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Select the academic department below to skip down to that department’s offerings. For more information about a specific instructor, click on the arrow beside the instructor name. Please consult ConnectCarolina (https://connectcarolina.unc.edu/) for the most up-to-date information about FYS offerings, meeting times, instructional modes, and availability.

Spring Priority Enrollment

All non-honors FYS seats are reserved during Waves 1 and 2 for first-year students who did not take an FYS in fall 2021. These students may enroll in one FYS during this priority enrollment window. Beginning November 19 (Open Enrollment), the remaining seats are made available to all first-year students. A first-year student may enroll in up to two FYS during Open Enrollment. Please note: a first-year student may only enroll in up to two FYS total during their undergraduate career.

Honors FYS Enrollment

Honors and non-Honors FYS are included in the list below. If you are not in the Honors Carolina program, but are nonetheless interested in registering for an Honors FYS, you can enroll in any Honors FYS with available seats after Open Enrollment begins on November 19 (please note: you must have a 3.0 GPA or higher to enroll in an Honors FYS).

Course List

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)
American Studies (AMST)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Art and Art History (ARTH/ARTS)
Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (ASIA)
Biology (BIOL)
Chemistry (CHEM)
City and Regional Planning (PLAN)
Classics (CLAS/CLAR)
Communication (COMM)
Dramatic Art (DRAM)
Economics (ECON)
English and Comparative Literature (CMPL/ENGL)
Exercise and Sport Science (EXSS)
Geography (GEOG)
Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)
History (HIST)
Honors (HNRS)
Information and Library Science (INLS)
Linguistics (LING)
Marine Sciences (MASC)
Mathematics (MATH)
Music (MUSC)
Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)
Political Science (POLI)
Psychology and Neuroscience (PYSC)
Public Policy (PLCY)
Religious Studies (JWST/RELI)
Romance Studies (ROML)
Sociology (SOCI)
Women’s and Gender Studies (WGST)
Other Opportunities (First-Year Launch)

African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD)

AAAD 51-001: Masquerades of Blackness
Gen Eds: VP, US
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Charlene Regester

Charlene Regester is an Associate Professor in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies and Affiliate Faculty for the Global Cinema Minor. She received her BA, MA, Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is the author of African American Actresses: The Struggle for Visibility, 1900-1960 (which was nominated by the press to the NAACP Image Awards). She is the 2011 recipient of the Trailblazer Award Hayti Heritage Film Festival and 2007 Oscar Micheaux Book and Film Award from the Oscar Micheaux Film Festival, South Dakota. She has appeared on North Carolina Bookwatch with UNC-TV 2011; WUNC-FM Radio “The State of Things;” and Turner Movie Classics. Documentaries in which she has appeared include: Movies of Color: Black Southern Cinema (2003, Tom Thurman director), Beyond Tara: The Extraordinary Life of Hattie McDaniel (2001), Madison Davis Lacy director), and Birth of a Movement (2017, Bestor Cram and Susan Gray directors).

This seminar is designed to investigate how the concept of race has been represented in cinema historically, with a particular focus on representations of race when blackness is masqueraded. Its intent is to launch an investigative inquiry into how African Americans are represented on screen in various time periods, how we as spectators are manipulated by these cinematic constructions of race, and how race is marked or coded other than through visual representation. Students will view films that deal with “passing” from the various historical periods and will utilize theoretical concepts introduced in class to read these visual representations. Films selected for viewing include the pre-World War II Era, the Civil Rights Era, and the “Post-Racial” era. Students will be required to write three papers that reflect their ability to apply theoretical concepts to reading racialized representations on screen in these three historical periods to demonstrate their understanding of how racial masquerades have evolved over time and continue to persist in contemporary culture.

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AAAD 54-001: African Migrations, Boundaries, Displacements, and Belonging
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Michael Lambert

Michael Lambert is an Associate Professor of African Studies and Anthropology. His research has principally been in francophone West Africa with a focus on issues related to migration. He has lived for over five years in Senegal and the neighboring nation of Mauritania, where he served as a Peace Corps volunteer, and he has travelled extensively throughout the continent. His first book, Longing for Exile: Migration and the Making of a Translocal Community in Senegal (West Africa) (Heinemann, 2002), explores the cultural and social history of urban migration in a Senegalese community. His most recent book (co-authored), Up from These Hills: Memories of Cherokee Boyhood (Nebraska [Bison Books], 2011), explores American Indian experience in the mid-20th century.

Boundary making, migration, and population displacement have been significant dimensions of the contemporary African experience. How has boundary making, broadly defined (inclusive of national borders, rural-urban distinctions, and ethnic and racial groupings, for example), shaped contemporary Africa? What types of and through what processes were boundaries were created? How did the African people respond to these processes? What population displacements unfolded in the context of this boundary making? And how did the people of Africa make sense of and understand boundary making, migration, and displacement? These are some of the questions we will be examining in this interactive and discussion oriented class. We will build our examination of these issues around six novels written by African authors. These novels will provide insight into the ways by which boundaries, migration, and displacement impacted the everyday lives of the African people.

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AAAD 89-001: Health Inequality in Africa and the African Diaspora
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Lydia Boyd

Lydia Boyd is an associate professor of African, African American, and Diaspora studies and is trained as a cultural and medical anthropologist, with a research focus in Uganda. Her work considers issues of health, religion, and the moral and political frameworks that shape health behavior. Her first book, Preaching Prevention: Born-Again Christianity and the Moral Politics of AIDS in Uganda (Ohio University Press, 2015), investigated the impact of one of the U.S.’s largest global health programs to date – President’s Bush’s 2003 PEPFAR program — in terms of the cultural and moral logics that motivated Ugandan Christian activists who popularized its HIV-prevention strategies (“abstain and be faithful”). Another strand of Dr. Boyd’s research has focused on human rights discourse in Africa, especially as it relates to growing legislation limiting sexuality-based rights on the continent. Her current research project concerns reproductive and maternal health in Uganda. This project addresses several overlapping topics, including women’s use of both biomedical and non-biomedical care during pregnancy, traditional discourses and practices shaping women’s experiences of health and fertility, and debates surrounding these issues in global and Ugandan national policy.

This seminar examines the ways that healthcare access and health itself are shaped by social, racial, and economic inequalities in our society and others. The geographic focus of this course is Africa and the United States, but case studies from the Caribbean and other African diasporic communities will be included. Drawing on research in medical anthropology, sociology, public health, and history we will gain an understanding of the political, economic, and social factors that create health inequalities. Topics include gender inequality and HIV/AIDS in Africa; race and chronic disease in the U.S.; inequality and the practice of global health; and how racial difference has historically been used to justify and explain health disparities. Students will gain experience with ethnographic research methods, and work on small qualitative research projects investigating health inequality in their own communities.

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American Studies (AMST)

AMST 89-001: North Carolina Black Feminisms
Gen Eds: US, EE-Performing Arts
MWF, 12:20 PM – 1:10 PM
Antonia Randolph

Antonia Randolph is an assistant professor of American Studies at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. She is a graduate of Spelman College (BA in Sociology) and Northwestern University (PhD in Sociology). Her interests include diversity discourse in education, multicultural capital, non-normative Black masculinity, and the production of misogyny in hip-hop culture. Her book The Wrong Kind of Different: Challenging the Meaning of Diversity in American Classrooms (Teachers College 2012) examined the hierarchies elementary school teachers constructed among students of color. She has also published in Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, The Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, and The Feminist Wire. Her current book project, That’s My Heart: Queering Intimacy in Hip-Hop Culture, examines portrayals of Black men’s intimate relationships in hip-hop culture.

The goal of this First-Year Seminar is to help students develop their own sense of Black feminist thought and practice through exploring the lives and works of several key Black feminist figures with ties to North Carolina. The figures are Harriet Jacobs, Anna Julia Cooper, Pauli Murray, Ella Baker, Nina Simone, Jaki Shelton Green, and Alexis Pauline Gumbs. Students will engage materials that put these figures in context of Black feminist thought and will do hands on activities that reflect Black feminist practices.

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Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 60H.001: Crisis & Resilience: Past & Future of Human Societies (Honors)
Gen Eds: HS, BN, CI
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Patricia A. McAnany

Patricia A. McAnany is Kenan Eminent Professor of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. A Maya archaeologist, she serves as co-principal investigator of Proyecto Arqueológico Colaborativo del Oriente de Yucatán and as Executive Director of InHerit: Indigenous Heritage Passed to Present (www.in-herit.org). She is particularly interested in the intersection of ritual and economy and in the perspectives of descendant Maya peoples on cultural heritage. She is the author/co-editor of several books, most recently Maya Cultural Heritage: How Archaeologists and Indigenous Communities engage the Past; Textile Economies: Power & Value from the Local to the Transnational (2011) co-edited with Walter E. Little; Ancestral Maya Economies in Archaeological Perspective (2010); Questioning Collapse: Human Resilience, Ecological Vulnerability, and the Aftermath of Empire (2009) co-edited with Norman Yoffee; and Dimensions of Ritual Economy (2008) co-edited with E. Christian Wells. Her recent journal articles include “Casualties of Heritage Distancing: Children, Ch’ortí Indigeneity, and the Copán Archaeoscape” (co-authored with Shoshaunna Parks), Current Anthropology Vol. 53 (2011); and “Thinking About Stratigraphic Sequence in Social Terms” (co-authored with Ian Hodder), Archaeological Dialogues Vol. 16 (2009). She is the recipient of several research awards from the National Science Foundation and of fellowships from the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Institute for the Arts & Humanities (UNC, Chapel Hill), the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Radcliffe Center for Advanced Study at Harvard University. Currently, she works to provide rural communities in the Maya Region with opportunities to dialogue about cultural heritage.

In this FYS, we take a long view of human societies by examining responses to crises engendered by political, economic, and environmental factors over the longue durée. Perspectives on societal change—both apocalyptic and transformational—are critically examined in light of a suite of case studies that span the Pleistocene to current times. Particular attention is paid to the idea of the Anthropocene—that humans have entered an epoch in which climate change is driven by humanly produced atmospheric conditions. We also examine critically the concepts of resilience and sustainability in terms of the future of human society. Students gain familiarity with evaluating archaeological, historical, and environmental information that is pertinent to understanding change. The aim of the seminar is to foster critical thinking and the ability to evaluate narratives (in both scholarly and popular media) about societal crises and human resilience.

Seminar research materials include books, journal articles, films, and student-run interviews. Class meetings generally consist of a short, introductory lecture followed by discussion headed by student discussion-leaders. Each student selects a topic or a case study to research in depth, develops a short class presentation, and writes a final research paper.

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ANTH 89-089: Breakfast Club
Gen Eds: SS, GL
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Caela O’Connell

Caela O’Connell is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and the Environment, Ecology, and Energy Program. She got hooked on researching farmers and the environment in particular while studying Spanish at the Universidad de Habana in Cuba. Dr. O’Connell runs the Socio-Ecological Change Research Lab (SECR Lab) at UNC investigating different aspects of sustainability, agriculture, inequality, water, disasters, adaptation, crisis and environmental conservation and partnering with community organizations for engaged scholarship. Her work is primarily in the Caribbean and North and South America. When not thinking about the future for farming and our global environment, Caela enjoys baking for friends, hiking (nothing too steep), taekwondo, tracking hurricanes, and traveling with her family.

From donuts to dim sum, what starts your day off right? Grabbing those simple meal bars on the way to class? A hearty bowl of oatmeal? Skipping breakfast altogether? Your answer to this question it is not only determined by your individual preferences, but also shaped by culture, economics, gender, environment, and marketing. In this course, we will explore breakfast around the world from hot fishcakes to cornflakes applying an anthropological lens to understand the human experience of producing, selling, preparing, and eating breakfast foods and drinks. This discussion-based seminar will read research and popular publications of nonfiction and fiction, one ethnographic book, view films and documentaries, and observe people breakfasting in everyday life. Assessment activities such as “Label Liability” students will learn to critically breakdown and research the marketing and ingredients involved in everyday breakfast foods will facilitate creative and experiential learning for students with everyday usefulness beyond the classroom setting.

Students will learn about how anthropologists spanning the humanities and the social sciences ask questions, investigate, and share research findings while developing critical thinking, reading, writing, and communication skills useful for college and beyond.

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Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies (ASIA)

ASIA 52-001: Food in Chinese Culture
Gen Eds: LA, BN
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Gang Yue

Dr. Gang Yue teaches a variety of courses on modern China, Tibet, and Chinese American experiences.

“You are what you eat,” but equally important is how you eat it and how you write about food and eating. The rich tradition of Chinese food and the even richer tradition of writing about food offer great food for thought. This course explores the major themes and topics related to food and the food culture of China as well as Chinese food in North America. Readings include two non-fiction books by Chinese American authors, namely, The Fortune Cookie Chronicles: Adventures in the World of Chinese Food by Jennifer Lee and Serve the People: A Stir-Fried Journey Through China by Jen Lin-Liu, as well as select fictional works by such Chinese authors as Wang Meng and Mo Yan. This course is reading-intensive. It is not a cooking class.

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ASIA 69.001: Wars and Veterans: Iran, Iraq, and Afghanistan
Gen Eds: LA, CI, GL
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Claudia Yaghoobi

Claudia Yaghoobi is a Roshan Associate Professor and the Inaugural Director of Persian Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is the author of Temporary Marriage in Iran: Gender and Body Politics in Modern Iranian Literature and Film (Cambridge UP, 2020) and Subjectivity in ‘Attar, Persian Sufism, and European Mysticism (Purdue UP, 2017). She is also the co-editor (with Janet Afary) of a book series titled, Sex, Marriage, and Family in the Middle East for Bloomsbury Press.

In this course, we will explore the various ways that wars and conflicts, particularly Iran-Iraq, U.S.-Iraq, and U.S.-Afghanistan wars, have been portrayed in literature, film, and photography. We will attempt to deepen and enrich our understanding of war experienced by both veterans and civilians of each country. We will examine the impact of war on the human psyche in regards to violence. We will read books by American war veterans and Middle East authors contemplating the wars and their consequences. We will look at each writer’s perspective on war and their interpretation of it comparatively. All readings will be in English. The class will be conducted in the form of a combination of lectures, discussion, and experimentations.

This course is designed for Equity in Teaching. During this course we will be implementing an innovative and interactive learning method—Collaborative Online International Learning, or COIL. During this course we will engage in class discussions and lectures and a final presentation assignment with Dr. Amir Hossein Vafa and students from the Shiraz University in Iran for approximately five class session (asynchronous and synchronous options available). These activities will enhance your learning of the course content, and your participation in the COIL activities is required. COIL activities will provide you with exposure to new cultural contexts, knowledge, and perspectives on the course material. By participating in the COIL activities, you will develop and enhance cross-cultural communication skills and gain experience working in multicultural teams. As part of your grade and COIL activities, in groups with Iranian students, you will sketch, design, and create a war-related artifact using the campus MakerSpace (BeAM) facilities.

Students may also register for this course under PWAD 69.001.

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ASIA 71-001: Asia in Iberian Converso Literature, 1500s-1650s
Gen Eds: LA, WB
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Carmen Hsu

Carmen Hsu is Associate Professor of Spanish in the Department of Romance Studies. Her primary field of research is 16th- and 17th-century Spanish literature, with emphasis on Cervantes, theater, news pamphlets, and Iberian-Asian relations. She is particularly interested in topics that deal with the construction of national/cultural identity, gender and space, dialogues between literature and history, as well as transoceanic impact of the Hispanic empire.

What does Asia represent to Iberian Christian writers of Jewish descent in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries? How do Iberian conversos represent their identities through their writings on Asia? How do the depictions of different Asian people come into play in these authors’ notion of personal identities and nationhood? This course examines how early modern Iberian authors of Jewish heritage imagined and represented Asia in their writings, how their representation of the non-European world dialogues with contemporary events in the Iberian Peninsular, and the significance of their notions of Asians. Upon the successful completion of the course, students will full fill Gen Ed requirements (WB and LA) and gain a better understanding of Iberian converso culture in a transoceanic and multicultural frame, in addition to acquiring a good knowledge of early modern European notions of Asia.

Students may also register for this course under ROML 71.001.

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ASIA 73-001: Popular Culture in the Arab World
Gen Eds: SS, BN
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Ana Vinea

Ana Vinea is a cultural anthropologist of the Middle East with research and teaching interests in medicine, occult practices, religion, and popular culture. Her current research examines revivalist Islamic therapies as prominent sites of innovation and contestation within changing medical, religious, and media landscapes. Vinea holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the Graduate Center of the City University in New York. Before joining UNC she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Michigan Society of Fellows, University of Michigan.

This First Year Seminar introduces students to popular culture in the Arab world. It aims to move away from the mass-mediated view of the Arab world as the land of terrorists, oppressed women, or oil billionaires to highlight the region’s dynamism, creativity, and complexity. We will investigate the production and consumption of popular culture in the region as an entry point for understanding aspects of the histories, cultures, and societies that form the Arab world. We will ask what can film, television, or music tell us about state power, inequality, national identities, gender, or political and social struggles? How is Arab popular culture integrated in global circuits of meaning and representations? And how can it be mobilized in times of revolutionary upheaval? The class will rely on anthropological readings alongside direct engagements with examples of popular culture from the Middle East.

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Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 53-001: Biotechnology: Genetically Modified Foods to the Sequence of the Human Genome
Gen Eds: PL
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Jill Dowen

Jill Dowen, PhD, is a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Integrative Program in Biological and Genome Sciences, and an Assistant Professor in the Biochemistry and Biophysics Department and the Biology Department at UNC-Chapel Hill. Dr. Dowen’s lab is investigating the function of DNA loops involving genes and their regulatory elements. Projects in her lab address how genome organization impacts the expression of genes in different cell types during development and how disruptions in these mechanisms lead to human diseases such as cancers and developmental syndromes.

A good life depends on access to adequate food and medical care. Advances in biotechnology have made possible both agriculture and medicine, and further advances may allow us to feed and keep healthy a burgeoning population in both developed and undeveloped countries. This seminar will examine the science behind a number of striking recent advances in biology, including animal cloning, genetic engineering of crop plants, development of new therapeutic drugs, development of embryonic stem cells, and deciphering of the complete human genome sequence. Students will debate how specific technological advances force us to confront new social and ethical choices, such as whether you want your own genome to be sequenced. We will also consider how new technologies are actually implemented, especially in regard to recent public health challenges such as Zika and SARS-CoV-2 viruses. The seminar should bring together the humanistic and technical impulses in students, and is open to students planning careers in scientific or humanities fields.

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Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 73H-001: From Atomic Bombs to Cancer Treatments: The Broad Scope of Nuclear Chemistry (Honors)
Gen Eds: PL
MW, 1:25 PM – 2:40 PM
Todd Austell

Todd Austell is a Teaching Professor and currently serves as the Associate Director of U’grad Studies for the Department of Chemistry. He serves as an academic advisor for STEM and pre-health science majors in UNC Academic Advising. Prof. Austell received his BS in Chemistry in 1987 and his PhD in Chemistry in 1996, both at UNC. He spent one year working in the pharmaceutical industry prior to graduate school and another year as an Assistant Professor at the United States Air Force Academy prior to returning to his current position in 1998. As an undergraduate, he participated in the Department of Energy and American Chemistry Society’s Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry. Topical studies in nuclear chemistry have been a hobby of his since that time. His graduate research involved separation science, and he is currently involved in both curriculum development within the chemistry department and in a long-term study of how middle school and secondary math education/preparation affects student performances in college general chemistry. His hobbies include hiking, camping, disc golf and gardening as well as following all UNC athletics. He has two young daughters whom he says are “his greatest accomplishment” and a wife who works as a physical therapist.

Nuclear chemistry is a broad field which we all are affected by almost daily in some way, shape or form. In this course we’ll explore many aspects of nuclear chemistry in an attempt to better understand the historical development, the present technology and the future of the field. A general chemistry background in atomic history and theory will first be provided, followed by a survey of the applications and research topics of nuclear chemistry today. Many topics discussed in the course are surrounded by controversy. In each of these cases, student will research and discuss the various sides of each argument to better understand the topics.

NOTE: STUDENTS IN THIS COURSE MUST NOT HAVE ANY OTHER CLASSES SCHEDULED BETWEEN 2:40 PM AND 5:00 PM ON MONDAYS & WEDNESDAYS.

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City and Regional Planning (PLAN)

PLAN 59-001: World’s Fairs
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Alainna Thomas

Dr. Allie Thomas looks at how technology can be used to address both environmental sustainability and social equity within the transportation sector. She relies upon qualitative methods to investigate the phenomenon of how and why technologies are accepted or rejected She sometimes embeds herself in the planning context to learn where the process succeeds or breaks down. Her work has looked bus rapid transit adaption in China, electric bikes in San Francisco, and the use of ridehailing services across Generation X and millennials in the Southeastern US. She is currently working on understanding how transit agencies adapt cashless fare technologies.

This course introduces students to World’s Fairs in the US between 1893 and 1965 (1884 World Cotton Centennial, New Orleans; 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago; 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition, Saint Louis; 1939 New York World’s Fair; 1962 Seattle World’s Fair; 1964/1965 New York World’s Fair). We will look at how ideas about cities and world’s fairs changed over time. We will also look at the role World’s Fairs played in: (1) promoting a city’s place in the US and the world, (2) addressing social issues, and (3) disseminating ideas about progress. We will learn about world’s fairs through documentaries (video/audio), texts, as well as examine memorabilia from each of the Fairs. Students will be responsible for participating in weekly discussions on readings and biweekly journal responses. Students will work on a group project on a world’s fair and present at the end of the semester. This project can use traditional means of presentations–such as PowerPoint and posters, or it could be a podcast (5 minutes), video, or some other media.

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Classics (CLAS/CLAR)

CLAR 50-001: Art in the Ancient City – ADDED 11/24/2021
Gen Eds: VP, BN, WB
TTH, 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM
Donald Haggis

Donald Haggis is Professor of Classical Archaeology in the Department of Classics and Adjunct Professor in the Curriculum in Archaeology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is a field archaeologist who has been conducting archaeological excavations and surveys in Greece for the past 36 years, working particularly on the island of Crete in the Greek Aegean. His main research interests include early state formation and the origins and emergence of early cities in the Aegean during the Bronze Age (ca. 2000 B.C.) and Early Iron Age (ca. 1000-700 B.C.). He is currently the director of excavations of an early Greek city at the site of Azoria in eastern Crete (https://azoria.unc.edu/).

The course is a comparative study of the archaeology of Ancient Egypt and the Bronze Age Aegean, ca. 3000-1100 B.C., exploring the public art produced by two Mediterranean state-level societies: the Aegean Bronze Age palace centers of Crete and Mainland Greece (Minoans and Mycenaeans); the territorial state and empire of ancient Egypt. These interrelated cultures produced very different forms of public art and architecture reflecting unique cultural developments, and forms of urbanization. We examine the form, style, context, and media of production, consumption and display of art in the public sphere, exploring the definition of art; art as material culture; and art as an expression of social values and projection of dominant sociopolitical ideologies. While these ancient civilizations on opposite sides of the Mediterranean were in contact with each other, borrowing or sharing certain cultural traits, they ultimately produced very different forms of complex society. The goal of the course is to compare and contrast the method, media, and subject matter of public art toward a contextual and archaeological understanding of these differences and similarities, and ultimately the cultures that formed them.

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CLAS 51H-001: Greek Drama from Page to Stage (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, CI, WB
MW, 4:40 PM – 5:55 PM
Al Duncan

Al Duncan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics. He holds a B.A. in English and Classical Languages & Literature from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in Classics and the Humanities from Stanford University. Having previously taught in Classics and Comparative Literature at the University at Utah, he joined the Carolina faculty in 2015, where he teaches a variety of courses on ancient Greek language and literature and ancient Mediterranean culture.

Professor Duncan’s research focuses on theatrical production, aesthetics, and genre. He is currently preparing a book on ugliness in Greek drama, as well as several chapters and articles on the material and cognitive aspects of ancient theater.

Taking a participatory approach to ancient Greek drama, this course pairs readings from three Athenian playwrights (Aeschylus, Euripides, and Aristophanes) with performance-oriented activities and scholarship.

At its most traditional, this course surveys the historical and cultural context of the so-called “classical” Athens of the fifth-century BCE, emphasizing the political, religious, and aesthetic forces that gave rise to humankind’s first recorded theater. More innovatively, this course probes the dual nature of theater, its distinct but intertwined existences as codified script and socially-embedded performance, through sustained investigations of some of its most influential texts and their modern reception in a global context with case studies focused on post-Apartheid South African and 21st-century Chicanx experiences.

Through a variety of original compositions (including Tweets, TikTok/FlipGrid videos, character backstories, stand-up routines, director’s notes, and scholarly analyses), students gain practical experience and theoretical insight into the ways text, performance, and culture interact. Through improvisational activities, recorded videos, and scene rehearsals, students become thespians in their own right, pressing the limits of how far performance might extend beyond the traditional stage. Class trips to Davis Library and the Forest Theater introduce first-year students to some of the academic and cultural resources UNC offers.

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Communication (COMM)

COMM 89-001: Communication, Culture, and Social Justice
Gen Eds: CI, US
MW, 5:45 PM – 7:00 PM
Michael Palm

Michael Palm’s teaching focuses on the history of everyday technology and the politics and economics of popular culture. He’s writing a book about the contemporary economy for vinyl records. Informed by research visits to pressing plants and (lots) of record stores, the book connects vinyl’s niche popularity to issues including ecological sustainability, gentrification, and independent cultural production in a digital media landscape. Palm’s book Technologies of Consumer Labor: A History of Self-Service (Routledge, 2017) documents and analyzes the history of telephone interface—from the rotary dial to the keypad to the touch screen—as self-service technology.

This course introduces students to several primary areas of focus for social justice-oriented scholarship and activism. These areas include racial justice, labor and economic justice, gender and sexual justice, and environmental justice. The course will also introduce students to ways that these issues are studied in the Department of Communication at UNC, by paying particular attention to popular culture and public engagement as sites of struggles for social justice.

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Dramatic Art (DRAM)

DRAM 83-001: Spectacle in the Theatre
Gen Eds: VP
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
David Navalinsky

David Navalinsky is the Director of Undergraduate Production in the Department of Dramatic Art. David has taught at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Mississippi. David’s recent design work includes scenery for The Uncanny Valley by Francesca Talenti. The Uncanny Valley featured a Robothespian™, which is exactly what it sounds like. He has also written a documentary theatre piece Priceless Gem: An Athlete Story, which tells the stories of UNC athletes. David has worked professionally at South Coast Repertory in Orange County California, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, The Illinois Shakespeare Festival, and the Karamu Performing Arts Theatre in Cleveland, OH. Some of David’s favorite projects were at the Dallas Children’s Theater where he made a dinosaur collapse and pirates walk the plank.

This seminar will explore the artists, art and technology involved in creating the world of the play. It is intended as an overview for students who want to learn about theatrical design. Students will create their own designs in the areas of scenery, costumes, and lighting for three plays throughout the semester. The plays will be placed outside of their traditional setting while still maintaining the story and themes. Students have placed Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a trailer park and a daycare center for example. Careful historical research, close reading and analysis, text and source material, and collaboration will be the focus of the student projects.

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Economics (ECON)

ECON 89-001: Social Equity and Entrepreneurship
Gen Eds: SS, US
TH, 3:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Riley Jones

Riley Jones is a lawyer and social entrepreneur who was recognized in 2019 as a Forbes 30 Under 30 honoree. His academic interests in the areas of education, technology and social justice inform his journey as a funder, operator and advisor of social enterprises. A proud native of Chicago’s South Side, Riley is glad to finally share the Tar Heel community with His Airness Michael Jordan. In his spare time, you can find Riley singing, playing tennis, or traveling. He holds a B.A. from Columbia University, J.D. from NYU Law School, and a Masters in Education Entrepreneurship from the University of Pennsylvania.

Social Equity and Entrepreneurship will explore how topics like racial equity, economic inequality, and gender disparities influence themes in social entrepreneurship. The course will also encourage students to engage with their peers and with guest lecturers- entrepreneurs, investors, and executives- in order to craft a thoughtful approach to pursuing equity in their own academic and entrepreneurial journeys.

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English and Comparative Literature (CMPL/ENGL)

ENGL 71H-001: Doctors and Patients (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Kym Weed

Kym Weed is a Teaching Assistant Professor in English & Comparative Literature and the Co-Director of the HHIVE Lab and Associate Director the MA program in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. She earned her PhD from UNC and recently returned to Chapel Hill via Vanderbilt University’s Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Her research focuses on the intersection of science and literature in late-nineteenth-century American literature and culture as well as historical and contemporary understandings of illness, health, disability, and embodiment. She teaches courses in health humanities, disability studies, American literature, and writing.

When medical anthropologist Arthur Kleinman writes that “illness has meaning,” he reminds us that the human experience of being sick involves more than bodily symptoms. Moreover, the effects of illness and disability are rarely confined to one person. In this course, we will analyze a diverse collection of writers who have taken as their topic the human struggle to make sense of suffering and debility through a range of genres including fiction, non-fiction, graphic memoir, podcasts, and oral histories.

Divided into five units, the course will allow us to explore not just the medical, but also the personal, ethical, cultural, and political facets of illness from the perspectives of patients, healers, and families. Central texts will include /Ask Me About My Uterus/ by Abby Norman, /Black Man in a White Coat/ by Damon Tweedy, /Mom’s Cancer/ by Brian Fies and /The Farewell/ directed by Lulu Wang. Additionally, students will utilize the growing archive of oral histories from the Stories to Save Lives project to learn more about the experiences of patients, healers, and families from across North Carolina.

MAY SUBSTITUTE FOR THE ENGL 268H / GATEWAY COURSE REQUIREMENT FOR THE MEDICINE, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE MINOR.

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ENGL 89-001: Catholic Literature: Scriptures, Saints, and Skeptics
Gen Eds: LA
MWF, 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Danielle Christmas

Danielle Christmas is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC. She holds a B.A. in English from Washington University in St. Louis and a Ph.D. in English from University of Illinois at Chicago. Her current manuscript, “Auschwitz and the Plantation: Labor, Sex, and Death in American Holocaust and Slavery Fiction,” concerns how representations of slavery and the Holocaust contribute to American socioeconomic discourses. She has received a number of national awards to support this research, including a Cummings Foundation Fellowship at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and a Mellon / ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship. Deeply interested in comparative frameworks, Danielle co-convened an international conference through Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia in July 2014 entitled, “The Future of the Past: Representing the Holocaust, Genocide, and Mass Trauma in the 21st Century” and she is proud to have been included in the USHMM’s interdisciplinary symposium of scholars working on genocide and literature. Most recently, her articles have appeared in Twentieth-Century Literature (2015) and Aftermath: Genocide, Memory, and History (Monash University, 2015). When she’s not working, Danielle’s taking a Nia class, drinking wine, playing a board game, or attempting to knit. You can find out more about Danielle’s work at her website, www.daniellechristmas.com.

In this FYS, you are invited to engage with a fascinating collection of ancient, medieval, and modern Catholic literature. We will consider several questions including: What is the “Catholic way” of reading the Bible as literature? Are there any tensions between literary production and Catholic belief? How does a “Catholic imagination” shape the way authors, in medieval and modern times, struggle with questions of meaning, purpose, and suffering? How can close textual readings develop our skills for literary analysis and critical thinking in classroom, personal, written, and inner discourse? This class is not a religious seminar or inducement to any particular belief, Catholic or otherwise; rather, we will work together to critically understand the often unnoticed ways in which a Catholic aesthetic has constructed what we understand to be literature and art, ethics and morals, saints and sinners. And that kind of critical turn requires an ability and eagerness for rigorous modes of reading, a kind of reading that is distinct from the eye we bring to Oprah’s Book Club, a psychology textbook, The New Yorker, or Twitter. Considering the influence of each form of writing we will encounter—Biblical narratives; spiritual biographies; and contemporary fiction that challenges and tests religious belief—doesn’t it seem like a good idea to learn how to read and think about these works, critically engage and argue about them, appreciate and challenge them? Because learning to read Catholic literature will allow you to better imagine and articulate your own moral worldview and ethical discourse, and participate in the public conversations that use religious belief to (re)form social and political boundaries.

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ENGL 89-002: Human Rights and Literature
Gen Eds: LA, GL
MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
Stephanie Degooyer

Stephanie Degooyer’s research examines intersections between law and literature, with interests in immigration, migration, history of disease and global health, and human rights and humanitarianism. She teaches classes on law and literature, transatlantic and colonial literature, Medical Humanities, and theories and history of the novel.

Stephanie Degooyer’s forthcoming book, Acts of Naturalization, (JHUP, 2022) looks to the legal process of naturalization in the long eighteenth century to argue for a new fictional conception of nationality in early modernity. She is currently working on two projects: Asylum Nation: Refugees and the Founding of America, which traces the colonial history of legal concepts such as “asylum” and “refugees” in British common law and early American legal and literary history, and a book project on the history and social function of unidentified bodily remains. She is co-author of The Right to Have Rights (Verso Books, 2018), and co-editor of The Routledge Companion to the Novel (forthcoming 2023). She has written on a variety of topics – immigration, borders, vaccines, disease, and literature – for The Nation, Guardian, Dissent, Boston Review, Lapham’s Quarterly, Humanity, Los Angeles Review of Books, and Public Books.

In this class we will investigate the history of human rights from the perspective of literature. We will explore how rights are represented and narrated in novels such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and how founding declarations—famously, the Declaration of Independence (1776), the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen (1789), and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948)—rely on fictional structures. While attending to some of the more politically contentious issues involved with human rights, such as the claim that universal rights lack political and legal enforcement, we will also consider the following questions: how does fiction help articulate and represent claims to human rights? Why might a political philosopher or legal scholar turn to a work of fiction from the eighteenth century or present day in order to make an argument about human rights? Alongside theoretical and historical writings about human rights we will read authors such as Hannah Arendt, Edmund Burke, Behrouz Boochani, Mahatma Gandhi, Thomas Hobbes, Mohsin Hamid, Thomas Paine, Mary Shelley, and Mary Wollstonecraft.

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ENGL 89-003: Apocalypse When?
Gen Eds: LA, NA
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Taylor Cowdery

Taylor Cowdery is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. His research focuses on how medieval poets think about the materiality of their poems—or in short, what they think their poems are made of. He’s also interested in the history of gender and sexuality, the history of book, the novel, and critical theory. He has two cats, but only one of them is named after a literary figure.

Plenty of us feel like we’re living in the end times—but why do some of us feel like they happened long ago, or that they’re just around the corner? This course considers the representation of the apocalypse in Western literature and culture from two angles: first, as the product of a religious fascination with the end of time, and second, as a phenomenon whose significance depends upon whether it has occurred, will occur, or is occurring at this very moment. Students will read a selection of texts drawn both from the Bible and from parallel religious traditions (for instance, medieval visions of the apocalypse, or the Babylonian Epic of Gilgamesh) alongside novels and essays by writers attempting to think through the significance of the apocalypse as both a temporal and an historical event.

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ENGL 89H-001: American Poetry in Motion (Honors)
John L. Townsend III FYS in English
Gen Eds: LA, EE-Mentored Research
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Eliza Richards

Eliza Richards is Professor of English, with a concentration in American literature before 1900 and American poetry. She has written about Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, poetry of the US Civil War, and popular women’s poetry. Professor Richards has won awards for teaching on both the graduate and undergraduate level.

This course focuses on the creative processes involved in writing poetry. We will look at poets’ revisions of their work, their statements about poetry, their letters to and from other writers, and the publication and reception of their poems in their own time. We will concentrate on specific case studies: the manuscripts and letter-poems of the reclusive writer Emily Dickinson; the notebooks, letters, and poems of Walt Whitman that he wrote while tending the wounded in the Civil War hospitals; the poems, manuscripts, and letters of George Moses Horton, who taught himself to read and write and published two books of poetry while enslaved in North Carolina; and the drafts, revisions, and animal drawings of twentieth-century modernist Marianne Moore. The course seeks to develop close reading skills that are crucial for interpreting poetry; to explore how social and cultural conditions both limit and enable poetic expression, and how poets analyze and criticize those conditions; to strengthen writing and oral communication skills; and to develop research skills.

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Exercise and Sport Science (EXSS)

EXSS 89-001: Sport Engineering and Human Performance: Where is the Limit?
MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM
Meredith Petschauer

Meredith Petschauer received her PhD from the University of North Carolina-Greensboro in Biomechanics, Master’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Athletic Training and bachelor’s degree from The College of Wooster. She teaches Biomechanics, Advanced Orthopedic Assessment and Functional Anatomy. She is the Director of Undergraduate Studies for EXSS and serves as the Athletic Trainer for the Women’s Volleyball team. Her clinical focus is what lead her into biomechanics and human performance. Her research interest includes emergency care of the equipment laden athlete. She and her husband, Greg have two children, Madison and Grant.

This first year seminar designed to discuss the limits of human performance and equipment that is engineered to enhance performance. How fast is it possible to run or swim? Will Olympic records continue to be broken? When do we reach our full athletic potential? This course is designed to challenge your thinking about performance using the science that governs biomechanics and human physiology as well as exploring the data that drives equipment development.

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Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 52-001: Political Ecology of Health and Disease
Gen Eds: SS, CI, GL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Michael Emch

Michael Emch is W.R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Geography and Epidemiology at UNC. His expertise is in infectious disease ecology, spatial epidemiology, neighborhood determinants of health, and geographic information science applications of public health. He leads the Spatial Health Research Group which conducts research that explores spatio-temporal patterns of disease, primarily infectious diseases of the developing world. His research group focuses on diverse topics such as the role of population-environment drivers in pathogen evolution, how social connectivity contributes to disease incidence, and using environmental indicators to predict disease outbreaks. For more information see the Spatial Health Research Group website at spatialhealth.web.unc.edu/.

This course examines the ecology of infectious diseases including environmental and anthropogenic drivers of those diseases. During the semester we will focus on several case studies of diseases including COVID-19, malaria, cholera, and HIV/AIDS. The biophysical and evolutionary drivers of diseases will be examined as well as the political, economic, social, and environmental systems that shape health and disease across spatial and temporal scales. A political ecological framework is used to examine such topics as how political forces and economic interests helped shape the HIV/AIDS and malaria pandemics in Africa and beyond. We will also examine how emerging infectious diseases such as COVID-19 diffuse through populations and how public health efforts and geographical and epidemiological modelling and analyses can be used to predict and limit their spread.

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GEOG 62-001: The Culture of Technology
Gen Eds: PH, CI
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Scott Kirsch

Scott Kirsch is a cultural, historical, and political geographer in the Geography Department at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He writes about social and political implications of technology; 19th & 20th century US science; history of scientific exploration and cartography; nuclear landscapes; US geopolitics, especially in Philippines and Asia/Pacific; and geographies of war and peace.

It is hard to define “technology”, but we know it when we see it: cell phones; global positioning systems; genetically-modified organisms; the internet; microchips; steam engines; railroad cars, automobiles, passenger jets; x-rays; nuclear bombs; satellites; magnetic resonance imaging. Technological systems and artifacts, as these examples suggest, have shaped our world in critical ways, from our means of dealing with nature to our modes of dealing with each other, and from economic production to political debates to the very dimensions of space and time around which social life is organized. And yet, though technology is arguably among the most human of social processes, its profound effects on social relations, everyday life, and the human environment are too often left unexamined. This seminar uses the lens of culture to explore codes of meaning and values, and relations of social power, that are invested in technologies. Focusing on representations of technology in film, literature, and new media, on one hand, and on the values that go into the making of actual technologies, on the other, the seminar encourages critical thinking and writing about our place in a technological world, and technology’s place in ours.

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GEOG 65H-001: Climate Change and the Media (Honors)
Gen Eds: PL, CI
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Erika Wise

Professor Erika Wise leads the Climate & Tree Ring Environmental Science (C-TRĒS) research group, based in UNC’s Department of Geography. She is a climatologist who specializes in using dendrochronology (tree-ring science) to study climate over the last several centuries, especially the long-term record of past droughts, floods, and other climate extremes. This research is important for establishing a baseline for recent climate change and for understanding how climate change might impact our water resources in the future. Before moving to North Carolina, Dr. Wise lived in Ohio, California, Pennsylvania, Arizona, and Iowa; she has collected tree samples in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Oklahoma, North Dakota, and South Dakota. She likes to go to new places and learn new things!

Climate change has been called both the “greatest hoax” ever perpetuated and the “most urgent threat” facing the world. While scientists produce volume after volume of consensus documents on climate change, the popular debate rages on, fueled by print and TV news, social media, movies, and fiction. Experts, pseudo-experts, and casual observers debate causes, consequences, and remedies in every form of media. In this class, we will explore how the established science of climate change is presented, distorted, and debated in the public sphere by alarmists, denialists, and everyone in between. Through reading and writing exercises, class viewings, discussions, and presentations, students will encounter many points of view, explore a variety of media sources, and develop informed perspectives on one of the defining issues of our time. Beyond climate change, the topics discussed in this class will have relevance to other current events where science, politics, and personal beliefs intersect.

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Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GSLL)

GSLL 52-001: Nature and Death: Ecological Crises in German Literature and Film – ADDED 12/2/2021
Gen Eds: LA, NA
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Christina Weiler

Christina Weiler was born in Oberstdorf, a small village in the Bavarian Alps, and has lived and taught in Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the US. Her research focuses on German literature, culture, and philosophy of the long eighteenth century in a comparative and interdisciplinary framework. Particularly, she is interested in German Romanticism, metaphor studies, philosophy of nature and the senses, and environmental studies. She has published on J.G. Herder, E.T.A. Hoffmann, and German film. In her research, she explores questions about nature and ecology. She is also interested in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

This seminar explores ecological crises and their depiction in German literature and film. We will focus on the central themes of nature and death. The texts and films we will discuss will range from early Romantic fairy tales to present-day documentaries and climate-change literature (cli-fi). We will encounter (human) animals in crisis. Together, we will face nuclear catastrophes, flooding, landslides, mass extinction, and climate change.

As a First-Year Seminar, this course goes beyond the traditional lecture and discussion format. It invites students to explore new and old ideas, engage with complex issues, and become active learners through inquiry, analysis, discovery, and action. Students will research a current ecological issue of their choice and give a presentation on it. They will also engage with the texts and films through critical analysis in writing and address an environmental issue creatively in their final project.

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GSLL 59-001: Moscow 1937: Dictatorships and Their Defenders
Gen Eds: HS, GL
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
David Pike

David Pike received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1978 in German Studies with a minor in Russian and has taught at UNC–CH since 1980. He is the author of three books, The Politics of Culture in Soviet -Occupied Germany, 1945-1949 (1993), Lukács and Brecht (1985), and German Writers in Soviet Exile, 1933-1945 (1982). His research takes him regularly to Berlin and Moscow.

This seminar deals in the broadest possible context with two critical issues that dominated the 20th century: the rise of fascism out of the carnage of World War I and the Bolshevik revolution to which the war and Czarist Russia’s involvement in it helped contribute. As the semester unfolds, drawing on a variety of historical and documentary films, and literature (memoirs, novels), we will take a comparative look at singular personalities like Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler and examine the role played by such key figures in historical events of this magnitude. Towards the end of the semester, we will glance briefly at the situation created in Western and Eastern Europe by the defeat of fascism and contemplate the origins and evolution of the cold war. We will conclude the seminar with a consideration of the dissolution and democratization of Eastern European countries, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and, against the tragic background of the past, the general prognosis for democracy in the future.

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GSLL 60-001: Avant-Garde Cinema: History, Themes, Textures
Gen Eds: VP
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Richard Langston

Richard Langston joined the faculty at Carolina in the fall of 2002, was promoted to the rank of associate professor in 2008, and then became full professor in 2019. His research focuses generally on twentieth- and twenty-first century German literature and film. More specifically, he is interested in the continued afterlife of the experimental arts beginning in the early twentieth century (expressionism, Dada, surrealism, etc.) in art and culture today.

Students explore the international history, filmic techniques and cultural meanings of non-narrative cinema of the 20th century. Students also transform in-class discussions and individual essays into video projects.

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GSLL 68H-001: Intensity, Vitality, Ecstasy: Affects in Literature, Film, and Philosophy (Honors)
Gen Eds: PH, NA
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Gabriel Trop

Gabriel Trop is Associate Professor of German at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. He earned his Ph.D. in German and Medieval Studies from the University of California at Berkeley. His research tends to focus on the relationship between literature, philosophy, and science, with a special emphasis on poetics and aesthetics. Both his scholarship and his teaching within this broader framework is rather comparative: he has engaged with texts and ideas from Ancient Greece, Roman Antiquity, the Middle Ages (mainly Middle High German), and German and French literature and philosophy from the eighteenth century to the twentieth century.

What cultural and intellectual resources do we have to increase the intensity of our inner lives, to feel more vitally plugged into the world, and to be attracted to extraordinary modes of perception? We will read texts by famous philosophers, mystics, and poets in order to help us answer these questions. Assignments will explore creative and alternative forms of writing (rather than the standard academic essay): dialogues, narratives, letters, and free writing, among others. Authors include: Plato, Sappho, Marcus Aurelius, Hildegard von Bingen, Mechthild von Magdeburg, Meister Eckhart, Descartes, Pascal, Goethe, Kafka, Musil, Deleuze, and Rilke, among others. (Course taught in English. No prerequisites.)

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GSLL 80-001: Not Just Dogs: Animals in Russian Literature
Gen Eds: LA, BN
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Radislav Lapushin

Radislav Lapushin, Associate Professor of Russian Literature, received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. His primary research interests are Chekhov; interrelationship between prose and poetry; and Russian literature on stage and screen. His well-received book, Dew on the Grass: The Poetics of Inbetweenness in Chekhov, focuses on the poetic dimensions of Anton Chekhov’s prose and drama. An author of several volumes of Russian poetry, his most recent collection, Dog Poetry (Boston, 2016), dovetails nicely with the topic of this seminar.

This seminar explores the “question of the animal” in the works of major Russian writers (Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Turgenev, Chekhov) and introduces students to the main theoretical texts on the animal/human relationship (Nietzsche, Levinas, Derrida, Irigaray). Among the topics to be discussed are the animal as the other, animal and human natures, dominance and submission, ethics of the human/animal relations, and the theme of “talking” animals.
The course’s main goals are:

• To follow the representation of the animal in Russian literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries;
• To examine the worlds of major Russian writers;
• To learn the methods of analyzing literature;
• To learn the methods of critical writing.

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GSLL 89-001: Uncharted Territory: Underworlds in Literature and the Visual Arts – CANCELLED 1/7/2022
Gen Eds: LA, NA
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Aleksandra Prica

Aleksandra Prica received her Ph.D. in medieval German literature from the University of Zurich, Switzerland. She spent two years on a postdoctoral grant at the Department of Germanic Studies at the University of Chicago before joining the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in January 2016. She has a published a book on biblical exegesis and poetics entitled “Heilsgeschichten. Untersuchungen zur mittelalterlichen Bibelauslegung zwischen Poetik und Exegese,” which appeared with Chronos Press in 2010. Her second book “Decay and Afterlife: Form, Time, and the Textuality of Ruins, 1100-1900” is forthcoming with University of Chicago Press. “Decay and Afterlife” sets out in new directions by pivoting away from our immediate visual fascination with the material urgency of ruins and towards the textuality that ruins manifest in discourses about disintegration and survival, be they literary, philosophical or historiographical. Decay and Afterlife takes readers on a journey across the Latin, Italian, French, German and English speaking lands of Europe, traversing the long duree of 800 years of intellectual and literary history.

Ever since antiquity, the notion of underworlds has been an integral part of how humans see and understand their living environment. This course examines concepts and representations of underworlds in literature and the visual arts from the ancient world to the Middle Ages and Renaissance to modernity. Our journey will take us to the realms of the afterlife as well as into the abyss of the human psyche and the shady areas of underground criminal activities. We will explore how the desire to know the beyond has triggered people’s imagination, inspired literary and artistic traditions and influenced new forms of knowledge, moral and intellectual values and social realities. Readings include excerpts from the Bible, Homer’s Odyssey, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Plato’s Republic, Dante’s Inferno, Milton’s Paradise Lost, Dostoevsky’s Notes from the Underground, Primo Levi’s Auschwitz memoirs, Don de Lillo’s Underworld and we will watch movies and episodes from TV shows such as Apocalypse Now, The Sopranos and Breaking Bad. We will visit the museum and a music/theater performance. Through reading responses, a creative writing project, an argumentative paper, and an oral presentation you will develop and practice skills of critical thinking as well as persuasive written and oral communication and you will have the opportunity to develop and use your creativity effectively.

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History (HIST)

HIST 53-001: Traveling to European Cities: American Writers/Cultural Identities, 1830-2000
John L. Townsend III FYS in History
Gen Eds: HS, NA
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Lloyd Kramer

Lloyd Kramer’s interests focus on Modern European History with an emphasis on nineteenth-century France and French-American cultural relations. He is particularly interested in historical processes that shape personal and collective identities, including the experiences of cross-cultural exchange and the emergence of modern nationalism. Other research and teaching interests deal with the roles of intellectuals in modern societies and the theoretical foundations of historical knowledge. His teaching stresses the pleasures of reading, discussing and writing about influential books in various eras of European and world history.

This seminar examines two key themes in modern cultural and intellectual history: the importance of travel in the lives and cultural identities of American writers and the important role of European cities in the evolution of modern American cultural identities. We shall focus on a historical era in which American writers were especially drawn to Europe as an alternative to the social and cultural life in the United States; and we’ll discuss how the encounter with Europe influenced these writers as they defined their national identities as well as their views of politics, social relations, gender identities, literature, art and European cultural traditions. The seminar explores how travel has become one of the most influential personal experiences in modern times; and we’ll conclude the course with discussions of how travel remained important for American writers at the end of the twentieth century. Our overall goal is to analyze the connection between travel, writing, and personal identities. This is a class for people who like to read about personal experiences and are intrigued by foreign travel. The assigned texts include works by women and men such as Margaret Fuller, David Dorr, Mark Twain, Henry James, Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller James Baldwin, Elizabeth Spencer, and David Sedaris; and we’ll focus on works that convey how writers have interpreted American experiences in European cities such as Paris, London, Rome, and Athens.

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HIST 59-001: Rebuilding the American South: Work and Identity in Modern History
Gen Eds: HS, US
MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM
Erik Gellman

Dr. Erik Gellman is Associate Professor of History at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. He’s the author of Death Blow to Jim Crow: The National Negro Congress and the Rise of Militant Civil Rights (UNC Press, 2012) and The Gospel of the Working Class: Labor’s Southern Prophets in New Deal America (IL Press, 2011, coauthor Jarod Roll). He’s co-directed NEH and Terra Foundation programs on the Black Chicago Renaissance. Thanks to an NEH Public Scholar fellowship, he’s about to publish his next book, Troublemakers: Chicago Freedom Struggles through the Lens of Art Shay (University of Chicago Press, December 2019). From 2006-2018, he taught at Roosevelt University in Chicago.

“Class” has been the subject of more mystification, misunderstanding, and ill-informed political disagreement than perhaps any other social category. Especially in the American South, the notion of fundamental class differences may seem antithetical to the aspirations, or even claims, for a class-less society. Yet differences in occupation, income, wealth, the habits of everyday life, and definitions of the “good life” clearly remain. This course examines how class experiences and debates over the meaning of work have shaped the postbellum Southern United States. Technological innovation, the emergence of a consumer economy, and the evolution of popular culture all have made and remade class identities and influenced ideas about the South as a region as well as the racial, gender, and sexual identities of its people. Students in this course will develop new perspectives on the South in American history. They will also cultivate skills (oral and written), using history as a way of learning to analyze the past and inform the present.

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HIST 89-001: Global Food History
Gen Eds: HS, BN
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Michelle King

Michelle King is an Associate Professor of History, specializing in modern Chinese gender and food history. She is the editor of Culinary Nationalism in Asia (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019) and a special issue on Chinese culinary regionalism in Global Food History (Summer 2020). Her latest research project focuses on the career of Taiwan’s beloved cooking celebrity, Fu Pei-mei (1931-2004), for which she was awarded a NEH Public Scholars Fellowship. She had the best bowl of noodles in her life twenty-five years ago at a nameless farmstead in rural Hunan province and has been seeking its equal ever since.

What does it mean to study food history, and how do we approach it from a global perspective? The world of food (and the food of the world) is a huge subject, and the focus in this class will be on historical texts and topics (as opposed to contemporary food issues), and on global examples (with an emphasis on non-Western regions, including Asia, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East). Class topics will center on three major themes: Food as Identity (Nation, Gender, Memory, Diaspora), Food as Value (Taste, Commodity, Feasting, Famine); Food in its Modern Forms (Industrialization, Consumption, Globalization). The course emphasis will be on giving students the opportunity to practice fundamental skills of historical methodology (written primary and secondary source analysis), and using what they have learned for a creative final project presentation, based on an oral history interview.

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HIST 89-002: Witchcraft and Magic in the Early Modern World
Gen Eds: HS, WB
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Ana Silva Campo

Ana María Silva Campo is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History. Her research focuses on witchcraft, religion, and race in Latin America, especially during the era of Spanish colonial rule. Professor Silva has published articles about witchcraft trials in the early Caribbean, the Spanish Inquisition, and the lives of runaways from slavery. She is originally from Bogotá, Colombia and she enjoys hiking and playing traditional Colombian music.

Witches, witchcraft, and magic have inspired folk legends, literary works, films, and artistic creations for centuries. Ideas and beliefs about these topics have also fueled deadly persecutions of groups and individuals. Witchcraft and magic raise questions about gendered norms and expectations, about human beliefs, fear, and responses to that fear. This First Year Seminar explores early modern witchcraft and magic to introduce students to the ways in which historians think about questions of gender, power, and belief in historical perspective. The seminar will focus on how historians pose problems, collect evidence, and evaluate knowledge about how witchcraft and magic reveal broader tensions in the early modern world. The seminar also draws connections to the present by emphasizing the lasting impact of beliefs and ideas about witchcraft and magic in culture and politics.

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Honors (HNRS)

HNRS 89-001: Narrative and Medicine: Writing COVID / Writing Us (Honors)
Gen Eds: LA, CI, EE-Performing Arts
M, 2:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Terrence Holt

Terrence Holt holds the M.F.A. (creative writing) and Ph.D. (English literature) degrees from Cornell University, and the M.D. degree from the University of North Carolina, where he has held a faculty position since completing his residency training (internal medicine) in 2003, teaching topics as diverse as health care finance and medical ethics; his proposed FS derives from a course he developed and still teaches for the Department of Social Medicine. For ten years a contributing editor to Men’s Health, he publishes and speaks widely on a range of topics related to the social, ethical, and experiential aspects of medical practice. His short story collections (In the Valley of the Kings, Internal Medicine) have appeared on numerous “best of” lists, including the New York Times bestsellers, and have been reprinted, translated, and anthologized in the US, Europe, and Asia. He thinks of this course as his central contribution to his teaching at Carolina, one that combines the multiple disciplinary strands of his career into a unified experience for learners at a broad range of levels.

A workshop in autobiographical and creative short story, focusing on the complex connections between story-telling, interpretive skill, and the practice of medicine. Students will write and distribute autobiographical and and creative short stories about illness and medical care; the seminar will meet weekly to discuss these stories, attempting to identify and articulate the key issues each story expresses about what it means to be sick, what it might mean to take care of others in their illness. The writing and (especially) interpretive skills acquired in this workshop are directly valuable to anyone contemplating a career in medicine, but are equally valuable to anyone who might at some point encounter (in themselves or in someone they care for) the trauma of illness. In addition to the weekly workshop, participants will have one-on-one conferences with the instructor (himself an MD with an international reputation as a writer). The capstone project will be a public reading (via webinar, allowing participants to invite an audience from anywhere on the globe) of participants’ work, which may (at student option) be in the form of a film composed under guidance of experts at the University’s Media Resources Center illustrating images and themes from the written work.

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Information and Library Science (INLS)

INLS 73-001: Smart Cities
MW, 10:10 AM – 11:25 AM
Arcot Rajasekar

Arcot Rajasekar is a Professor in the School of Library and Information Sciences, a Chief Scientist at the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) and co-Director of Data Intensive Cyber Environments (DICE) Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A leading proponent of policy-oriented large-scale data management, Rajasekar has several research projects funded by the NSF, NARA, NIH and other funding agencies. Rajasekar has a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Maryland at College Park and has more than 100 publications in the areas of data grids, digital library, persistent archives, logic programming and artificial intelligence. His latest projects include the Datanet Federation Consortium and the Data Bridge that is building a social network platform for scientific data.

A smart city is one where the needs of a populace meet the needs of environmental sustainability. The balance between the social and environmental issues is governed by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) that power a smart city infrastructure. In this course, we learn about the influence of urban networks, smart city urban planning, energy as a catalyst of sustainable development, smart city infrastructure, sustainable transportation, flow of information and communications, smart grids, digital infrastructure and the role of data and information technology. We will discuss criteria for measuring the smartness of a city, including quality of life, citizen governance, and discuss issues that go towards the making of a future smart city. Several case studies will be presented with guest lecturers invited to present on critical thinking and practices in smart city development. Students will be involved in group projects to assess smartness of cities.

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Linguistics (LING)

LING 89-001: How Reading Works: Language, Cognition, and Literacy
Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Jennifer Smith

Jennifer Smith first encountered linguistics as a first-year college student looking for ways to combine a love of languages with an interest in science. Her research focuses on the cognitive representation of language sound systems: what kinds of consonants, vowels, and syllables do the languages of the world use, and why? How does the sound-structure system of a language interact with the structure of words or sentences? She has been invited to teach courses and give lectures around the US and abroad, and she was awarded the Chapman Family Fellowship for excellence in teaching at UNC Chapel Hill.

In many societies today, we live our lives surrounded by the written word. But did you ever stop to wonder how reading works? How do we go from looking at symbols on a page, sign, or screen to understanding the writer’s message? How do children learn to read, and what ways of teaching reading would best promote success for all students? We will explore these questions through hands-on analysis of language and writing-system structure, as well as discussion of the primary research literature. Your final course project will address a real-world question about reading, literacy, or reading education from the perspective of language and cognition.

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Marine Sciences (MASC)

MASC 51-001: Global Warming: Science, Social Impacts, Solutions
Gen Eds: PL, QI
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Marc Alperin

Marc Alperin’s work involves the use of stable isotopes as natural tracers of sedimentary processes. He is particularly interested in carbon cycling in coastal sediments and its role in the global carbon budget. Recent projects have included studies of the biogeochemistry of organic compounds dissolved in sediment pore waters, the fate of organic matter deposited on the seafloor, anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments, and the effects of dissolved organic nitrogen and carbon in atmospheric precipitation on coastal ecosystems. Dr. Alperin also co-leads the CHAOS Biogeochemistry Laboratories.

Students will examine evidence that human activity has caused global warming, investigate scientists’ ability to predict climate change, and discuss the political and social dimensions of global climate change.

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MASC 52-001: Living with Our Oceans and Atmosphere
Gen Eds: PL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
John Bane

Born in his mother’s home town of Kalamazoo, Michigan, John Bane lived in several locations throughout the U.S and abroad with his military family (his father was an Air Force pilot). He returned to earn his B.S. in Physics and Mathematics at Western Michigan University before going on to Florida State University for a Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography. Following a year at LSU where he studied coastal processes in the Gulf of Mexico, John joined the faculty at UNC.

John conducts research on the dynamics of the Gulf Stream and coastal currents, ocean-atmosphere interaction processes, and marine renewable energy. This work focuses on mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric variability that occurs on daily and longer time scales. Past study regions include the Gulf Stream from the southeastern United States to the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean, the coastal ocean and atmosphere off the U. S. west coast, from southern California to Oregon, the northern Gulf of Mexico, and the shallow waters of the Bahama Banks. He has been involved in the promotion of marine alternative energy, from both wind and ocean current resources. Presently he is a member of two investigator groups funded through the National Science Foundation (Physical Oceanography Program) and the North Carolina Renewable Ocean Energy Program. These studies are ongoing in the Cape Hatteras region, offshore of the Carolinas and Virginia.

This seminar will introduce students to the nature of the Earth’s oceans and atmosphere, and describe the processes that lead to our weather patterns and global climate. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the oceans and atmosphere affect human population, how oceanic and atmospheric changes are linked to increasing human activity, and how these changes can affect you. Basic principles and modern theories of changing climate, severe weather events, oceanic hazards, and interactions between the oceans and the atmosphere will be studied. Examples of presently active research being conducted at UNC and at other institutions will be used to highlight how the above topics are investigated scientifically. Readings will be taken from introductory textbooks on meteorology, oceanography and environmental sciences; and modern articles in periodicals such as Scientific American, Nature, American Scientist, National Geographic, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, and Weatherwise. Various websites, including those within the UNC Department of Marine Sciences, will be used.

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MASC 53-001: The Ends of the Earth: Polar Oceanography and Exploration
Gen Eds: PL
TTH, 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM
Carol Arnosti

Carol Arnosti grew up in Wisconsin, where she developed an early appreciation for snow and ice. As an undergraduate at Lawrence University, she majored in chemistry, studied history, and played intercollegiate basketball. After completing a Ph.D. in oceanography at M.I.T. and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, she went to the Max-Planck Institute in Bremen, Germany, where she rapidly became involved in a new project investigating microbial life at low temperatures. Continued involvement in this project since moving to Chapel Hill in 1995 has led to repeated research work in the Arctic as well as a trip to Antarctica, and a permanent case of ‘Polar Fever’.

What explains the ‘pull of the Poles’? What motivated early explorers to undergo great hardships to investigate the Arctic and Antarctic, and what did they discover about these regions? What have we discovered in the intervening decades, and what do we still not understand about polar regions? Why do the Arctic and Antarctic play such a critical role in global climate? This seminar will combine scientific and historical perspectives to investigate the ‘ends of the earth’, the Arctic and Antarctica. We will begin by surveying the geography and oceanography of these regions, and then step back into the past and follow in the footsteps of some of the early polar explorers through their own accounts of their explorations. Modern accounts will help us compare and contrast these early explorations. The seminar will also include readings and discussions about current questions and problems of the polar regions, in particular human impacts and potential effects of global warming. A ‘Makerspace’ component is an important feature of the class – students will be supplied with materials to work on a design/build challenge, testing, revising, discussing, and consulting with one another to improve their efforts through the course of the semester. This ‘making’ experience is highly relevant to the experiences of early polar explorers as well as modern oceanographers, who often have to improvise and fix or build or create things on the spot, with materials at hand, in order to solve specific problems. Note that no experience in Makerspace, and no design or build experience, is assumed, expected, or required for this seminar. There are no prerequisites for this seminar.

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MASC 57H-001: From “The Sound of Music” to “The Perfect Storm” (Honors)
Gen Eds: PL, QI
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Alberto Scotti

Professor Scotti’s research focuses on problems of applied fluid dynamics which are environmentally and/or geophysically relevant. Presently, he is involved in several projects involving stratified flows interacting with topography, internal waves (linear and nonlinear) and boundary layer turbulence using a combination of theoretical and numerical tools.

We are constantly surrounded by phenomena that are wave-like in nature. We communicate over short distances with sound waves, while we use electromagnetic waves over long distances. We see waves when we stand at beach, and the weather we experience is controlled very often by wave-like features of the jet stream. In this seminar, we will develop the conceptual framework necessary to understand waves, starting from laboratory observations. The main goal is to expose the common traits of waves, and how they can be used to enhance our understanding and predict the outcome of a broad range of important physical phenomena.

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Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 51H-001: Fish Gotta Swim, Birds Gotta Fly: The Mathematics and the Mechanics of Moving (Honors) – CANCELLED 12/9/2021
Gen Eds: QI
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Roberto Camassa

Roberto Camassa is the Kenan Distinguished Professor in the Department of Mathematics. His Ph.D. is from Cal Tech, and his research interests include nonlinear evolution equations, mathematical modeling, fluid mechanics and optics.

The scientific method is arguably the single most important achievement of the modern era. Together with its technological implications, in the last four centuries it has shaped the world both physically and culturally, and continues to do so, like no other element in the history of mankind. The overall aim of the course is to learn the basic elements of the method through a combination of simple physical experiments (mostly at the \thought” level), rigorous mathematical training and elementary mathematical modeling. The focus will be on mechanics, which can arguably be considered the “birthplace” of the method. In particular, the mechanics of fluids will provide the main emphasis, both for its implications in any aspect of life on Earth and for its challenges to the physical intuition.

You should be ready to work with a non-standard class format, where concepts are developed through class discussions in which everybody is expected to join and share observations, insights as well as critiques. No question offered in earnest is too naive or irrelevant, and students are expected to share their doubts as well as their knowledge to achieve the outcome of understanding a certain issue. In-depth class discussion, \open ended” homework assignments with problems and essays, hands-on in-class, in-lab and in-silico (computational) experiments will be the basis for evaluation and final grade assignment.

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MATH 68-001: The Mathematics of Voting
Gen Eds: QI
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Linda Green

Linda Green is a teaching faculty member in mathematics. In her early career, she did research in 3-dimensional topology and developed mathematical models of breast cancer  for a health care research  start-up. Since joining the UNC faculty  in 2013, she has taught every class in the Precalculus-Calculus sequence, designed two first year seminars, recorded over 300 instructional videos, and hosted math enrichment programs for K – 12 students. She was a 2018 recipient of the UNC Math Department’s Teaching Award. A problem solver at heart, she is eager to turn her attention to the problem of evaluating and improving election systems.

What properties should a fair election have and are these properties achievable in theory and in practice? How can mathematics and statistics be used to expose election fraud and gerrymandering? What might voting systems look like if they were designed by mathematicians? Students will address these questions as they compare different election systems, evaluate their strengths, weaknesses, and abuses, and design improvements to current structures. Topics will include ranked voting, approval voting, exit polls, election fraud, and gerrymandering. The course will include some data analysis, but no prior experience is needed.

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MATH 69-001: Unfolding Infinity: Mathematical Origami and Fractal Symmetry
Gen Eds: QI
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Mark McCombs

Mark McCombs is a Teaching Professor of Mathematics. He teaches Selected Topics in Mathematics, Calculus 1–3, Discrete Math and First Year Seminars focusing on mathematical art. He strives to help students explore how mathematical ideas resonate with fields typically perceived as non-mathematical. He uses UNC’s BeAM network to develop maker-based activities that cultivate students’ analytical creativity. He enjoys making 3D origami sculpture and digital fractal art (https://www.deviantart.com/boygnius/gallery/), some of which was exhibited at the 2018 Bridges Conference in Stockholm, Sweden. One of his sculptures is now on display in Stockholm’s National Museum of Science and Technology!

Have you ever wanted to be able to hold infinity in the palm of your hand? This course engages students in an exploration of the interplay between mathematics, origami, and fractal symmetry. Learning objectives will include mastering basic origami folding techniques, identifying and applying fundamental symmetry operations, recognizing and analyzing fractal symmetry, and creating geometric tessellations. Students will use image editing software (Illustrator and Photoshop), mathematical imaging software (Geometer’s Sketchpad and Ultra Fractal), and the laser cutter in UNC’s BeAM space, to design and create modular origami and fractal tessellation artwork. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and small group work, as well as submit short written assignments on course topics.

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MATH 89-001: Networks: The Science of the Connected World
Gen Eds: QI
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Jeremy Marzuola

We live in a connected world, where the confluence of the different connections—social, political, financial, informational, technological, biological, behavioral, epidemiological—affects virtually every aspect of our lives. The study of networks provides a language for describing these connections and for attempting to describe the resulting impacts. Most people are familiar with the concept of a network in terms of hyperlinked Web pages or online social networks; but networks are also useful for studying a wider variety of applications, with “nodes” representing actors of interest and connecting “edges” representing relationships. We will explore the roles of networks in public health, political activity, economic markets, workplace interactions, and internet search, among others. We will explore classical ideas in graph theory, fundamental concepts in social network analysis, and more recent developments in network science. We will also meet with guest speakers who are leading mathematical and social scientists studying networks.

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Music (MUSC)

MUSC 89-001: Hip Hop Diplomacy: Opportunities and Challenges
Gen Eds: VP, GL
MW, 10:10 AM – 11:25 AM
Mark Katz

Mark Katz’s scholarship focuses on music and technology, hip hop, cultural diplomacy, and the violin. He has written four books, Capturing Sound: How Technology has Changed Music (2004, rev. ed. 2010), The Violin: A Research and Information Guide (2006), Groove Music: The Art and Culture of the Hip Hop DJ (2012), and Build: The Power of Hip Hop Diplomacy in a Divided World (2019). His latest book, Music and Technology: A Very Short Introduction will be published in 2022. He co-edited (with Timothy Taylor and Tony Grajeda) the collection Music, Sound, and Technology in America (2012). He is former editor of the Journal of the Society for American Music and served for many years on the National Recording Preservation Board. Katz has served on the Boards of Directors of the American Musicological Society and the Society for American Music. He is a former chair of the Department of Music and former Director of UNC’s Institute for the Arts and Humanities.

For 75 years the U.S. Department of State has been sending American musicians abroad as cultural diplomats. In 2001 it sent its first hip hop musician on an official tour, and 2013 it established Next Level, a program that sends American hip hop artists abroad to teach and perform with youth in underserved communities. Hundreds of hip hop diplomats have now toured and taught in scores of countries around the world. Katz created the Next Level program and, as its director, oversaw residencies in twelve countries on five continents. This class draws both on the history of American musical diplomacy and Katz’s own experiences to explore hip hop diplomacy in the context of American foreign policy and consider its goals, potential, and challenges. Next Level artists will serve as special guests throughout the semester.

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MUSC 89-002: Music in the Movies
Gen Eds: VP, CI
TTH, 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM
Lee Weisert

Lee Weisert is a composer of instrumental and electronic music and an associate professor in the Music Department at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he teaches courses in composition, electronic music, and film music. Weisert’s recent compositions have incorporated increasingly disparate elements in an attempt to find, “through experimentation, tinkering, and unconventional approaches, a ritualistic and deeply expressive world of sound.” Along with collaborator Jonathon Kirk, he creates electronic sound installation projects that expose and explore hidden aspects of the sounding environment. Weisert has composed several film scores and frequently collaborates with visual artists on multimedia and virtual reality projects.

This course will examine the concepts and techniques of film music, covering many influential film scores dating from the 1930’s to the current day. We will analyze and discuss the various conceptual issues relating to film music, such as theme, narrative, character development, synchronization, etc., and compare the different approaches that film composers have taken with respect to these issues. Students will research and analyze film scores from a variety of perspectives (sonic/musical, dramatic, historical, etc.) in the form of class presentations and research papers. In addition, students will learn to use digital sound technology to incorporate concepts explored in the class in the creation of original sound design elements for pre-existing film footage. No previous training in musical performance or music theory is required for the class. Students will not be expected to be able to read conventional musical notation.

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Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD)

PWAD 69-001: Wars and Veterans: Iran, Iraq, and Afghanistan
Gen Eds: LA, CI, GL
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Claudia Yaghoobi

Claudia Yaghoobi is a Roshan Associate Professor and the Inaugural Director of Persian Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is the author of Temporary Marriage in Iran: Gender and Body Politics in Modern Iranian Literature and Film (Cambridge UP, 2020) and Subjectivity in ‘Attar, Persian Sufism, and European Mysticism (Purdue UP, 2017). She is also the co-editor (with Janet Afary) of a book series titled, Sex, Marriage, and Family in the Middle East for Bloomsbury Press.

In this course, we will explore the various ways that wars and conflicts, particularly Iran-Iraq, U.S.-Iraq, and U.S.-Afghanistan wars, have been portrayed in literature, film, and photography. We will attempt to deepen and enrich our understanding of war experienced by both veterans and civilians of each country. We will examine the impact of war on the human psyche in regards to violence. We will read books by American war veterans and Middle East authors contemplating the wars and their consequences. We will look at each writer’s perspective on war and their interpretation of it comparatively. All readings will be in English. The class will be conducted in the form of a combination of lectures, discussion, and experimentations.

This course is designed for Equity in Teaching. During this course we will be implementing an innovative and interactive learning method—Collaborative Online International Learning, or COIL. During this course we will engage in class discussions and lectures and a final presentation assignment with Dr. Amir Hossein Vafa and students from the Shiraz University in Iran for approximately five class session (asynchronous and synchronous options available). These activities will enhance your learning of the course content, and your participation in the COIL activities is required. COIL activities will provide you with exposure to new cultural contexts, knowledge, and perspectives on the course material. By participating in the COIL activities, you will develop and enhance cross-cultural communication skills and gain experience working in multicultural teams. As part of your grade and COIL activities, in groups with Iranian students, you will sketch, design, and create a war-related artifact using the campus MakerSpace (BeAM) facilities.

Students may also register for this course under ASIA 69.001.

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Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 80-001: Short Stories and Contemporary Social Problems
Gen Eds: PH
MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM
Luc Bovens

Professor Bovens is Professor of Philosophy and Core Faculty in UNC’s Philosophy, Politics and Economics Program. His philosophical interests are broad and include paradoxes of rationality, issues in formal epistemology, philosophy of economics, political science, moral psychology, and bioethics.

What is the point of learning about ethics? An ethics course should teach you how to recognize a moral issue when it stares you in the face. You should learn to appreciate its intricacies, to reason your way through it, and to discuss it with your peers. This will raise your skills of critical reflection and your moral sensitivities. And if you can translate what you gained into action, dare I say it, then it will make you into a better person as well. Short stories—much more so than the classics or contemporary journals of professional philosophy—are a great tool for this purpose. In this course, we will explore contemporary social, political and moral issues through short stories in world literature connect these stories with research papers in the social sciences and the humanities, blogs, and newspaper articles.

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PHIL 89-001: Philosophical Issues in Humor
Gen Eds: PH
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Matthew Kotzen

Professor Kotzen specializes in epistemology and the philosophy of science. Much of his recent work is in the epistemology of law, including issues surrounding legal evidence, standards of proof, burdens of proof, and appellate review. He has also written and taught on philosophical issues in comedy.

This is a course on various philosophical issues related to laughter and humor. The course is roughly divided into three sections, though part of the aim of the course is to explore connections between these sections: 1) Historical and contemporary philosophical theories of humor; 2) Connections between more traditional issues in philosophical aesthetics and the philosophy of humor; and 3) Moral questions about humor, including the question of what makes some jokes racist/sexist/heterosexist/etc and the question of how humor and morality interact. We will focus on how scholars from different fields pose and answer questions about humor, comparing and contrasting their methodologies, assumptions, and goals. The seminar is heavily discussion-oriented and will emphasize active learning techniques.

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Physics and Astronomy (PHYS)

PHYS 53-001: Handcrafting in the Nanoworld: Building Models and Manipulating Molecules
Gen Eds: PL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Michael R. Falvo

Michael R. Falvo is a Research Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. He received his BS in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1991, and his PhD in physics from UNC-CH in 1997. He is a former winner of the UNC Student Undergraduate Teaching Award presented annually to three professors by the undergraduate student body, and is a member of the UNC Academy of Distinguished Teaching Scholars. His current research focuses is on the physics of proteins and cells. He stretches, pokes and prods nanometer scale biological systems such as viruses, biopolymer strands, and individual protein molecules to test their mechanical properties. Falvo has a long-standing interest in science outreach and frequently presents workshops for the public and k-12 teachers. He has also co-authored two books on nanoscience for middle school science teachers.

The nanoworld is a strange and captivating place. It is a world of molecules vibrating trillions of times a second, quantum dots emitting rainbow colors, DNA encoding information in molecular bonds, and protein motors driving the complex machinery of the cell. At this scale, nature has unique rules and behaviors, some of which are amazing and unexpected. We are still uncovering these rules, and are only beginning to apply this new knowledge to technology. Can we build molecular machines that cure disease or clean up the environment? Can we make computers using single molecule transistors? How do viruses and other bio systems “assemble” themselves? In this seminar, we dive into the basic physics, chemistry and biology that describe the nanometer scale world. We will also try to distinguish the true promise of nanoscience from the hype. Students will engage in class discussions informed by their weekly reading of selected scientific literature. They will also participate in small group projects building physical models of nanoscale objects and phenomena, and perform calculations to gain a quantitative understanding of the physics underlying the nanoworld. No prerequisite is required for this course, but a spirit of adventure is.

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Political Science (POLI)

POLI 63-001: Social Movements and Political Protest and Violence
John L. Townsend III FYS in Political Science
Gen Eds: SS, NA
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Pamela Conover

Pamela Conover, Burton Craige Professor of Political Science, was educated at Emory University and received her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota. Professor Conover teaches courses dealing with political psychology, and social movements and political protest. In the past, Professor Conover’s research has concerned the nature of political thinking and the politics of identity and citizenship. She also coauthored the book Feminism and the New Right. Her current research is focused on the Trump brand, election aversion, and gender bias in the national news media. In her spare time, she enjoys cycling and being walked by her two golden retrievers, Izzy and Henry.

This seminar focuses on explaining and understanding social movements and the collective political behaviors that they promote (e.g. demonstrations, protests, violence, and eco-terrorism). Our theoretical focus will be interdisciplinary, drawing on research in political behavior, social psychology, sociology, political theory, and the law. We will discuss when and why collective action occurs, who participates, what forms it takes, and how governments respond. Substantively, we will study a variety of movements including: The Tea Party movement, Black Lives Matter, #MeToo movement, the Environmental movement, the Animal Rights movement, and the White Nationalist movement. We will use a variety of approaches and resources: class discussions, films, wiki writing, online discussions, novels, and texts. Grades will be based on class participation, a writing project, and several group wiki papers.

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POLI 75-001: Thinking about Law
Gen Eds: PH
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Charles Szypszak

Charles Szypszak is Albert Coates Distinguished Professor of Public Law and Government. He has been with the School of Government since 2005. Prior to that, he was an attorney and director of a general practice firm in New Hampshire. He provides legal counsel to state, national and international institutions, organizations and public officials and teaches Law for Public Administration in the graduate program in public administration. He has taught and worked on law reforms in Poland and Russia. He is the recipient of the University’s J. Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award and the School of Government’s Coates Distinguished Professorship for Teaching Excellence.

Are you interested in being a lawyer or public official? Do you know what it means to “think like a lawyer?” Have you considered why people mostly honor the law? Where do you find “the law?” How do judges decide difficult cases? This seminar will explore the notion of a rule of law, formal and customary law, legal analysis, judicial interpretation and the realities of the adversarial system and law practice. We will consider what makes law seem legitimate and how to assess whether it promotes liberty and justice. This seminar will challenge students to be reflective and critical about their own perspectives and to explore personal responsibility for promoting a rule of law. Students will be engaged in analytical thinking and expression through required participation in teacher-led dialogues based on assigned readings and with research and writing assignments. Reading materials include selections from court cases and other sources that provide an introduction to the notion of a rule of law, the sources of law that govern us and protect our individual rights, the nature of legal analysis, the different methods of judicial interpretation, and the realities of law practice and the adversarial system.

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POLI 76-001: The Obama Presidency
Gen Eds: SS, US
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Christopher J. Clark

Christopher J. Clark’s research focuses on black electoral representation and its influence on political processes. Clark earned his Ph.D. in Political Science in 2010 from the University of Iowa, and he has been on faculty at UNC since July 2012. Chris is a huge sports fan, with his favorite teams being the Kansas City Chiefs (NFL), Kansas Jayhawks (college basketball), and Iowa Hawkeyes (college football). He is married to Tiana and is father of Kaya, Cadence, and Kinlee; they all bring him great joy. Chris enjoys reading, cooking, playing sports, and he is active in his church community.

This course examines the presidency of Barack Obama, the first African American to serve in the nation’s highest office. The course is broken down into four parts. The first part studies Shirley Chisholm and Jesse Jackson, two black people who ran for President prior to Obama. The second part examines Obama prior to running for office, reading a book that he authored. The third part of the class examines Obama’s presidency, both how he reached office and a look back at what he achieved while in office. The last part of the class considers American politics post-Obama, with a particular focus on race/ethnicity.

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Psychology and Neuroscience (PSYC)

PSYC 89H-001: Critical Thinking in Psychology and Beyond (Honors)
Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Jonathan Abramowitz

Dr. Abramowitz is a professor in the Clinical Psychology Program within the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. His interests lie in the area of OCD and anxiety, but his other passion is critical thinking and the philosophy of science. This FYS overlaps with both clinical psychology and philosophy as we apply logic and critical thinking to phenomena in clinical psychology and beyond.

This FYS course focuses on the development of critical thinking skills, especially as they relate to psychological science. The field of mental health is loaded with theories and therapies—some of them are valid and useful, and others not so much. Critical thinking is a must if you are to successfully learn about how psychological knowledge is created, evaluated, and applied. In addition to examining the basic skills of logic, we will learn about the logic of the scientific method and the common errors of human cognition that impede critical thinking. We will then apply critical thinking skills to various widespread (and sometimes controversial) claims about abnormal behavior and its treatment. You will learn by discussing and writing effective arguments, analyzing the writings of others to evaluate their claims, exploring contemporary controversies within psychology, and interacting with members of the class regarding the weekly topics.

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Public Policy (PLCY)

PLCY 81-001: America’s Labor Market
Gen Eds: Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Jeremy Moulton

Jeremy Moulton received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California, Davis and works in the fields of public and labor economics. His research primarily utilizes public policy shocks as “natural experiments” to investigate labor market outcomes, retirement decision-making, the intergenerational transmission of wealth and education, and the real estate market. Jeremy has published papers that investigate the extent to which people leave the labor force when they lose eligibility for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), whether people can marry a more educated spouse if they increase their own education using variation in education caused by the World War II G.I. Bill, whether lower healthcare costs caused by Medicare Part-D pushed people to enter self-employment, the long-run impact of entering the labor market during the Great Depression, and the impact of property tax exemptions on real estate prices using a ballot initiative in Virginia.

The course will familiarize students with the major public policies and movements affecting the American labor market. Students will learn how each of the following impacts the labor market: education, the minimum wage, Social Security, pensions, unions, unemployment insurance, welfare (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, TANF), income taxes (including the Earned Income Tax Credit, EITC), self-employment, immigration, automation, and the gig economy. The course uses news articles, policy summaries, podcasts, and academic journal articles to help students learn the many theoretical and political viewpoints associated with each topic.

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PLCY 85H-001: Reforming America’s Schools (Honors)
Gen Eds: SS, NA
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Douglas Lauen

Dr. Lauen’s work seeks to understand the effects of educational policies, school types, and school contextual factors on student outcomes. He focuses on areas that policymakers can control and that have high relevance to current educational policy debates, such as classroom poverty composition, educational accountability, performance incentives, and school choice.

This seminar will examine the role of schools and other institutions play in determining life chances, which educational interventions work well for economically and academically disadvantaged students, and what to do when institutions cease to work well. Students will learn how to analyze complex educational public policy problems while exploring questions of effectiveness, inequality, resource management, and politics.

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Religious Studies (RELI)

RELI 64-001: Reintroducing Islam – ADDED 1/11/2022
Gen Eds: PH, BN, GL
MW, 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM
Youssef Carter

Youssef Carter is interested in the manner in which religious discourses and movements become oriented in the direction of abolition. At the moment, he is fascinated with how Muslims in the United States and in West Africa interpret their religion as a means of empowerment in the face of oppression, while relying on scripture and prophetic narration to navigate hostile political realities. To that end, he is working on a book called “The Vast Oceans: Remembering God and Self on the Mustafawi Sufi Path” which is a multisite ethnography of a transatlantic spiritual network of African-American and West African Sufis that deploy West African spiritual training to navigate historical-political contexts in the U.S. South and beyond.

An introduction to the Islamic religious tradition, focusing on major themes of Islamic religious thought, bringing out both traditional spirituality and the critical issues confronting Muslims today.

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RELI 70-001: Jesus in Scholarship and Film
Gen Eds: SS
MW, 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM
Bart Ehrman

Bart Ehrman is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies. He has taught at Carolina since 1988. He is author or editor of thirty books and is widely regarded as a leading expert on the New Testament and the history of the early Christian church. He is also a well-known teacher on campus, having won the Undergraduate Students Teaching Award, the Bowman and Gordon Gray Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and the John William Pope Center Spirit of Inquiry Teaching Award.

This seminar will examine how historians have reconstructed the life, teachings and death of the historical Jesus. We will look at the Gospels of the New Testament, as well as references to Jesus in other writings (Roman and Jewish sources, as well as Gospels that did not make it into the New Testament). In addition, we will explore how Jesus has been portrayed in modern film, including such Biblical “epics” as The Greatest Story Ever Told, such “period pieces” as Jesus Christ Superstar, such brilliant retellings as Jesus of Montreal and such controversial films as The Last Temptation of Christ and The Passion of the Christ. The ultimate goals of the seminar are to see what we can say about the historical man Jesus himself and how Jesus came to be portrayed in both ancient sources and modern imagination.

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RELI 80.001: Religion and Writing in the Ancient World
Gen Eds: HS, WB
TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Joseph Lam

Joseph Lam is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies. He received his Ph.D. (with Honors) from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. His research focuses on ancient Near Eastern religious texts and practices, with an emphasis on the diverse written traditions of the Levant (Syria-Palestine) in 2nd and 1st millennia BCE, including the Hebrew Bible. At Carolina, he has taught courses on Classical Hebrew language, Hebrew Bible, ancient Near Eastern culture, and the place of metaphor in religious language.

Few technological innovations have more profoundly shaped the course of human civilization than the invention of writing. This course explores the role of writing in the development of ancient religious traditions, covering the wide chronological period from the beginnings of writing in Mesopotamia and Egypt (approximately 3200 BCE) to the advent of Islam. We will begin by considering the nature of writing both as a technology and as a symbolic system, giving attention to insights coming out of modern linguistic research. Then we will examine a series of case studies of the relationship between religion and writing drawn from the ancient world (especially the ancient Near East), in order to illustrate the diversity and complexity of these interactions between technology and society. Specific topics to be addressed include: religion and the early alphabet, magical and mystical uses of writing, religion and literacy, scribal culture, and the development of “scriptural” texts such as the Bible and the Qur’an.

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Romance Studies (ROML)

ROML 71-001: Asia in Iberian Converso Literature, 1500s-1650s
Gen Eds: LA, WB
TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Carmen Hsu

Carmen Hsu is Associate Professor of Spanish in the Department of Romance Studies. Her primary field of research is 16th- and 17th-century Spanish literature, with emphasis on Cervantes, theater, news pamphlets, and Iberian-Asian relations. She is particularly interested in topics that deal with the construction of national/cultural identity, gender and space, dialogues between literature and history, as well as transoceanic impact of the Hispanic empire.

What does Asia represent to Iberian Christian writers of Jewish descent in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries? How do Iberian conversos represent their identities through their writings on Asia? How do the depictions of different Asian people come into play in these authors’ notion of personal identities and nationhood? This course examines how early modern Iberian authors of Jewish heritage imagined and represented Asia in their writings, how their representation of the non-European world dialogues with contemporary events in the Iberian Peninsular, and the significance of their notions of Asians. Upon the successful completion of the course, students will full fill Gen Ed requirements (WB and LA) and gain a better understanding of Iberian converso culture in a transoceanic and multicultural frame, in addition to acquiring a good knowledge of early modern European notions of Asia.

Students may also register for this course under ASIA 71.001.

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ROML 89-001: Déjà vu: Medicine and Narration across Time and Space
Gen Eds: LA
MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Dorothea Heitsch

Dorothea Heitsch is Teaching Professor in French & Francophone Studies in the Department of Romance Studies. In addition to the language sequence, she teaches French grammar & composition, culture courses about France and French-speaking regions, and topics courses across the centuries, inviting students to explore Honors Theses, the Ackland Museum’s visuals, and UNC’s numerous special collections. Her research and teaching include medical, political, and religious issues, and she particularly enjoys pointing students to questions of rhetoric, translation, and linguistic practice. She is the author of two monographs and numerous articles on early modern topics and the co-editor of two collections.

Hallucinations, depression, hysteria, paranoia, anxiety, neurosis, body dysmorphic disorder, obsession, and pain are only some of the symptoms that will be reflected in the narratives of this course. The authors featured in this seminar are familiar with the medical knowledge of their time and are often patients themselves suffering from the medical conditions they describe. Throughout the semester, we will examine the practices of authors – such as Maupassant, Montaigne, Selzer, Sembène, or Meruane – who not only borrow heavily from medicine in composing their works but also conceive of writing itself as something medical, that is, as having a therapeutic function for both writer and reader. Accordingly, we will study a group of writers and artists across time and space who explore, adapt, and converse with contemporaneous medical learning in their creative works.

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Sociology (SOCI)

SOCI 57H-001: Rationalization and the Changing Nature of Social Life in 21st-Century America (Honors)
Gen Eds: SS
TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Howard E. Aldrich

Howard E. Aldrich is Kenan Professor of Sociology. He has won numerous awards for his teaching and mentoring: Favorite Professor Award from the senior class at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; graduate students’ Award for Best Teaching, Department of Sociology, several times; and the J Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award from the University of Carolina Chapel Hill. His two sons and his daughters-in-law graduated from Carolina. His main research interests are entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial team formation, gender and entrepreneurship, and evolutionary theory. He writes a regular column, “Speaking from Experience,” for The National Teaching and Learning Forum. He fly fishes year-round in the mountains of Western North Carolina and Eastern Tennessee and wherever else his travels may take him. Photos of his catches may be seen on his homepage.

Today, fast food restaurants have become a model for everyday life. Some scholars have even talked about the “McDonaldization” of the nation and the world. By that, scholars mean a drive toward greater efficiency, predictability, calculability, and control by non-human technologies in modern organizations. This drive has shaped many features of American life, including health care, law, and education. Such forces have even affected personal relationships. Sociologists have a term for this process: “rationalization.” We will explore “rationalization” through a process called “active learning” in which you will have opportunities to explore online resources, engage in peer-to-peer discussions, and work with me to develop a research project in which you explore the impact of rationalization on an occupation that might be a destination for you. We will spend one class period, every other week, working on the term paper in class. We will have four or five guests, sharing their expertise on how rationalization has affected their work. You will be assessed based on your contributions to blog posts, class discussion, short answer written assignments, and a research project culminating in a term paper (15-20 pages). You will then build an Adobe Spark page that explains, to the world, what you have learned. We will have no traditional examinations or quizzes.

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SOCI 68-001: Immigration in Contemporary America
Gen Eds: SS, CI, GL
TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Jacqueline Hagan

Jacqueline Hagan is Kenan Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her central research area is international migration, with a special focus on migration between the United States and Latin America. She has conducted research on migration and labor markets, immigration policy effects, gender and migration, human rights and migration, and religion and migration. She is author of Deciding to be Legal (1994 Temple University Press), and award-winning books, Migration Miracle (Harvard Press 2008), and (co-authored with Ruben Hernandez Leon and Jean Luc Demonsant) of Skills of the Unskilled: Work and Mobility among Mexican Migrants (2015 University of California Press).

Contemporary international migration is transforming politics, economics, social relations, and ethnic identities in societies throughout the world. This seminar is designed to introduce students to the fascinating and ever-changing study of immigration in contemporary America. We will cover the great waves of European migration at the turn of the 20th century, review the emergence of Latino and Asian migration flows to the United States after 1965, and the contemporary movement of migrant agricultural workers to North Carolina, a state that until recently had experienced little or no migration. We will look at why people migrate, how citizens respond to that migration, how the federal government regulates migration, how local communities manage the settlement of its newcomers. Through a variety of methodological approaches, ranging from fieldwork to content analysis to interviewing to research, students will be actively engaged in each of the topics examined throughout the course.

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Women’s and Gender Studies (WGST)

WGST 68-001: Assumed Identities: Performance in Photography
Gen Eds: VP
TTH, 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM
Susan Harbage Page

Susan Harbage Page is an Associate Professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. Harbage Page is a visual artist with a background in photography and lens-based work that explores immigration, race, and gender. She is well-known for her work on the U.S. – Mexico Border which explores bodies and belonging through photography, the creation of an “Anti-Archive” of objects left-behind on the border and site-specific art interventions which involve performative actions in the space of a border.

Our day to day lives are filled with selfies and social media images. This course asks students to re-examine these images through feminist analysis. Students will make self-portraits that reflect the multiple and changing aspects of their identity and contemporary society. Thru role-playing, performance, and documentation we work to understand the construction of identity and the ways in which photography can help us control our own narratives.

We begin the semester with a close look at the ethics and issues of representation throughout the history of photography. Using visual analysis, we explore how photographers have historically used assumed identities and theatrical aspects of photography to push the boundaries of their realities and challenge society’s stereotypes. Students will complete the semester with a stronger set of visual literacy skills and a better understanding of how our identities are shaped by society and how we shape our identities and society in return.

There are no specific camera requirements. Phone cameras are the perfect tool for this course.

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Other Opportunities (First-Year Launch Courses)

First-Year Launch courses are designed and structured for incoming first-year students with no prior college experience. Students join faculty members who are accomplished teachers in small classes that offer an introduction to a major. This small setting gives students the opportunity to engage actively with their peers and faculty as they learn the foundations of a long-term sequence of study. Students will work together to reveal how scholars pose problems, discover truths, resolve controversies, and evaluate knowledge in a specific field.

First-Year Launch Enrollment Policy

Enrollment in First-Year Launch sections is limited to first-year students. All first-year students should be able to enroll in the First-Year Launch sections as soon as their spring 2022 registration appointment opens.

BIOL 202-008: Molecular Biology and Genetics – First-Year Launch
Credits: 4
Gen Eds: PL
Requisites: Prerequisites, BIOL 101 and CHEM 101 or 102; A grade of C or better in BIOL 101 and CHEM 101 or 102 is required.
MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Lillian Zwemer

Structure and function of nucleic acids, principles of inheritance, gene expression, and genetic engineering. Three lecture hours and one recitation-demonstration-conference hour a week. Honors version available

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GEOL 101-005: Planet Earth – First-Year Launch
Gen Eds: PX when taken with GEOL 101L
TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM
Michelle Haskin

This first-year launch course will introduce geological concepts through the lens of U.S. national parks and a plate tectonic framework. The course will take a small-group approach to in-class work where developing collaboration and communication skills will be a focus. Students will apply their talents, skills, knowledge, and creativity to investigate related topics of interest as they manifest in a specific U.S. National Park to examine the interconnectedness of the geologic sciences and other fields of study. They will present their work in a manner appropriate to their project. Because this course is geared toward students newer to the university environment, the course will also discuss adjacent issues relevant to first-year students such as studying approaches, professionalism, as well as usefulness of meta-cognition, self-reflection, and feedback. Students will practice employing these ideas and approaches though individual and small-group work. Optional laboratory: GEOL 101L. PX Gen Ed credit for GEOL 101+101L.

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