenth century, Michel de Montaigne famously called the imagination a “runaway horse” and asserted that the imagination brings fevers and death to those who give it a free hand and encourage it. How did we get from Pandora’s calamitous curiosity and Montaigne’s death-dealing imagination to Epcot Center’s gleeful celebration of curiosity and the imagination? In this course, we will seek answers to this question by looking back in time to the thought and literature of classical antiquity and Early Modern Europe–to writings by Plato, Lucian, Cervantes, Shakespeare, and others.

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ENGL 53-001: Slavery and Freedom in African American Literature and Film
Gen Eds: LA, US
MWF, 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM
Danielle Christmas

Danielle Christmas is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC. She holds a B.A. in English from Washington University in St. Louis and a Ph.D. in English from University of Illinois at Chicago. Her current manuscript, “Auschwitz and the Plantation: Labor, Sex, and Death in American Holocaust and Slavery Fiction,” concerns how representations of slavery and the Holocaust contribute to American socioeconomic discourses. She has received a number of national awards to support this research, including a Cummings Foundation Fellowship at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and a Mellon / ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship. Deeply interested in comparative frameworks, Danielle co-convened an international conference through Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia in July 2014 entitled, “The Future of the Past: Representing the Holocaust, Genocide, and Mass Trauma in the 21st Century” and she is proud to have been included in the USHMM’s interdisciplinary symposium of scholars working on genocide and literature. Most recently, her articles have appeared in Twentieth-Century Literature (2015) and Aftermath: Genocide, Memory, and History (Monash University, 2015). When she’s not working, Danielle’s taking a Nia class, drinking wine, playing a board game, or attempting to knit. You can find out more about Danielle’s work at her website, www.daniellechristmas.com.

The seminar’s purpose is to explore the African American slave narrative tradition from its 19th-century origins in autobiography to its present manifestations in prize-winning fiction and film.

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ENGL 59-001: Black Masculinity and Femininity
Gen Eds: LA, CI, US
MWF, 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM
Tyree Daye

Tyree Daye is a poet from Youngsville, North Carolina. He is the author of two poetry collections River Hymns 2017 APR/Honickman First Book Prize winner and Cardinal forthcoming from Copper Canyon Press 2020. Daye is a 2017 Ruth Lilly Finalist and Cave Canem fellow. Daye’s work has been published in Prairie Schooner, New York Times, and Nashville Review. Daye won the 2019 Palm Beach Poetry Festival Langston Hughes Fellowship, 2019 Diana and Simon Raab Writer-In-Residence at UC Santa Barbara, and is a 2019 Kate Tufts Finalist. Daye most recently was awarded a 2019 Whiting Writers Award.

This first year seminar will use literature, film, and popular culture to explore different expressions of masculinity and femininity in the African American and Black diasporic context. Students will evaluate how artists use gender and sexuality for social critique and artistic innovation.

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ENGL 71H-001: Doctors and Patients (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Kym Weed-Buzinski

Kym Weed-Buzinski is a Teaching Assistant Professor in English & Comparative Literature and the Co-Director of the HHIVE Lab and Associate Director the MA program in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. She earned her PhD from UNC and recently returned to Chapel Hill via Vanderbilt University’s Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Her research focuses on the intersection of science and literature in late-nineteenth-century American literature and culture as well as historical and contemporary understandings of illness, health, disability, and embodiment. She teaches courses in health humanities, disability studies, American literature, and writing.

When medical anthropologist Arthur Kleinman writes that “illness has meaning,” he reminds us that the human experience of being sick involves more than bodily symptoms. Moreover, the effects of illness and disability are rarely confined to one person. In this course, we will analyze a diverse collection of writers who have taken as their topic the human struggle to make sense of suffering and debility through a range of genres including fiction, non-fiction, graphic memoir, podcasts, and oral histories.

Divided into five units, the course will allow us to explore not just the medical, but also the personal, ethical, cultural, and political facets of illness from the perspectives of patients, healers, and families. Central texts will include /Ask Me About My Uterus/ by Abby Norman, /Black Man in a White Coat/ by Damon Tweedy, /Mom’s Cancer/ by Brian Fies and /The Farewell/ directed by Lulu Wang. Additionally, students will utilize the growing archive of oral histories from the Stories to Save Lives project to learn more about the experiences of patients, healers, and families from across North Carolina.

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ENGL 89-002: American Poetry in Motion
Gen Eds: LA, EE-Mentored Research
TTh, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Eliza Richards

Eliza Richards is Professor of English, with a concentration in American literature before 1900 and American poetry. She has written about Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, poetry of the US Civil War, and popular women’s poetry. Professor Richards has won awards for teaching on both the graduate and undergraduate level.

This course focuses on the creative processes involved in writing poetry. We will look at poets’ revisions of their work, their statements about poetry, their letters to and from other writers, and the publication and reception of their poems in their own time. We will concentrate on specific case studies: the manuscripts and letter-poems of the reclusive writer Emily Dickinson; the notebooks, letters, and poems of Walt Whitman that he wrote while tending the wounded in the Civil War hospitals; the poems, manuscripts, and letters of George Moses Horton, who taught himself to read and write and published two books of poetry while enslaved in North Carolina; and the drafts, revisions, and animal drawings of twentieth-century modernist Marianne Moore. The course seeks to develop close reading skills that are crucial for interpreting poetry; to explore how social and cultural conditions both limit and enable poetic expression, and how poets analyze and criticize those conditions; to strengthen writing and oral communication skills; and to develop research skills.

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ENGL 89H-001: Beauty Like a Tightened Bow: Modernist Philosophies of Art (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, CI, NA
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
David A. Ross

Dr. David A. Ross is a graduate of Yale and Oxford. He has been a member of the Department of English & Comparative Literature at UNC–Chapel Hill since 2002. He is the author of A Critical Companion to William Butler Yeats (2009) and the co-editor/co-translator of The Search for the Avant-Garde, 1946–1969 (2012), the descriptive catalogue of the Taipei Fine Arts Museum. A collector and dilettante scholar of traditional Chinese painting, he has served as president of Southeast Conference of the Association for Asian Studies and as both editor and book review editor of the Southeast Review of Asian Studies.

This course explores the metaphysics and cultural logic of “modernism,” the dominant international tendency in the arts from roughly the 1880s to the 1930s, though most closely associated with the 1910s and 1920s. We will define modernism; become conversant with its canon; acclimate to its sometimes disconcerting and even bizarre techniques; assess its representation of the artist; and ponder its philosophies of art. Coursework will include major works of literature as well as discussion of the era’s avant-garde art movements: the Arts and Crafts Movement, Art Nouveau, Cubism, the Vienna Secession, Futurism, Vorticism, the Bauhaus, Dada, Surrealism, Bloomsbury, Jazz, Art Deco.

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Exercise and Sport Sciences (EXSS)

EXSS 89-001: Sport Engineering and Human Performance: Where is the limit?
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Meredith Petschauer

Meredith Petschauer received her PhD from the University of North Carolina-Greensboro in Biomechanics, Master’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Athletic Training and bachelor’s degree from The College of Wooster. She teaches Biomechanics, Advanced Orthopedic Assessment and Functional Anatomy. She is the Director of Undergraduate Studies for EXSS and serves as the Athletic Trainer for the Women’s Volleyball team. Her clinical focus is what lead her into biomechanics and human performance. Her research interest includes emergency care of the equipment laden athlete. She and her husband, Greg have two children, Madison and Grant.

This first year seminar designed to discuss the limits of human performance and equipment that is engineered to enhance performance. How fast is it possible to run or swim? Will Olympic records continue to be broken? When do we reach our full athletic potential? This course is designed to challenge your thinking about performance using the science that governs biomechanics and human physiology as well as exploring the data that drives equipment development.

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Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 50-001: Mountain Environments
Gen Eds: PL
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Aaron Moody

Aaron Moody’s work is rooted in theory, concepts, and methods from ecology, biogeography, remote sensing and spatial analysis. Although his research has been rather broad, in the systems studied, approaches taken, and questions asked, there are several dominant themes. At the most basic level, he studies interactions between biological and physical systems, with particular emphasis on how these dynamics produce geographic patterns and temporal dynamics in the biosphere. Typically, Dr. Moody pursues his work using some combination of field data, remote sensing and other spatial data, environmental models, and quantitative analysis. Within this general context, he has focused his research on plant-water relations in California chaparral, ecosystem response to climate variability, patterns and causes of biodiversity, and habitat conservation. His research has spanned spatial scales from intercellular to global, but he gravitates towards what might be called “landscape” to “regional” scales.

This seminar focuses on understanding the physical geography of mountain environments and the processes that have created them, shaped them, and sustained them. There are several reasons for studying the environments of mountains: (a) they reveal integrative earth systems processes that can be readily observed and understood; (b) the processes are not oversimplified, but have spatial complexity at scales that can be methodically analyzed; and (c) mountains often reveal the intricate dynamics of coupled human-natural systems. We will explore mountain environments by concentrating on processes that shape the landscape, patterns that are apparent because of those active processes, and how the concept of scale (both through space and time) define the patterns that we observe when go on a hike or when we drive across the country. We will draw examples from different environments, including the Appalachian Mountains, the Rocky Mountains, and the Andes.

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GEOG 50H-001: Mountain Environments (Honors)
Gen Eds: PL
MWF, 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM
Diego Riveros-Iregui

Diego Riveros-Iregui is a Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Professor in the Department of Geography at UNC-Chapel Hill. He received his B.S. in geosciences from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia (1999), M.S. in geology from the University of Minnesota (2004), and Ph.D. in ecology and environmental sciences from Montana State University (2008). He was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Colorado Boulder (2008-2010) and an assistant professor at the University of Nebraska (2010-2013) before relocating to UNC (2013-present). His research interests include watershed science, forest and soil processes, ecosystem ecology, and human-environment interactions. Currently, his field studies include rural and urban watersheds of the North Carolina Piedmont, high-altitude watersheds in the Andes Mountains, and human-impacted highlands of the Galapagos Islands. Riveros-Iregui teaches courses on watershed science, mountain geography, and Earth’s systems, and has regularly taught a field course on tropical ecohydrology in Ecuador. He is recipient of the J. Carlyle Sitterson Award for Teaching First-Year Students, and the National Science Foundation Early Career Award. He is an avid runner and can be followed on Twitter @carbonshed.

Mountains cover one quarter of the Earth’s land surface and represent the home to one quarter of the human population. This first-year, honors seminar examines the physical and human geography of mountain environments and the processes that have created them, shaped them, and sustained them over time scales from minutes to millions of years. The course is divided into three parts. The first part focuses on the extraordinary life of German geographer Alexander von Humboldt and his five-year expedition to the Andes Mountains where he observed and described nature as we understand it today: an interconnected global force with similarities and differences across the world that are subject to human-induced change. The second part explores mountain processes that shape the landscape and create patterns that are apparent to us today. The third part examines the concept of scale in space and time, and evaluates examples from the latest peer-reviewed literature and popular media. Students should expect to read – and be prepared to discuss – an average of three readings per week, ranging from technical articles to newspaper reports. Throughout the semester, students will gain familiarity and confidence leading in-class discussions, nurturing critical thinking skills that extend well beyond mountain environments.

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GEOG 52-001: Political Ecology of Health and Disease
Gen Eds: SS, CI, GL
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Michael Emch

Michael Emch is W.R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Geography and Epidemiology at UNC. His expertise is in infectious disease ecology, spatial epidemiology, neighborhood determinants of health, and geographic information science applications of public health. He leads the Spatial Health Research Group which conducts research that explores spatio-temporal patterns of disease, primarily infectious diseases of the developing world. His research group focuses on diverse topics such as the role of population-environment drivers in pathogen evolution, how social connectivity contributes to disease incidence, and using environmental indicators to predict disease outbreaks. For more information see the Spatial Health Research Group website at spatialhealth.web.unc.edu/.

This course examines the ecology of infectious diseases including environmental and anthropogenic drivers of those diseases. During the semester we will focus on several case studies of diseases including COVID-19, malaria, cholera, and HIV/AIDS. The biophysical and evolutionary drivers of diseases will be examined as well as the political, economic, social, and environmental systems that shape health and disease across spatial and temporal scales. A political ecological framework is used to examine such topics as how political forces and economic interests helped shape the HIV/AIDS and malaria pandemics in Africa and beyond. We will also examine how emerging infectious diseases such as COVID-19 diffuse through populations and how public health efforts and geographical and epidemiological modelling and analyses can be used to predict and limit their spread.

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GEOG 52-002: Political Ecology of Health and Disease– ADDED 12/14/2020
Gen Eds: SS, CI, GL
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Michael Emch

Michael Emch is W.R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Geography and Epidemiology at UNC. His expertise is in infectious disease ecology, spatial epidemiology, neighborhood determinants of health, and geographic information science applications of public health. He leads the Spatial Health Research Group which conducts research that explores spatio-temporal patterns of disease, primarily infectious diseases of the developing world. His research group focuses on diverse topics such as the role of population-environment drivers in pathogen evolution, how social connectivity contributes to disease incidence, and using environmental indicators to predict disease outbreaks. For more information see the Spatial Health Research Group website at spatialhealth.web.unc.edu/.

This course examines the ecology of infectious diseases including environmental and anthropogenic drivers of those diseases. During the semester we will focus on several case studies of diseases including COVID-19, malaria, cholera, and HIV/AIDS. The biophysical and evolutionary drivers of diseases will be examined as well as the political, economic, social, and environmental systems that shape health and disease across spatial and temporal scales. A political ecological framework is used to examine such topics as how political forces and economic interests helped shape the HIV/AIDS and malaria pandemics in Africa and beyond. We will also examine how emerging infectious diseases such as COVID-19 diffuse through populations and how public health efforts and geographical and epidemiological modelling and analyses can be used to predict and limit their spread.

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GEOG 58-001: Making Myth-Leading Memories: Landscapes of Remembrance– ADDED 12/14/2020
Gen Ed: SS
MWF, 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM
Jonathan Lepofsky

This course considers memorial landscapes created to reinforce values symbolized by the person, group, or event memorialized. It looks at how disagreements and cultural changes affect memorial landscape interpretation.

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Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)

GSLL 55-001: Fantasies of Rome: Gladiators, Senators, Soothsayers, and Caesars
Gen Eds: HS, CI, WB
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Clayton Koelb

Clayton Koelb is Guy B. Johnson Distinguished Professor of German and Professor of English and Comparative Literature. Before coming to Carolina he was Professor of German and Comparative Literature at the University of Chicago, and he has been visiting Professor at Purdue, Minnesota, and Princeton. He has published many books on literary history and literary theory, including two that are especially relevant to this course: The Incredulous Reader, which deals with the issue of why we like stories we might not believe; and Legendary Figures, which examines the depiction of ancient history in modern novels.

Introduces students to study of humanities by examining how the idea of Rome evolved through poetry, history, philosophy, opera, even forgery into a concept that has long outlasted the Romans. Previously offered as GERM 55.

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GSLL 56-001: Germans, Jews, and the History of Anti-Semitism
Gen Eds: HS, CI, NA
MW, 03:35 PM – 04:50 PM
Adi Nester

Adi Nester received her Ph.D. in German Studies from the University of Colorado Boulder and holds additional degrees in Musicology and Piano Performance from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and the University of Southern California. She joined the department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures at UNC in fall 2020. Adi’s research focuses on German-Jewish Studies and the intersection of literature, music, theology, and politics in the cultures and traditions of German-speaking countries.

This seminar offers first-year students an introduction to the German-Jewish experience and the history of anti-semitism in Germany, from early modernity to the present day. Students in this seminar will learn to analyze a variety of texts (both literary and philosophical), musical works, and films in relation to the history of Jews in German-speaking countries, and will be able to apply their knowledge to their analysis of present-day manifestations of antisemitism and xenophobia in Germany. The course has no requisites and presumes no prior knowledge of the subject matter.

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GSLL 75-001: The Book of Books: Literature and the Bible
Gen Eds: LA, NA
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Aleksandra Prica

Aleksandra Prica studied German Literature and Theology at the University of Zürich in Switzerland and at the Humboldt University in Berlin. She received her Ph.D. degree in Medieval German Literature at the University of Zürich in 2010. Before spending two years on a postdoctoral grant at the Department of Germanic Studies at the University of Chicago she was a Senior Research Associate (Oberassistentin) of Medieval German Studies in the Department of Germanic Studies at the University of Zürich. She joined the faculty of UNC in January 2016.

Dr. Prica’s academic interest focuses on literature of the Middle Ages and contemporary adaptations of the medieval world in literature, art and film.

The Bible is the single most influential book in all of Western civilization. It is the top bestseller of all time and the most translated work in history. No other text has been read, discussed and interpreted as often and no other book had a comparable impact on the arts. Knowing the Bible is therefore the condition that helps us understand substantial aspects of what is at stake in literary, visual and musical traditions. In this class we will familiarize ourselves with the stories, poems, letters, historical documents, songs, witness accounts and philosophical treatises that the Bible contains, and we will examine how works of art have preserved or transformed this biblical material. While our focus will lie on literature, we will also visit the museum, go to a music performance and watch movies. In written assignments and oral presentations, you will have the chance to interpret and work creatively with and through the biblical and literary texts.

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GSLL 80-001: Not Just Dogs: Animals in Russian Literature
Gen Eds: LA, BN
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Radislav Lapushin

Radislav Lapushin, Associate Professor of Russian Literature, received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. His primary research interests are Chekhov; interrelationship between prose and poetry; and Russian literature on stage and screen. His well-received book, Dew on the Grass: The Poetics of Inbetweenness in Chekhov, focuses on the poetic dimensions of Anton Chekhov’s prose and drama. An author of several volumes of Russian poetry, his most recent collection, Dog Poetry (Boston, 2016), dovetails nicely with the topic of this seminar.

This seminar explores the “question of the animal” in the works of major Russian writers (Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Turgenev, Chekhov) and introduces students to the main theoretical texts on the animal/human relationship (Nietzsche, Levinas, Derrida, Irigaray). Among the topics to be discussed are the animal as the other, animal and human natures, dominance and submission, ethics of the human/animal relations, and the theme of “talking” animals.
The course’s main goals are:

• To follow the representation of the animal in Russian literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries;
• To examine the worlds of major Russian writers;
• To learn the methods of analyzing literature;
• To learn the methods of critical writing.

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GSLL 89-001: Manifestos, Revolutions, and the Avant-Gardes
Gen Eds: LA, CI, GL
MW, 03:35 PM – 04:50 PM
John Gill

John Gill studied German literature and philosophy at UNC-Chapel Hill and received his Ph.D. from the Carolina-Duke Graduate Program in German Studies in 2020. He joined the Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures department as a Teaching Assistant Professor in fall 2020. His research focuses on German Romanticism and the role of the political imagination in literary movements, but also includes the later revolutionary avant-gardes explored in this course.

Marxist Surrealism, Fascist Futurism, Anarchist Situationism: what do these different “–isms” have in common? They are some of the most influential modern literary movements to publish manifestos. Through the lens of the manifesto, this course examines these radical groups of thinkers and the relationships between art and politics that they propose. Paying attention to the tradition of manifesto writing in avant-garde movements will help focus a set of broad questions, including: What is the avant-garde? What is a manifesto, its typical form and content, method and goal? How, more generally, have literary artists dedicated their work to political change? By the end of the course, students will have examined a number of literary movements and engaged with a major secondary work of academic research. Students will also research a topic of contemporary or personal importance and write their own manifestos. All texts and class discussions in English.

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History (HIST)

HIST 53-001: Traveling to European Cities: American Writers/Cultural Identities, 1830-1930
Gen Eds: HS, NA
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Lloyd Kramer

Lloyd Kramer’s interests focus on Modern European History with an emphasis on nineteenth-century France and French-American cultural relations. He is particularly interested in historical processes that shape personal and collective identities, including the experiences of cross-cultural exchange and the emergence of modern nationalism. Other research and teaching interests deal with the roles of intellectuals in modern societies and the theoretical foundations of historical knowledge. His teaching stresses the pleasures of reading, discussing and writing about influential books in various eras of European and world history.

This seminar examines two key themes in modern cultural and intellectual history: the importance of travel in the lives and cultural identities of American writers and the important role of European cities in the evolution of modern American cultural identities. We shall focus on a historical era in which American writers were especially drawn to Europe as an alternative to the social and cultural life in the United States; and we’ll discuss how the encounter with Europe influenced these writers as they defined their national identities as well as their views of politics, social relations, gender identities, literature, art and European cultural traditions. The seminar explores how travel has become one of the most influential personal experiences in modern times; and we’ll conclude the course with discussions of how travel remained important for American writers after 1930. Our overall goal is to analyze the connection between travel, writing and personal identities. This is a class for people who like to read about personal experiences and are intrigued by foreign travel. The assigned texts include works by women and men such as Margaret Fuller, David Dorr, Mark Twain, Henry James, Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, James Baldwin, Elizabeth Spencer, and David Sedaris; and we’ll focus on how writers described cities such as Paris, London, Rome, and Athens. In the spring of 2021 the course will be taught in instructional mode 3 – synchronous remote.

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HIST 89-002: Watching TV to Understand History
Gen Eds: HS, NA
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Donald Reid

Donald Reid is an historian of the French Resistance and of labor in France. He received the Tanner Award for excellence in undergraduate teaching. Reid has published widely on the relation of literature and film to the interpretation and presentation of history. His most recent book, ‘Opening the Gates: The Lip Affair, 1968-1981’ (2018), came out in French in the summer of 2020.

The television series is a media on which Americans and Europeans are increasingly dependent for their entertainment and education. Since 1945 and particularly since the early 1970s, the French have fought in the academy and in a diversity of sites in the public sphere over how to tell the history of the occupation and liberation of France during World War II. Can a television series present the complexities of this history? To address this question, students will learn about scriptwriting and filming and will analyze A French Village, a series with ambitious aesthetic goals—it was the first television series in France written following models derived from successful American series—as well as in the presentation of history.

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HIST 89-003: Modern Afghanistan
Gen Eds: HS, BN
TTh, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Eren Tasar

Eren Tasar is a historian of Soviet Central Asia. Professor Tasar’s first book, Soviet and Muslim: the Institutionalization of Islam in Central Asia, focused on the consequences of the communist attempt to bureaucratize Islam in the USSR’s largest Muslim region after World War II. Professor Tasar’s current research focuses on atheism in Soviet Central Asia. Much of Tasar’s teaching focuses on the postcolonial Islamic world.

This course focuses on the history of modern Afghanistan over the past two hundred years. Its main methodological feature is an interplay between a main textbook and fictional and journalistic materials as well as primary sources.

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Honors (HNRS)

HNRS 89-001: Narrative and Medicine
Gen Eds: LA, CI, EE-Performing Arts
M, 02:00 PM – 04:30 PM
Terrence Holt

Terrence Holt holds the M.F.A. (creative writing) and Ph.D. (English literature) degrees from Cornell University, and the M.D. degree from the University of North Carolina, where he has held a faculty position since completing his residency training (internal medicine) in 2003, teaching topics as diverse as health care finance and medical ethics; his proposed FS derives from a course he developed and still teaches for the Department of Social Medicine. For ten years a contributing editor to Men’s Health, he publishes and speaks widely on a range of topics related to the social, ethical, and experiential aspects of medical practice. His short story collections (In the Valley of the Kings, Internal Medicine) have appeared on numerous “best of” lists, including the New York Times bestsellers, and have been reprinted, translated, and anthologized in the US, Europe, and Asia. He thinks of this course as his central contribution to his teaching at Carolina, one that combines the multiple disciplinary strands of his career into a unified experience for learners at a broad range of levels.

A workshop in autobiographical and creative short story, focusing on the complex connections between story-telling, interpretive skill, and the practice of medicine. Students will write and distribute autobiographical and and creative short stories about illness and medical care; the seminar will meet weekly to discuss these stories, attempting to identify and articulate the key issues each story expresses about what it means to be sick, what it might mean to take care of others in their illness. The writing and (especially) interpretive skills acquired in this workshop are directly valuable to anyone contemplating a career in medicine, but are equally valuable to anyone who might at some point encounter (in themselves or in someone they care for) the trauma of illness. In addition to the weekly workshop, participants will have one-on-one conferences with the instructor (himself an MD with an international reputation as a writer). The capstone project will be a public reading (via webinar, allowing participants to invite an audience from anywhere on the globe) of participants’ work, which may (at student option) be in the form of a film composed under guidance of experts at the University’s Media Resources Center illustrating images and themes from the written work.

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Information and Library Science (INLS)

INLS 73-001: Smart Cities
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Arcot Rajasekar

Arcot Rajasekar is a Professor in the School of Library and Information Sciences, a Chief Scientist at the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) and co-Director of Data Intensive Cyber Environments (DICE) Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A leading proponent of policy-oriented large-scale data management, Rajasekar has several research projects funded by the NSF, NARA, NIH and other funding agencies. Rajasekar has a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Maryland at College Park and has more than 100 publications in the areas of data grids, digital library, persistent archives, logic programming and artificial intelligence. His latest projects include the Datanet Federation Consortium and the Data Bridge that is building a social network platform for scientific data.

A smart city is one where the needs of a populace meet the needs of environmental sustainability. The balance between the social and environmental issues is governed by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) that power a smart city infrastructure. In this course, we learn about the influence of urban networks, smart city urban planning, energy as a catalyst of sustainable development, smart city infrastructure, sustainable transportation, flow of information and communications, smart grids, digital infrastructure and the role of data and information technology. We will discuss criteria for measuring the smartness of a city, including quality of life, citizen governance, and discuss issues that go towards the making of a future smart city. Several case studies will be presented with guest lecturers invited to present on critical thinking and practices in smart city development. Students will be involved in group projects to assess smartness of cities.

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Marine Sciences (MASC)

MASC 51-001: Global Warming: Science, Social Impacts, Solutions
Gen Eds: PL, QI
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Marc Alperin

Marc Alperin’s work involves the use of stable isotopes as natural tracers of sedimentary processes. He is particularly interested in carbon cycling in coastal sediments and its role in the global carbon budget. Recent projects have included studies of the biogeochemistry of organic compounds dissolved in sediment pore waters, the fate of organic matter deposited on the seafloor, anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments, and the effects of dissolved organic nitrogen and carbon in atmospheric precipitation on coastal ecosystems. Dr. Alperin also co-leads the CHAOS Biogeochemistry Laboratories.

Students will examine evidence that human activity has caused global warming, investigate scientists’ ability to predict climate change, and discuss the political and social dimensions of global climate change.

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MASC 53-001: The Ends of the Earth: Polar Oceanography and Exploration
Gen Eds: PL
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Carol Arnosti

Carol Arnosti grew up in Wisconsin, where she developed an early appreciation for snow and ice. As an undergraduate at Lawrence University, she majored in chemistry, studied history, and played intercollegiate basketball. After completing a Ph.D. in oceanography at M.I.T. and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, she went to the Max-Planck Institute in Bremen, Germany, where she rapidly became involved in a new project investigating microbial life at low temperatures. Continued involvement in this project since moving to Chapel Hill in 1995 has led to repeated research work in the Arctic as well as a trip to Antarctica, and a permanent case of ‘Polar Fever’.

What explains the ‘pull of the Poles’? What motivated early explorers to undergo great hardships to investigate the Arctic and Antarctic, and what did they discover about these regions? What have we discovered in the intervening decades, and what do we still not understand about polar regions? Why do the Arctic and Antarctic play such a critical role in global climate? This seminar will combine scientific and historical perspectives to investigate the ‘ends of the earth’, the Arctic and Antarctica. We will begin by surveying the geography and oceanography of these regions, and then step back into the past and follow in the footsteps of some of the early polar explorers through their own accounts of their explorations. Modern accounts will help us compare and contrast these early explorations. The seminar will also include readings and discussions about current questions and problems of the polar regions, in particular human impacts and potential effects of global warming. A ‘Makerspace’ component is an important feature of the class – students will be supplied with materials to work on a design/build challenge, testing, revising, discussing, and consulting with one another to improve their efforts through the course of the semester. This ‘making’ experience is highly relevant to the experiences of early polar explorers as well as modern oceanographers, who often have to improvise and fix or build or create things on the spot, with materials at hand, in order to solve specific problems. Note that no experience in Makerspace, and no design or build experience, is assumed, expected, or required for this seminar. There are no prerequisites for this seminar. Also note that in 2021, ‘making’ will be carried out remotely, with kits supplied by UNC’s Makerspace.

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Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 51H-001: Fish Gotta Swim, Birds Gotta Fly’: The Mathematics and the Mechanics of Moving (Honors) – CANCELLED 1/18/2021
Gen Eds: QI
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Roberto Camassa

Roberto Camassa is the Kenan Distinguished Professor in the Department of Mathematics. His Ph.D. is from Cal Tech, and his research interests include nonlinear evolution equations, mathematical modeling, fluid mechanics and optics.

The scientific method is arguably the single most important achievement of the modern era. Together with its technological implications, in the last four centuries it has shaped the world both physically and culturally, and continues to do so, like no other element in the history of mankind. The overall aim of the course is to learn the basic elements of the method through a combination of simple physical experiments (mostly at the \thought” level), rigorous mathematical training and elementary mathematical modeling. The focus will be on mechanics, which can arguably be considered the “birthplace” of the method. In particular, the mechanics of fluids will provide the main emphasis, both for its implications in any aspect of life on Earth and for its challenges to the physical intuition.

You should be ready to work with a non-standard class format, where concepts are developed through class discussions in which everybody is expected to join and share observations, insights as well as critiques. No question offered in earnest is too naive or irrelevant, and students are expected to share their doubts as well as their knowledge to achieve the outcome of understanding a certain issue. In-depth class discussion, \open ended” homework assignments with problems and essays, hands-on in-class, in-lab and in-silico (computational) experiments will be the basis for evaluation and final grade assignment.

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MATH 70-001: Topology and Symmetry
Gen Eds: QI
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Linda Green

Linda Green graduated from the University of Chicago with a B.S. and M.S. in mathematics and from Princeton University with a Ph.D. in mathematics. After doing research in 3-dimensional topology, she worked in industry developing mathematical models of breast cancer. She joined the faculty of UNC Chapel Hill in 2013. Since then, she has taught every class in the Precalculus-Calculus sequence as well as first year seminars. Dr. Green was a 2018 recipient of the UNC Math Department’s Teaching Award.

In this first year seminar, students will explore ideas from topology and geometry and their application to symmetry patterns. We will start by building intuition for properties of surfaces with games and visualization exercises. We will develop tools to distinguish surfaces and prove impossibility theorems. Next, we will study the curvature of surfaces and discover connections with our previous work in topology.

The focus of the course will then shift to symmetry and the identification of repeating patterns in the world around us, from snowflakes, to frieze patterns on campus buildings, to designs on tapestries and wallpaper, to paintings like those of M.C. Escher. We will relate symmetry patterns to their folded-up counterparts, called orbifolds, and use tools from geometry and topology to determine which patterns are possible and which can never be achieved. We will extend our analysis to spherical and hyperbolic patterns, uncovering some of the shocking differences between Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry.

Course assignments will include readings, mathematical investigations, design projects such as virtual and physical kaleidoscopes, quizzes, and a final project. The final project will allow students to pursue a theoretical topic (e.g. hyperbolic tilings or map projections), an application (e.g. quasicrystals or patterns on neckties), or a maker project (e.g. 3-dimensional pattern kaleidoscopes or hyperbolic quilts). No prerequisite knowledge is needed. Students can choose between taking this course fully online or in person.

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Music (MUSC)

MUSC 89-001: Music in the Movies
Gen Eds: VP, CI
MW, 02:30 PM – 03:45 PM
Lee Weisert

Lee Weisert is a composer of instrumental and electronic music and an associate professor in the Music Department at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he teaches courses in composition, electronic music, and film music. Weisert’s recent compositions have incorporated increasingly disparate elements in an attempt to find, “through experimentation, tinkering, and unconventional approaches, a ritualistic and deeply expressive world of sound.” Along with collaborator Jonathon Kirk, he creates electronic sound installation projects that expose and explore hidden aspects of the sounding environment. Weisert has composed several film scores and frequently collaborates with visual artists on multimedia and virtual reality projects.

This course will examine the concepts and techniques of film music, covering many influential film scores dating from the 1930’s to the current day. We will analyze and discuss the various conceptual issues relating to film music, such as theme, narrative, character development, synchronization, etc., and compare the different approaches that film composers have taken with respect to these issues. Students will research and analyze film scores from a variety of perspectives (sonic/musical, dramatic, historical, etc.) in the form of class presentations and research papers. In addition, students will learn to use digital sound technology to incorporate concepts explored in the class in the creation of original sound design elements for pre-existing film footage. No previous training in musical performance or music theory is required for the class. Students will not be expected to be able to read conventional musical notation.

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MUSC 89-002: When Moors Ruled in Europe: Music of Al-Andalus
Gen Eds: HS, WB
MW, 03:35 PM – 04:50 PM
Anne MacNeil

Anne MacNeil holds a PhD in the History & Theory of Music from the University of Chicago and a Master’s Degree from the Eastman School of Music. She is a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome and the Authority of Record at the Library of Congress on the Renaissance commedia dell’arte actress Isabella Andreini. Prof. MacNeil is also a founding directory of IDEA: Isabella d’Este Archive, an international research consortium that studies the music and culture of Renaissance Italy through the lens of the marchesa of Mantua, Isabella d’Este (1474-1539)

This course focuses is on the Iberian Peninsula, Occitania, and the Basque region during the time of the Crusades – roughly 700 to 1492 – when Moors ruled in Western Europe. History of the Crusades has received a lot of scholarly and artistic attention recently, with a particular focus on including the history of Arabic and African cultures in Western Europe and on opening up a diversity of scholarly perspectives. The goals for this course are to empower students to interrogate sources of information and to write reparative histories of the music and culture that recognize this ethnic diversity. Students will learn how to create ArcGIS StoryMaps for their reparative history projects.

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Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 61-001: Self: Transformation and Aspiration
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Jennifer Morton

Jennifer Morton is an associate professor in the Philosophy department and the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics program. Her research focuses on moral and political philosophy and philosophy of education. Her book Moving Up Without Losing Your Way (Princeton University Press, 2019) explores the ethical costs that first-generation and low-income students face in the path of upward mobility.

Novels, memoirs, and aisles of self-help books attest to our desire to transform ourselves. Yet, the idea of self-transformation is puzzling. If a person decides to embark on a new adventure in the hopes of transforming herself, can she really become a new self or is she merely exhibiting her preexisting adventurousness? What about the aspiring college student who is hoping that college will change him? How can we make sense of his aspiration? In this class, we will critically examine the idea of aspiration and transformation. Readings for this course will be drawn from philosophical, literary, and popular literature.

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PHIL 75-001: Evil
Gen Eds: PH
W, 03:35 PM – 06:05 PM
Susan Wolf

Susan Wolf is the Edna J. Koury Distinguished Professor of Philosophy. Majoring in math and philosophy, she graduated from Yale in 1974. She did her graduate work at Princeton and taught at Harvard, the University of Maryland, and Johns Hopkins before coming to UNC in 2002. In 2003 she received the Mellon Foundation’s award for Distinguished Achievement in the Humanities. Professor Wolf is the author of Freedom Within Reason, Meaningfulness in Life and Why It Matters, The Variety of Values: Essays on Morality, Meaning, and Love, and numerous articles ranging over topics in ethics. In addition to philosophy, she enjoys hiking, cooking, movies, and Tarheel basketball.

What is evil?  Who – if anyone – is responsible for it?  Are there evil people?  If so, how different are evil people from the rest of us?  How should we respond to them?   The seminar will explore the nature of evil, engaging with both real and fictional examples, using films, stories, and readings in philosophy, psychology, and more.

The course will involve short weekly writing assignments, as well as lots of discussion.  In addition, students will select an independent project, present their findings to the class and lead a discussion on it.

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PHIL 89-002: Ethics and History of Human and Animal Experimentation
Gen Eds: PH
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Rebecca L. Walker

Rebecca L. Walker is a professor in the Department of Philosophy. She also teaches medical students in the School of Medicine, where she is a professor in the Department of Social Medicine and in the Center for Bioethics. Before coming to UNC in 2003, she completed a post-doctoral fellowship in bioethics and health policy at Johns Hopkins University; she has also taught at the University of Arizona and the University of Michigan. She researches and publishes on many different aspects of bioethics including genomic ethics, animal research, health care allocation and respect for patient autonomy. You can find out more about her work here: http://rebeccawalker.web.unc.edu.

There are many historical examples of unethical uses of both human and nonhuman animals in science including the 40 year-long Tuskegee syphilis study and isolation experiments on infant monkeys in the 1950’s. Yet whether or not a study is ethically sound is often much more complicated a matter than in these studies, and even for these studies, scientists at the time thought they were morally acceptable. This is a course about the ethics and history of animal and human subject experimentation. Issues to be addressed include: the history of the animal model in science; contentions in sorting the balance of harms and benefits of research; changing conceptions of role obligations, virtues, and identity of the ‘good scientist’; the development of the vulnerable research subject; and evolving views of human and animal moral standing and rights. Students in this course will participate actively, take a leadership role in at least one session, and write on the course themes including one independent project.

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Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)

PHYS 53-001: Handcrafting in the Nanoworld: Building Models and Manipulating Molecules
Gen Eds: PL
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Michael R. Falvo

Michael R. Falvo is a Research Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. He received his BS in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1991, and his PhD in physics from UNC-CH in 1997. He is a former winner of the UNC Student Undergraduate Teaching Award presented annually to three professors by the undergraduate student body, and is a member of the UNC Academy of Distinguished Teaching Scholars. His current research focuses is on the physics of proteins and cells. He stretches, pokes and prods nanometer scale biological systems such as viruses, biopolymer strands, and individual protein molecules to test their mechanical properties. Falvo has a long-standing interest in science outreach and frequently presents workshops for the public and k-12 teachers. He has also co-authored two books on nanoscience for middle school science teachers.

The nanoworld is a strange and captivating place. It is a world of molecules vibrating trillions of times a second, quantum dots emitting rainbow colors, DNA encoding information in molecular bonds, and protein motors driving the complex machinery of the cell. At this scale, nature has unique rules and behaviors, some of which are amazing and unexpected. We are still uncovering these rules, and are only beginning to apply this new knowledge to technology. Can we build molecular machines that cure disease or clean up the environment? Can we make computers using single molecule transistors? How do viruses and other bio systems “assemble” themselves? In this seminar, we dive into the basic physics, chemistry and biology that describe the nanometer scale world. We will also try to distinguish the true promise of nanoscience from the hype. Students will engage in class discussions informed by their weekly reading of selected scientific literature. They will also participate in small group projects building physical models of nanoscale objects and phenomena, and perform calculations to gain a quantitative understanding of the physics underlying the nanoworld. No prerequisite is required for this course, but a spirit of adventure is.

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Political Science (POLI)

POLI 89-001: What Does It Mean to Be a Good Citizen?
Gen Eds: PH
MWF, 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM
Nora Hanagan

Nora Hanagan studies political ideas. She is particularly interested in the ideas that have animated American politics and history. She also researches different approaches to environmental and food politics. Her book, Democratic Responsibility: The Politics of Many Hands in America, examines whether individuals bear responsibility for harms that are caused by social institutions and processes. She has taught at Duke University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and is excited to be joining UNC this year. When she isn’t chasing her young children around, she likes gardening and hiking. She is also still trying to make a sourdough starter.

What, if any, responsibilities accompany democratic citizenship? Voting? Active participation in political meetings? Obeying laws? Volunteering in one’s community? Preserving natural resources for future generations? Adhering to certain values? Protesting unjust laws? This course offers an overview of the different ways in which Americans have answered these questions.

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POLI 89-002: Immigrants and Refugee in World Politics
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Niklaus Steiner

Niklaus Steiner is a native of Thun, Switzerland, who moved to Chapel Hill with his family when his father became a professor at Carolina. He has had the good fortune of moving between cultures his whole life and because of this experience, his teaching and research interests are around immigration, refugees, nationalism, and citizenship. He has written a number of books and article on these topics, including the textbook “International Migration and Citizenship Today” that aims to facilitate classroom discussions on admission and membership in democracies. He earned a bachelor’s degree with highest honors in international studies at UNC and a Ph.D. in political science at Northwestern University.

The movement of people across international borders is one of the most politically controversial issues in the world today. This class, which is discussion-based, focuses on two different types of global migrants, immigrants and refugees, and explores why these two groups move out of their countries and how they are treated by receiving countries. Immigrants and refugees have traditionally been thought of as politically, legally and ethically different from each other and this class explores these differences, but it also explores the many ways that they are similar. This class has two goals: 1) to give you a solid understanding of the key concepts around global migration so that you can contribute thoughtfully to discussions about immigrants and refugees as a reader, writer and discussant; and 2) to introduce you to the many migration-related resources at UNC and in the local community. This class encourages students from a wide range of backgrounds, experiences and perspectives to enroll because it benefits significantly from including such diversity.

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Psychology and Neuroscience (NSCI/PYSC)

PSYC 54-001: Families and Children
Gen Eds: SS
TTh, 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM
Shauna Cooper

Shauna Cooper studies the cultural and contextual factors that contribute to positive youth development, with a specific focus on African American adolescents and families. Visit her online: African American Youth Development Research Laboratory.

In this First Year Seminar we will consider family as a context for children’s development. Contemporary families are highly diverse, and topics covered in class reflect this diversity. We will examine characteristics of traditional, divorced and step families, single parents, gay and lesbian parents, and immigrant families. In addition to taking two examinations, students will interview a family member and write a five-page paper based on that interview. Each student will also give a class presentation on a family-related topic.

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PSYC 89H-001: Critical Thinking for Psychology and Beyond: How to use Your Brain (Honors)
Gen Eds: SS
TTh, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Jonathan Abramowitz

Jonathan Abramowitz studies psychological processes and cognitive-behavioral treatment of anxiety disorders, especially obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and health-related anxiety.

Critical thinking is the ability (and willingness) to assess claims and make objective judgments on the basis of well-supported reasons. It is the ability to look for flaws in arguments and resist claims that have weak supporting evidence (or none at all). Critical thinking is not simply negative thinking; it fosters the ability to be creative and constructive, generate solutions, think of implications, and apply knowledge to a broad range of social and personal problems. Critical thinking skills are essential to success as a student, in your career, as a consumer of goods and services, and in many other areas of your life.

This course focuses on the development of critical thinking skills, especially as they relate to psychological science. The field of mental health is loaded with theories and interventions—some of them scientifically and logically valid, and others not. Critical thinking is a must if one is to successfully learn about how psychological knowledge is created, evaluated, and applied. In addition to learning basic skills of logic, students in this Honors First Year Seminar will learn about the logic of the scientific method and the common errors of human cognition that impede critical thinking. We will emphasize the application of critical thinking skills to psychological phenomena and claims about abnormal behavior and its treatment. Students will learn by discussing and writing effective arguments, analyzing the writings of others and evaluating their claims, exploring contemporary controversies within and beyond psychology, and interacting with members of the class regarding the weekly topics.

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Public Policy (PLCY)

PLCY 71H-001: Justice and Inequality (Honors)
Gen Eds: PH
MWF, 12:20 PM – 01:10 PM
Douglas Mackay

Douglas Mackay holds a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Toronto. Prior to joining the Department of Public Policy on July 1, 2013, he completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. MacKay’s research and teaching interests concern questions at the intersection of justice and public policy. He is currently working on projects concerning the justice of economic inequality – both domestic and global; the ethics of immigration policy; priority setting in health care; the ethics of public policy research; and the design of welfare policy.

The value of equality is a foundational principle of the United States of America. The Declaration of Independence proclaims that “all men are created equal” and possess unalienable rights to “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” The Constitution of the United States requires that no State “deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” Additionally, equality has been the goal of a number of influential political movements, including the Civil Rights movement, the Feminist movement, Occupy Wall Street and the LGBTQ movement. Yet despite this prominence of the value of equality, the U.S. is becoming a more unequal society in a number of domains, particularly, with respect to the distribution of income, political influence, and social mobility. This course investigates the value of equality and asks which forms of inequality are unjust and ought to be remedied. We will focus on a variety of different spheres of U.S. social, political and economic life, including the distribution of income and opportunities, health outcomes, education, voting and political influence, employment, and the criminal justice system. We will also ask whether equality is a value that applies beyond U.S. borders, particularly with respect to global disparities in income and wealth, the treatment of migrants, and climate change. The course will feature a combination of lectures and class discussion. Significant instructional time will also be dedicated to developing students’ critical thinking, reading, and writing skills.

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PLCY 75-001: Debates in Public Policy and Racial Inequality
Gen Eds: SS, CI
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Fenaba Addo

Fenaba R. Addo is an associate professor in the department of public policy. Her research agenda consists of three intersecting lines of inquiry: (1 household finances and relationship outcomes; (2 family structure (cohabiting and marital relationships) and well-being; and (3 the role of consumer debt in recreating economic and racial inequality, primarily in the lives of women and children, young adults, and Black and Latinx families. Her work reflects an interest in bridging social demography with economic inequality and producing policy relevant work on marginalized and economically vulnerable populations in the United States. Dr. Addo was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar. She received her Ph.D. in Policy Analysis and Management from Cornell University and holds a B.S. in Economics from Duke University.

It has been over 150 years since the emancipation of black Americans and nearly 60 years since the passage of civil rights legislation, yet they still lag far behind white Americans in virtually every socioeconomic indicator. This course critically examines the causes, consequences of economic inequality and social policies to address these disparities, with a focus on racial disparities. We will examine the merits and limitation of various assumptions aimed at explaining these persistent disparities, explore how economic inequality is affected by race, systemic racism, and socioeconomic factors (education, labor market) and identify evidence-based policy options and proposal for reducing inequality. We will critically examine questions such as why do we need race-based policies in addition to economic based policies to address inequality within our society? Can policies promote wealth-building and also contribute to greater wealth equity? The course content will focus on the U.S. and be heavily weighted towards analyzing contemporary social and economic activity (2000-present).

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PLCY 80-001: Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Economic Growth
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Maryann Feldman

Maryann Feldman is Carolina’s S.K. Heninger Distinguished Professor of Public Policy, adjunct Professor of Finance at Kenan Flagler Business School and Research Fellow at the Kenan Institute for Private Enterprise. She has also taught at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Toronto. She attained her Ph.D. in Economics at Carnegie-Mellon University and is author of more than 80 academic articles, 2 books, and 9 edited volumes. Her work focuses on the spatial distribution of economic activity and understanding the factors that contribute to making certain places economically vibrant and creative. Her most recent work explores place-based economic processes that contribute to emerging industries, entrepreneurship and regional transformation. She is currently researching the industrial genesis of the Research Triangle Region.

The impact of COVID-19 has exacerbated stark inequalities and exposed inadequacies in our society. Conventional economic strategies often focus on stopgap measures aimed at the most conspicuous problems and have failed to create sustainable paths for widespread prosperity. The course develops students’ entrepreneurial mindset to search for new solutions. The class will cover the evolution of economic and political systems in prosperous societies and develop applied projects that empower students to impact their local communities and/or communities within North Carolina. The class focuses on critically connecting the historical context in order to envision resilient systems and solutions to contemporary challenges.

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PLCY 89-001: America’s Labor Market
Gen Eds: SS
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Jeremy Moulton

Jeremy Moulton received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California, Davis and works in the fields of public and labor economics. His research primarily utilizes public policy shocks as “natural experiments” to investigate labor market outcomes, retirement decision-making, the intergenerational transmission of wealth and education, and the real estate market. Jeremy has published papers that investigate the extent to which people leave the labor force when they lose eligibility for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), whether people can marry a more educated spouse if they increase their own education using variation in education caused by the World War II G.I. Bill, whether lower healthcare costs caused by Medicare Part-D pushed people to enter self-employment, the long-run impact of entering the labor market during the Great Depression, and the impact of property tax exemptions on real estate prices using a ballot initiative in Virginia.

The course will familiarize students with the major public policies and movements affecting the American labor market. Students will learn how each of the following impacts the labor market: education, the minimum wage, Social Security, pensions, unions, unemployment insurance, welfare (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, TANF), income taxes (including the Earned Income Tax Credit, EITC), self-employment, immigration, automation, and the gig economy. The course uses news articles, policy summaries, podcasts, and academic journal articles to help students learn the many theoretical and political viewpoints associated with each topic.

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Religious Studies (JWST/RELI)

JWST 60-001: Israeli Culture and Society: Collective Memories and Fragmented Identities
Gen Eds: BN
TTh, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Yaron Shemer

Yaron Shemer was born in Jerusalem, Israel. He is a Levine/Sklut Fellow in Jewish Studies and an associate professor of Israeli Culture and Modern Hebrew in the Department of Asian Studies. He earned his degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Film & Television from Tel Aviv University in 1983 and then worked as an assistant director at the Israeli Educational Television in Tel Aviv. He earned his M.A. and Ph.D. in Film Studies from the University of Texas at Austin. From 1991 to 2008 he taught at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Shemer’s current research interests include Jewish and Islamic terrorism in Middle Eastern and North African cinema, and the Jew in Arab cinema. Dr. Shemer is the author of “Identity, Place, and Subversion in Contemporary Mizrahi Cinema in Israel” (U. of Michigan Press, 2013).

This seminar is oriented toward students who are interested in learning about the culture and society of modern Israel. Specifically, we will examine the transformative power of the early Zionist discourse in the formation of the new State of Israel and the challenges to this discourse in years that followed. Consequently, the emphasis in this class will be on the cultural and social manifestation of the tensions between the creeds of “one nation” and “the melting pot” on the one hand, and the reiteration of ethnic, gender, and religious identities on the other. The first five sessions will provide contextual and background accounts for later discussions. Then, until the middle of the semester, the seminar will focus on various arenas of Israeli culture, past and present. The second part of the semester will be devoted to selected themes and case studies pertinent to culture and society in modern Israel.

Students may also register for this course under ASIA 60-001.

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RELI 70-001: Jesus in Scholarship and Film
Gen Eds: SS
W, 09:00 AM – 11:50 AM
Bart Ehrman

Bart Ehrman is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies. He has taught at Carolina since 1988. He is author or editor of thirty books and is widely regarded as a leading expert on the New Testament and the history of the early Christian church. He is also a well-known teacher on campus, having won the Undergraduate Students Teaching Award, the Bowman and Gordon Gray Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and the John William Pope Center Spirit of Inquiry Teaching Award.

This seminar will examine how historians have reconstructed the life, teachings and death of the historical Jesus. We will look at the Gospels of the New Testament, as well as references to Jesus in other writings (Roman and Jewish sources, as well as Gospels that did not make it into the New Testament). In addition, we will explore how Jesus has been portrayed in modern film, including such Biblical “epics” as The Greatest Story Ever Told, such “period pieces” as Jesus Christ Superstar, such brilliant retellings as Jesus of Montreal and such controversial films as The Last Temptation of Christ and The Passion of the Christ. The ultimate goals of the seminar are to see what we can say about the historical man Jesus himself and how Jesus came to be portrayed in both ancient sources and modern imagination.

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Romance Studies (ROML)

ROML 63-001: Forging Alliances: Religion, War and Cultural Transference on the Camino de Santiago
Gen Eds: HS, WB
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Hélène de Fays

Hélène de Fays is a Senior Lecturer in the Romance Studies Department. She has earned undergraduate degrees in Finances and International Relations, as well as an MA and Ph.D. in Hispanic Literature. Her educational and professional backgrounds, as well as her personal multidisciplinary interests, have guided her research and teaching. Dr. de Fays has taught a number of successful cultures courses and has published articles on the concepts of utopia and dystopia in Spanish American Science Fiction and ecofeminism in Central American narrative. She has also co-authored a web-based textbook on the cultural history of the Hispanic world.

This course explores the role the Camino de Santiago (the Way of St. James) played in the construction of a distinctive Spanish identity in the medieval period of Europe. We will approach this issue from a variety of perspectives. From the religious point of view, we will discuss the transformation of the man into a legend and eventually a myth, as well as the growth of the pilgrimage to Santiago. From the political and economic perspectives, we will examine the role of the Camino in the strengthening of the first Christian Kingdoms in the North of Spain, the creation of the first Spanish knight orders and their fight against Islam. We will also discuss the cultural transference that took place along the Camino by analyzing the art, architecture, music and literature that developed in the cities and villages along the pilgrimage routes.

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ROML 89-001: Contagion and Culture: Lessons from Italy
Gen Eds: LA, WB
TTh, 02:00 PM – 03:15 PM
Maggie Fritz-Morkin

Maggie Fritz-Morkin studies the literature and culture of medieval Italy. She has published numerous essays on the ethics of visceral language, and is finishing a book on obscenity in the literary works of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio. Her current research interests include the obsession with fraud in late medieval Italy, conflicting theories of debt and obligation, and medieval women’s voices in the articulation of justice.

Set in plague-stricken Florence of 1348, Boccaccio’s Decameron begins with a portrait of social unravelling and civic collapse that is uncannily familiar in our jarring new pandemic reality. What can medieval literature and philosophy tell us about how to live when our knowledge, institutions, and laws falter? Who is at fault when catastrophe strikes? What is the role of art in responding to trauma, in rebuilding society? How does communal suffering compare to private suffering? How are power and privilege revealed, increased, or challenged in a pandemic? How do the narratives we tell about different maladies shape our lives and communities? This course explores Italian responses over the course of seven centuries to these questions, and reflects on how the Italian story continues to shape North American culture.

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Sociology (SOCI)

SOCI 57H.001: Rationalization and the Changing Nature of Social Life in 21st-Century America (Honors)
Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM
Howard E. Aldrich

Howard E. Aldrich is Kenan Professor of Sociology. He has won numerous awards for his teaching and mentoring: Favorite Professor Award from the senior class at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; graduate students’ Award for Best Teaching, Department of Sociology, several times; and the J Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award from the University of Carolina Chapel Hill. His two sons and his daughters-in-law graduated from Carolina. His main research interests are entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial team formation, gender and entrepreneurship, and evolutionary theory. He writes a regular column, “Speaking from Experience,” for The National Teaching and Learning Forum. He fly fishes year-round in the mountains of Western North Carolina and Eastern Tennessee and wherever else his travels may take him. Photos of his catches may be seen on his homepage.

Today, fast food restaurants have become a model for everyday life. Some scholars have even talked about the “McDonaldization” of the nation and the world. By that, scholars mean a drive toward greater efficiency, predictability, calculability, and control by non-human technologies in modern organizations. This drive has shaped many features of American life, including health care, law, and education. Such forces have even affected personal relationships. Sociologists have a term for this process: “rationalization.” The COVID19 pandemic has changed the way I teach this course, as it will now be online rather than in-person. Nevertheless, insofar as possible, we will still explore “rationalization” through a process called “active learning” in which you will have opportunities to explore online resources, engage in peer-to-peer discussions, and work with me to develop a research project in which you explore the impact of rationalization on an occupation that might be a destination for you. You will be assessed based on your contributions to blog posts, class discussion, short (two page) papers, and a research project culminating in a term paper (15-20 pages). We will have no traditional examinations or quizzes.

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Women’s and Gender Studies (WGST)

WGST 64-001: Plantation Lullabies: Literature by and about African American Women
Gen Eds: LA, NA
TTh, 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Tanya Shields

Tanya Shields is an Associate Professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. Dr. Shields believes that teaching should engage students’ everyday lives by helping them make connections between the past and the present. Her research area is the Caribbean, specifically literature and its role in Caribbean belonging.

Have you ever had historical déjà vu? Were you ever struck by historical images in contemporary places? If not, you might be surprised to know how much of the past is hidden in plain sight. This seminar offers analytical strategies for understanding different ways that plantation culture was represented metaphorically in the 19th and 20th centuries with a view to understanding how it continues to manifest itself today with a particular emphasis on women’s experiences. We will explore the idea of the plantation as a physical place, an often-nostalgic idea, and a lasting economic system. We will journey through poetry, film, literature, and music to see how these echoes appear in various women’s texts from the US and the Caribbean. We will consider how our own identities inform our reactions to these texts and our broader environment. The final project for the seminar asks students to create their own plantation narratives—an engaging assignment that brings together history, storytelling, and analytic ability.

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